Attachments

PCET PERIODIC REIVEW MARCH 2018: FULL VERSION REVISED SPECIFICATION PCET FEBRUARY 2018 FINAL SENT – 27-02-18 with codes (LNAB)

MAY 2018 UPDATE in response to PANEL Recommendations (04-05-18) Printed 13-08-18 – to file (work on)

Final amendments made and modules separated out (14-08-18) Sent 14-08-18

 

 

 

Quality Handbook

 

 

Programme Specification Template

 

 

SECTION A:CORE INFORMATION

 

  1.  

Name of programme:

Post Compulsory Education and Training (PCET)

 

  1.  

Award title:

  • Post Graduate Certificate in Post Compulsory Education and Training
  • Professional Graduate Certificate in Post Compulsory Education and Training
  • Certificate in Education in Post Compulsory Education and Training

 

  1.  

Programme linkage:

 

Is this part of a group of linked programmes between which students can transfer at agreed points?

 

Yes - On campus students can transfer from the Post graduate route to the Professional Graduate route

 

  1.  

Is the programme a top-up only?

 

No

  1.  

Does the programme have a Foundation Year (Level 3) associated with it so that students enter for a four-year programme and progress directly from the Foundation Year to Stage 1 without having to re-apply?

 

No

  1.  

Level of award:

 

Post Graduate Certificate in Post Compulsory Education and Training: Level 7

Professional Graduate Certificate in Post Compulsory Education and Training: Level 6 

Certificate in Education in Post Compulsory Education and Training: Level 5

 

  1.  

Awarding Body:

University of Sunderland

  1.  

Department: School of Education

 

  1.  

Programme Studies Board: Post Compulsory Education and Training

 

  1.  

Programme Leader: Lawrence Nixon & Andrew Buglass

 

 

 


  1.           How and where can I study the programme?

Tick all boxes that apply

 

At Sunderland:

 

Full-time on campus

YES

Part-time on campus

YES

As work-based learning full-time

 

As work-based learning part-time

 

As a full-time sandwich course

 

As a part-time sandwich course

 

By distance learning

 

 

At the University of Sunderland London campus: 

 

Full-time on campus

 

Part-time on campus

 

As work-based learning full-time

 

As work-based learning part-time

 

As a full-time sandwich course

 

As a part-time sandwich course

 

By distance learning

 

 

At a partner college:

 

Full-time in the UK 

YES

Part-time in the UK

YES

Full-time overseas

 

Part-time overseas

 

By distance learning

 

As a full-time sandwich course in the UK

 

As a part-time sandwich course in the UK

 

As a full-time sandwich course overseas

 

As a part-time sandwich course overseas

 

As work-based learning full-time in the UK 

 

As work-based learning part-time overseas

 

Other (please specify)

 

 

Free text below for give further brief details (optional) – e.g. that the partner teaches Stages 1 after which students’ progress to Sunderland. (Maximum 150 words)

 

  1.           How long does the programme take?

 

 

Min number of years / months

Max number of years / months

Full-time

1 academic year

3 years

Part-time

2 academic years

5 years

Distance learning

 

 

Work-based learning

 

 

 

For start-dates please see the current edition of the Prospectus or contact the relevant department at the University. For start-dates for programmes delivered in a partner college, please contact the relevant college.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

SECTION B:FURTHER CORE INFORMATION 

 

Overview of the Post Compulsory Certificates and Programmes

The Post Compulsory Education and Training area of teacher education offers three programmes at three levels: Post Graduate Certificate, Professional Graduate Certificate and Certificate. These certificates in education are widely recognised qualifications for teachers working in the Further Education and Skills sector.  Post-compulsory education takes place in a wide range of settings such as FE Colleges, 6th Forms, Training Providers, Prisons, Work-based Learning, Family Learning and Adult and Community Learning.

 

The Post Graduate and Professional Graduate programmes are offered on-campus as a full-time pre-service programme lasting one year.  The Professional Graduate and Certificate Programmes are offered at partner institutions through a part-time in-service programme that lasts two years. 

 

In terms of the University model this is a one stage programme as it is completed in one 120 credit stage.

 

There are three possible awards:

  • Post Graduate Certificate in Post Compulsory Education and Training (Level 7)
  • Professional Graduate Certificate in Post Compulsory Education and Training (Level 6)
  • Certificate in Post Compulsory Education and Training (Level 5)

 

The Post Graduate Certificate in Post Compulsory Education and Training is a Pre-Service Programme that is aimed at graduates who wish to teach in the Post Compulsory Education and Training Sector. This programme is only delivered on-campus in one year. The Placement Office will help students enrolled on this programme to source a suitable teaching placement

 

The Professional Graduate Certificate in Post Compulsory Education and Training is delivered Full-Time, On-Campus for Pre-Service trainees, and Part-Time, Off-Campus for In-service trainees.  

 

The pre-service Professional graduate students currently study on-campus over one year. The Placement Office will help students enrolled on this programme to source a suitable teaching placement

 

The in-service Professional graduate students study at partner colleges over one or two years, full or part-time and will already have a teaching practice organised as a requirement of enrolling onto the course. 

 

The Certificate in Post Compulsory Education and Training is for non-graduates and is delivered by our partner colleges only.  The in-service Certificate students study at partner colleges over one or two years, full-time or part-time and will already have a teaching practice organised as a requirement of enrolling onto the course.  

 

Phase 1 is common to all programmes and includes two level 4 modules and one level 5 module.  These three modules lead to the award of 60 credits. 

 

Phase 2 of these three programmes all lead to the award of another 60 credits.  These credits are at different levels: 

  • Trainees studying on the Post Graduate Certificate in Post Compulsory Education and Training complete two 30 credit modules at level 7.
  • Trainees studying on the Professional Graduate Certificate in Post Compulsory Education and Training complete three 20 credit modules at level 6.
  • Trainees studying on the Certificate in Post Compulsory Education and Training complete three 20 credit modules at level 5.

 

The full-time pre-service provision is popular with graduates who have degrees in subjects that are not widely taught in secondary schools such as dance, childhood studies, law and psychology.  The University helps to arrange a 100 hour teaching placement and a subject specialist mentor.

 

There is a specialist pathway within the full-time programme for teachers of English.  Graduates with a degree in English (or a closely related subject) may be eligible for a bursary. This specialist pathway is available on both the Post Graduate and Professional Graduate Programmes.

 

The part-time provision is aimed predominately at teachers who are already working in the sector and wish to obtain a recognised qualification.  They teach across a full range of academic and vocational subjects taught in 16-19 provision, as well as commercial, industrial and public service training.  A significant proportion of the in-service trainees teach vocational subjects such as construction, childcare, health & social care, hair & beauty, travel & tourism, etc.

 

All modules in the Professional Graduate Certificate and Certificate programmes are marked on a pass/fail basis in accordance with the assessment regulations governing the programme.  In addition, because this is a programme of Initial Teacher Education (ITE) students are also indicatively graded (following Ofsted best practice guidance) as ‘Exceeding Expectations’, ‘Meeting Expectations’ or “Required to Improve” The two 30 credit M Level modules are marked in line with the University’s generic Post-Graduate grading criteria. 

 

The external examiner identified the following strengths in the programme in June 2017:

  • “Particularly impressive are the high success rates, the support for individual students”
  • “Good Assessment practice is apparent across the provision”
  • The way ETF professional standards were embedded and clustered in the programme was “really clear”.
  • “It was evident that students make immense progress during their time on the programme whether full or part time, regardless of the level at which they are studying.”
  • The entire team has succeeded in encouraging students to develop their practice in the area of embedding of British values with sensitivity and in a meaningful manner.
  • “The sense of celebration at the summer conference in which full time and second year part-time students share their JPD inquiry”

 

 

 

  1. Learning and teaching strategy

The PCET programmes are all focused on building upon the practical teaching skills and pedagogical knowledge of students in a manner that supports the critical informed evaluation of practice.  Central to the programme are three pedagogical principles widely discussed in educational literature. First, the view that it is challenging to transfer practical skills (See Eraut 2003, Wiliam 2007). We have developed a number of systems to support this transfer of practical knowledge process. Mentors and students sit down and review the mentee’s progress on a regular basis. The Mentor and Trainee Record and Review of Practical Teaching captures these discussions and supports the student to identify areas of practice to develop. The Next Steps to Success form is completed after each formal observation. This form allows trainees to identify one improvement priority to research in detail and then work to implement these ideas. Finally, progress review tutorials with tutors are focused by a Personal Learning Plan report the student completes to help them to take stock and evaluate their progress over the previous period of study in order to identify strengths and areas of practice to keep developing through, research, professional discussion and  feedback support.

 

The second pedagogic principle that underpins the PCET programmes is that of joint practice development (JPD).  The idea of joint practice development (JPD), developed originally by Michael Fielding (2005), suggests that people learn better together when they share problems in their teaching and learning and then collaborate to identify a likely solution, try it out in their different classrooms and evaluate impact together.  As Kant puts it, “mind cannot function outside of society”.  This model of professional development informs the organisation of key elements of our programme, including paired micro teaches and paired action research projects.

 

Finally, the pedagogical principle that ‘everyone is the same, everyone is different’ (see John Wisdom, 1950 and University of Sunderland Equality policy) informs our work to ensure all students are included in our teaching and learning. As student teachers they are also supported to effectively include all their learners in the sessions they teach.  Elements of our programme that make this commitment to inclusion a reality include: the Behaviour Management Conference, sessions on tackling Prejudice head on, support for including learners with SEND and our approach to Prevent that promotes ‘getting along with difference’ while confronting violent extremism. 

