Attachments

 

 

Quality Handbook

 

 

Programme Specification – Undergraduate 2019-20

 

 

SECTION A:CORE INFORMATION

 

  1.  

Name of programme:

Sociology

 

  1.  

Award title:

BSc Honours

 

  1.  

Programme linkage:

 

Is this part of group of linked programmes between which students can transfer at agreed points?

No

 

  1.  

Is the programme a top-up only?

 

No

  1.  

Does the programme have a Foundation Year (Level 3) associated with it so that students enter for a four-year programme and progress directly from the Foundation Year to Stage 1 without having to re-apply?

 

No

 

  1.  

Level of award:

 

Level 6

  1.  

Awarding Body:

University of Sunderland

 

  1.  

Faculty:

Department:

Education and Society

 

Social Sciences

 

  1.  

Programme Studies Board:

Criminology and Sociology

 

  1.  

Programme Leader:

 

Dr Wendy Podd

 


  1. How and where can I study the programme?

 

At Sunderland:

 

Full-time on campus

Part-time on campus

As work-based learning full-time

 

As work-based learning part-time

 

As a full-time sandwich course

 

As a part-time sandwich course

 

By distance learning

 

 

At the University of Sunderland London campus: 

 

Full-time on campus

 

Part-time on campus

 

As work-based learning full-time

 

As work-based learning part-time

 

As a full-time sandwich course

 

As a part-time sandwich course

 

By distance learning

 

 

At a partner college:

 

Full-time in the UK 

 

Part-time in the UK

 

Full-time overseas

 

Part-time overseas

 

By distance learning

 

As a full-time sandwich course in the UK

 

As a part-time sandwich course in the UK

 

As a full-time sandwich course overseas

 

As a part-time sandwich course overseas

 

As work-based learning full-time in the UK 

 

As work-based learning part-time overseas

 

Other (please specify)

 

 

  1. How long does the programme take?

 

 

Min number of years / months

Max number of years / months

Full-time

3

9

Part-time

6

9

Distance learning

 

 

Work-based learning

 

 

 

For start-dates please see the current edition of the Prospectus or contact the relevant department at the University. For start-dates for programmes delivered in a partner college, please contact the relevant college.

 

SECTION B:FURTHER CORE INFORMATION 

 

Use Outline Programme Proposal Form for ADC for questions 13 to 25

 

  1. Learning and teaching strategy. 

The learning and teaching strategy in Sociology reflect the aims of both the current University and Faculty based Learning and Teaching Plans 2013-16.

 

In support of the Faculty Learning and Teaching Plan, the Faculty aims to:

 

Improve the use of library resources across the subject disciplines to support learning

 

Students are directed to library resources via reading lists in module guides and descriptors, and via my module resources.  In addition all students are invited to attend sessions within a bespoke student development programme which supports them in understanding how to access resources and how to cite these correctly within their assessed work.

 

Enhance the use of digital pedagogies

 

The learning and teaching strategy of the Sociology team supports this aim with our use of the virtual learning environment (VLE) available on Canvas. We utilise learning technologies within and outside the classroom. For example, this has particular relevance in active learning with software packages NVIVO and Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS).                           
My module Resources are used for every module on Canvas.

 

Ensure the quality and consistency of feedback on assignments.

 

The learning and teaching strategy of the Sociology team supports this aim by designing feedback given against learning outcomes.  We have built a reputation with external examiners and with students for our fair and rigorous approach to feedback, and feedback is given through Turnitin.  Feedback encourages improvement progression achievement

 

Secure cohort identity, empowering students to make the most of their University experience and take responsibility for their learning

 

The learning and teaching strategy of the Sociology team supports this aim throughout induction, by arranging trips and in organisation of teaching. For example, in core modules we group Sociology students together in learning groups for seminars and lectures.  Extra- curricular social opportunities such as ‘Social Studies Graduation Ball’, ‘Sociology Society’ and student initiated screenings of relevant movies and documentaries in the digital cinema are encouraged and facilitated.

 

The B.Sc. Sociology reflects all of the above aims and in addition uses ‘My Module Resources’ through liaison with the library based subject co-ordinator to ensure resources are available.  As a staff group, we are committed to innovative and creative teaching methods such as, allowing students to choose their own sources, recognising the power of the visual, by mixing written, biographical and visual sources into our teaching, and creating external visits and trips wherever possible within the new programme’s modules. We use facilities such as the university’s digital cinema, departmental research events and social media. The programme engages students in digital pedagogies and provides optimal/digital learning environments. We use the Virtual Learning Environment to stimulate learning and encourage independence.  Sociology modules are on Canvas, and the programme builds on our use of this in the provision of lecture notes, teaching and other materials for students; it is also a useful tool that staff can use to communicate to students at both module and programme level. We provide significant sections of required reading in digitised form, although we are careful to avoid the VLE being used solely as a content repository, and aim in the new programme to use the VLE, as an interactive tool to both challenge and stimulate students to fully engage in reading and discussions within modules. Examples include: encouraging the use of discussion groups, setting tasks and activities, and encouraging students to share resources with each other and with staff.

 

In addition, students submit assignments electronically through Turnitin; this has had learning and teaching impact in relation to citation and referencing.  We use Turnitin as a learning tool, and students are able to check their own presentation of references and to check on their own similarity scores. 

 

The programme team use reflective techniques such as class based peer review and sharing best teaching practice. Our approach is based on, sharing good practice and recognising a variety of learning styles.  The new programme, therefore, includes a variety of methods and assessments which enhance learning and develop skills.  Through written work, presentations and group activities, we work progressively with students to enable autonomous learning. The programme will continues to build upon our commitment to in-depth and quality feedback on assignments, as we see this as key to the student’s own reflective learning.  The content of the core modules is structured to ensure that the student takes progressively more responsibility for their own learning, a process which culminates in the B.Sc. Sociology Dissertation.

 

The B.Sc. Sociology programme has been developed in line with QAA national benchmarks and also as a reflection of our own specialisms. The basis of the B.Sc. undergraduate programme rests in the core structure with its rigorous grounding in social theory, social policy and practical research skills. Training in the appropriate selection and application of a range of research methods enables students to interpret data, to use NVivo for the analysis of qualitative data, and to use IBMs ‘Statistical Package for the Social Sciences’ software (SPSS) for analysis of statistical data. The programme will ensures that our graduates’ are theoretically informed about the social world, and are confident in their practical research skills: The core modules are also accessed by other degree programmes as well as the Sociology students.  Cohort identity is secured through specific programme focused induction activities at each level, and also through seminar distribution, so that Sociology students are studying these core aspects as a group where possible.

 

We maintain and develop our research active curriculum within the B.Sc.  The programme will emphasises the integration of research skills with a new core work placement module, projects and final dissertation. Students will acquire key transferable and employability skills in the new programme through modules such as the new placement and the research methods strand.

 

The placement module is offered at level 5 and can be linked to the dissertation module (SSC 308) at level 6. Students will choose to focus on an issue connected to their work placement (SSC 226), and use methodological skills acquired in SSC 113 and SSC 223 to construct an independent research study. We will work in close liaison with Sunderland Futures to equip our students with enhanced certification such as the Sunderland Professional Award. The employability of our graduates is the key priority in these developments; along with our commitment to prepare students for post graduate challenges should they choose further study at MSc. MA or PhD level.  Students graduating with B.Sc. Sociology from Sunderland will be able to construct and produce research reports.

 

We have traditionally offered full time undergraduate routes but have also accommodated part time routes wherever possible.  We continue this practice as one of our approaches is widening participation to which we remain committed.  Our strong reputation and success in widening participation is due largely to our learning and teaching strategy, and our close working relationship with Learning and Disability Support within the university.

