Attachments

 

 

Quality Handbook

 

 

Programme Specification Template - Undergraduate

 

Please note:

  • Guidance notes for staff or suggestions for the design and functionality of the database are in grey highlight.  Guidance notes should be deleted in the final version.

 

SECTION A:CORE INFORMATION

 

  1.  

Name of programme:

Public Health

  1.  

Award title:

BSc Honours

  1.  

Programme linkage:

 

Is this part of group of linked programmes between which students can transfer at agreed points?

No

  1.  

Is the programme a top-up only?

 

No

  1.  

Does the programme have a Foundation Year (Level 3) associated with it so that students enter for a four-year programme and progress directly from the Foundation Year to Stage 1 without having to re-apply?

 

Yes

If yes:

You can take a Foundation Year (Level 3) as an integral part of this programme of study. For details of the Foundation Year see the programme specification for Public Health with Integrated Foundation Year BSc (Hons).

 

  1.  

Level of award:

 

Level 6

  1.  

Awarding Body:

University of Sunderland

  1.  

Department:

Nursing and Health Sciences – Allied Health

  1.  

Programme Studies Board:

Allied Health

  1.  

Programme Leader:

 

Karen Carling

 


  1. How and where can I study the programme?

Tick all boxes that apply

 

At Sunderland:

 

Full-time on campus

X

Part-time on campus

X

As work-based learning full-time

 

As work-based learning part-time

 

As a full-time sandwich course

 

As a part-time sandwich course

 

By distance learning

 

 

At the University of Sunderland London campus: 

 

Full-time on campus

 

Part-time on campus

 

As work-based learning full-time

 

As work-based learning part-time

 

As a full-time sandwich course

 

As a part-time sandwich course

 

By distance learning

 

 

At a partner college:

 

Full-time in the UK 

 

Part-time in the UK

 

Full-time overseas

 

Part-time overseas

 

By distance learning

 

As a full-time sandwich course in the UK

 

As a part-time sandwich course in the UK

 

As a full-time sandwich course overseas

 

As a part-time sandwich course overseas

 

As work-based learning full-time in the UK 

 

As work-based learning part-time overseas

 

Other (please specify)

 

 

  1. How long does the programme take?

 

 

Min number of years / months

Max number of years / months

Full-time

3

9

Part-time

6

9

Distance learning

 

 

Work-based learning

 

 

 

For start-dates please see the current edition of the Prospectus or contact the relevant department at the University. For start-dates for programmes delivered in a partner college, please contact the relevant college.

 

SECTION B:FURTHER CORE INFORMATION 

 

Use Outline Programme Proposal Form for ADC for questions 13 to 25

 

  1. Learning and teaching strategy.  Students have the opportunity to undertake a full-time or part-time programme of study.  Students undertaking the part-time mode of study will join with the full-time mode students with the expectation of completion of the programme within the 6 year academic period. Students on the part-time mode will have the opportunity to negotiate their choice of modules per semester within each respective level of study prior to commencing the programme; adhering to University Regulations.  Learning strategies are designed to be creative, flexible and are built on existing good practice within the University. As such, there will be a variety of different delivery modes that will be applicable to the specific subjects and to the student groups. Different learning styles and the varied delivery proposed will support and encourage active student participation. In previous cohorts, we have taught students with a range of specific learning needs and tutors are experienced in taking account of the diverse nature of our students by supporting inclusive practice.

 

Students following this programme are from diverse backgrounds and a range of ages. This will provide excellent opportunities to draw from the experience of all students in a supportive and inclusive way and we aim to encourage a positive culture which encourages discussion between students from all backgrounds. Tutors are particularly sensitive to mixing students in group work. The content of the programme lends itself to valuing diversity and being able to explore the global nature of community and public health issues.

 

Lectures will be used to inform, highlight important topics, explain concepts, theoretical perspectives, models of behaviour change and guide students to appropriate literature. Many lectures will be designed to incorporate student centred activities. Active learning will be further encouraged through seminars, tutorials, workshops and practical sessions including the use of visual and audio media. These all involve students working individually, in smaller group settings, as well as with larger groups. This is designed to encourage interaction and team working skills that are particularly valued by employers. Guest speakers, visits and encouragement to attend outside events in other academic institutions and workplaces will highlight the applications of the subject material to the work situation. 

 

Important life skills of self-management, project management, and research skills will be promoted in the modules that have a student centred emphasis. The Work-Based Practice module (HSS127) at Level 4, alongside the two research methods modules (HSS128 & HSS229) will allow for the development and implementation of literature research, design, data analysis as well as key skills in communication. Generic skills assessed in a number of modules at each level include IT, oral and written communication, interpersonal skills and presentation skills.

 

Learning is supported by material placed on the Virtual Learning Environment (Canvas) and work will be submitted via Turnitin. This programme will also make use of electronic notice boards and e-mail communication.

 

Feedback and feed-forward is embedded into every session to clarify session content and check for student understanding.   The specific learning outcomes appertaining to each session will be addressed throughout the session content and verified for comprehension.