 

  1. Retention strategy 

In order to further improve the final achievement of our student teachers we are working to ‘close the loop’ on the bunching of practical teaching observations. Giving student teachers the time to address practical developmental feedback is crucial to them maximising their achievement and retention for the programme.  New ways of recording and monitoring are being developed to ensure tutors, students and mentors all have access to the data relating to the number of hours completed and the number of observations completed.  This new development will help everyone to see when observations need to be completed to give good time to students to practice and build confidence in using effective teaching practices suggested in feedback.

 

  1. Any other information

Teaching Placement /Teaching Practice

Practical teaching is at the heart of the Post Compulsory Education and Training programmes. The quality of the teaching placement/teaching practice is a key determinant of professional development and practice of both part time and full time students.

 

For full time pre-service students this takes the form of a ‘teaching placement’.

 

For full-time and part time in-service students this takes the form of a ‘teaching practice’. This teaching practice is normally part of their paid employment.

 

The purpose of the teaching placement/practice is to enable student teachers to gain practical experience of working in a post compulsory education and training context and to put into practice the skills and approaches developed during the taught aspects of the course. During teaching placement/teaching practice students are required to observe, participate fully in, investigate and record various aspects of teaching, learning and assessment and ‘classroom’ procedures and processes.

 

Each pre-service student teacher will be found an appropriate teaching placement which is, as far as is practical, matched to the student’s subject specialism, preferred location, level and range of courses and student types. For pre-service students this is organised through the University of Sunderland Placement Office with the processes monitored and managed by the University Programme Leader. With the growth in full time student numbers and the increasing demands on the Placement Office, student teachers have been encouraged to be pro-active in working with the Office and their tutors to secure placements and to build up a data base of placements for in-coming and existing students.

 

The working practices and experiences of in-service students form the practical focus for the development of their teaching. These are monitored by the Assistant Programme Leader in each Partner Institution who will take appropriate action regarding any issues relating to the quality, breadth and scope of the student’s practical teaching experience.

 

These processes include meeting and conducting joint observations with subject mentors, reviewing the general environment of their teaching practice, their timetables and appropriate procedures and documentation.

 

As part of their professional development files and in order to meet the requirements of the practical teaching modules (EPF140, EPF234/EPF308/EPFM 14) student teachers are required to present a log of the range of their practical teaching hours completed, which is authenticated by their mentor and pass all teaching practice observations.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SECTION C:TEACHING AND LEARNING

 

What is the programme about?

 

The Post Compulsory Education and Training Programmes provide students with a challenging programme of academic study which is relevant to their role as a teacher in this sector.  The spiral curriculum is designed to develop knowledge and skills relevant to successful planning, teaching, classroom management and evaluation of subject specialist teaching. The programme develops the confidence of student teachers to design, deliver and evaluate a number of educational areas including procedures to assess and record the progress of individual learners, embed the development of literacy and numeracy, to test and criticise ideas and evidence in a creative and imaginative way and to build commitment to research and inquiry in their own practice using ICT where appropriate to enhance and update their subject knowledge and pedagogy.

 

The Post Compulsory Education and Training curriculum aims to deepen and broaden student teachers’ skills, knowledge and reflective capacities through a considered engagement with educational research, philosophical and sociological perspectives.  The aim of the programme is to develop outstanding beginning teachers.

 

 

 

  1. What will I know or be able to do at the end of the programme?

 

Learning Outcomes – Knowledge

By the end of this 120 credit programme students successfully completing their programme of study should know, understand or be able to do the following:

  • LO K 1 Use first principles in planning and managing teaching, learning and assessment.
  • LO K 2 Build a repertoire of approaches to planning and managing teaching, learning, assessment and evaluation.
  • LO K 3 Analyse key pedagogical concepts and skills in the classroom.
  • LO K 4 Plan and manage an individual programme of professional development and subject updating.
  • LO K 5 Synthesize key pedagogical concepts and skills in the classroom.
  • LO K 6 Develop, test and justify their personal theory of learning through a planned programme of professional development and subject updating.
  • LO  K 7 Relate their own professional ideas and practices to an organisational, local, regional and national context.
  • LO K 8 Evaluate the impact of major curriculum, organisational and policy changes on their own professional practice.

 

  • In addition the Pre-Service, Full-Time, Post-Graduate PGCE PCET Programme will expect students to:

 

  • LO K 9 Employ highly specialised and advanced research skills and tools relevant to the study.

 

  •   LO K 10 Analyse current pedagogic concepts, models and strategies to identify their framing principles and values.

 

 

Learning Outcomes – Skills

By the end of this one year, 120 credit programme students successfully completing their programme of study should know, understand or be able to do the following:

 

  • LO S 1 Apply key pedagogical concepts and skills in the classroom.
  • LO S 2 Use ICT within their subject to extend their subject knowledge and understanding.
  • LO S 3 Design, use and evaluate a range of learning resources, technologies and aids competently and effectively to improve subject and pedagogical knowledge and understanding.
  • LO S 4 Embed the development of adult literacy and numeracy in the teaching of their subject specialism.
  • LO S 5 Advance a repertoire of approaches to planning and managing teaching, learning, assessment and evaluation.
  • LO S 6 Demonstrate the creative application of a broad range of learning resources, technologies and aids to improve subject knowledge and understanding and pedagogy
  • LO S 7 Conduct a small-scale evaluation study of your own practice.
  • LO S 8 Adopt a professional commitment and the necessary skills to reflect on values and ethical issues in professional practice.

 

  • In addition the Pre-Service, Full-Time, Post-Graduate PGCE PCET Programme will expect students to:

 

  • LO S 9 apply theoretical principles and themes to investigate current practice to identify challenges to ‘good’ practice and opportunities to ‘enhance’ practice
  • LO S10 synthesise developments in practice in order to further develop teaching capabilities

 

 

 

  1. What will the programme consist of?

 

Phase 1

Post Graduate Certificate;  Professional Graduate Certificate; Certificate

All programmes study for 3x 20 credit modules = 60 credits

 

 

Preparing to Teach in the Lifelong Learning Sector

EPF 134

20 at HE Level 1

(NCF LEVEL 4)

Either:

Developing Theories of  Teaching Learning & Assessment in PCET

EPF 230

20 at HE Level 2

(NCF LEVEL 5)

Or:

Subject Specialist Knowledge and Pedagogy (English: literacy)

EPF238

20 at HE Level 2

(NCF LEVEL 5)

Practical Teaching & Professional Development 2

 

 

 

EPF 140

20 at HE Level 1

(NCF LEVEL 4)

Phase 2  Post Graduate Certificate:  2x 30 credit modules = 60 credits

 

Developing Curriculum and Implementing Policy in Post Compulsory Education and Training

EPFM13

 

30 at HE level 4

(NCF LEVEL 7)

 

Advancing Subject Specialist Teaching through Critical Reflection and Professional Development

EPFM14

30 at HE level 4

(NCF LEVEL 7)

Phase  2 Professional Graduate Certificate:   3x 20 credit modules = 60 credits

 

 

 

Contextualising Policy and Curriculum in PCET

EPF 304

20 at HE Level 3

(NCF LEVEL 6)

 

Enhancing Subject Specialist Learning through Innovation & Change

EPF 309

20 at HE

Level 3

(NCF LEVEL 6)

Advancing Subject Specialist Teaching & Professional Development

EPF 308

20 at HE Level 3

(NCF LEVEL 6)

Phase 2 Certificate:   3x 20 credit modules = 60 credits

 

 

 

Contextualising Policy and Curriculum in PCET

EPF 217

20 at HE Level 2

(NCF LEVEL 5)

Enhancing Subject Specialist Learning through Innovation & Change

EPF 235

20 at HE Level 2

(NCF LEVEL 5)

Advancing Subject Specialist Teaching & Professional Development

EPF 234

 

20 at L HE Level 2

(NCF LEVEL 5)

 

 

  1. How will I be taught?

 

Overview of Teaching and Learning Strategy

The programme team's approach to teaching and learning is guided by the University's Teaching and Learning Strategy. A range of teaching, learning and assessment strategies which are relevant to the learning outcomes of the programme are utilised. The strategies modelled by the teaching and mentoring teams enable students to develop the knowledge, skills and understanding they need to meet the requirements of the ETF Professional Standards (2014).

 

Matrix Mapping Teaching & Learning Methods against all Modules & Stages

Learning

Outcomes

EPF134

EPF230

EPF238

EPF140

EPF217

EPF304

EPF235

EPF307

EPF309

EPF234

EPF308

 

EPFM

13

 

EPFM14

Lectures

 

Interactive classroom tasks and activities

 

Tutorials

 

Seminars

 

 

 

 

Use of ICT for demonstration

Use of ICT by students

Practical teaching

 

 

 

 

Guided reading,

directed study

Self-directed study

Individual Learning Plan

 

 

 

 

Observation

 

 

 

 

 

Scheduled teaching activities

YES

Independent study

YES

Placement

YES

 

 

A list of the modules for the programme is included as an appendix

 

A summary of the types of teaching, learning and assessment in each module of the programme can be found in the Matrix of Modes of Teaching. See Section 33 below

 

 

  1. How will I be assessed and given feedback? 

 

The programme team build upon previous experience of providing a high level of interaction during contact time with students and provide students with important feedback about the quality of their work. The programme team considers formative feedback to be important in enhancing student motivation and developing progress.

