Attachments

 

Programme Specification

 

 

 

SECTION A: CORE INFORMATION

 

  1.  

Name  of programme:

Project  Management

 

  1.  

Award title:

MSc

Postgraduate Certificate

Postgraduate Diploma

 

  1.  

Programme linkage:

 

Is this part of group of linked programmes between which students can transfer at agreed points? (e.g. a group of programmes with a common set of taught modules)

Yes

 

This programme is one of a group of related programmes which also includes MSc Engineering Management

 

It is possible to transfer between these programmes at certain points. This may be subject to particular requirements.

 

  1.  

Is the programme a top-up only?

No

 

  1.  

Level of award:

Level 7

 

  1.  

Awarding body:

University of Sunderland

 

  1.  

Department:

School of Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Advanced Manufacturing

 

  1.  

Programme Studies Board:

TBC

 

  1.  

Programme Leader:

Mr Ian Ridley

 


  1. How and where can I study the programme?

Tick all boxes that apply

 

At Sunderland:

 

Full-time on campus

Part-time on campus

As work-based learning full-time

 

As work-based learning part-time

 

As a full-time sandwich course

 

As a part-time sandwich course

 

By distance learning

 

 

At the University of Sunderland London campus: 

 

Full-time on campus

 

Part-time on campus

 

As work-based learning full-time

 

As work-based learning part-time

 

As a full-time sandwich course

 

As a part-time sandwich course

 

By distance learning

 

 

At a partner college:

 

Full-time in the UK 

 

Part-time in the UK

 

Full-time overseas

Part-time overseas

By distance learning

 

As a full-time sandwich course in the UK

 

As a part-time sandwich course in the UK

 

As a full-time sandwich course overseas

 

As a part-time sandwich course overseas

 

As work-based learning full-time in the UK 

 

As work-based learning part-time overseas

 

Other (please specify)

 

 

  1. How long does the programme take?

 

 

Min number of years / months

Max number of years / months

Full-time

1 year

2 years

Part-time

2 years

4 years

Distance learning

 

 

Work-based learning

 

 

 

For start-dates please see the current edition of the Prospectus or contact the relevant department at the University. For start-dates for programmes delivered in a partner college, please contact the college.

 

SECTION B:  FURTHER CORE INFORMATION

 

Use Outline Programme Proposal Form for ADC, for questions 12 to 23

 

  1. Learning and teaching strategy.

 

The programme is designed to produce graduates who are able to operate as critical and effective managers who can deploy advanced research and analysis skills to enhance their practice. As such the learning and teaching strategy has been constructed to align with these aims.

 

The teaching and learning approach adopted will be based on the development of the required skills and their application in practice using industrially relevant case studies and problems. This will provide a framework where students can revise, revisit and reflect on their learning in a real context.

 

While there will be some inevitable variation to meet the nuances of each module, the general approach used will largely consist of the following stages:

 

  1. Introduction to a topic and familiarisation with the core concepts.
  2. Introduction to a topic or case study which the students will work through
  3. Individual or group work to research, analyse and define the potential approaches or solutions that might be adopted.
  4. Evaluation and reflection of the degree of success achieved and how this relates to other approaches that could have been taken.

 

Wherever possible case studies will be sourced from industry or will have been synthesised by staff based on their industrial experience and which provide the appropriate opportunities for research and analysis. The topics used for case studies will be diverse to mirror the diversity inherent in the academic and professional background of students embarking on a programme such as this.

 

A key theme throughout the programme will be the need for students to work effectively with others. As such students will engage in group work throughout the programme. The ability to communicate effectively both verbally and in writing will also be developed through activities embedded in each module building on an initial orientation to Masters level academic skills delivered during the introductory stages of the programme.

 

  1. Retention strategy

The main theme of the postgraduate retention strategy is engagement and support. This has been developed over a number of years and recognises the importance of supporting the student faculty towards their academic and professional goals. This strategy acknowledges support requirements have evolved, yet maintains the priorities of academic success and personal wellbeing. The strategy themes of engagement and support are characterised into two sections; Personal tutoring and Curriculum and Community.  

 

Personal tutoring

 

Personal tutoring is a key feature of the MSc programmes. A specific member of staff is assigned to each student at the beginning of each stage offering structured support meetings. In addition to this structured approach, personal tutors offer the opportunity to discuss matters informally – whenever the need arises. Meetings are not simply used to resolve areas of concern, but a forum for advising and mentoring the student to achieve all their goals. This can be based on the personal experience of the tutor – or signposting the student towards a more useful University facility. The personal tutoring experience will be different for each individual student, as the agenda is driven from both participants. The tutor will use analytics information representing attendance and engagement, but recognises this information is indicative. The true value in the process will come from the subsequent meeting and conversation.