  1. Retention strategy

Overall programme retention rates are good.  However, various ongoing strategies are employed to support this.  During induction our new students are informed they will be allocated a personal tutor.  The role of the personal tutor is explained fully and allocation of personal tutors is completed by the Programme Leader.  Students are advised to make initial contact with their tutor within two weeks of commencing the programme and to have regular contact thereafter. Students are advised that regular contact with their personal tutor will help to establish a good rapport and contribute to the milieu of a positive and productive learning experience. The programme academic team are fully aware of the benefits of providing high quality support to students and personal tutors encourage students to meet with them on a regular basis, in addition to discussing any personal difficulties they may encounter.  This may allow any personal difficulties the student is experiencing to be identified and addressed before the situation escalates. Whilst personal tutors do not always have the required expert knowledge they are in a position to signpost students appropriately.

 

All returning students are invited to attend a Returners’ session. Any direct entry students (Levels 5/6, stage 2/3) are also invited to the session. The session is designed to welcome students back to University and to introduce direct entry students to their fellow class colleagues. The students are also invited to attend two ‘refresher sessions’.  These sessions are implemented to reassure students and supplement their academic study. The sessions receive positive feedback and continue to be part of the programme curriculum.  Students are often anxious and concerned about entering into a new environment, engaging with new people and encountering new ways of teaching and learning.  New students may also worry and be apprehensive around their academic ability, prior subject specific knowledge or concerns around ‘fitting in’ with their peers.  Welcoming sessions aim to aid students to settle into University life as smoothly as possible. 

 

Time Data Security (TDS) is accessed on a weekly basis to facilitate attendance monitoring and to follow up with those students who have or are about to be contacted.  Early identification of non-attendance is essential in-order to identify and address any student concerns which may be affecting their attendance. 

 

  1. Any other information.  Programme student numbers are continuing to increase annually and with growing Public Health agenda the opportunities for employment continue to expand.

 

SECTION C:TEACHING AND LEARNING

 

  1. What is the programme about?

The programme aims to provide a course of study to graduate level in public health, providing the knowledge and skills needed to address international and national policy in public health which emphasises preventative health and healthcare.

 

  • Graduates will be provided with the knowledge and skills required to find   employment in a diversity of organisations involved in the delivery of public health, for example, health improvement, commissioning health, community and social enterprises, local government initiatives and health care providers.

 

  • A theoretical base underpins the programme with the aim of enabling students to evaluate current and future needs in population health.

 

  • The programme adopts an integrated approach allowing students to

critically review current research and practice in relation to public health. 

 

  • Students are offered and encouraged to participate in work based learning opportunities, including placements, with scope to apply and develop knowledge and skills acquired on taught components of the course.

 

 

  • Students are encouraged to focus on topics of particular interest throughout Levels 5 and 6 of the programme with the aim of inspiring them to explore high impact public health issues. Whilst this will develop students wider knowledge base students will also develop skills in producing high quality, robust publishable research.   

 

The programme contributes to the University's commitment to enhance opportunities for high quality education and training in the region, and in particular it aims to increase the capacity for the work force in public health, community development, health improvement and primary health care provision. 

 

  1.              What will I know or be able to do at each Stage of the programme?

 

Learning Outcomes Stage 1 – Skills  

By the end of this Stage of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

 

  • S1: Demonstrate an integrated approach in community health and work based practice. 

 

  • S2: Describe the practice of public health and its impact on wellbeing.

 

  • S3: Discuss the biology and psychology of early human development.

 

  • S4:Identify  and discuss practical solutions to a range of real-life problems

 

  • S5:Take responsibility for the management and communication of their learning

 

  • S6:Utilise standard ITC equipment and software

 

  • S7:Demonstrate an appreciation of the uncertainty and limits of knowledge

 

 

Learning Outcomes Stage 1 – Knowledge

By the end of this Stage of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

  • K1 : Recognise the range of bio-psychosocial factors that have a positive and negative impact upon inequalities and quality of life, health and psychosocial wellbeing.

 

  • K2:  Develop an understanding and appreciation of the application of research methods.

 

 

Learning Outcomes Stage 2 – Skills

By the end of this Stage of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

  • S1: Analyse the application of research methods community and population health.

 

  • S2: Analyse and formulate practical solutions to a range of real-life problems.

 

  • S3: Exercise initiative and independence in critical evaluation of conflicting data and arguments.

 

  • S4: Exercise personal responsibility and decision-making.

 

  • S5: Communicate information, ideas, problems and solutions.
  • S6: Demonstrate the ability to work in a team.

 

Learning Outcomes Stage 2 – Knowledge

By the end of this Stage of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

 

  • K1:Examine and understand current issues in the practice of community and population health.

 

  • K2:Examine and debate areas of community health from a range of bio-psychosocial perspectives in subjects such as health, mental health and illness, drug and alcohol studies, changing health behaviours, physical activity and health and health promotion.

 

 

Learning Outcomes Stage 3 – Skills

By the end of this Stage of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

 

  • S1:Evaluate and compare areas of community and population health from a range of bio-psychosocial perspectives in subject areas such as health, mental health and illness, drug and alcohol studies, public health, health improvement, physical activity and health, and health promotion.

 

  • S2: Critically evaluate an area of community health literature/research in the production of either a dissertation or research project.

 

  • S3: Apply research approaches, leading to the design, execution and  evaluation of an independent project requiring collection of primary data, or critical evaluation in an area of community and population health in the  production of a dissertation.

 

  • S4: Evaluate aspects of current research through use of scholarly reviews and primary sources to extend and consolidate knowledge and understanding.