The assessment techniques employed vary both within modules and between modules. The programme team have devised a balance of assessment which ensures an overall assessment scheme which is evenly balanced throughout each phase, and is not end-loaded.

 

Three elements contribute to the grading process of student teachers on these programmes.  First, the written assignments.  Second, the formal observations completed by tutors that are graded using a set of grading criteria informed by ETF, OFSTED and collaborative work with other providers.   Finally, the formal review tutorials scheduled at the end of every term. 

 

All modules on the Professional Graduate and Certificate programmes are assessed on a PASS/FAIL basis. In addition, in line with OFSTED best practice guidance, indicative remarks indicate a level of achievement. On the Post Graduate Programme, trainees will be assessed on a PASS/FAIL basis for the first three modules (these are the modules that are shared with the Professional Graduate and Certificate programmes). The final two M Level modules will be assessed in line with the University’s Post Graduate Generic Grading Criteria and their grades will be recorded on the trainees’ transcripts.

 

The grading of all practical teaching observations carried out by a tutor is informed by the Grading Criteria and Attainment Tracker.  These observations are graded pass/fail but, in line with OFSTED best practice guidance, an indicative level of achievement is indicated drawing on the Grading Criteria and Attainment Tracker.

 

Finally, all student teachers complete a Personal Learning Plan that is updated on a regular basis and is formally reviewed at scheduled tutorials at the end of every term.  As part of this process and, in line with OFSTED best practice guidance, students are holistically assessed to record evidence of achievement to date and this helps to inform clear target setting for their future development.

 

A variety of modes of assessment, reflecting the range of teaching and learning styles, are used and these will focus on:

-  formal written assignments

-  collaborative group assignment

-  group presentation

-  practical tasks

-  extended research and enquiry

- observation of practical teaching

- formative and summative feedback from mentors, tutors, and peers

- self assessment

 

 

Written examinations

No

Coursework

YES

Practical assessments

YES

 

A summary of the types of teaching, learning and assessment in each module of the programme can be found in the Matrix of Modes of Teaching.

 

The generic assessment criteria which we use can be found here. Some programmes use subject-specific assessment criteria which are based on the generic ones.

 

This programme uses the Generic University Assessment Criteria

YES

 

This programme uses the Subject Specific Assessment Criteria

 

NO

 

The University regulations can be found here.

 

The University aims to return marked assessments and feedback within 4 working weeks of the assignment submission date after internal moderation processes have been completed. If this is not possible, students will be notified by the Module Leaders when the feedback is available and how it can be obtained.

 

The Academic Misconduct Regulations and associated guidance can be found here. It is the responsibility of students to ensure they are familiar with their responsibilities in regards to assessments and the implications of an allegation of academic misconduct.

 

Students should refer to the University Regulations for information on degree classifications and compensation between modules.

 

 


  1. Teaching, learning and assessment matrix. Table cross referencing learning outcomes to modules. T= taught, D= Developed & A = Assessed

Module Code

Core/ optional

Modes of T&L

Modes of Assessment

LO K1

LO K2

LO K3

LO K4

LO K5

LO K6

LO K7

LO

K8

LO

K9

LO

K10

LO

S1

LO

S2

LO

S3

LO

S4

LO

S5

LO

S6

LO

S7

LO

S8

LO

S9

LO

S10

EPF 134

Core

Lectures, private study, group work, seminars

Individual written reports, paired micro teach

T

D

A

T

D

A

T

D

 

 

T

D

A

T

T

 

 

 

T

D

A

T

D

T

D

A

T

T

T

D

 

T

 

 

EPF 230

Optional

Lectures, private study, group work, seminars

Individual written assignments, group presentation

 

 

T

D

A

 

 

D

A

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

T

D

A

 

 

 

D

 

 

EPF 238

Optional

Lectures, private study, group work, seminars

Individual written assignments, group presentation

 

 

T

D

A

 

 

D

A

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

T

D

A

 

 

 

D

 

 

EPF 140

Core

Lectures, private study, group work, seminars

Individual written assignment,

Observation and reflective log

D

A

D

A

 

T

D

A

T

D

A

 

 

 

 

 

D

A

 

T

D

A

 

 

T

D

A

 

D

A

 

 

EPF 304

(pol)

Core

Lectures, private study, group work, seminars

Individual written report, group presentation

 

 

 

 

 

T

D

A

T

D

A

T

D

A

T

D

A

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

T

D

 

 

EPF 309

Core

Lectures, private study, group work, seminars

Group presentation

Individual written assignment,

Observation & reflective log

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

T

D

A

 

 

T

D

A

 

 

 

 

 

T

D

 

 

EPF 308

(prac)

Core

Lectures, private study, group work, seminars

Individual written report, group presentation

D

A

D

A

T

D

A

T

D

A

T

D

A

 

 

 

 

 

D

A

 

T

D

A

 

T

D

A

T

D

A

T

D

A

T

D

A

 

 

EPF 217

(pol)

Core

Lectures, private study, group work, seminars

Individual written report, group presentation

 

 

 

 

 

T

D

A

T

D

A

T

D

A

T

D

A

 

 

 

 

 

 

T

D

 

T

D

 

 

EPF235

 

Core

Lectures, private study, group work, seminars

Individual written report, group presentation

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

T

D

A

 

 

T

D

A

 

 

 

 

 

T

D

 

 

EPF234

(Prac)

Core

Lectures, private study, group work, seminars

Individual written report, group presentation

D

A

D

A

T

D

A

T

D

A

T

D

A

 

 

 

 

 

D

A

 

T

D

A

 

T

D

A

T

D

A

T

D

A

T

D

A

 

 

EPFM13

Core

Lectures, private study, group work, seminars

Individual written report, group presentation

 

 

 

 

 

T

D

A

T

D

A

T

D

A

T

D

A

T

D

A

 

T

D

A

 

 

 

 

 

T

D

T

D

A

T

D

A

EPFM14

Core

Lectures, private study, group work, seminars

Group presentation

Individual written assignment,

Observation & reflective log

D

A

D

A

T

D

A

T

D

A

T

D

A

 

 

 

 

T

D

A

T

D

A

D

A

 

T

D

A

 

T

D

A

T

D

A

T

D

A

T

D

A

T

D

A

T

D

A

.


  1. How does research influence the programme? 

The University of Sunderland was awarded Centre of Excellence in Teacher Training status (SUNCETT) in recognition of the expertise and standards of teaching, learning and research of the PCET team. The capability of the PCET team to deliver at a full range of levels, including M-Level, is evidenced by the award of Centre for Excellence in Teacher Training status (SUNCETT) and the long standing recognition by the Education and Training Foundation (ETF) of the team’s expertise and standing in teaching, learning and research in PCET. For example, the team have worked collaboratively with the ETF over the past eight years to deliver the Research Development Fellowship (RDF) Programme, the MA Advancing Pedagogy short course and to support over twenty MPhil studentships. This programme has generated substantial empirical evidence over the years that demonstrates the overall effectiveness of the RDF approach to teaching and learning and Fellows from this programme have went on to make significant and long-lasting impacts upon the Further, Adult and Vocational Education sector.

 

This long running, sector focused research across the national Further Education arena has directly impacted on two areas of the PCET team’s work.  First, this research has directly informs the development of the Post Compulsory Education and Training programmes.  For example, the innovative practice ‘next steps to success’ and Joint Practice Development come directly from the research led by SUNCETT. 

 

Second, this practical research to improve practice has informed PCET teams work to  produce and publish, through Bloomsbury two textbooks for the prestigious ‘Reflective Teaching’ series. This will ensure student teachers can continue to benefit from the direct contributions of the PCET team:

 

  • Gregson, M., Nixon L, Pollard, A., S., Spedding T. (2015) Readings for Reflective Teaching in Further, Adult and Vocational Education. London, Bloomsbury.

 

  • Gregson, M., Hillier, Y., Biesta, G., Duncan, S., Nixon L, Spedding T., Wakeling P. (2015) Reflective Teaching in Further, Adult and Vocational Education. London, Bloomsbury. 

 

For the Part Time programme, each Partner College offering PCET programmes has an Assistant Programme Leader who coordinates the provision within the college. All teacher trainers in the PCET partnership are fully qualified to teach in the sector.  Many already have qualification at PhD or Masters level or are pursuing Master of Arts Degrees. The PCET team has a strong tradition of research in FE ITT which informs much practice.

 

Areas of staff research include Vocational Pedagogy; Reflective Practice; Formative and Summative Educational Evaluation; Approaches to Educational Improvement; Education and Democracy; Curriculum Design and Action-based research. Members of the team have worked with the ETF and others in the establishment of a National Commission for Vocational Pedagogy.

 

 

SECTION D:EMPLOYABILITY

 

  1. How will the programme prepare me for employment?

Faculty Priorities / Employer Requirements

 

The University’s Strategic Plan 2016-2021 challenges its programmes to be bold and inspirational in the ways that they offer transformative experiences to students, communities and business partners. The ambition of the Faculty of Education and Society is to offer Knowledge Creators programmes that make our faculty their choice for study in Post Compulsory Education and Training. In order to make Tomorrow Makers we need to provide exceptional student-centred experience based on internationally significant research and pedagogic best practice in ways that serve the needs of a diverse population.

 

The Post Compulsory Education and Training Programmes build upon the significant research and pedagogic best practice recognised by both the Education and Training Foundation and Bloomsbury Publishing. These programmes will support Knowledge Creators and Tomorrow Makers working in business partners such as colleges and training providers to develop innovative teaching, learning and assessment and to improve outcomes for learners.