 

Curriculum & Community

 

The retention strategy recognises that staff may not always be available or appropriate for student support needs. From this perspective, peer support groups are encouraged and facilitated. One particular technique for encouraging this is our Induction programme, which takes place in Freshers Week. The programme is open to all new (and existing) students and involves essential information from an academic, social and wellbeing perspective. Furthermore, a practical, fun, group activity is included to introduce students to each other in a focussed environment. Anecdotal evidence suggests friendships made at this stage, transform into informal study groups which continue throughout the subsequent degree.

 

Techniques to encourage a peer support network are also a part of the formal assessment schedule of several modules. Coursework is often group orientated. This is not to dilute the volume of work, but to improve the engagement in what can be perceived as an intimidating activity.  Conclusively, peer support in these tasks ensures a high degree of engagement in a variety of formal assessment activities.

 

Encouraging student support through an Engineering community is continued with all Faculty staff. Access to staff for academic or personal issues is not exclusive to the personal tutor. For several years, staff have adopted and employed and open door policy for student issues. No formal appointment is required for a discussion – if the member of the faculty team is available they will attempt to resolve the query at that time. The high regard placed by students on this aspect of the engineering retention strategy is well recognised, through informal feedback and SSLC meetings.

 

Finally, curriculum and community is brought together through the Faculty encouraging student participation in professional body competitions. The events are competitive, friendly and team based, involving the completion of a specified practical activity. Crucially, the students are competing against other Universities. As well as developing the skills of the student, the competitions expose the student in a friendly environment to a wider engineering community, strongly linked to some of their career goals. This link is seen as vital, allowing the student to connect their own programme of study to an engineering world they aspire to be a part of.

 

 

  1. Any other information

 

SECTION C:  TEACHING AND LEARNING

 

  1. What is the programme about?

 

The aim of the programme is to broaden the knowledge and ability of graduate and practising engineers in relevant management skills, principles and procedures. The programme will focus upon the methods, knowledge and techniques which allow this important area to be managed effectively.

 

The overall aims of the programme are:

 

  • Develop and enhance the management skills and knowledge of students so they are able to manage effectively in a wide variety of environments.

 

  • Enable students to make critical assessments regarding the applicability of management knowledge and techniques within a variety of project contexts.

 

  • Provide students with the skills and knowledge to make a significant contribution to project  management research activities.

 

  1. What will I know or be able to do at the end of the programme?

 

Learning Outcomes Postgraduate Certificate – Skills

By the end of this part of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

 

  • S1 Independently and objectively, critically review, evaluate, consolidate and extend their knowledge to produce a systematic and coherent body of information.
  • S2 Apply knowledge and skills in a range of activities in project and engineering management.

 

Learning Outcomes Postgraduate Certificate – Knowledge

By the end of this part of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

 

  • K1 Conduct a thorough appraisal and understanding of the current methods and concepts at the forefront of project management.
  • K2 Demonstrate a thorough and critical understanding of key aspects of the academic discipline, including project control; commercial, contractual and legal matters; and organisational structures.
  • K3 Demonstrate a critical understanding of research methods relative to the discipline area.

 

Learning Outcomes Postgraduate Diploma – Skills

By the end of this part of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

 

  • S3 Work independently and use appropriate tools and techniques to make objective decisions relating to complex engineering management problems.
  • S4 Communicate effectively through presentational and report writing skills.
  • S5 Define, identify, quantify and assess elements of risk.
  • S6 Apply appropriate project management methodologies and tools for planning and control of project cost and schedules.

 

Learning Outcomes Postgraduate Diploma – Knowledge

By the end of this part of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

 

  • K4 Appreciate the importance of teamwork and communications management.
  • K5 Display a critical awareness of the implications of people, leadership and structures upon project delivery.
  • K6 Demonstrate a critical awareness of risk management methods and their relevance in a systems change context.
  • K7 Demonstrate a critical awareness of the importance of and approaches to project governance.
  • K8 Display a critical understanding of issues in and approaches to management of disparate, multi-site, multi-disciplinary and multi-national project teams.
  • K9 Demonstrate an understanding and critical awareness of the techniques which aid management decision making

 

Learning Outcomes Masters – Skills

By the end of this part of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

 

  • S7 Design and undertake independently, a major original research project on a topic which relates to the forefront of the academic discipline of Project Management and reflect extensively and objectively on method, process, and outcomes.
  • S8 Demonstrate self-direction, originality and critical evaluation of sources in tackling and solving problems.
  • S9 Deal with complex issues in Project Management both systematically and creatively, make informed judgements in the absence of complete data, and communicate their conclusions clearly to specialist and non-specialist audiences.