 

  • S5: Application and evaluation of practical techniques of analysis and enquiry during a community health placement

 

  • S6: Management of own learning and utilisation of appropriate sources of knowledge

 

  • S7: Self-reflection

 

  • S8: Exercise initiative and personal responsibility

 

  • S9: Critical evaluation and decision making in complex and unpredictable contexts

 

  • S10: Critical evaluation of arguments and data

 

Learning Outcomes Stage 3 – Knowledge

By the end of this Stage of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

 

  • K1:Exercise awareness of a range of practical techniques of analysis and enquiry in addressing community and population health issues and problems using a range of perspectives.  

 

  • K2:Appraise the application of knowledge whilst undertaking a community health placement.

 

 

 

Learning Outcomes – Ordinary degree

If you are awarded an Ordinary degree you will have achieved the majority of the learning outcomes for the programme studied. However you will have gained fewer credits at Stage 3 than students awarded an Honours degree, your knowledge will typically be less broad and you will typically be less proficient in higher-level skills such as independent learning.

 

  1. What will the programme consist of?

 

Each undergraduate programme consists of a number of Stages from a minimum of 1 to a maximum of 4, each of which is equivalent to a year’s full-time study. The summary below describes briefly what is contained in each Stage. Most programmes have a mixture of core (i.e. compulsory) modules and optional ones, often with increasing choice as you move through the programme and gain in experience. In some programmes the choice of optional modules gives you particular ‘routes’ through the programme. The programme structure including a detailed list of modules can be found in the programme regulations.

 

Stage 1 The overall aim of the BSc (Hons) Public health programme is to provide a course of study to graduate level in public health, which provides the knowledge and skills needed to address international and national policy issues that affect communities and the public’s health. The Programme’s emphasis is on preventing poor health by, “working ‘upstream’ to promote and improve health in communities”. By ‘upstream’ we mean developing programmes and projects that help people before they become ill rather than having to treat them once they become ill – a preventive approach.

 

The programme is based on a modular scheme with modules being either 20 or 40 credit rated.  Students are required to study 120 credits equivalent to 1200 learning hours at each of levels 4, 5 and 6, i.e. 360 credits in total.

 

 

(Level 4) Modules are all core

 

Module Code

Module Title

Credits

HSS108

The Politics of Health

20

HSS127

Work Based Practice

20

HSS128

Introduction to Research

20

HSS129

Determinants of Health

20

HSS130

Community Perspectives on Health

20

HSS131

Fundamentals of Social Sciences

20

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stage 2 (Level 5) Core modules

 

Module Code

Module Title

Credits

HSS227

Social Exclusion

20

HSS229

Research Methods in Health

20

HSS248

Introduction to Epidemiology

20

 

Optional modules

Choose modules to the value of 60 credits from the following list:

 

Module Code

Module Title

Credits

HSS246

Work based Partnerships

20

HSS247

Drug and Alcohol Issues in Health

20

HSS249

Health Improvement

20

HSS250

Contemporary issues in Health

20

 

 

Stage 3 (Level 6) Core modules

 

Module Code

Module Title

Credits

HSS319

Dissertation

40

HSS332

Critical issues in Health

20

HSS341

Building Healthy Communities

20

 

Optional modules

Choose modules to the value of 40 credits from the following list:

 

Module Code

Module Title

Credits

HSS316

Placement

20

HSS339

Global Issues in Health

20

HSS342

Law and Ethics

20

HSS343

Public Mental Health

20

 

For a detailed list of individual module content please access: http://www.opportunities-online.sunderland.ac.uk/modcat-noflash/search.jsp


   The programme is organised into a number of themed strands (see below) so at each

    level of the programme there are integrated modules.  The integrated modules

    provide a holistic overview focussing on the relationships between public health,

    communities and populations of interest.

 

 

Programme Themed Strands and Module Occurrence

Themed Strands

Semester 1

Semester 2

Semester 1 & 2

 

Level

Public

Health

Health Improvement

Well-

being

Politics

&

ethics

Psycho-

social

Research

Work based practice

4

Determinants of health

 

Community perspective on health

 

The politics of health

Fundamentals of social science

Introduction to research

Work based practice

5

Epidemiology

Health Improvement

Drug and alcohol issues in health

 

Contemporary issues in health

Social exclusion

Research methods of health

Work based partnership

6

Global issues in health

Building healthy communities

Public mental health

 

Law and ethics

Critical issues in health

Dissertation

Placement

 

Stage 1 (Level 4)

 

All Level 4 modules will be core. This is an important feature of level 4 where the emphasis is on the development of a core theory base of knowledge, together with the development of transferable and generic skills. 

 

The integration of community, population and public health will be addressed across the programme, in particular, HSS129 Determinants of Health, HSS130 Community Perspectives on Health and HSS127 Work-Based Practice.  Within HSS127 Work Based Practice students are exposed to the foundations of careers within the Public Health remit.  A diverse range of external public health specialists deliver career focused sessions as part of the module content, giving students an insight into the vast range of career pathways afforded to public health graduates.  Students also visit external organisations to initiate and facilitate a deeper understanding of public health practitioners in practice.  This core module provides students with the opportunity to gain a broad knowledge of public health practice within various work place arenas.  Students then have the option at stage 2 of the programme to study HSS246 Work Based Partnerships.  This module allows students to choose a particular aspect within   public health practice which is of interest to them and focus in more depth on current public agenda in relation to this. 