 

The programmes are highly practical in focus and develop the capacities of student teachers to collaborate, problem solve and think critically and creatively. Working alongside highly experienced teachers and teacher-educators, student-teachers on the programme develop a wide-range of characteristics and values which help them to appreciate the realities of working in this sector and how to survive and thrive within it.

 

Teaching Practice Placements are a key component of the programmes and allow student teachers to experience the day to day challenges of teaching, learning and assessment in the sector. Designed to give the opportunity for students to complete all the tasks required to meet the guidance published by the Education and Training Foundation for the DET. After completing our Post Compulsory programme, students are able to go onto apply to the Education and Training Foundation to complete the Qualified Teaching in the Lifelong Learning Sector  (QTLS) award. The award of QTLS is separate to our Post Compulsory Programme but evidence of having successfully completed our programme allows students to meet one of the key entry criteria ETF set for beginning to study for QTLS.   

 

Teaching Practice/Placements are a key component of the programme and allow student teachers to experience the day to day challenges of teaching, learning and assessment in the sector. These placements provide opportunities for student-teachers to demonstrate their abilities to potential employers as they build strong professional relationships and work collaboratively with colleagues on a regular basis. They also encourage student-teachers to actively seek out advice in order to further develop their own professional learning by responding to the feedback from their University teacher-educators and their Subject Specialist Mentors.

 

Our graduates benefit from career development opportunities, networking and professional mentoring that helps to produce the social capital to enable them to succeed in the FAVE sector. Graduates of the Post Graduate Programme will be able to extend their studies further by gaining Masters credits that can be used to access MA Education programmes in the University.

 

The PGCE PCET maintains close links with a number of stakeholders, including faculty and school leaders, key employers and stakeholders (PCET Partnership Committee), past and current students, external examiner, and other sector stakeholders. These links help us to keep up to date with any changes facing the sector, and we use these experiential accounts of the current political and educational climate to provide contemporary and real time advice to trainees about the realities of working in the FE sector.

 

Personal and Career Planning

The majority of part time in-service students are already employed.  Many of our successful in-service students have progressed rapidly from part-time to full-time positions and from temporary to permanent contracts. In addition, quite soon after completing the programme, significant numbers of our students are promoted to more senior posts with leadership responsibilities within and beyond the institutions in which they are employed. The full time students on completion of their studies take up teaching posts in the UK and beyond, which includes schools, colleges, training organisations, adult, community and prison education.

 

Guidance to Further Study

In terms of progression, most students entering the programme do so to achieve a recognised teaching qualification within the sector.  But apart from this, there is scope for further professional development. Students achieving the Certificate can progress onto the BA (Hons) Education Studies programme. 

 

Graduates from the Post Graduate Certificate in Education Programme can use the Level 7 modules to gain access to MA Education programmes within the University of Sunderland.

 

Subject Specialist Mentors

 

Students registered on the Programme are supported by tutors from the University, the Partner Institutions and also by mentors who are available for the purposes of assessment, support and guidance. 

 

Mentors are selected on the basis of their qualifications and experience. All mentors must have a qualification in their specialist subject at a minimum of NQF level 3 or equivalent or extensive, authenticated, professional experience of their subject. All mentors must be qualified teachers.  All mentors are trained in their roles and responsibilities through a formal Mentor Training Programme including observation training which was developed by the University in recognition of the pivotal place mentors have in the overall PG/CE programme and in particular the development of subject specialist knowledge and professional skills. This is cascaded across the Partnership in a number of ways. All University tutors and Assistant Programme Leaders attend a one day workshop introducing them to the content, activities and resources contained in the Mentor Training Programme. The University programme team provides formal Mentor Training for the mentors of students on the full time and part time programmes. Normally this is done through a one day workshop for groups of mentors. Where a mentor is unable to attend a group event the university team provide one to one/small group training for mentors in their own institution. This model of mentor training is also used by Assistant Programme Leaders in the University’s partner Institutions to train the mentors of part time in-service students.  Although mentor training is compulsory and it is strongly recommended that mentors attend the training events, where a mentor has undergone recent and relevant training from another organisation approved by the university then in such cases these mentors are provided with a short introduction to the University of Sunderland’s documentation and procedures for mentors.

 

The training outlined above is supported by handbooks and relevant documentation. Within these documents the roles and responsibilities of student teachers, placement providers and tutors are clearly detailed. An on-line Mentor Training programme is also available to enable all mentors to access training. 

 

Within this programme the Reflection, Action Planning and Target Setting Booklet is used to monitor and review student progress. These booklets are used as the basis for the assessment of the practical teaching and professional development modules (EPF140; EPF234/EPF308). Subject mentors, programme tutors and tutor observers use this practical teaching file to focus review discussions. It is designed to progressively address issues as students work their way through the programme.

 

Recent developments in the University’s Virtual Learning Environments has led to the creation of digital Mentoring spaces. This is populated with relevant documentation for mentors and can be used to advertise upcoming mentor training events. The university also runs an annual mentor training course across all phases of initial teacher training and the successful completion of this training can allow mentors to gain M-level credits.

 

 

For information about other opportunities available to our students who study on campus, click here.

 

Additional opportunities to develop your experiences more widely will vary if you study at one of our partner colleges. For information about the extra-curricular activities available in any of our colleges please contact the college direct. 

 

 

 

 

  1. Particular features of the qualification (optional)

 

Not Required

 

 

 

  1. Professional statutory or regulatory body (PSRB) accreditationChoose one of the following.

 

PSRB accreditation is not relevant to this programme 

Not relevant to this programme

PSRB accreditation is currently being sought for this programme

 

This programme currently has PSRB accreditation

 

 

In the Education and Training Foundation’s Guidance notes (2016) make the following key statements. The ‘requirements’ set out below are all met by the Post Compulsory Education and Training programmes.

In detail the statements are:

The requirement for a prescribed teaching qualification in post 16 education

“The requirement for teachers in publicly funded post 16 education and training to have prescribed teaching qualifications was revoked from September 1st 2013… Many employers retain a preference for those who have, or who are willing to gain, a teaching qualification. The most commonly accepted qualifications for the sector are those in Education and Training which are explained in this document.” (2016:07)

 

The Professional Standards 2014

“The 2014 professional standards define the professional requirements of teachers, trainers and tutors of post 16 learners, and underpin effective teaching practice in the sector.” (2016:8)

 

The new standards:

  • set out clear expectations of effective practice in education and training;
  • enable teachers and trainers to identify areas for their own professional development;
  • support initial teacher education;
  • provide a national reference point that organisations can use to support the development of their staff
  • The new standards can be accessed at professional standards

(2016:8)

 

 

The Level 5 Diploma in Education and Training (DET)

 

“For those who wish to become fully qualified as further education teachers, with the possibility of gaining the professional status of Qualified Teacher Learning and Skills (QTLS)8, the Level 5 Diploma (or its university equivalent) offers the optimal opportunity for substantial career development.”

(2016:14)

 

“The DET is a general or ‘generic’ teaching qualification that covers most curriculum areas within further education.”

(2016:8)

 

 

 

Title of the programme

“Higher education institutions are required to base their qualifications on the mandatory and optional units but are not required to use the title Diploma in Education and Training. They usually offer two versions of the qualification – one for graduates and one for non-graduates. A range of titles is used, including most commonly Professional or Post Graduate Certificate in Education for Post Compulsory Education and Training (PGCE PCET). HEI qualifications are validated by the participating university…”  (2016: 15)

Entry requirements

“Those intending to teach academic subjects would usually be expected to have a degree in their subject specialism. Those intending to teach in professional or vocational areas would usually be expected to have a professional or industry qualification and experience of working in their respective sector.” (2016: 15)

“There are no firm rules regarding prior qualifications in maths or English although it is expected that trainee teachers gain qualifications at Level 2 prior to completion of their initial teaching qualification. (2016: 15)

“Progression to Qualified Teacher Learning and Skills (QTLS) status also requires possession of level 2 qualifications in maths and English.” (2016: 15)

 

Guided learning hours

“The indicative number of guided learning hours for the DET is 360. On a one year programme, usually in a HEI, this equates to between 10 – 12 hours per week. On a 2 year programme in a further education college the commitment would be about 5 hours per week and this may be arranged over more than one session.” (2016:16)

 

 

 

Teaching Practice Requirement

 

“Teaching practice, together with observation and assessment of that practice, is a vital component of high-quality initial training. There is a requirement for a minimum of 100 hours of practice for the DET which ideally will include teaching a variety of learners at more than one level in different learning environments. HEI courses may require more than the minimum 100 teaching practice hours.” (2016: 16)

 

“The term 'teaching practice' refers to the teaching and learning sessions that are planned for specific learners and that take place in a learning environment. These sessions will include aspects of planning, delivery and assessment, including differentiation, and other factors that contribute to successful teaching and learning. Contact hours where teachers are supervising students for other purposes cannot be included as part of the required teaching practice hours.” (2016: 16)

 

“Teaching practice group sizes may vary, ideally with a minimum of 12 learners, but the majority of the teaching practice must be to groups of 5 or more learners. It would not be possible to acquire, develop and demonstrate the full range of teaching skills through individual or small group teaching. Teachers need to be able to manage larger groups of learners and to deploy a variety of teaching techniques and facilitate a wide spectrum of learning activities.” (2016: 17)

 

 

Observed and Assessed Practice requirements

“For the Level 5 Diploma in Education and Training, the 120 credit subject specialist qualifications and all the equivalent qualifications in the FHEQ, there must be a minimum of 8 observations totalling a minimum of 8 hours.” (2016:30)

 

“Observations should be appropriately spaced throughout the whole programme and take into account a teacher’s progress.” (2016:30)

 

Financial Support

Individuals that meet the ‘home student’ classification (see eligibility) who are taking a Level 5 DET, a 120/135 credit Level 5 subject specialist qualification or the HEI equivalent of these qualifications should be able to access financial support from Student Finance England. For most individuals, this will be in the form of a repayable loan for the course fees. (2016: 24)

 

Progression

Successful completion of a teaching qualification for working in the education and training sector permits progression to the status of qualified teacher learning and skills (QTLS). This is conferred through a process called professional formation and is administered by the Society for Education and Training (SET) which is the professional body for those working as teachers in the sector. (2016: 25)

 

Summary statement: The PCET programmes meet all the requirements associated with the Level 5 Diploma. This level 5 diploma is embedded in the PCET programmes.