 

Sociology is both theoretical and evidence-based. Essentially, students learn to appraise theories and to assess them in relation to evidence.   As an evidence-based discipline, Sociology insists on the scrutiny and evidenced reassessment of everyday understandings of the social world.  It is a discipline in which theoretical considerations and epistemological scepticism are combined, with an appreciation of the need to establish firm grounds for our knowledge of the social. It employs a wide diversity of research strategies and methods, many of which are shared with other disciplines. Its distinctive ways of knowing and understanding, however, are rooted in sociological perspectives and insights. The diversity of teaching, learning and assessment methods that will be used in the new Programme will enable students to develop as autonomous learners, able to pursue areas of sociological specialism, and to increase skills of group work and co-operation.

 

Active Learning

 

Sociology encourages and requires the development of practical skills (see Skills below). Within research methods and other modules students are required to source material such as government policies, research reports etc.; summarise and evaluate it, and produce their own conclusions based on empirical evidence. We encourage and teach applied theoretical work, which is common to many social sciences. This is illustrated in many activities and assignments within modules. For example, in SSC 112 (Core Module) the first assignment requires students to be ‘investigative reporters’ to produce a source report. In this they gather visual, written and experiential information on gender diversity and difference.  In SSC 103 (option module) students visit the local courts and write reports on their visit, detailing their perceptions and applying their critical skills. In SSC 308 (Core Module) students choose their own focus of study and carry out independent research, and in SSC 307 (Option module) students use their existing theoretical knowledge, and apply skills to the analysis of film and literature. These examples illustrate students’ opportunities to apply theoretical knowledge and interpret various aspects of the social world. The new programme stimulates, challenges and engages students in order that they are able to understand theory and apply it to contemporary issues; thus producing social scientists.

 

 

 

Assessments

 

Firstly, assessment in the B.Sc. Sociology programme focuses on students developing their ability to be autonomous and self-motivated learners. The teaching, learning and assessment strategies employed in core modules at levels four and five provide a basis for the development of self-motivation and autonomy, which is assessed most thoroughly at level six in the B.Sc.  Sociology Dissertation, SSC 308. This independence is gradually encouraged from level four to level six using teaching concepts such as the ‘student as producer’. 

 

Secondly, assessment focuses on students’ increasing abilities in graduate transferable and discipline-specific skills. The assessment strategy associated with the Programme focuses on ensuring that core modules both deliver (see under Learning Outcomes and the Modules which provide these, above) for and assess level-appropriate learning outcomes.

 

Third, the assessment stimulates, challenges and reflects increasing degrees of comprehension and complexity in discipline-specific knowledge across the three levels of undergraduate learning.  This is reflected in the programme assessment strategy that requires increased expectations of the quantity and quality of assessed work at each level, which is consistent across each level in the Sociology programme. We recognise that length of assignment does not equate clearly to difficulty or level of analysis, and word limits at different levels will be evaluated and considered each year.  Our agreed guidelines on wordage at each level give students a flavour of what is expected of them, and also provides a guide for distinguishing between levels.

 

The use of relatively short assessments, timed early in the processes of individual modules, has become more common since the previous incarnation of the programme (e.g. SSC301). It provides indications for the staff of the levels of prior knowledge and skill of the individual students, but also gives some reassurance and guidance for the students themselves. Assessment strategies on the Programme have been developed with three key issues in mind as outlined above. Diagnostic assessments enable staff to fully support students in their development through one to one support, tutorials and PDPs.  This has been essential to the successful retention and progression of Sociology students.  The evidence suggests a clear progression trajectory, with exit velocity for most students. 

 

  1. Retention strategy

The retention strategy in Sociology is reflective of and supporting both the current University and Faculty based Learning and Teaching Plan 2013-16. For example the BSc. Sociology programme will:

 

Provide student support for progression and achievement; enhance cohort identity; support students in gaining employability skills both within and out with the curriculum, particularly with respect to Sunderland Futures initiatives; and encourage student engagement at module level to respond effectively to individual concerns.

 

 

The Sociology teaching team reflect these aims in our approach to retention. Our use of short modules (that is teaching in semesters or blocks over 15-weeks) has the added advantage that students may make up for poor performances during, rather than at the end of the academic year.  In addition we are committed to our Personal Development Plan model to enhance progression and achievement. This involves a targeted discussion with each student at the beginning and at the end of each semester when results are available, enabling us to identify, highlight and address any issues surrounding possible disengagement.

Ongoing support is offered through Personal Development Plan meetings with level tutors.  Each student is assigned a personal tutor at induction and students keep the same tutor through to graduation where possible. These meetings include tutorial advice, career advice, and possible referrals to student health and well-being if necessary. During these meetings we arrange direct contact between the student and Sunderland Futures initiatives. This has included arrangement of internships and volunteering opportunities in the BSc Sociology programme, but in the new B.Sc. there will be an additional new focus on the core work placement module.  

 

Monitoring and support for students will be organised through the university, faculty and department strategy of registering attendance, and the student support team provide referral for counselling for any student who appears to be dropping attendance. The department of Social Sciences has dedicated staff to respond to the needs of student, and the university has established an excellent array of student support services

http://www.sunderland.ac.uk/studentlife/support/health/

 

The programme team focus on engaging our students and see this as one of our major responsibilities to them.  The provision of a cycle of core and optional modules provides for a more flexible mode of provision, particularly for those students who switch in and out of full- and part-time mode of study. Given the other burdens of our students, most of whom are fitting income-earning around their studies; this has been a convenient device for both BSC Sociology and students from other programmes to access our modules. The provision is flexible, and is designed to accommodate the variety of interests and career goals of a diverse group of students. We encourage student engagement at module level to respond effectively to individual concerns, through our regular Staff Student Liaison Committees (SSLC), which are already well established. Renewed emphasis on the need for student representatives at Module Boards and Programme Boards in the new programme will enhance communication between the student cohorts, and the programme and departmental teams. We will continue to focus on the ‘You said we did’ item on SSLC agendas in order to demonstrate the results of their engagement, which has been one of the influences in the development of the new BSc. The personal development plan meetings with level tutors also provide opportunities for individual to raise concerns in a more confidential manner.

 

  1. Any other information

 

The move to B.Sc. is a development which has brought all three degrees in Social Studies in line with one another.  A key aim of B.Sc. Sociology is to maintain and enhance the employability of students studying Sociology at Sunderland University. Students will be able to choose specialisms in Sociology which link to routes into employment but which maintain the distinctive underlying principles of Sociology as a subject as outlined in section 26 above. For example, these include:

 

  • Gender and CultureInequality, Diversity, ‘Race’ - which includes equal rights, disability, film and visual culture.  This pathway enables professional management of difference and diversity in many types of workplace, and many graduates succeed in teaching primary and Post 16 provision, but also many go into further research and/or working for organisations surrounding rights and inequality. 

 

  • Health and the Social Body – which covers content that is relevant to health and social care and/or social work/disability professions, which is relevant to future careers in social policy/health and Social Care/Social Work.

 

  • Family and Identities - which is relevant to future careers in social policy/health and Social Care/Social Work

 

  • Young People, Representation and Society – which includes how young people are represented in the media, in society, in criminal justice, the social construction of young people’s identities, and the social construction of the deficit model of ‘youth’ and its implications and is relevant to future careers working with young people.

 

The emphasis in the B.Sc. is on research skills, and the placement module/workplace evaluation and the benefit of this to students. This development promotes employability and key transferable skills for professional futures. The research element of the new programme was already in place, but has been significantly developed and updated within the last three years. They are now excellent skills based modules with research experienced staff teaching them.