 

Stage 2 (Level 5)

 

At Level 5, the integrative modules HSS227 Social Exclusion, HSS229 Research Methods in Health and HSS248 Introduction to Epidemiology will be core. Students must select an additional 60 credits from a selection of four 20 credit optional modules. They will be able to continue with these subject strands at level 6, for example, HSS250 Contemporary Issues in Health would be followed by HSS342 Law and Ethics at level 6.  HSS246 Work Based Partnerships would be followed by HSS316 Placement module.  HSS246 explores the key ingredients of effective partnership working, including skills and behaviours to see how common values may underpin effective partnership working, giving students the opportunity to reflect upon their experience. The opportunity to obtain this experience is via a placement which is of particular relevance to the student’s future career aspirations.  The placement is supported by the university for the duration of 20-30 hours.

 

This structure will ensure that students retain a broad perspective on issues of public health as they enter level 6. The emphasis during level 5 will be on expanding student’s public health knowledge base underpinned by holism, whilst giving students the opportunity to conduct an in-depth exploration of an area of public health which is of interest to them.  This will develop their critical and analytical abilities in order to apply theories and concepts towards creative public health strategies with the intention of preparing them for their future careers within public health.  

 

Stage 3 (Level 6)

 

At Level 6, the core modules are represented by the HSS319 Dissertation, HSS332 Critical Issues in Health and HSS341 Building Healthy Communities. As the dissertation module is 40 credits, students must select an additional two optional modules from a choice of four, which follow on from level 5 strands. The emphasis during level 6 will be on critical and analytical abilities as independent learners, while evaluating knowledge and skills in public health. 

Students at stage 3 have the option to study HSS316 Placement module.   Each student will be encouraged to negotiate and secure their own placement.  The ethos underpinning this is to allow students to utilise the employability skills they have gained throughout the programme and prepare students for the process of applying for and securing employment post- graduation.  Each student will be supported by the module leader who will contact the placement supervisor prior to the start of placements to ensure that everything is in place for the student and employer (e.g. module guide, supervision, schedule of work). The module leader will visit the student whilst on placement to ensure all concerned are adhering to and working towards the student achieving the objectives of the placement Learning Contract.  The Health team has considerable experience of placement opportunities and have built up a number of useful networks and contacts locally within various statutory and voluntary community and public health initiatives. Many of these have agreed to take placement students.

 

In addition, a range of guest speakers contribute to module delivery and this provides 

an opportunity for students to network and meet practitioners who may be able to 

provide workplace experiences.

 

  1. How will I be taught? Modes of teaching and learning aligned with Unistats– choose one or more

Scheduled teaching activities

Lectures will be used to inform, highlight important topics, explain concepts and guide students to appropriate literature. Many lectures will be designed to incorporate student centred activities. Active learning will be further encouraged through seminars, tutorials, workshops and practical sessions including the use of visual and audio media. Video Enhanced Observation (VEO) is utilised throughout the programme enabling students and academic tutors to reflect on teaching and learning activities. These all involve students working individually, in smaller group settings, as well as with larger groups. This is designed to encourage interaction and team working skills that are particularly valued by employers. Guest speakers, external visits, work-based learning and encouragement to attend outside events in other academic institutions and workplaces will highlight the applications of the subject material to the work situation. 

Independent study

Guided independent study is employed throughout the programme.  However, at stage 1 (Level 4) this mode of teaching and learning is mainly applied within student centred modules.  The aim is to lay the foundations for independent study within the early stage of the programme and build upon this gradually.  Greater emphasis on this mode of teaching and learning is applied as student’s progress through the stages of the programme.  The rationale for this is to identify, develop and encourage   independent, critical and reflective thinking.

Placement

Placements are included at stage 2 (Level 5) within the optional module HSS246 Work Based Partnerships and at stage 3 (Level 6) within HSS316 Placement module.  Placements allow students to observe theory in practice in ‘real world’ settings and gain valuable experience to enhance employability.

 

A list of the modules in each Stage of the programme can be found in the Programme Regulations.

 

A summary of the types of teaching, learning and assessment in each module of the programme can be found in the Matrix of Modes of Teaching.

 

  1. How will I be assessed and given feedback? 

Written examinations

Written examinations within the programme occur at the end of the respective modules and are used to assess whether students have achieved the required learning outcomes. ‘Seen’ and ‘unseen’ examinations are used in the form of essays, short and concise answers to a choice of questions and Multiple Choice Questions (MCQ). All written examinations take place under time constrained conditions. Detailed written feedback.

Coursework

Coursework forms the main mode of assessment within the programme at all stages. This includes written essays, whereby students are required to write about and critically analyse a particular topic or answer a question in depth.  Portfolio’s are also used to assess students.  Here the aim is to allow students to put theory into practice whilst also assessing the ability to engage in reflective analysis underpinned by practical experiences. Assessments in the form of reports are used at all stages of the programme. Here students are required to produce a concise and objective report following a prescribed format.  At stage 3 students undertake an extended piece of work in the form of a dissertation.  The expectation here is that students will produce an independent piece of work, supported by a supervisor. This gives students the opportunity to pursue an area within Public Health which is of particular interest to them.  The dissertation draws upon all aspects of the programme content whilst focusing on the application of methods of enquiry within research. Written, oral and electronic (Turnitin) feedback is given.