 

Education and Training Foundation (2016) Qualifications in education and training. Updated guidance on the teaching qualifications for the further education and skills sector. November 2016. London. ETF.   Available at: http://www.et-foundation.co.uk/about-us/   Accessed 24-01-18

 

The programme is also inspected by OFSTED.  The ETF Professional Standards inform the OFSTED inspection priorities.  In addition the PCET team, work alongside Primary and Secondary, to identify and respond to emerging OFSTED priorities.

 

 

There are programme-specific regulations relating to the following.

 

An exemption from the university regulations has been given to allow a short course qualification to be awarded as an interim award.  This is the University Certificate in Post-compulsory Education and Training (40 credits at Level 4; 20 credits at Level 5).  It is not a Certificate of Higher Education under the QAA national credit framework.

 

This interim award originally approved in 2016 applies to all students completing the three modules associated with phase one of the programme.

SECTION E:PROGRAMME STRUCTURE AND REGULATIONS

 

Complete and insert Part B of the Programme Regulations Form, for questions 39 and 40 (attached as appendix)

 

 

  1. What are the admissions requirements?

The University’s standard admissions requirements can be found in the university regulations. Programme-specific requirements which are in addition to those regulations are given below.

 

The programme team welcomes applicants from a variety of routes and are always happy to advise potential applicants about both their qualifications and how to obtain the relevant level of teaching qualification.

 

Entry Requirements

 

The Pre-Service, Full-Time, Post-Graduate Programme

 

All applicants must have obtained a minimum of an honours degree award with a classification of a 2:2 or above in a relevant subject. Typically students for the Post-Graduate Programme would have a 2:1 or above. It is an entry requirement that all students must have evidence of achievement in English and Maths at GCSE grade C or above or the equivalent.

 

We accept equivalencies from  www.equivalencytesting.com.

 

Applicants interested in the Post-Graduate Programme will have to express this intention at interview. A further briefing event will be organised before September to determine suitability. Any applicant who is deemed ineligible for the Post-Graduate Programme will be automatically enrolled onto the Professional Graduate Programme. This follows the already established selection process for selecting candidates to study on the PCET’s English Pathway.

 

Applicants will also be required to undergo a Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS, formerly Criminal Records Bureau) and health checks in order to prove their suitability to teach. These checks must be successfully completed before students start the course.

 

Applicants invited for interview will be asked to participate in a group activity and complete a short, in-house, hand-written literacy assessment. Applications are handled through UCAS and interviews are scheduled to take place throughout the academic year.

 

Applicants whose first language is not English must achieve a minimum IELTS band score of 6.5, with 6.5 in writing, no sub section below 6.

 

Applicants will be required to present their original certificates to the University. Photocopies are not accepted.

 

 

 

 

The Pre-Service, Full-Time, Professional-Graduate Programme

All applicants must have obtained a minimum of an honours degree award with a classification of a 2:2 or above in a relevant subject. It is an entry requirement that all students must have evidence of achievement in English and Maths at GCSE grade C or above or the equivalent.

 

We accept equivalencies from  www.equivalencytesting.com.

 

Applicants will also be required to undergo a Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS, formerly Criminal Records Bureau) and health checks in order to prove their suitability to teach. These checks must be successfully completed before students start the course.

 

Applicants invited for interview will be asked to participate in a group activity and complete a short, in-house, hand-written literacy assessment. Applications are handled through UCAS and interviews are scheduled to take place throughout the academic year.

 

Applicants whose first language is not English must achieve a minimum IELTS band score of 6.5, with 6.5 in writing, no sub section below 6.

 

Applicants will be required to present their original certificates to the University. Photocopies are not accepted.

 

The In-Service, Part-Time, Professional-Graduate Programme

 

All applicants must have obtained a minimum of an honours degree award with a classification of a 2:2 or above in a relevant subject. It is an entry requirement that all students must have evidence of achievement in English and Maths at GCSE grade C or above or the equivalent.

 

We accept equivalencies from  www.equivalencytesting.com.

 

Applicants will also be required to undergo a Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS, formerly Criminal Records Bureau) and health checks in order to prove their suitability to teach. These checks must be successfully completed before students start the course.

 

Applications are handled through whichever Partner College the applicant wishes to study at and interviews are scheduled to take place throughout the academic year.

 

Applicants whose first language is not English must achieve a minimum IELTS band score of 6.5, with 6.5 in writing, no sub section below 6.

 

Applicants will be required to present their original certificates to the appropriate Partner College. Photocopies are not accepted. Applicants must already be working as teacher or trainers in the Further Education Sector. It is the responsibility of the applicant to ensure they have a suitable teaching practice that will allow them to secure a minimum of 50 hours teaching a year.

 

The In-Service, Part-Time, Certificate Programme

All applicants must have obtained a Level 3 or higher qualification in a vocational or another specialist subject.

 

It is an entry requirement that all students must have evidence of achievement in English and Maths at GCSE grade C or above or the equivalent.

 

We accept equivalencies from  www.equivalencytesting.com.

 

Applicants will also be required to undergo a Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS, formerly Criminal Records Bureau) and health checks in order to prove their suitability to teach. These checks must be successfully completed before students start the course.

 

Applications are handled through whichever the Partner College the applicant wishes to study at and interviews are scheduled to take place throughout the academic year.

 

Applicants whose first language is not English must achieve a minimum IELTS band score of 6.5, with 6.5 in writing, no sub section below 6.

 

Applicants will be required to present their original certificates to the appropriate Partner College. Photocopies are not accepted. Applicants must already be working as teacher or trainers in the Further Education Sector. It is the responsibility of the applicant to ensure they have a suitable teaching practice that will allow them to secure a minimum of 50 hours teaching a year.

 

 

Articulation

Applicants are given accurate information about the nature of the programme through publicity material that can be accessed from a range of sources. These include:

  • publicity material at recruitment events
  • publicity material available at individual colleges and the Faculty of Education & Society, University of Sunderland
  • University of Sunderland web-site
  • University of Sunderland Part-time and Full-time prospectus
  • The Marketing, Recruitment and Admissions Unit, Faculty of Education & Society, University of Sunderland.

 

The web site is regularly updated to give more detailed descriptions of the pathways in the programme. The entry requirements and overall structure of particular programmes are included in publicity material.

 

The Faculty Marketing Officer is careful to advertise in a variety of publications, which attract a range of readerships and therefore potential applicants, including both younger students and mature entrants and those from the home countries and from overseas.

 

Attention is given to all publicity material to ensure that it is inclusive. This is done both by careful use of photographs, and by targeting particular publications. For example, advertisements are placed in publications targeted at minority ethnic groups, both locally and nationally.

 

Advice is given to prospective trainees by the Marketing and Recruitment Officer, the Admissions Officer and the Programme Leader. Many applicants will make contact with the Programme Leader before making a formal application, and such initial contact can be useful in ensuring that applicants are sufficiently qualified before they apply, and given the opportunity to prepare appropriately for their interview.

 

Student teachers’ entry requirements are thoroughly checked during the admissions procedures, which are outlined below.

Admissions Procedures

 

The admissions process begins with the short-listing of applicants for interview, which for the pre-service full time pathway is through UCAS then direct to the University of Sunderland Central Admissions. For the part time pre-service programme the admission process is handled directly through the University of Sunderland’s “Online Apply”. Applicants are shortlisted for interview based on the calibre of the application.  The Admissions Office keeps a record of any candidate who is rejected prior to interview, with the reasons for rejection, so that monitoring can take place over time.

 

For the part –time in-service pathway admission is direct to the chosen Partner Institution. .

 

Those candidates invited for interview receive a letter informing them that will be required to obtain DBS clearance prior to the start of the Programme and that they must be prepared to undertake a short written diagnostic assessment activity and participate in an interactive group assessment activity. Candidates are advised that at interview they will be asked to demonstrate a clear understanding of current issues in the Sector as they are asked to discuss current issues in post compulsory education and training. This will build upon the pre-interview task requiring candidates to submit a 1,000 word assignment on the Purpose of Education.

 

Where possible, Mentors and Programme Tutors jointly interview prospective students. It would be especially relevant to involve Human Resource professionals especially in the context of the in-service programme.  The questions asked at interview are designed to determine:

  • the applicant’s subject knowledge background;
  • knowledge of educational issues,;
  • consideration the applicant has given to the choice of the particular phase of teaching;
  • evidence of any relevant experience of teaching
  • the applicant’s personality, tenacity including enthusiasm and commitment, communication and interpersonal skills and suitability for teaching.

 

All applicants must at interview take a short written test to assess standards of comprehension and written English in order to ensure that they can rise to the academic demands of the course. In addition, all applicants must satisfy the University that they have met the Secretary of State’s requirements for physical and mental fitness to teach and that they have no criminal background that would prevent them from working in an educational and training context.