 

The positioning of Sociology in the wider curriculum is part of an integrated Social Studies team and department.  Sociology within in the department of Social Sciences is at the centre of all three programmes in that it provides key theory and skills based modules to support the delivery of all four of the programmes.  For example, core modules in ‘Social Theory and Research Method’ are offered to B.Sc. Criminology, B.Sc. Health and Social Care and to all BSc Social Sciences programme routes. The Sociology programme team encompasses colleagues from the whole Social Studies team. The resource base is large and varied due to the multidisciplinary nature of the programmes within Social Sciences.  In addition to the numbers on single honours programmes Sociology is available in the Combined Subjects Programme.  In the move to B.Sc. we envisage building upon our successful programme with an increase in the number of applicants putting Sunderland as first choice for Sociology, due to the increased focus on skills and employability, and the variety of modules that we are able to offer. Recent evidence from marketing insights suggests there is a 27% increase in the take-up of Sociology at A level in the region.  This move to B.Sc. Sociology positions Sociology at Sunderland to effectively respond to this significant increase in student interest in this subject.

 

We have developed new placement/workplace evaluation modules in the new B.Sc. Sociology, and a strong research base where students will acquire skills in their quantitative and qualitative pathways. This will link to placements, workplace evaluations and internships enhancing employability. Following the successful revalidation and move to B.Sc. for Health and Social Care and Criminology and the introduction of the new BSc in Social Sciences, this successful revalidation has brought all four closely connected programmes into an aligned ‘suite’ of B.Sc. programmes. 

 

 

 

 


SECTION C:TEACHING AND LEARNING

 

  1. What is the programme about?

 

The key aims of the B.Sc. Sociology programme are to produce graduate social scientists that will leave the university having achieved the following goals:

 

  • a grounding in sociological knowledge and understanding, including awareness of sociological issues in a global context;
  • an awareness of the distinctive nature of Sociology in relation to other disciplines and the ability to apply sociological theory to a range of contemporary issues;
  • development of an evidence-based approach to investigation of social phenomena;
  • development of transferable skills in research, analysis and their practical application;
  • the ability to reflect self critically on existing perceptions of the social  world.

 

 

The study of Sociology focuses upon social structures and formation of social and cultural identities, groups and individuals, and their roles in society.   Its concerns also relate to those of philosophy and political theory, as well as to practical ethics and to social, public and civic policy. No single theoretical framework should dominate the discipline, and there are numerous, legitimate, sources of theoretical diversity. What is essential to the subject is that students learn to appraise theories and to assess them in relation to evidence.   As an evidence-based discipline, Sociology insists on the scrutiny and evidenced reassessment of everyday understandings of the social world.  It is a discipline in which theoretical considerations and epistemological scepticism are combined, with an appreciation of the need to establish firm grounds for our knowledge of the social. It employs a wide diversity of research strategies and methods, many of which are shared with other disciplines, and it shares broad generic skills with many other areas of enquiry. Its distinctive ways of knowing and understanding, however, are rooted in sociological perspectives and insights. The shift from Bachelor of Arts to Bachelor of Science denotes a strong central emphasis on evaluation of empirical evidence based theory. Students will acquire key transferable skills in the core research methods modules in conjunction with the new placement module. Sociology graduates from Sunderland will be able to construct and produce research reports, and will have graduate skills for employment, ranging from Business and Commerce to the voluntary sector.  The employability of our graduates is uppermost on these developments along with our commitment to prepare student for post graduate challenges. 

 

 

  1. What will I know or be able to do at each Stage of the programme?

 

Learning Outcomes Stage 1 – Skills   (Certificate of Higher Education)

 

By the end of this Stage of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

 

Discipline Specific Skills

  • S1 construct appropriate sociologically informed questions at an introductory level
  • S2 summarise and explain the findings of empirical sociological research, including a critical assessment of the methodological frameworks used
  • S3 select and use appropriate research tools at an introductory level
  • S4 investigate sociologically informed explanations
  • S5 outline the ethical implications of social research in a variety of applied research settings
  • S6 discuss sociological topics with appreciation of theory, evidence and relevance to current debates and to present the conclusions in a variety of appropriate sociological formats
  • S7 identify and comment on the value of sociological work with regard to social, public and civic policy issues.

 

Knowledge

 

By the end of this Stage of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

 

  • K1 describe and examine a range of key concepts and theoretical approaches within Sociology and evaluate their application
  • K2 provide an account of social diversity and inequality and their effects
  • K3 understand the issues and problems involved in the use of comparison in Sociology
  • K4 identify the nature of social relationships between individuals, groups and social institutions
  • K5 examine the processes that underpin social change and social stability
  • K6 acquire knowledge of and examine a range of research strategies and methods and assess the appropriateness of their use
  • K7 acquire knowledge and describe the relationship between sociological arguments and evidence in a range of contexts
  • K8 comprehend and describe ways in which Sociology can be distinguished from other forms of understanding

 

Learning Outcomes Stage 2 – Skills (Diploma of Higher Education):

 

By the end of this Stage of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

 

Discipline Specific Skills

  • S8 construct appropriate sociologically informed questions
  • S9 evaluate the findings of empirical sociological research, including a critical assessment of the methodological frameworks used
  • S10 select and use appropriate research tools
  • S11 evaluate sociologically informed explanations
  • S12 analyse the ethical implications of social research in a variety of applied research settings
  • S13 analyse and assess sociological topics with appreciation of theory, evidence and relevance to current debates and to present the conclusions in a variety of appropriate sociological formats
  • S14 evaluate sociological work with regard to social, public and civic policy issues.

 

 

Learning Outcomes Stage 2 – Knowledge (Diploma of Higher Education):

 

 

By the end of this Stage of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

 

 

  • K9 assess and evaluate a range of key concepts and theoretical approaches within Sociology and evaluate their application
  • K10 provide an analytical account of social diversity and inequality and their effects
  • assess and evaluate the issues and problems involved in the use of comparison in Sociology
  • K11 analyse the nature of social relationships between individuals, groups and social institutions
  • K12 analyse the processes that underpin social change and social stability
  • K13 evaluate a range of research strategies and methods and assess the appropriateness of their use
  • K14 evaluate the relationship between sociological arguments and evidence in a range of contexts
  • K15 analyse the ways in which Sociology can be distinguished from other forms of understanding

 

Learning Outcomes Stage 3 – Skills (B.Sc. Degree without Honours)

 

By the end of this Stage of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

 

Discipline Specific Skills

  • S15 construct appropriate sociologically informed questions to an advanced level
  • S16 critically evaluate the findings of empirical sociological research, including a critical assessment of the methodological frameworks used
  • S17 select, use and critically evaluate appropriate research tools
  • S18 critically evaluate sociologically informed explanations
  • S19 critically analyse the ethical implications of social research in a variety of applied research settings
  • S20 critically analyse and assess sociological topics with appreciation of theory, evidence and relevance to current debates and to present the conclusions in a variety of appropriate sociological formats
  • S21 critically evaluate sociological work with regard to social, public and civic policy issues

 

Learning Outcomes Stage 3 - Knowledge (B.Sc. Degree without Honours)

 

By the end of this Stage of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

 

 

  • K16 critically evaluate a range of key concepts and theoretical approaches within Sociology and evaluate their application
  • K17 provide an evaluative account of social diversity and inequality and their effects
  • K18 critically assess and evaluate the issues and problems involved in the use of comparison in Sociology
  • K19 critically analyse the nature of social relationships between individuals, groups and social institutions
  • K20 critically analyse the processes that underpin social change and social stability
  • K21 critically evaluate a range of research strategies and methods and assess the appropriateness of their use
  • K22 critically evaluate the relationship between sociological arguments and evidence in a range of contexts
  • K23 critically analyse the ways in which Sociology can be distinguished from other forms of understanding

 

If you are awarded an Ordinary degree you will have achieved the majority of the learning outcomes for the programme studied. However you will have gained fewer credits at Stage 3 than students awarded an Honours degree, your knowledge will typically be less broad and you will typically be less proficient in higher-level skills such as independent learning.