 

Learning Outcomes Masters – Knowledge

By the end of this part of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

 

  • K10 Demonstrate an understanding and critical awareness of project management concepts and techniques, including the use of advanced tools for the management of projects.
  • K11 Display advanced knowledge in a highly specialised area in the discipline of Project Management via an individual project or dissertation.

 

  1. What will the programme consist of?

 

Taught postgraduate programmes generally consist of a number of taught modules leading to the award of a Postgraduate Certificate (60 credits) or Postgraduate Diploma (120 credits). A Masters qualification (180 credits) usually culminates in a major piece of independent work such as a project or dissertation. All modules are at postgraduate level (level 7 in the UK’s national scheme). The summary below describes briefly what is contained in the programme. The programme structure, including a detailed list of modules, can be found in the programme regulations.

 

ENGM91 – Project Management and Control (30 Credits). This module provides an introduction to the subject of Project Management and equips students to effectively evaluate, appraise, plan and control project taking due account of issues such as risk, quality and people from strategic, technical and economic viewpoints.

 

ENGM115 – Understanding Organisations and Systems (15 Credits). This module looks at how organisation and systems can be understood to help facilitate their design, change and management. This will be done by investigating various methods of organisational analysis and modelling. Both hard and soft system modelling will be explored.

 

CETM10 – Commercial and Contractual Issues (15 Credits). This module will provide a detailed introduction to the importance of commercial and contractual issues in projects. The role of Strategy and Strategic Management, Business Plans, Legal Issues, Commercial Relationships and Financial Management and Tendering will all be explored.

 

ENGM116 Leadership and the Management of Project Risk, Quality and People (30 Credits). This module will explore the role of leadership and people management in ensuring a successful outcome to a project. The module will also investigate the issues and strategies in managing risk and quality and how these can be deployed to provide a successful project outcome.

 

ENGM117 Project Delivery and International Project Management (30 Credits). This module will provide an introduction to some of the issues facing project managers who must efficiently and effectively oversee the delivery of projects, to include consideration of a range of international contexts.

 

ENGM123 Project/Dissertation (60 Credits). This module will provide students with the opportunity to carry out a major project or piece of research relevant to the field of Engineering Management. Students will need to identify a relevant practical problem or research question, develop a project plan and research strategy and execute this to produce an output that address the problem or research question.

 

 

  1. How will I be taught?

 

Scheduled teaching activities

Independent study

Placement

 

 

A rich mixture of different learning and teaching methods such a lectures, tutorials, seminars, online learning (e.g. Virtual Learning  Environment, VLE), directed reading and surgery sessions have been selected to make the learning experience more interesting to the wide diversity of students that the programme attracts.

 

The fact that the course is targeted at graduates and educating them to Master’s level means that the students are expected, and have the ability, to carry out a significant quantity of unsupervised study. This may take the form of directed reading of research papers and advanced technical material or practical work on various software problems and packages.

 

The objective of the student-staff contact time is to set milestones and learning goals, and make new ideas and concepts accessible to the students. These ideas are then followed up in tutorials and in the students' own time. Tutorials are used within each module to provide support for lectures. The prime objectives of tutorial time are to allow in depth study of particular topics that have been introduced and also for practical exercises. As well as requiring a significant amount of individual study, the course also encourages group working. This is in recognition of the fact that a graduate of the course will, normally be employed in environments where significant demands will be made upon his or her ability to co operate and collaborate with others.

 

A list of the modules in the programme can be found in the Programme Regulations.

 

A summary of the types of teaching, learning and assessment in each module of the programme can be found in the Matrix of Modes of Teaching.

 

  1. How will I be assessed and given feedback?

 

Written examinations

 

Coursework

Practical assessments

 

 

A summary of the types of teaching, learning and assessment in each module of the programme can be found in the Matrix of Modes of Teaching.

 

The generic assessment criteria which we use can be found here. Some programmes use subject-specific assessment criteria which are based on the generic ones.

 

This programme uses the Generic University Assessment Criteria

YES

NO

This programme uses the Subject Specific Assessment Criteria

YES

NO

 

The University regulations can be found here.

 

The students experience a diverse range of assessment strategies across the programme, enabling them to display various skills associated with Masters level learning.  This will include research papers, case study analysis, system analysis/evaluation, formal paper reviews, and presentations.

 

The students experience a diverse range of assessment strategies across the programme, enabling them to display various skills associated with Masters level learning.  This will include research papers, case study analysis, tutorial design, system analysis/evaluation, formal paper reviews, and presentation. The assessment strategies chosen within each module are appropriate to the content and style of delivery and have been further selected in order to provide a rich mixture of diverse assessment strategies while ensuring that module aims and objectives can be accurately assessed.