 

An APA process enables suitable candidates to join the programme when they have provided appropriate evidence of prior learning.   Applications to enter into year 2 of the programme with appropriate qualifications will be considered on an individual basis following the University procedures.

 

 

 

  1. What kind of support and help will there be?

 

Student Support and Guidance

 

Mechanisms for Provision of Student Support and Guidance

 

The programme team recognises the importance of detailed, timely and constructive processes for student support and guidance. At induction all students are made aware of the services available to support their studies including finance, disability support, student welfare, counselling and the Student Union.

 

For all phases of the programme one hour per week is identified for academic/pastoral student support, although past experience indicates that student teachers’ are much more likely to approach the programme leader or tutor by email or before/after a session rather than wait for the nominated time. Programme tutors also operate as personal tutors for nominated cohorts.

 

There is a highly structured tutorial programme which tracks all trainee teachers towards the achievement of challenging individual targets which are regularly reviewed at tutorial and include feedback from the trainee’s mentor.  In the tutorials, Action Plans are negotiated to guide the trainee towards continuing achievement.

 

Should difficulties arise of an academic nature, student teachers are encouraged to talk initially to the programme tutor concerned, and then if the issue is not resolved, to the Programme Leader at the University or the Assistant Programme Leader at their Partner Institution. In addition to maintaining regular contact with all student teachers during the normal timetabled sessions, the programme tutor takes the opportunity to review progress for the cohort as a whole at three formal review tutorials scheduled throughout the academic year where the individual achievements and development needs of each student are discussed.

 

Feedback is given to students on all module coursework assignments through detailed comments on scripts with a summative commentary documented on module feedback forms. Much of this feedback is formative in nature and identifies areas for improvement in relation to the assessment criteria.  Study skills advice and guidance is in the first instance built into the programme at induction with additional workshops led by college or University tutors as the need emerges for example, ‘Harvard Reference Skills’. These are further supported through student handbooks and through the library website. Where a student is seen to be struggling in terms of the academic demands of the course, tutors will give very detailed feedback on scripts with a recommendation that students meet with them for an additional Progress Review to discuss how the work could be improved in order to reach the required standard. As part of this process the tutor may direct the student to seek additional support from Student Study Support both at the University and the Partner Institutions   At this point should the work require resubmission the tutor will agree an action plan and deadlines. 

 

Feedback to students on their practical teaching is documented in their Reflection, Action Planning and Target-setting Booklet through tutors’ and mentors‘ written comments on Teaching Practice Observation forms supported by verbal feedback immediately following the observation. Where it becomes apparent that a student is experiencing difficulties with the practical teaching elements of the course the tutor will arrange to meet their mentor to identify the nature of the problem together with an appropriate way forward.  (Section 5 of the Mentor Training handbook details these procedures.) This will be supported by clear examples and evidence related to the student’s practice and in some circumstances the pre-service student may be withdrawn from that placement and offered an appropriate alternative.

 

On-campus full time and part time pre-service students have access to the University’s central support services including Counselling, Disability Service, Health and Well-being, Chaplaincy, financial support and advice, International Office and Careers and Employability Service.  

 

Off-campus, part-time in-service students access college based provision for the following support services: Counselling; Disability Service (including diagnostic testing); Health and Well-being; Chaplaincy and Careers and Employability Services.

 

The Partnership Office provides financial advice to partnership off-campus part-time in-service students via our Partnership Liaison service. The Liaison team offer the student comprehensive IAG, provide advocacy services and make referrals to more appropriate internal / external services as is appropriate. This service is available either via Liaison staff based at college sites or through the main office or for partners without this provision.

 

The Students’ Union provides an independent service which offers advice and support across the full range of personal and academic problems which students may encounter. Students wishing to lodge a complaint or an appeal can seek advice from the Students’ Union or from Academic Services. Full details of all these services can be found on the University’s web-site. Where appropriate, academic or support staff in the Faculty will sign-post students to these specialist services.  Whilst partnership students can complain to the University about things wholly under the control of the University (library facilities; accommodation etc) they must follow individual college complaints procedure for all other matters.  If, once the college’s complaints procedure has been exhausted fully, then the student has recourse to ask the University to look at the complaint.

 

 

  1. in the university as a whole:

The University provides a range of professional support services including wellbeing, counselling, disability support, and a Chaplaincy. Click on the links for further information.

 

  1. in a partner college:

Please see the relevant college prospectus or website for details of student support if you are planning to study in one of our partner colleges.

 

  1. What resources will I have access to?

Learning Environment and Resources

Equipment/Library/IT/Other Facilities;

 

The Full Time Programmes are delivered at the St Peter’s Campus and benefit from the excellent resource environment there. The in-service part time programme is predominately delivered through the University’s network of Partner Institutions with students attending St Peter’s campus for the one day Summer Conference in preparation for their Professional Induction/Formation year.   Resources at the Partner Institutions are monitored on a regular basis by the University Programme Team, the University subject librarian and through the University’s Partnership Office and through Institutional reviews of individual institutions.

 

The University has two libraries, one of which is open 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Across both sites there is a good selection of subject specialist texts, pedagogical and theoretical texts relevant to teaching, learning and assessment in the sector. Student teachers are permitted to borrow up to 15 books on standard loan, an additional two from the short loan collection and up to 12 items from the teaching practice collection. So long as they have not been requested by other trainees, borrowed items can all be renewed by telephone.

 

There is an online search facility of all books within the library (including both sites) and reservations can be made online. The library also offers an inter-library loan service. These resources are available to both Full-Time and Part-Time students. The Faculty of Education and Society has a wide range of resources appropriate for the training of teachers for the Learning and Skills sector. Computers and data projectors are available for use in each teaching room on request.

 

The Education Subject Librarian receives an updated copy of the programme reading list at the end of each academic year this is then used to update the library book stock at the university. Paper based and electronic journals are updated by consultation with academic staff in each faculty on an annual basis. These resources are available to both full time and part time students.

 

Increasing use is being made of the VLE to support teaching and learning. CANVAS and ePortfolio are both being utilised as a hub for learners to upload their assignments, and as a way for University Tutors to continually monitor progress. The spaces are also being effectively used as a hub for resources. The initial feedback from the students is positive and we will be continuing to update CANVAS for use in the foreseeable future.

 

On campus   YES

In a partner college   YES

By distance learning

 

 

On campus

 

General Teaching and Learning Space

IT

Library

VLE

Laboratory

 

Studio

 

Performance space

 

Other specialist

 

Technical resources 

 

 

 

Information about the University’s facilities can be found here.

 

 

  1. Are there any additional costs on top of the fees?

 

No, but all students buy some study materials such as books and provide their own basic study materials.

 

Yes (optional) All students buy some study materials such as books and provide their own basic study materials. In addition there are some are additional costs for optional activities associated with the programme (see below)

Yes (essential) All students buy some study materials such as books and provide their own basic study materials. In addition there are some are essential additional costs associated with the programme (see below)

 

 

 

  1. How are student views represented?

 

All taught programmes in the University have student representatives for each Stage (year-group) of each programme who meet in a Student-Staff Liaison Committee (SSLC) where they can raise students’ views and concerns. The Students’ Union and the faculties together provide training for student representatives. SSLCs and focus groups are also used to obtain student feedback on plans for developing existing programmes and designing new ones. Feedback on your programme is obtained every year through module questionnaires and informs the annual review of your programme. Student representatives are also invited to attend Programme and Module Studies Boards which manage the delivery and development of programmes and modules.  Faculty Academic Committee, also has student representation. This allows students to be involved in higher-level plans for teaching and learning. At university level Students are represented on University level Committees by sabbatical officers who are the elected leaders of the Students’ Union.

 

Student Feedback

Student achievement and attainment on the Post Compulsory Education and Training programmes has been consistently very strong over the last decade. Student satisfaction is high and our graduates often go out and make significant and long-lasting impacts as teachers in the Further, Adult and Vocational Education Sector. Many students choose to go on to further studies after they graduate from the programme. This is either through enrolling onto an MA or a PhD in education, or by signing up to the SUNCETT/ETF Research Development Fellowship Programme. The work they do on these further programmes is often inspired by the research they began on the PGCE PCET, and many students have voiced an interest in doing more on their research projects. The introduction of new MA modules on the PGCE PCET will allow us to address this feedback and help students to begin their post graduate practitioner research journey. The MA Education programme recruits from Primary and Secondary students taking their M-Level credits onto the full MA programme. The addition of PCET students carrying 60 M-Level credits has the potential to further strengthen recruitment to the MA Education programme. 

 

 

The University’s student representation and feedback policy can be found here.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SECTION G:QUALITY MANAGEMENT 

Programme Management and Quality Assurance

 

The programme is managed and quality assured through the University’s standard processes. The Programme Studies Board, which includes module leaders, student representatives and, where applicable, typical employers, is responsible for the programme as a whole, ensuring the coherence of the programme overall, its currency, progression, and alignment between the learning outcomes and modes of teaching, learning and assessment. Student achievement, including progression between levels is kept under review. The programme is reviewed annually and a report is sent to the Faculty Quality Management Sub-Committee.

 

External examiners are appointed to oversee and advise on the assessment of the programme. They verify the comparability of the standards of the programme with the standards of similar programmes elsewhere in the UK and the quality of the assessment process. They are also invited to comment on proposed developments to the programme. Their reports are sent to the DVC (Academic) as well as to the Faculty; s/he requires a report from the Faculty on any major issues of concern raised by the external examiner.