Practical assessments

Oral assessments, individual and group presentations are used at every stage of the programme.  At stage 1 (Level 4) the focus is on group presentations allowing students to gain in confidence and acquired the fundamentals of presentation skills. These skills are developed and built upon throughout each stage of the programme with the aim of enhancing student employability skills.  Written and electronic (Turnitin) feedback is given.

 

A summary of the types of teaching, learning and assessment in each module of the programme can be found in the Matrix of Modes of Teaching.

 

The generic assessment criteria which we use can be found here. Some programmes use subject-specific assessment criteria which are based on the generic ones.

 

This programme uses the Generic University Assessment Criteria

YES

 

This programme uses the Subject Specific Assessment Criteria

 

NO

 

The University regulations can be found here.

 

 

As discussed above a number of assessment strategies have been developed and impact on this programme. Assessment throughout the programme uses a diverse range of methods that are appropriate to each stage of the programme and to the learning outcomes of the modules. Within stage 1 of the programme the student’s knowledge and understanding will encompass the underlying concepts, theories and principles of public health. The aim is to provide students with a fundamental framework of public health agenda which will be developed and extended at stage 2. On progression into stage 2 student’s knowledge and understanding will be expanded to include the development of key concepts and principles, areas of current debate and uncertainty and the current focus of research in academe and practice. In the final year (stage 3) of the programme student’s knowledge and understanding will include a systematic knowledge of all elements of the discipline informed by the forefront of current research and professional practice.  The final year dissertation aims to assess student’s knowledge and understanding.  The ability to deploy accurately established practical techniques of analysis and enquiry and demonstrate personal qualities and transferable skills will also be evidenced within the dissertation. This will enable student’s to be confident independent learners with the ability to critically evaluate public health issues.    Assessment methods are designed not only to grade performance and to allow judgements relating to progression but to motivate learners and influence their learning strategies.

 

Employers value students who can work independently and as part of a team. Group work is explicitly assessed in a number of modules using several types of assignment (posters, presentations and written reports).

 

The University aims to return marked assessments and feedback within 4 working weeks of the assignment submission date after internal moderation processes have been completed. If this is not possible, students will be notified by the Module Leaders when the feedback is available and how it can be obtained.

 

The Academic Misconduct Regulations and associated guidance can be found here. It is the responsibility of students to ensure they are familiar with their responsibilities in regards to assessments and the implications of an allegation of academic misconduct.

 

Students should refer to the University Regulations for information on degree classifications and compensation between modules.

 

 

 

 


 

  1. Teaching, learning and assessment matrix

 

NB Text in the table below is an example. You will need some means of cross-referring to each of the learning outcomes (LO) specified for the programme. Here they are labelled LO / S (for skills) / 1, 2 etc.; LO / K (for knowledge) / 1, 2 etc. but you do not need to follow that approach. One matrix sheet must be completed for each stage of the programme.

 

NB. Not all option modules may be offered in any one academic year and will depend on the availability of staff and the priorities of the school. In addition, modules will usually need to be selected by a minimum number of students. Option modules may be available on more than one programme and the Programme Leaders will liaise with the Faculty Management Team to ensure there is a reasonable amount of choice in any given year.

 


Stage 1

Module

Code

Core / Option

Modes of T&L

Modes of Assessment

LO  1a

LO  1b

LO  1c

LO 1d

LO 1e

LO 2a

LO 3a

LO 3b

LO 3c

The Politics of Health

HSS

108

C

Lectures, private study, seminars

Essay

 

Report

D

 

T

 

 

T

 

A

 

D

 

T

T

 

A

T

 

D

T

 

A

Community Perspectives on Health

HSS

130

C

Lectures, private study, group work,  seminars

Essay

 

Presentation

D

 

T

D

T

 

A

T

 

A

D

D

T

D

T

 

A

Fundamentals of Social sciences

HSS

131

C

Lectures

Group work

Computer labs

MCQ

 

Report

D

D

 

 

T

 

A

T

 

A

T

T

 

A

T

 

A

Work Based Practice

HSS

127

C

Workshop

Self directed study

seminars

Essay

 

Poster Presentation

 

T

 

A

D

 

D

T

 

A

T

 

T

 

A

Introduction to Research

HSS

128

C

Workshop

Self directed study

seminars

Essay

 

Report

T

 

A

 

 

 

 

T

 

A

T

 

A

 

 

T

 

A

Determinants of Health

HSS

129

C

Workshops

Self directed study

Essay

 

Poster Presentation

T

 

A

D

 

T

T

 

A

 

 

T

 

A

T

 

A

 

T

 

A

 

Stage 2

Module

Code

Core / Option

Modes of T&L

Modes of Assessment

LO  1f

LO 1g

LO 1h

LO 2b

LO 2c

LO 3d

LO 3e

LO 3f

LO 3g

Social Exclusion

HSS

227

C

Workshops

Self directed study

Seminars

Report

 

Time Constrained Essay

T

 

A

T

 

D

T

 

A

T

 

A

T

 

A

T

 

A

T

 

A

T

 

A

 

Research Methods in Health

HSS

229

C

Lecturers

Seminars

Computer labs

Portfolio

 

T

 

A

T

 