 

 

Learning Outcomes Stage 3 – Skills (B.Sc. Degree with Honours)

 

By the end of this Stage of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

 

Discipline Specific Skills

  • S15 construct appropriate sociologically informed questions to an advanced level
  • S16 critically evaluate the findings of empirical sociological research, including a critical assessment of the methodological frameworks used
  • S17 select, use and critically evaluate appropriate research tools
  • S18 critically evaluate sociologically informed explanations
  • S19 critically analyse the ethical implications of social research in a variety of applied research settings
  • S20 critically analyse and assess sociological topics with appreciation of theory, evidence and relevance to current debates and to present the conclusions in a variety of appropriate sociological formats
  • S21 critically evaluate sociological work with regard to social, public and civic policy issues

 

Learning Outcomes Stage 3 - Knowledge (B.Sc. Degree with Honours)

 

By the end of this Stage of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

 

  • K16 critically evaluate a range of key concepts and theoretical approaches within Sociology and evaluate their application
  • K17 provide an evaluative account of social diversity and inequality and their effects
  • K18 critically assess and evaluate the issues and problems involved in the use of comparison in Sociology
  • K19 critically analyse the nature of social relationships between individuals, groups and social institutions
  • K20 critically analyse the processes that underpin social change and social stability
  • K21 critically evaluate a range of research strategies and methods and assess the appropriateness of their use
  • K22 critically evaluate the relationship between sociological arguments and evidence in a range of contexts
  • K23 critically analyse ways in which Sociology can be distinguished from other forms of understanding

 

If you are awarded a degree with honours you will have met all of the above skills and knowledge to an advanced level, and this will be reinforced by a 40 credit dissertation

 

 

 

 

  1. What will the programme consist of?

 

Each undergraduate programme consists of a number of Stages from a minimum of 1 to a maximum of 4, each of which is equivalent to a year’s full-time study. The summary below describes briefly what is contained in each Stage. Most programmes have a mixture of core (i.e. compulsory) modules and optional ones, often with increasing choice as you move through the programme and gain in experience. In some programmes the choice of optional modules gives you particular ‘routes’ through the programme.  Section C (above) includes the programme structure including a detailed list of modules.  The programme structure including a detailed list of modules can be found in the programme regulations.

 

Stage 1

 

Students will have demonstrated an introductory knowledge and understanding of sociological underlying concepts and evidence based learning.  At this level emphasis is also placed upon the development of key skills.

 

For example:

  • an awareness of social context, of the nature of social processes, and of social diversity and inequality;
  • an appreciation of the uncertainty of knowledge and the variety of methodologies used;
  • begin to acknowledge the demands of organising and synthesizing material and data;
  • consider appropriate and variety of communications skills required over a range of broad issues

 

Stage 2

 

Students are required to develop a broader range of knowledge, understanding and skills within the context of more thematic and issue related studies.  This is particularly relevant within the two core modules at level two, but all modules offered will further develop the learning outcomes introduced at level one.  At this level emphasis is placed upon the development of intellectual and subject specific graduate skills.
 

For example, demonstrating:

  • knowledge and understanding of the well established principles of study;
  • application of basic concepts within new contexts;
  • development of  a variety of appropriate communications skills;
  • identification of appropriate methodologies;
  • acknowledgement of the limits of their knowledge and the limits this makes upon their analysis and interpretation.

 

 

 

 

Stage 3

 

At this level, students should show in addition to the skills elaborated above for a Diploma in Higher Education) ability to:

 

  • synthesising arguments and relevant data with regard to at least three areas of sociological concern at Level 3;
  • adopt and understand the application of relevant methodologies to sociological problems;
  • manage and appropriately use scholarly resources.

 

 

 

  1. How will I be taught?  Modes of teaching and learning aligned with KIS/Unistats

 

 

Scheduled teaching activities

Independent study

Placement

 

The teaching approach is reflective of the University Learning and Teaching Plan 2013-16 which advocates “discursive and interactive approaches to learning and teaching, including methods which meet challenges of teaching large and highly diverse groups.” In support of this aim the teaching approach in the B.Sc. Sociology has been designed to enhance students’ engagement by creating optimal learning environments. Scheduled teaching activities will include: a variety of teaching methods including lectures, seminars, workshops and individual tutorial guidance. In all of these we will maintain an awareness of the need for a multi-sensory approach. Diversity of learning needs requires materials to be made available in accessible formats to students with hearing and sight impairments and to students with Dyslexia. University of Sunderland policy with regard to inclusive programme design can be found here.  New learning technologies have, therefore, been developed that have enhanced our teaching approaches and, we in turn have learnt from working with Disability Support Student Services. This knowledge will be taken forward with the new B.Sc. and we are well placed to continue our reputation for widening participation. 

The impact of learning technologies has changed the learning landscape and enabled students to become increasingly independent, as the three years progress. The new B.Sc. programme offers both continuity and further development in excellence, and we will further enhance our interactive use of the Virtual Learning Environment (VLE). Students are introduced to the learning resources available in the University, including the IT facilities and the library. As learning resources become increasingly electronic, it has become more important both to guide students to government reports and online journals, and use the VLE (Canvas) to provide the links between the module guides and the resources. The digitization process for articles and other texts has been the most recent example of this, and library staff have provided Sociology lecturers with the key guidance for the creation of digitized module resources. Some modules, for example, SSC102, have their entire compulsory reading made available in this way.

Independent study will be encouraged and supported, and will include guidance to navigate the wealth of learning resources available to students through the Module Resources lists on their Canvas subject pages. 

The library services will guide students to become skilled in their searches with advice as follows:

 

My Module Resource List

Your module reading list is a live interactive resource list available from within your online module space and the University’s library website.

 

What do you get?

  • Real time library information, both availability and location of print books, plus being able to place reservations on books that are already on loan
  • Direct access/links to electronic resources
  • Allows you to set up RSS alerts for changes and additions to your Module Resource  list
  • Smartphone and tablet friendly – providing QR capture, Touch screen functionality and E-resource access

 

How does this help you?

  • Getting the right resources easily, from flexible access points and approaches
  • Receive guidance from your tutor on what to read  at a point of need by using search filters e.g. essential reading, recommended reading or reading for the 1st seminar
  • Helping you to use a wider range of resources to support your learning and achieve better grades

 

Extra skills you can develop through using My Module Resource list

  • Improved academic reading and research skills
  • Quality v quantity – finding the right resources
  • Referencing and avoiding Plagiarism skills
  • Employability skills
    • Finding information and solving queries/tasks
    • Keeping up to date with trends and developments

 

How will you find out how to access and use My Module Resource list

 

Level 4 teaching is based on familiarising student with resources, and the course content offers an introduction of threshold concepts. Students are introduced to key authors and theories, key skills in qualitative research and the use of VLE. By the end of Level 4 students are able to use a range of learning technologies and navigate their way around a wealth of library resources. At this level, the teaching approach is to draw students into a community of learning.

 

Teaching at level 5 is aimed at developing independent, active and reflective learners. The teaching style is based on promoting learning partnerships in which supportive and challenging teaching practice inspires students to approach their subject with critical ability and enthusiasm. By the end of Level 5, students who have progressed successfully will be ready to take on the challenge of independent study.

 

Teaching at Level 6 is aimed at producing “graduateness” in each of our students in line with the University of Sunderland learning and teaching plan, which can be found here. Facilitating this involves student support, dialogue and a teaching model based on partnership between academics and students. At this stage the student completes an independent study carrying 40 credits (SSC 308). Equally important at Level 6 is recognition of the discipline specificity of Sociology. The successful student has awareness that they have become part of a community of learners, not only within the University, but nationally and internationally. This involves familiarising our students with the wider intellectual community, in this case the British Sociological Association.

 

A list of the modules in each Stage of the programme can be found in the Programme Regulations.

 

A summary of the types of teaching, learning and assessment in each module of the programme can be found in the Matrix of Modes of Teaching.

 

  1. How will I be assessed and given feedback?  Modes of assessment aligned with KIS/Unistats.

 

Written examinations

Coursework

Practical assessments

 

A summary of the types of teaching, learning and assessment in each module of the programme can be found in the Matrix of Modes of Teaching.