 

All programmes are reviewed by the University on a six-yearly cycle to identify good practice and areas for enhancement. Programmes are revalidated through this review process. These reviews include at least one academic specialist in the subject area concerned from another UK HEI.

 

Students’ views are sought through twice-yearly questionnaires and by other methods. The feedback informs module leaders’ annual reports on their modules. Students are represented on the Programme Studies Boards; in the former they are involved in discussion of External Examiners’ reports.

 

Programme Standards and Monitoring

 

The main criteria used to measure the standards of programme provision result from the Ofsted Inspection Framework. All Post Compulsory Education and Training programmes are subject to either a short or a full Ofsted inspection usually every three years. Ofsted Inspectors assess the quality of training, the standards achieved by the trainees in their final year of training and management and quality assurance of the programme. The availability of Ofsted reports for Higher Education Institutions has enabled us to:

  •    benchmark our provision in relation to other institutions; and
  •    undertake a study of those other providers who have achieved excellent Ofsted ratings.

 

The University and Faculty of Education and Society also collect data relating to recruitment, progression and retention and these figures are included in programme annual monitoring reports. These are presented to Programme Studies Boards and School Quality Assurance Board, which are chaired by senior managers in the School (Dean of Faculty, Associate Dean, Initial Teacher Training and Quality, Head of Quality).

 

 

External Examiners

 

External Examiners give feedback on the quality of students’ work at module level and also at programme level through scrutiny of a representative sample of coursework assignments. External Examiners for the programme are expected to assure the standard of students’ awards, including interim awards.

 

Programme External Examiners also make visits to a representative sample of students on teaching practice to give feedback on teaching standards, quality assurance and partnership matters.

 

All External Examiners are normally required to participate in the relevant University assessment board at least once per annum.

 

Student Representation and Feedback

 

Student feedback is collected twice per year by nominal group technique. This feedback is presented to the Programme Board of Studies.

 

All students are encouraged to raise concerns and issues in an informal manner as they arise. In addition a student representative is nominated by the individual groups during the first few weeks of the programme. The University Programme Leader/ Partner Institution Assistant Programme Leader meets with the student representative before each Programme Studies Board where roles are clarified. The student teacher is encouraged to collect feedback from everyone in the group, and is invited to submit written feedback for the Board to the programme leader in advance. The student representative attends the Programme Board of Studies to give feedback.  University training is available for Student Representatives through the Student Union.

 

The Partnership Model and how it operates

The Collaborative Partnership for the programme has operated successfully since 1991. The programme is jointly developed and delivered in a partnership of equals under a “Joint Franchise” model.  The University team take responsibility for the academic leadership and overall coherence of the programme. Assistant Programme Leaders and their colleagues in the partner colleges contribute to the contextualisation of the programme by bringing to the fore key developments and issues in policy and practice currently influencing the sector. Since its inception in 1991 the collaborative partnership for the delivery of the programme has been characterised by high levels of involvement, enthusiasm and mutual support.

There are opportunities and challenges in managing a Partnership of this breadth and scale. The experience and enthusiasm of long-standing colleagues in the Partnership and the ways in which they operate as ambassadors and supporters of the University within their own institutions and geographical areas is an asset to the University and to their own personal credit. The knowledge and experience of the sector and the variety of contexts that both long-standing and new colleagues bring to staff development days enables the whole programme team to appreciate the variety of situations, practices and the day to day realities of teachers and learners working therein.

For existing partners who wish to add this programme to their partnership portfolio there is an official University process to be followed. Part of this process will include input from both the Faculty and the In-Service Programme Leader.

Where an existing Partner Institution Assistant Programme Leader is replaced due to staff turnover or other change in circumstance the University Programme Leader arranges a series of meetings with the incoming Assistant Programme Leader to brief them about their roles and responsibilities, the content and structure of the programme, the nature of development days and calendar of meetings together with key assessment and moderation dates and the procedure which govern them. Following this ‘formal’ induction to assistant programme leadership the University Programme Leader works informally with them via visits, email and telephone to ensure that they are fully aware of and confident in their new position. It is also useful when new Assistant Programme Leaders and tutors join the Partnership to link them with their more experienced colleagues in other institutions to enable them to consolidate and develop their understandings of the quality assurance systems and other duties expected of them by the University and in particular for moderation of student work.

In addition to routine monitoring visits by the University Team Assistant Programme Leaders and tutors from the Partner Institutions bring problems and issues as they arise to the regular planned Development Days or contact the University Programme Leader directly if the concern is pressing. Development Days serve a number of purposes including review and evaluation of modules, the identification and sharing of good practice, the provision of curriculum materials and resources, moderation, problem solving and the planning and development of key events in the academic calendar, for example, preparation for revalidation and inspection.  While attendance at Development Days is generally high where an Assistant Programme Leader has been unable to attend a meeting they remain informed of key decisions and actions by accessing the Action Notes of each meeting which are circulated to all members of the Partnership.

 

  1. National subject benchmarks

 

The Quality Assurance Agency (QAA) for Higher Education publishes benchmark statements which give guidance as to the skills and knowledge which graduates in various subjects and in certain types of degree are expected to have. These can be found here.

 

The QAA also publishes a Framework for Higher Education Qualifications (FHEQ) which defines the generic skills and abilities expected of students who have achieved awards at a given level and with which our programmes align. The FHEQ can be found here.

 

  1. How are the quality and standards of the programme assured?

 

The programme is managed and quality assured through the University’s standard processes. Programmes are overseen by Module and Programme Studies Boards which include student representatives. Each year each module leader provides a brief report on the delivery of the module, identifying strengths and areas for development, and the programme team reviews the programme as a whole.  The purpose of this is to ensure that the programme is coherent and up-to-date, with suitable progression from one Stage to another, and a good fit (alignment) between what is taught and how students learn and are assessed - the learning outcomes, content and types of teaching, learning and assessment. Student achievement, including progress between Stages of the programme and degree classification, is kept under review. The programme review report is sent to the Programme Studies Board and the Faculty in turn reports issues to the University’s Quality Management Sub-Committee (QMSC).

 

External examiners are appointed to oversee and advise on the assessment of the programme. They ensure that the standards of the programme are comparable with those of similar programmes elsewhere in the UK and are also involved in the assessment process to make sure that it is fair. They are invited to comment on proposed developments to the programme. Their reports are sent to the Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Academic) as well as to the Faculty so that issues of concern can be addressed.

 

All programmes are reviewed by the University on a six-yearly cycle to identify good practice and areas for enhancement. Programmes are revalidated through this review process. These reviews include at least one academic specialist in the subject area concerned from another UK university. Quality Assurance Agency (QAA) review reports for Sunderland can be found here.

 

Further information about our quality processes can be found here.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Appendix 1

 

PART B   -  Programme  Regulation/s

 

Name of programme: Professional Graduate / Certificate in Education in Post-compulsory Education and Training)

Title of final awards: Professional Graduate Certificate in Education in Post-compulsory Education & Training

Certificate in Education in Post-compulsory Education and Training)

 

Interim awards[1]:University Certificate in Post-compulsory Education and Training

(40 credits at Level 4 and 20 credits at Level 5) (short course)

Students with fewer credits than this will receive a transcript including the module

title(s)

Accreditation: Education &Training Foundation

 

University Regulations: 6.1.3 / 4.2.2 / 2.3.1

Programme-specific regulations to meet Professional Body requirements:

 

Interim Award Titles

Interim award titles are different from the main award title.

An exemption from the university regulations has been given to allow a short course qualification to be awarded as an interim award.  This is the University Certificate in Post-compulsory Education and Training (40 credits at Level 4; 20 credits at Level 5).  It is not a Certificate of Higher Education under the QAA national credit framework.

 

Compensation

All modules are pass / fail modules and students must achieve 120 credits to receive the full award.

 

Different levels of modules taken within the same Stage

An exemption from the University regulations has been granted to permit this programme to contain modules from different levels at the same stage.

 

Phase 1

 

Core modules (Certificate in Education in Post-compulsory Education and Training):

Code

Title

Credits

Level

EPF134

Preparing to Teach in the Lifelong Learning Sector

20

4

EPF140

Practical Teaching & Professional Development 2

20

4

EPF230

Developing Theories of Teaching Learning & Assessment in PCET

20

5

 

Core modules (Professional Graduate Certificate in Education in Post-compulsory Education and Training):

 

Code

Title

Credits

Level

EPF134

Preparing to Teach in the Lifelong Learning Sector

20

4

EPF140

Practical Teaching & Professional Development 2

20

4

 

 

 

 

Optional modules (Professional Graduate Certificate in Education in Post-compulsory Education & Training )

 

Students take either EPF230 or EPF238

 

Code

Title

Credits

Level

EPF238

  Subject Specialist Knowledge And Pedagogy (English: Literacy)

20

5

EPF230

Developing Theories of Teaching Learning & Assessment in PCET

20

5

 

 

Phase  2

 

Core modules (Certificate in Education in Post-compulsory Education and Training)

 

Code

Title

Credits

Level

EPF217

Contextualising Policy & Curriculum

20

5

EPF235

Enhancing Learning through Innovation & Change

20

5

EPF234

Practical Teaching & Professional Development

20

5

 

Core modules (Professional Graduate Certificate in Education in Post-compulsory Education & Training):

 

Code

Title

Credits

Level

EPF304

Contextualising Policy & Curriculum

20

6

EPF309

Enhancing Learning through Innovation & Change

20

6

EPF308

Practical Teaching & Professional Development 3

20

6

 

 

There are no optional or elective modules at Stage 2

 

 

Submitted February 2018 by Lawrence Nixon and Andrew Buglass

 

 

 

PART B   -  Programme  Regulation/s

 

Name of programme: Post Graduate Certificate in Post-compulsory Education and Training

Title of final awards: Post Graduate Certificate in Education in Post-compulsory Education & Training

Certificate in Education in Post-compulsory Education and Training

 

Interim awards[2]:University Certificate in Post-compulsory Education and Training

(40 credits at Level 4 and 20 credits at Level 5) (short course)

Students with fewer credits than this will receive a transcript including the module

title(s)

Accreditation: Education &Training Foundation

 

University Regulations: 6.1.3 / 4.2.2 / 2.3.1

Programme-specific regulations to meet Professional Body requirements:

 

Interim Award Titles

Interim award titles are different from the main award title.