A

T

 

A

T

 

A

T

 

A

T

 

A

T

 

A

 

Work Based Partnerships

HSS

246

O

Lectures

Workshops

Group work

Essay

 

Time Constrained Test

T

 

A

T

 

A

T

 

A

T

 

A

T

 

D

T

 

A

T

 

A

T

 

A

 

Drug and Alcohol Issues in Health

HSS

247

O

Lectures

Workshops

Group work

Essay

 

Debate

T

 

A

T

 

D

T

 

A

T

 

A

T

 

A

T

 

A

T

 

A

T

 

A

T

 

A

Introduction to Epidemiology

HSS

248

C

Lectures

Videos

Group Work

Seminars

Presentation

 

Essay

T

 

A

T

 

D

T

 

A

T

 

A

T

 

A

T

 

A

T

 

A

T

 

A

T

 

A

Health Improvement

HSS

249

O

Workshops

Self directed study

Seminars

Essay

 

Poster

T

 

A

T

 

D

T

 

A

T

 

A

T

 

A

T

 

A

T

 

D

T

 

A

D


Contemporary Issues in Health

HSS

250

O

Lectures

Videos

Formal group work

Seminars

Essay

 

Portfolio

T

 

A

T

 

D

T

 

A

T

 

A

T

 

A

T

 

A

T

 

A

T

 

A

 

 

 

 


Stage 3

 

Module

Code

Core / Option

Modes of T&L

Modes of Assessment

LO 1i

LO 1j

LO 1k

LO 2d

LO 2e

LO 2f

LO 3h

LO 3i

LO 3j

LO 3k

LO 3l

Dissertation Critical Review

HSS

319

C

Individual supervision

Self-directed Study

Report

T

 

A

 

T

 

A

T

 

A

T

 

A

 

T

 

A

 

T

 

A

T

 

A

T

 

A

Critical Issues in Health

HSS

332

C

Work based learning

Report

Reflective Account

T

D

A

 

 

 

 

T

 

D

T

 

A

T

 

A

T

 

A

T

 

A

T

 

A

T

 

A

T

 

A

Building Healthy

Communities

HSS

341

C

Lecturers

Workshops

Essay

Individual

Presentation

T

 

D

A

 

T

 

D

A

T

 

A

T

 

A

 

T

 

A

T

 

A

T

 

A

T

 

A

T

 

A

Placement

HSS

316

O

Workshops

Self directed study

Seminars

Individual Portfolio

Essay

T

 

A

T

 

A

 

T

 

D

T

 

A

T

 

A

T

 

A

T

 

A

T

 

A

T

 

A

T

 

A

Global Issues in Health

HSS

339

O

Lecturers

Videos

Work in Seminars

Essay

Group Presentation

T

 

D

 

 

T

 

A

T

 

D

T

 

A

 

T

 

A

T

 

D

T

 

A

 

T

 

A

Law and

Ethics

HSS

342

O

Lectures

Workshops

tutorials

Essay

 

T

D

A

 

T

D

A

T

D

 

T

A

 

 

T

 

A

T

 

A

T

 

A

 

 

 

 

Public Mental Health

HSS

343

O

Workshops

Self directed study

Seminars

Essay

Presentation

 

T

 

A

 

 

T

 

A

T

 

A

 

T

 

A

T

 

A

T

 

A

T

 

A

T

 

A



  1. How does research influence the programme? 

 

The University’s Health Sciences and Wellbeing research brings together academics with a range of research skills and experience, and acts as a hub where high quality research can be developed that will lead to better physical and mental health and well-being. The beacon is involved in building sustainable, interdisciplinary academic communities with proven international reputation to help inform practice across a wide range of health disciplines and professions. Its research has real-world impact and focuses on:

 

-          health improvement and wellbeing

-          drug discovery and application of therapies.

 

In terms of consultancy activity, staff within the team have worked with various local health initiatives including the Sunderland Health and Wellbeing Board, Newcastle City Council’s public health team and with CAPE in the University around providing a leadership programme around safeguarding adults. 

Research Methods is delivered in two modules within the programme. At stage one HSS128 Introduction to Research students are taught the fundamentals of research.  Building upon this at stage two HSS229 Research Methods in Heath is clearly focused on the value of research within a wide context of public health and focusing on the practical application of research skills.  Two current programme module leaders are actively involved in research that informs and drives the curriculum.

 

SECTION D:EMPLOYABILITY

 

  1. How will the programme prepare me for employment?

 

The programme gives you the opportunity to develop skills which you can use in the future. Some skills are more specific than others to the subject area, or to a particular type of activity, but all skills can be applied in a range of employment situations, sometimes in quite unexpected ways. The skills which this programme is designed to develop are listed below.

 

Upon commencement of the programme students are enrolled as members of the Royal Society

for Public Health (RSPH) https://www.rsph.org.uk/.   Membership includes opportunities for networking at conferences and courses and free membership events along with the ability to participate in campaign and policy work.  Students gain valuable experience whilst networking, attending events and participating in RSPH activities which will enhance future career pathways and employability skills. 