 

The generic assessment criteria which we use can be found here. Some programmes use subject-specific assessment criteria which are based on the generic ones.

 

This programme uses the Generic University Assessment Criteria

YES

This programme uses the Subject Specific Assessment Criteria

NO

 

The University regulations can be found here.

The diversity of assessment methods used on the Programme include a range of written exams, coursework and practical assessments. These will enable students to develop as autonomous learners able to pursue areas of sociological specialism, and to increase skills of group work and co-operation. The teaching and learning strategy and the content of the core modules are structured to ensure that the student takes progressively more responsibility for their own learning, a process which culminates in their completing the B.Sc. Sociology Dissertation.

In Level 4 students are assessed by time constrained tests, exams, written essays, source reports, court reports, group presentations, poster presentations and research project reports.

In Level 5, students are assessed, for example, by essays, source reports, source directories, presentation, reflective evaluation of work placement, research projects and statistical analysis tests which enable the students develop their analytical thinking skills.

In Level 6 students are assessed by supported independent research/study, the dissertation accounts for 40 credits. Analysis of film is also introduced at this stage. Students are also assessed through essays, practitioner/policy reports and presentations.

Assessment in the new programme reflects increasing degrees of comprehension and complexity in discipline-specific knowledge across the three levels of undergraduate learning.  This is reflected in the Programme assessment strategy that requires increased expectations of the quantity of assessed work at each level, which is consistent across each level in the Sociology Programme.

 

The University aims to return marked assessments and feedback within 4 working weeks of the assignment submission date after internal moderation processes have been completed. If this is not possible, students will be notified by the Module Leaders when the feedback is available and how it can be obtained.

 

The Academic Misconduct Regulations and associated guidance can be found here. It is the responsibility of students to ensure they are familiar with their responsibilities in regards to assessments and the implications of an allegation of academic misconduct.

 

Students should refer to the University Regulations for information on degree classifications and compensation between modules.

 

 

 

 


 

  1. Teaching, learning and assessment matrix

 

 

Teaching, learning and assessment matrix

Link above was copied from old template but does not work, no table to copy over.

 

NB Text in the table below is an example. You will need some means of cross-referring to each of the learning outcomes (LO) specified for the programme. Here they are labelled LO / S (for skills) / 1, 2 etc.; LO / K (for knowledge) / 1, 2 etc. but you do not need to follow that approach. One matrix sheet must be completed for each stage of the programme.

 

NB. Not all option modules may be offered in any one academic year and will depend on the availability of staff and the priorities of the school. In addition, modules will usually need to be selected by a minimum number of students. Option modules may be available on more than one programme and the Programme Leaders will liaise with the Faculty Management Team to ensure there is a reasonable amount of choice in any given year.

 

 

Level 4 Module Code

Level 4

Module Title

S1

S2

S3

S4

S5

S6

S7

K1

K2

K3

K4

K5

K6

K7

K8

SSC101

Introduction to Social Theories

 

 

 

TDA

 

TDA

 

TDA

 

TDA

TDA

TDA

 

TDA

TDA

SSC102

Social Problems

 

 

 

TDA

 

TDA

TDA

TDA

TDA

 

TDA

TDA

 

TDA

TDA

SSC103

Introduction to Criminal Justice

 

 

 

TDA

 

TDA

TDA

TDA

TDA

 

TDA

 

 

TDA

 

SSC111

Crime, Surveillance and Social Control

 

 

 

TDA

 

TDA

TDA

TDA

 

 

 

 

 

TDA

 

SSC112

Inequality, Diversity and Society

 

 

 

TDA

 

TDA

TDA

TDA

TDA

 

TDA

TDA

 

TDA

 

SSC113

Applied Qualitative Research in the Social Sciences

TDA

TDA

TDA

TDA

TDA

TDA

 

 

 

TD

D

 

TDA

TDA

 

SSC120

Dimensions of Health and Social Care

 

 

 

TDA

 

TDA

TDA

TDA

TDA

 

TDA

 

 

TDA

TDA

SSC121

Classical Readings in Criminology

 

 

 

TDA

 

TDA

TD

TDA

TDA

TD

TDA

 

TDA

TDA

TDA

SSC122

Spaces for Reflective Practice, Participation and Social Action

 

TDA

TDA

TDA

 

TDA

TDA

TDA

TDA

 

TDA

TDA

 

TDA

 

MED122

Introduction to Digital Media Cultures

 

 

 

TDA

 

TDA

 

TDA

 

 

TDA

TDA

 

 

 

HIS116

The Transformation of Britain: British History since 1750.

 

 

TDA

 

 

 

 

 

TDA

 

TDA

D

TDA

 

 

POL102

British Politics since 1945

 

 

TDA

 

TD

 

 

 

TDA

 

TDA

D

TD

 

 

POL105

Introduction to Politics: Democracy and Tyranny

 

 

TD

 

 

 

 

 

TDA

 

 

D

TD

 

 

Level 5 Module Code

Level 5

Module Title

S8

S9

S10

S11

S12

S13

S14

K9

K10

K11

K12

K13

K14

K15

 

SSC201

Social Theory of Industrial Society

 

 

 

TDA

 

TDA

 

TDA

 

TDA

TDA

TDA

 

TDA

 

SSC202

Health Improvement and Healthy Lifestyles

 

 

 

TDA

 

TDA

TDA

TDA

 

 

 

TDA

 

TDA

 

SSC206

Theoretical Issues in Criminology

 

 

 

 

TDA

 

TDA

TDA

TDA

TDA

TDA

TDA

 

 

TDA

 

SSC207

Youth, Crime and Criminology

 

 

 

 

TDA

 

TDA

 

TDA

TDA

 

TDA

 

 

TDA

 

SSC216

Sex, Families and the Construction of Personal Lives

 

 

 

TDA

 

TDA

 

TDA

TDA

 

TDA

D

 

TDA

 

SSC219

Gender, Diversity and Society

 

 

 

TDA

 

TDA

 

TDA

TDA

 

TDA

 

 

TDA

 

SSC220

Medicalisation, Normality and the Body

 

 

 

TDA

 

TDA

 

TDA

 

 

TDA

TDA

 

TDA

 

SSC230

Early Life Course Approaches in Health and Social Care

 

 

 

TDA

 

TDA

TDA

TDA

TDA

 

 

 

 

TDA

 

SSC222

Offender Management in Criminal Justice

 

 

 

TDA

 

TDA

TDA

TDA

TDA

 

 

 

 

TDA

 

SSC223

Applied Quantitative Research in the Social Sciences

TDA

TDA

TDA

TDA

TDA

TDA

 

 

 

D

 

 

TDA

TDA

 

SSC224

Contemporary Issues in Social Policy

 

 

 

TDA

 

TDA

TDA

TDA

 

 

D

TDA

 

TDA

 

SSC226

Practical Application in Sociology

TDA

TDA

TDA

TDA

D

 

TDA

 

TDA

TDA

D

 

 

 

 

SSC228

Sociology Workplace Evaluation Portfolio

TDA

TDA

TDA

TDA

D

 

TDA

 

TDA

TDA

 

 

 

 

 

HIS216

Experiencing the 20th Century

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

D

 

 

 

POL201

European political ideas

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

D

 

 

 

POL202

British Politics and Government

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

D

D

 

 

 

LLS220

Continuing independent study in HE

TDA

TDA

TDA

TDA

TDA

D

 

D

 

 

 

 

D

 

 

Level 6 Module Code

Level 6

Module Title

S15

S16

S17

S18

S19

S20

S21

K16

K17

K18

K19

K20

K21

K22

K23

SSC301

Advanced Social Theories

 

 

 

TDA

 

TDA

TDA

TDA

TDA

TDA

TDA

TDA

TDA

TDA

TDA

SSC305

‘Race’, Racialisation and the Criminal Justice System

TDA

TDA

TDA

TDA

 