An exemption from the university regulations has been given to allow a short course qualification to be awarded as an interim award.  This is the University Certificate in Post-compulsory Education and Training (40 credits at Level 4; 20 credits at Level 5).  It is not a Certificate of Higher Education under the QAA national credit framework.

 

Compensation

The first three modules (EPF134, EPF140 and EPF230/238) are pass / fail modules and students must achieve the 60 credits to be eligible to receive the Interim Award. To receive the full Post Graduate Certificate students must also complete the two, 30 credit, level 7 modules

 

Different levels of modules taken within the same Stage

An exemption from the University regulations has been granted to permit this programme to contain modules from different levels at the same stage.

 

Phase 1

 

 

Core modules (Post Graduate Certificate in Education in Post-compulsory Education and Training)

 

Code

Title

Credits

Level

EPF134

Preparing to Teach in the Lifelong Learning Sector

20

4

EPF140

Practical Teaching & Professional Development 2

20

4

 

 

 

 

Optional modules (Post Graduate Certificate in Education in Post-compulsory Education & Training)

 

Students take either EPF230 or EPF238

 

Code

Title

Credits

Level

EPF238

  Subject Specialist Knowledge And Pedagogy (English: Literacy)

20

5

EPF230

Developing Theories of Teaching Learning & Assessment in PCET

20

5

 

 

 

 

 

 

Phase 2

 

Core modules (Post Graduate Certificate in Education in Post-compulsory Education and Training)

 

Code

Title

Credits

Level

EPFM 13

Developing Curriculum and Implementing Policy in Post Compulsory Education and Training

30

7

EPFM14

Critical reflection and developing Pedagogy

Or Critical reflection and progress in teaching, learning and assessment

30

7

 

 

 

Submitted February 2018 by Lawrence Nixon and Andrew Buglass

 

 

 

Appendix 2

 

SITS SUMMARY PROGRAMME/SHORT COURSE DETAILS

(Form to be completed electronically by the Faculty and forwarded to the Quality Assurance and Enhancement (QAE) Quality Officer supporting the Approval event, or sent to Management Information and Systems Development (MISD) for faculty devolved processes before sending to QAE)

 

PROGRAMME/SUBJECT/SHORT COURSE DETAILS

Professional Graduate/Certificate in Education in Post Compulsory Education and Training

 

Exit Award: Title of programme/award

Professional Graduate/Certificate in Education in Post Compulsory Education and Training

 

If replacement for existing, specify title of old

 

Faculty(ies):

Faculty of Education and Society

Department:

School of Education

SITS Programme/Short Course code

OGENPCTFT, PGENPCTPT, OCERTCEFT, OCERTCEPT

Programme Studies Board

PCET Programme Studies Board

 

UCAS code4  (if applicable).  If other please state

method.

X341 (Full-Time, On-Campus, Professional Graduate),

CID1257 (Part-Time, On-Campus Professional Graduate/Certificate),

CID161 (Part-Time, Off-Campus, Professional Graduate),

CID1215 (Part-Time, Off-Campus, Certificate)

 

 

JACS code5

X141

Qualification Level / Qualification Aim

Level 6 Professional Graduate Certificate

Level 5 Certificate

 

 

Modes of delivery and duration:

Full Time On-Campus, 1 year (Professional Graduate Certificate)

 

Part Time On-Campus, 2 year (Professional Graduate/Certificate)

 

Full Time Off-Campus, 1 year (Professional Graduate Certificate)

 

Part Time Off-Campus 2 year (Professional Graduate/Certificate)

 

CSP Only. Other subject combinations not allowed with this subject:

N/A

Programme/Subject/Short Course Leader:

Lawrence Nixon and Andrew Buglass

Date of Approval /Modification/Review

March 2017

 

FUNDING DETAILS

 

 

 

 

Confirm funding arrangements for programme e.g. HEFCE/TDA/NHS/Other6

HEFCE

If it is TDA, is it primary/secondary/F.E./Other (please state)

FE

Is the programme Open or Closed7:

Open

Date of next review (QAE to complete)

 

Start date of programme/Short Course

September 2017

Number of intakes per annum and likely month(s) intake(s) starts.

One September

 

ACCREDITING BODY

The Professional Graduate is mapped to the DET requirements outlined by the Education and Training Foundation.

 

The Society for Education and Training (SET) is the Professional Membership Organisation for Practitioners working in the Post-16 Education and Training System.

 

SET offers a recognition route to qualified teacher learning and skills (QTLS) status for newly qualified teachers through a professional formation process. This is designed to enable teachers to demonstrate how they are continuing to develop their professional practice in their new role following completion of their ITE programmes.

 

PROGRAMME SPECIFIC REGULATIONS

Are there to be programme specific regulations? Yes

If yes, please attach completed form AQH-B3 Appendix 2 or AQH-B8.

COLLABORATIVE:

Please complete details

UKYes

 

OverseasNo

Institution                                      Collaborative model        Funding arrangements

Partner Institution

Bishop Auckland College                                All partner Institutions are model C                        HEFCE

Sunderland College

East Durham College

Gateshead College

Tyne Metropolitan College

South Tyneside College

 


INTERIM AWARD SCHEDULE

 

 

Interim award title

 

Credits required

 

Interim structure

 

Please show mandatory requirements if applicable e.g. core module codes

An exemption from the university regulations has been given to allow a short course qualification to be awarded as an interim award.  This is the University Certificate in Post-compulsory Education and Training (40 credits at Level 4; 20 credits at Level 5).  It is not a Certificate of Higher Education under the QAA national credit framework.

 

(40 credits at Level 4; 20 credits at Level 5). 

EPF134, EPF140, EPF230/EPF238

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SITS SUMMARY PROGRAMME/SHORT COURSE DETAILS

(Form to be completed electronically by the Faculty and forwarded to the Quality Assurance and Enhancement (QAE) Quality Officer supporting the Approval event, or sent to Management Information and Systems Development (MISD) for faculty devolved processes before sending to QAE)

 

PROGRAMME/SUBJECT/SHORT COURSE DETAILS

Post Graduate Certificate in Post Compulsory Education and Training

 

Exit Award: Title of programme/award

Post Graduate Certificate in Education in Post Compulsory Education and Training

 

If replacement for existing, specify title of old

 

Faculty(ies):

Faculty of Education and Society

Department:

School of Education

SITS Programme/Short Course code

TBC

Programme Studies Board

PCET Programme Studies Board

 

UCAS code4  (if applicable).  If other please state

method.

TBC

 

 

JACS code5

TBC

Qualification Level / Qualification Aim

Level 6 and Level 7 Post Graduate Certificate

 

 

 

Modes of delivery and duration:

Full Time On-Campus, 1 year (Post Graduate Certificate)

 

 

CSP Only. Other subject combinations not allowed with this subject:

N/A

Programme/Subject/Short Course Leader:

Lawrence Nixon and Andrew Buglass

Date of Approval /Modification/Review

N/A


 

Date of next review (QAE to complete)

 

Start date of programme/Short Course

September 2018

Number of intakes per annum and likely month(s) intake(s) starts.

One September

 

 

FUNDING DETAILS

 

Confirm funding arrangements for programme e.g. HEFCE/TDA/NHS/Other6

HEFCE

If it is TDA, is it primary/secondary/F.E./Other (please state)

FE

Is the programme Open or Closed7:

Open

 

 

ACCREDITING BODY

The Post Graduate Certificate is mapped to the DET requirements outlined by the Education and Training Foundation.

 

The Society for Education and Training (SET) is the Professional Membership Organisation for Practitioners working in the Post-16 Education and Training System.

 

SET offers a recognition route to qualified teacher learning and skills (QTLS) status for newly qualified teachers through a professional formation process. This is designed to enable teachers to demonstrate how they are continuing to develop their professional practice in their new role following completion of their ITE programmes.

 

 

PROGRAMME SPECIFIC REGULATIONS

Are there to be programme specific regulations? Yes

If yes, please attach completed form AQH-B3 Appendix 2 or AQH-B8.

 

COLLABORATIVE:

Please complete details

UKNo

 

OverseasNo

N/A

INTERIM AWARD SCHEDULE

 

 

Interim award title

 

Credits required

 

Interim structure

 

Please show mandatory requirements if applicable e.g. core module codes

An exemption from the university regulations has been given to allow a short course qualification to be awarded as an interim award.  This is the University Certificate in Post-compulsory Education and Training (40 credits at Level 4; 20 credits at Level 5).  It is not a Certificate of Higher Education under the QAA national credit framework.

 

(40 credits at Level 4; 20 credits at Level 5). 

EPF134, EPF140, EPF230/EPF238

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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