 

Employment and employability, including engagement with prospective employers and career planning is emphasized throughout the programme at all stages. Through modules such as Work Based Learning HSS127 students develop links with appropriate work places and develop skills required for a variety of vocational opportunities and careers.  The University’s Careers and Employability Service run workshops on CV building, interpreting job descriptions and writing covering letters. These workshops are embedded into the programme.   HSS246 Work Based Partnerships includes sessions on preparing for work.  The sessions include applying for jobs, preparing for interviews and the utilisation of CES services post- graduation. 

A diverse range of careers and employment opportunities exist within the Public Health arena. For detailed information please access the following link:

 

For information about other opportunities available to our students who study on campus, click here.

 

Additional opportunities to develop your experiences more widely will vary if you study at one of our partner colleges. For information about the extra-curricular activities available in any of our colleges please contact the college direct. 

 

Public Health Careers

 

There are also opportunities for on-campus students outside your programme of study.

 

For information about other opportunities available to our students who study on campus, click here.

 

Additional opportunities to develop your experiences more widely will vary if you study at one of our partner colleges. For information about the extra-curricular activities available in any of our colleges please contact the college direct. 

 

  1. Professional statutory or regulatory body (PSRB) accreditation. 

 

PSRB accreditation is not relevant to this programme 

PSRB accreditation is currently being sought for this programme

 

This programme currently has PSRB accreditation

 

 

SECTION E:PROGRAMME STRUCTURE AND REGULATIONS

 

Complete and insert Part B of the Programme Regulations Form, for question 39

 

SECTION F:ADMISSIONS, LEARNING ENVIRONMENT AND SUPPORT

 

  1. What are the admissions requirements?

 

The University’s standard admissions requirements can be found in the university regulations. Programme-specific requirements which are in addition to those regulations are given below.

 

The current entry requirements for this programme is as specified in the Fees and Entry Requirements section on the programme page on the University’s website.

 

Entry from a University of Sunderland Foundation Year

 

Can students enter with advanced standing?

Yes

 

 

If yes, to which Stages?

Stage 1

X

Stage 2

X

Stage 3

X

Stage 4

 

 

If yes, with what qualifications? (Maximum 100 words)

 

(e.g. HND with credit in management of care for entry to Stage 3. NB include reference to approved standard overseas as well as UK qualifications where applicable. Remember that mappings must be in place – seek advice from Academic Registry if you are unsure about this)

 

Notes:

For undergraduate programmes Standard entry requirements must be qualifications listed in the UCAS Tariff and must include the UCAS Tariff points required - advice on this can be sought from the Admissions Office;

Where Entry with advanced standing is given (i.e. Stage 2 or 3 entry to an undergraduate programme or after the Certificate or Diploma phase of a Masters award) you will need to

  • ensure that the entry route is approved
  • map the learning outcomes of the entry qualification to the relevant Stage of this programme (this requires Faculty approval – seek advice from your Academic Dean)

See Articulation and Related Processes for details or consult the Academic Registry.

 

Other:

For example, any professional experience required or desirable; English language proficiency; any other skills required (e.g. IT). Note that it is now generally illegal to give age as any kind of entry criterion: please seek advice from Academic Registry if you think this may be a problem.

 

The University has a process by which applicants whose experience to date already covers one or more modules of the programme they are applying for may seek Accreditation of Prior Learning (APL). Full details can be found here but if you think that this may be relevant to you, please contact the department which offers the programme you are interested in.

 

  1. What kind of support and help will there be?
    1. in the department:

Support and guidance is offered to students through a comprehensive set of mechanisms. All students are encouraged to actively participate within all aspects of the programme.  A further emphasis will be directed at those students enrolled on the part-time mode of study to encourage and enhance regular communication between fellow students and academic staff. Since the programme will recruit from a wide spectrum of society, including those groups currently under-represented in Higher Education, this is an essential part of the programme. Students will be offered a range of academic and personal support that will include:

-Induction

-Personal level tutors

-Programme handbook

-Module guides

-Library skills induction

-Extensive library facilities, journal and book stocks, access to electronic databases

-Computing facilities induction

-Learning resource centre

-Email

-Access to professional personal counsellors in Student Support and Welfare Services

-Access to the resources and staff of the Learning Development Service

 

 

Personal tutors

During induction all new students are informed they will be allocated a personal tutor. The role of the personal tutor is explained fully and allocation of tutors is completed by the Programme Leader.  Students are advised to make initial contact with their personal tutor within the first two weeks of starting the programme and to have regular contact thereafter.  Students are advised that regular contact with their personal tutor will help to establish a good rapport and contribute to the milieu of a positive and productive learning experience. The programme academic team are fully aware of the benefits of providing high quality support to students and personal tutors encourage students to meet with them on a regular basis, in addition to discussing any personal difficulties they may encounter.  This process ensures that students and tutors meet regularly and allows the forum to build up a relationship. Students will be made aware that their personal tutor is a port of call for their academic and pastoral support.  This may allow any personal difficulties the student is experiencing to be identified and addressed before the situation escalates.  This may necessitate sign- posting students to the relevant specialist services of which all personal tutors are familiar with.  A list of student and personal tutor allocations is also available on Canvas. 

 

  1. in the university as a whole:

The University provides a range of professional support services including wellbeing, counselling, disability support, and a Chaplaincy. Click on the links for further information.