TDA

TDA

TDA

TDA

 

D

D

 

TDA

D

SSC307

Youth, Gender and Identities

 

 

 

TDA

 

TDA

TDA

TDA

TDA

TDA

TDA

D

 

TDA

 

SSC308

Sociology Dissertation

TDA

TDA

TDA

TDA

TDA

TDA

TDA

TDA

 

TDA

TDA

 

TDA

TDA

 

SSC311

Re-Imagining Crime and Criminology

 

 

 

TDA

 

TDA

 

TDA

TDA

 

D

D

 

TDA

D

SSC312

Substance Use and Society

 

 

 

TDA

 

TDA

TDA

TDA

 

 

 

D

 

TDA

 

SSC314

Punishment and Society

 

 

 

TDA

 

TDA

 

TDA

 

 

TDA

TDA

 

TDA

 

SSC316

Gender, Sexuality and Identity

 

 

 

TDA

 

TDA

 

TDA

TDA

 

TDA

 

 

TDA

 

SSC317

Violence, Gender and Society

 

 

 

TDA

 

TDA

 

TDA

TDA

 

TDA

D

 

TDA

 

SSC319

The Clinical Gaze: Medicine, Disability and Confinement

 

D

 

D

D

TDA

 

 

TDA

D

TDA

 

 

TDA

D

SSC320

Justice for Young People

 

 

 

TDA

TDA

TDA

TDA

TDA

TDA

 

TDA

TDA

 

TDA

 

SSC330

Life Course Approaches to Health and Ageing

 

 

 

TDA

 

TDA

 

TDA

TDA

 

 

D

 

TDA

 

SSC335

Global Health

 

 

 

TDA

 

TDA

TDA

TDA

TDA

 

TDA

TDA

 

TDA

 

LLS320

Continuing Independent study in HE (with presentation)

TDA

TDA

TDA

TDA

TDA

D

 

D

 

 

 

 

D

 

 

 

 

*Indicates a compulsory module which must be successfully passed for progression to further modules or to the next academic year of study.


  1. How does research influence the programme? 

 

The curriculum is informed by current research in every specialist field covered on the programme. We regularly update reading lists and suggested sources with recent legislation, new policies, recently published peer-reviewed research, government White Papers, and media coverage of contemporary issues, along with visual sources such as documentary and cinematic film. 

 

We have a vibrant research culture in Centre for Applied Social Studies (CASS) with open Wednesday lectures where all students are welcome. Students are encouraged to join and can follow on twitter @CASS 180661.  We encourage students to become involved in research seminars and to gain an understanding of how research fundamentally underpins their studies. 

 

We offer a substantial research-active curriculum where students actively engage with research at each level in terms of: research design, literature review, ethical analysis, fieldwork, data analysis and evaluation. To support this, the teaching and learning strategy, and the content of the core modules are structured to relate to research ability, and ensure that the student takes progressively more responsibility for their own learning. This process culminates in their completing the B.Sc. Sociology Dissertation. Learning and assessment methods used on the Programme will enable students to develop as autonomous learners/researchers who are able to pursue areas of sociological specialism.

 

 

All of the teaching staff on the programme actively engage in sociological research and are members of the Centre for Applied Social Sciences research centre The mission of CASS reflects that of the University's aim as a civic university: to take an active interest in the social issues that affect the region and beyond by engaging in research and practice-based collaborations that aim to improve living conditions, address inequalities and social exclusion and promote social justice.  Our work is currently organised around the following three strands:

 

 

The range of work the Centre engages in requires a multi-disciplinary approach.  It combines original academic research with practice-based collaborations and reach-out activities, often working directly with practitioners, policymakers and front-line delivery staff regionally, nationally and internationally.   In practical terms the students can utilise our own work as our titles are on their reading lists, and all modules include the use of current research reports and ongoing funded research, to enable students to make the link between the curriculum they are studying and the wider research community of their discipline.  We embed skills related to research into our assessments, and students are the encouraged to search for and to make use of peer reviewed journals.  Sociology lecturers at University of Sunderland are actively engaged within many specialist fields of study, which is reflected in the variation of modules available, and which enables students to study areas of Sociology that are of most relevance to a range of professional aspirations.

 

 

SECTION D:EMPLOYABILITY

 

  1. How will the programme prepare me for employment?

 

The programme gives you the opportunity to develop skills which you can use in the future. Some skills are more specific than others to the subject area, or to a particular type of activity, but all skills can be applied in a range of employment situations, sometimes in quite unexpected ways. The skills which this programme is designed to develop are listed below.

 

The B.Sc. Sociology has been designed to enhance the employment opportunities of graduates. The new revalidated programme will include workplace opportunities through Sunderland Futures, internships, a new placement module and volunteering opportunities.    

 

The core structure of the programme ensures that students complete the programme with the key transferable skills that will allow them to be successful in the variety of employment settings that Sociology graduates typically enter. In particular the emphasis is more explicitly on producing graduates with research skills and experience of applying these in workplace settings.

 

Graduate skills are specifically taught, developed and assessed in designated option modules (SSC226/SSC228), which provide students with practical employment experience and assessment based upon their ability to plan, engage in reflective practice, and to evaluate their own performance and/or a specific workplace setting. Students, through these modules, will be provided with an opportunity to engage in a piece of ‘real life’ research that produces empirical evidence and/or evaluative tools for the project, e.g. some evaluative research, some analysis of project data, some design of feedback tools and so on.  In addition, students will gain valuable knowledge of organisational practices and procedures in their chosen workplace setting.

 

This emphasis on employability is also enhanced by working with Sunderland Futures to provide BSc Sociology students from level 5 onwards with opportunities for internships and voluntary work that may link to their placement experiences and/or their dissertation module at level 6.

 

In order to ensure that our students are confident and articulate the core BSc, Sociology modules include the requirement to present information in a variety of oral and written formats, for example, essays in SSC201, SSC301, time constrained test in SSC 101, research report in SSC113 and 223, critical review in SSC 201 and presentation in SSC101.

 

The employability of Sociology graduates is reliant upon a range of transferable skills.  In addition to the QAA skills for Sociology graduates generally, the employability skills that students will have upon completing a BSc. Sociology at the University of Sunderland are detailed in the appendix on ‘Graduate Skills for B.Sc. Sociology’: (please note that core modules only are referred to as examples in the appendix, in order to ensure that all skills are met by all graduates of the programme).

 

We offer a range of activities to support students general development.  Students have an open invitation to the seminars and events of the Centre for Applied Social Science (CASS). Trips are organised during induction, and throughout each level we have talks and visits from outside agencies and organisations. We facilitate and encourage students to take advantage of the study abroad scheme, and each year have students travelling to the USA, Australia and Europe. In addition we have a cinema club attached to a third year module which includes analysis of movies.  We regularly use the digital cinema for the Sociology Cinema Club.

 

For information about other opportunities available to our students who study on campus, click here.

 

Additional opportunities to develop your experiences more widely will vary if you study at one of our partner colleges. For information about the extra-curricular activities available in any of our colleges please contact the college direct. 

 

  1. Particular features of the qualification

 

 

The placement module is offered at level 5 and can be linked to the dissertation module (SSC 308) at level 6. Students will choose to focus on an issue connected to their work placement (SSC 226), and use methodological skills acquired in SSC 113 and SSC 223 to construct an independent research study. We will work in close liaison with Sunderland Futures to equip our students with enhanced certification such as the Sunderland Professional Award. The employability of our graduates is the key priority in these developments; along with our commitment to prepare students for post graduate challenges should they choose further study at MSc. MA or PhD level.  Students graduating with B.Sc. Sociology from Sunderland will be able to construct and produce research reports.