 

  1. What resources will I have access to?

 

On campus

X

In a partner college

 

By distance learning

 

 

On campus

Tick all that apply

General Teaching and Learning Space

X

IT

X

Library

X

VLE

X

Laboratory

 

Studio

 

Performance space

 

Other specialist

 

Technical resources 

 

 

Within the faculty there are well equipped teaching rooms provided in dedicated areas within 

      the Science Complex. The newly developed Living Lab enables students to access and  

      experience simulated Public Health issues.  Students also have direct contact with Patient 

      and Carers Public Involvement (PCPI’s) which contributes to a deeper student understanding

      of real life patient/carers experiences.   

 

      Students have access to a number of teaching and learning hubs along   

      with use of the Open Access Lab.  All computers are networked and printing facilities are

      provided.  Students have access to email and the worldwide web.

 

      High quality library resources are provided by the Murray Library. The library is equipped with

      photocopiers for student use at a small charge.  New students receive an induction tour with an

      open learning workbook.  Trained support staff and assistive technology are provided for

      students with disability or specific learning difficulty. 

 

      Students have use of Canvas (VLE).

 

Information about the University’s facilities can be found here.

 

  1. Are there any additional costs on top of the fees?

 

No, but all students buy some study materials such as books and provide their own basic study materials.

 

Yes (optional) All students buy some study materials such as books and provide their own basic study materials. In addition there are some are additional costs for optional activities associated with the programme (see below)

 

Yes (essential) All students buy some study materials such as books and provide their own basic study materials. In addition there are some are essential additional costs associated with the programme (see below)

X

 

 

Students choosing to study HSS246 Work Based Partnerships and HSS316 Placement will be required to obtain a Disclosure Barring Service (DBS) at their own expense.

 

  1. How are student views represented?

All taught programmes in the University have student representatives for each Stage (year-group) of each programme who meet in a Student-Staff Liaison Committee (SSLC) where they can raise students’ views and concerns. The Students’ Union and the faculties together provide training for student representatives. SSLCs and focus groups are also used to obtain student feedback on plans for developing existing programmes and designing new ones. Feedback on your programme is obtained every year through module questionnaires and informs the annual review of your programme. Student representatives are also invited to attend Programme and Module Studies Boards which manage the delivery and development of programmes and modules.  Faculty Academic Committee, also has student representation. This allows students to be involved in higher-level plans for teaching and learning. At university level Students are represented on University level Committees by sabbatical officers who are the elected leaders of the Students’ Union.

 

The University’s student representation and feedback policy can be found here.

 

Undergraduate programmes only: Final-year students are also invited to complete a National Student Survey (NSS) which asks a standard set of questions across the whole country. The results of this are discussed at Programme Studies Boards and at Faculty Academic Committee to identify good practice which can be shared and problems which need to be addressed. We rely heavily on student input to interpret the results of the NSS and ensure that we make the most appropriate changes.

 

Programmes offered in partner colleges: If you are studying in one of our partner colleges the college will have its own mechanisms for obtaining student feedback. Some of these may be the same as those on-campus at the University but others may be different. You should ask your college for further information.

 

For distance learning operated from Sunderland: if you are studying by distance learning you will have slightly different arrangements from those used on campus. In particular, you are likely to have virtual rather than physical meetings and discussions. However, these arrangements should provide comparable opportunities for you to give feedback. Details are given below.

 

Describe further features including office hours / open door policies, on-line facilities such as VLE discussion boards, programme questionnaires and anything else. (Maximum 300 words)

 

SECTION G:QUALITY MANAGEMENT 

 

  1. National subject benchmarks

 

The Quality Assurance Agency (QAA) for Higher Education publishes benchmark statements which give guidance as to the skills and knowledge which graduates in various subjects and in certain types of degree are expected to have. These can be found here.

 

Are there any benchmark statements for this programme?

 

NO

 

There are no benchmarks for this programme.

 

The QAA also publishes a Framework for Higher Education Qualifications (FHEQ) which defines the generic skills and abilities expected of students who have achieved awards at a given level and with which our programmes align. The FHEQ can be found here.

 

  1. How are the quality and standards of the programme assured?

 

The programme is managed and quality assured through the University’s standard processes. Programmes are overseen by Module and Programme Studies Boards which include student representatives. Each year each module leader provides a brief report on the delivery of the module, identifying strengths and areas for development, and the programme team reviews the programme as a whole.  The purpose of this is to ensure that the programme is coherent and up-to-date, with suitable progression from one Stage to another, and a good fit (alignment) between what is taught and how students learn and are assessed - the learning outcomes, content and types of teaching, learning and assessment. Student achievement, including progress between Stages of the programme and degree classification, is kept under review. The programme review report is sent to the Programme Studies Board and the Faculty in turn reports issues to the University’s Quality Management Sub-Committee (QMSC).

 

External examiners are appointed to oversee and advise on the assessment of the programme. They ensure that the standards of the programme are comparable with those of similar programmes elsewhere in the UK and are also involved in the assessment process to make sure that it is fair. They are invited to comment on proposed developments to the programme. Their reports are sent to the Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Academic) as well as to the Faculty so that issues of concern can be addressed.

 

All programmes are reviewed by the University on a six-yearly cycle to identify good practice and areas for enhancement. Programmes are revalidated through this review process. These reviews include at least one academic specialist in the subject area concerned from another UK university. Quality Assurance Agency (QAA) review reports for Sunderland can be found here.

 

Further information about our quality processes can be found here.

 

Please also complete and insert the SITS form.