 

  1. Professional statutory or regulatory body (PSRB) accreditation. 

 

PSRB accreditation is not relevant to this programme 

PSRB accreditation is currently being sought for this programme

 

This programme currently has PSRB accreditation

 

 

 

There are programme-specific regulations relating to the following. Details are given in the programme regulations:

 

The modules to be studied

 

Pass-marks for some or all modules and/or parts

(elements) of modules 

 

Requirements for progression between one Stage and another

 

Placement requirements

 

Attendance requirements

 

Professional practice requirements

 

Degree classification  

 

Other 

 

 

 

 

Interim or exit awards are not accredited. 

 

Free text for description which is not covered by the options above.

 

Not applicable

 

SECTION E:PROGRAMME STRUCTURE AND REGULATIONS

 

The programme is organised into core modules which address the QAA benchmarks, and range of options which reflect staff specialisms.  The programme structure is outlined below:

 

 

PART B-PROGRAMME REGULATION/S

 

Name of programme: Bsc (Hons) Sociology

Title of final award:   BSc with honours

Interim awards1:   Cert HE, Diploma, Ordinary Degree

 

Accreditation: na

 

University Regulation (please state the relevant University Regulation): 4.2.1. The overall pass mark for each module is 40%. To pass a module a student must also have submitted work for each element of assessment.

 

Programme specific regulation: requires that in module SSC226 there will be two pass fail elements of assessment that the student is required to pass, but which are graded and are therefore weighted at 0

 

Regulations apply to students commencing their studies from (please state the date / intake that these regulations will apply to students for each Stage):

 

Regulations apply to students

Date the regulations apply

Intakes affected

Stage 1

 

 

Stage 2

September 2018

Sept 2017 onwards

Stage 3

 

 

Stage 4

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Programme Structure Overview

 

Level 4

 

Core Modules

Note: All Level 4 Core Modules constitute a foundation for suggested specialist strands at Levels 5 and 6.

 

Module code

Module title

Credits

SSC101

Introduction to Social Theories

20

SSC102

Social Problems

20

SSC113

Applied Qualitative Research in the Social Sciences

20

SSC112

Inequality, Diversity and Society

20

 

Optional Modules

Students are to select any two optional modules from the list below.  It is recommended that one module is taken from each semester.

 

Module code

Module title

Credits

SSC103

Introduction to Criminal Justice

20

SSC111

Crime, Surveillance and Social Control

20

SSC120

Dimensions of Health and Social Care

20

SSC121

Classical Readings in Criminology

20

SSC122

Spaces for Reflective Practice, Participation and Social Action

20

POL105

Intro to Politics 1: Democracy and Tyranny

20

HIS116

The Transformation of Britain: British History since 1750.

20

POL102

Britain since 1945

20

MED122

Introduction to Digital Media Cultures

20

 

 

Progression Regulations 

 

There are no programme-specific progression regulations[1]

 


Level 5

 

Core Modules

Module code

Module title

Credits

SSC201

Social Theory of Industrial Society

20

SSC223

Applied Quantitative Research in the Social Sciences

20

SSC224

Contemporary Issues in Social Policy

20

 

Designated Options

Students must take one of the following modules

 

Module code

Module title

Credits

SSC226

Practical Application in Sociology

20

SSC228

Sociology Workplace Evaluation Portfolio

20

 

Optional Modules (choose two)

These are the options available. We have set out specific specialist strands that students can follow if they choose to specialise. Alternatively, students can select any combination of TWO options one of which must be either SSC216, SSC220, or SSC231

 

Module code

Module title

Credits

SSC202

Health Improvement and Healthy Lifestyles

20

SSC206

Theoretical Issues in Criminology

20

SSC207

Youth, Crime and Criminology

20

SSC216

Sex, Families and the Construction of Personal Lives

20

SSC220

Medicalisation, Normality and the Body

20

SSC222

Offender Management in Criminal Justice

20

SSC230

Early Life Course Approaches in Health and Social Care

20

SSC231

Gender, Diversity and Human Rights: Global Perspectives

20

HIS216

Experiencing the 20th Century

20

POL201

European political ideas

20

POL202

British politics and Government

20

 

Semester 3

 

Module code

Module title

Credits

LLS220

Continuing Independent Study in H.E. (With Presentation)

20

 

Progression Regulations

There are no programme-specific progression regulations[2]


Level 6

 

Core Modules

 

Module code

Module title

Credits

SSC301

Advanced Social Theories

20

SSC308 - Semester 3

Sociology Dissertation

40

 

Optional Modules (choose three)

These are the options available. We have set out specific specialist strands that students can follow if they choose to specialise. Alternatively, students can select any combination of THREE options listed below two of which must be either SSC307, SSC314, SSC316, SSC317, SSC319, SSC320 or SSC335

 

Module code

Module title

Credits

SSC305

‘Race’, Racialisation and the Criminal Justice System

20

SSC307

Youth, Gender and Identities

20

SSC311

Re-Imagining Crime and Criminology

20

SSC312

Substance Use and Society

20

SSC314

Punishment and Society

20

SSC316

Gender, Sexuality and Identity

20

SSC317

Violence, Gender and Society

20

SSC319

The Clinical Gaze: Medicine, Disability and Confinement

20

SSC320

Justice for Young People

20

SSC330

Life Course Approaches to Health and Ageing

20

SSC335

Global Health

20

 

Semester 3

 

Module code

Module title

Credits

LLS320

Semester 3

Advanced Independent Study in H.E.

20

 

 

 

 

 


Optional Specialist Strands in Sociology

 

Specialist topic strands are not compulsory but are set out as recommendations for students who may have particular interests connected to future professional occupations. Each strand requires the completion of at least 20 credits at level 5 and level 6.  It is possible for student to engage in more than one specialist pathway

 

Strand A: Health and the Social Body

 

Module Code

Module Title

Semester

Credits

SSC220

 

Medicalisation, Normality and the Body

SEM 2

20

SSC319

 

The Clinical Gaze: Medicine, Disability and Confinement

SEM 2

20

SSC335

Global Health

SEM 2

20

 

 

Strand B:  Gender and Culture

 

SSC216

 

Sex, Families and the Construction of Personal Lives

SEM 1

20

SSC231

 

Gender, Diversity and Human Rights: Global Perspectives

SEM 2

20

 

SSC307

 

Youth, Gender and Identities

SEM 2

20

SSC316

 

Gender, Sexuality and Identity

SEM 1

20

SSC317

 

Violence, Gender and Society

SEM 2

20

 

Strand C: Family and Identity

 

SSC216

 

Sex, Families and the Construction of Personal Lives

SEM 1

20

SSC231

 

Gender, Diversity and Human Rights: Global Perspectives

 

SEM 2

20

SSC307

 

Youth, Gender and Identities

SEM 2

20

SSC316

 

Gender, Sexuality and Identity

SEM 1

20

 

Strand D: Young People, Representation and Society

 

SSC216

 

Sex, Families and the Construction of Personal Lives

SEM 1

20

SSC307

 

Youth, Gender and Identities

SEM 2

20

SSC320

 

Justice for Young People

SEM 2

20

 

 

 

SECTION F:ADMISSIONS, LEARNING ENVIRONMENT AND SUPPORT

 

  1. What are the admissions requirements?

 

The University’s standard admissions requirements can be found in the university regulations. Programme-specific requirements which are in addition to those regulations are given below.

 

The current entry requirements for this programme is as specified in the Fees and Entry Requirements section on the programme page on the University’s website.

The standard entry is 300 UCAS points

 

Entry from a University of Sunderland Foundation Year

 

Can students enter with advanced standing?

Yes

 

If yes, to which Stages?

Stage 1

Stage 2

Stage 3

Stage 4

 

 

If yes, with what qualifications?

 

The University has a process by which applicants whose experience to date already covers one or more modules of the programme they are applying for may seek Accreditation of Prior Learning (APL). Full details can be found here but if you think that this may be relevant to you, please contact the department which offers the programme you are interested in.

 

  1. What kind of support and help will there be?

 

In the department:  Academic year tutors are assigned to each cohort of students to guide them through the course of their studies until they graduate. We have tended to rely on mid-year and end-of-year tutorials to provide a review of progress and guidance for students: this reflects the teaching semesters, and formal assessment boards at module level, which are held twice a year. During these meetings tutors also discuss careers and opportunities within the university that students are able to take advantage of to improve their curriculum vitae (see below). As well as this, students are able to make appointments with tutors, as and when they wish to speak to them. This is encouraged so that any problems students might have can be identified early and responded to appropriately.

 

PDP and Career Planning

 

For career and personal development, we hold a reflective workshop for Level 6 students to discuss their learning experiences on the degree and the way these relate to their career aspirations. We precede this with a carefully staged system of advice on career planning, 1) encouraging students to explore the graduate career information websites, 2) preparing draft CVs for particular sectors of employment and 3) conducting a more formal PDP and skills audit with each student before term 3. We also maintain a close working relation with Sunderland Futures and talks and events are designed specifically for sociologist students at levels five and six which assist them through the process of preparing them for future careers and relating the curriculum to their aspirations/ambitions. In addition, twitter, Canvas, and email are used to draw the attention of Sociology students to careers events and opportunities being organised by the university.

Disability

 

b. in the university as a whole: The University has comprehensive systems to identify, diagnose and support students with special learning needs. In line with QAA, HEFCE, the Special Educational Needs and Disability Act (SENDA), and the Post 16 Code of Practice, the University has developed inclusion protocols and practices which conform to these guidelines and legislation. The University Disability Support Team provides a statement and code of practice on disability and specific learning difficulties laying out the principles and core values of disability support in the University. The University also provides a resource directory providing information on the range of support and contact points for disabled students. The Social Science Department a disability support tutor (DST) to provide day-to-day advice, support and guidance to staff and students in order to further the social and academic inclusion of disabled students.

 

The University provides a range of professional support services including health and well-being, counselling, disability support, and a Chaplaincy. Click on the links for further information.

 

 

  1. What resources will I have access to?

 

On campus

In a partner college

 

By distance learning

 

 

On campus

 

General Teaching and Learning Space

IT

Library

VLE

Laboratory

 

Studio

 

Performance space

 

Other specialist

Technical resources 

 

General teaching and learning occurs in a range of technologically equipped appropriate lecture halls, IT suites and seminar rooms.

 

Students have access to research appropriate software including Nvivo and software such as Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) in the specialist IT suites, the VLE on Canvas, access to PCs in the library, the refectory and the IT suites for more general use.   

 

The library is equipped with up to date research and scholarly works in the form of research journals and books. As learning resources become increasingly electronic, it has become more important both to guide students to use the VLE, and to provide the links between the module guides and the resources.

Information about the University’s facilities can be found here.

 

Please see the relevant college prospectus or website for details of college learning resources if you are planning to study in one of our partner colleges.

 

  1. Are there any additional costs on top of the fees?

 

No, but all students buy some study materials such as books and provide their own basic study materials.

 

Yes (optional) All students buy some study materials such as books and provide their own basic study materials. In addition there are some are additional costs for optional activities associated with the programme (see below)

Yes (essential) All students buy some study materials such as books and provide their own basic study materials. In addition there are some are essential additional costs associated with the programme (see below)

 

 

There may be some costs for students associated with the placement module, e.g. travel costs. However, since a lot of students travel to attend the university it is predicted that travel costs associated with placements will be no more than those associated with attending university. Everything will be done to provide students with placements that have minimum costs attached.

 

  1. How are student views represented?

 

All taught programmes in the University have student representatives for each Stage (year-group) of each programme who meet in a Student-Staff Liaison Committee (SSLC) where they can raise students’ views and concerns. The Students’ Union and the faculties together provide training for student representatives. SSLCs and focus groups are also used to obtain student feedback on plans for developing existing programmes and designing new ones. Feedback on your programme is obtained every year through module questionnaires and informs the annual review of your programme. Student representatives are also invited to attend Programme and Module Studies Boards which manage the delivery and development of programmes and modules.  Faculty Academic Committee, also has student representation. This allows students to be involved in higher-level plans for teaching and learning. At university level Students are represented on University level Committees by sabbatical officers who are the elected leaders of the Students’ Union.

 

The University’s student representation and feedback policy can be found here.

 

Final-year students are also invited to complete a National Student Survey (NSS) which asks a standard set of questions across the whole country. The results of this are discussed at Programme Studies Boards and at Faculty Academic Committee to identify good practice which can be shared and problems which need to be addressed. We rely heavily on student input to interpret the results of the NSS and ensure that we make the most appropriate changes.

 

If you are studying in one of our partner colleges the college will have its own mechanisms for obtaining student feedback. Some of these may be the same as those on-campus at the University but others may be different. You should ask your college for further information.

 

Student Support and Guidance

 

Tutors

 

We have a system of academic level tutors. Each intake of students is allocated to a tutor who will guide them through the course of their studies until they graduate. We provide mid-year and end of year tutorials review and guide students in terms of their progress through the curriculum: this remains the key device for academic advice, as we are in semesters, and formal assessment boards at module level are held twice a year.

 

At induction students are invited to a week of activities that includes information about the academic and pastoral support provided at university (including student union), faculty, department and programme team levels. At induction students are introduced to the academic tutor system, meet their tutor and are encouraged to keep in touch with their tutor if and when problems arise that affect their study.

 

During induction students also have a visit and tour of the library services and are introduced to the librarian appointed to the social sciences. Again, it is hoped that this starts a relationship with library services that develops and continues throughout the students’ studies.  

 

 

 

SECTION G:QUALITY MANAGEMENT 

 

  1. National subject benchmarks

 

The Quality Assurance Agency (QAA) for Higher Education publishes benchmark statements which give guidance as to the skills and knowledge which graduates in various subjects and in certain types of degree are expected to have. These can be found here.

 

Are there any benchmark statements for this programme?

YES

 

The subject benchmark for this programme is:

http://www.qaa.ac.uk/en/Publications/Documents/SBS-Sociology-16.pdf

 

The QAA also publishes a Framework for Higher Education Qualifications (FHEQ) which defines the generic skills and abilities expected of students who have achieved awards at a given level and with which our programmes align. The FHEQ can be found here.

  1. How are the quality and standards of the programme assured?

 

The programme is managed and quality assured through the University’s standard processes. Programmes are overseen by Module and Programme Studies Boards which include student representatives. Each year each module leader provides a brief report on the delivery of the module, identifying strengths and areas for development, and the programme team reviews the programme as a whole.  The purpose of this is to ensure that the programme is coherent and up-to-date, with suitable progression from one Stage to another, and a good fit (alignment) between what is taught and how students learn and are assessed - the learning outcomes, content and types of teaching, learning and assessment. Student achievement, including progress between Stages of the programme and degree classification, is kept under review. The programme review report is sent to the Programme Studies Board and the Faculty in turn reports issues to the University’s Quality Management Sub-Committee (QMSC) and Student Success Committee (SSC formerly Academic Experience Committee AEC).

 

External examiners are appointed to oversee and advise on the assessment of the programme. They ensure that the standards of the programme are comparable with those of similar programmes elsewhere in the UK and are also involved in the assessment process to make sure that it is fair. They are invited to comment on proposed developments to the programme. Their reports are sent to the Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Academic) as well as to the Faculty so that issues of concern can be addressed.

 

All programmes are reviewed by the University on a six-yearly cycle to identify good practice and areas for enhancement. Programmes are revalidated through this review process. These reviews include at least one academic specialist in the subject area concerned from another UK university. Quality Assurance Agency (QAA) review reports for Sunderland can be found here.

 

Further information about our quality processes can be found here.

 

Please also complete and insert the SITS form.

 


[1] This will be the norm – university regulations apply

[2] This will be the norm – university regulations apply