 

The University aims to return marked assessments and feedback within 4 working weeks of the assignment submission date after internal moderation process have been completed. If this is not possible, students will be notified by the Module Leaders when the feedback is available and how it can be obtained.

 

The Academic Misconduct Regulations and associated guidance can be found here. It is the responsibility of students to ensure they are familiar with their responsibilities in regards to assessment and the implications of an allegation of academic misconduct.

 

Students should refer to the University Regulations for information on degree classifications.

 

 


  1. Teaching, learning and assessment matrix

 

Matrix of modes of teaching, learning and assessment

 

Programme Learning Outcomes – Knowledge

 

Code

Title

C/O

Modes of T&L

Modes of Assessment

Learning Outcomes

K1

K2

K3

K4

K5

K6

K7

K8

K9

K10

K11

ENGM91

Project Management & Control

C

Lecture, tutorials/ seminars, group work, software laboratories, and project management exercises.

  • CW – Research report
  • CW – reflective report

T
D
A

T
D
A

D

A

D

D

T

D
A

T

D

A

D
A

D

A

T
D
A

D

ENGM115

Understanding Organisations & Systems

C

Lecture, seminar and tutorial, case studies, practical modelling & simulation laboratories.

  • CW – Critical Report

 

T
D
A

T
D
A

D

 

T
D
A

 

T

D

A

D

D

D

D

CETM10

Commercial and Contractual Issues in Project Management

C

Lecture, tutorials/ seminars, business games/role playing, external speakers.

  • CW – Research report

T
D
A

T
D
A

D
A

D
A

D

D

T

D

A

D
A

D

D
A

D

ENGM116

Leadership and the Management of Project Risk, Quality and People

C

Lectures, tutorials, case studies and problem-based groupwork.

  • CW – Literature review
  • CW – Case study

T
D
A

T
D
A

D
A

T
D
A

T
D
A

T
D
A

T

D

A

T

D
A

T

D

A

D
A

D

ENGM117

Project Delivery and International Project Management

C

Lectures, tutorials, case studies, industrial visits, external speakers.

  • CW – Research Report
  • CW – Reflective Report

T
D
A

T

D
A

D

A

D

A

D

A

D

T
D
A

T
D
A

T
D
A

D

A

D

ENGM123

Project / Dissertation

C

Group Lectures & tutorials, Supervision of individual project work, conducted at work, in the University, and in private study, as appropriate.

  • CW – Project Plan
  • CW – Written report
  • Practical – Presentation and Viva

D

A

D

A

D

A

D

A

D

A

D

A

D

A

D

A

D

A

D
A

D

A

 

 


Programme Learning Outcomes – Skills

 

Code

Title

C/O

Modes of T&L

Modes of Assessment

Learning Outcomes

S1

S2

S3

S4

S5

S6

S7

S8

S9

ENGM91

Project Management & Control

C

Lecture, tutorials/ seminars, group work, software laboratories, and project management exercises.

  • CW – Research report
  • CW – reflective report

D
A

D
A

D
A

D
A

T

D
A

 

D

D

A

D

A

ENGM115

Understanding Organisations & Systems

C

Lecture, seminar and tutorial, case studies, practical modelling & simulation laboratories.

  • CW – Critical Report

 

D
A

D
A

D
A

D
A

D

 

D

D
A

D
A

CETM10

Commercial and Contractual Issues in Project Management

C

Lecture, tutorials/ seminars, business games/role playing, external speakers.

  • CW – Research report

D
A

D
A

D
A

D
A

D

D

A

D

D
A

D
A

ENGM116

Leadership and the Management of Project Risk, Quality and People

C

Lectures, tutorials, case studies and problem-based groupwork.

  • CW – Literature review
  • CW – Case study

D
A

T
D
A

D

D
A

T

D
A

D
A

D

D
A

D
A

ENGM117

Project Delivery and International Project Management

C

Lectures, tutorials, case studies, industrial visits, external speakers.

  • CW – Research Report
  • CW – Reflective Report

D
A

D
A

D

D
A


D
 


D
 

D

A

D
A

D
A

ENGM123

Project / Disertation

C

Group Lectures & tutorials, Supervision of individual project work, conducted at work, in the University, and in private study, as appropriate.

  • CW – Project Plan
  • CW – Written report
  • Practical – Presentation and Viva

D

A

D

A

D

A

D

A

D

A

D

A

D

A

D

A

D

A

 

 

 

*Indicates a compulsory module which must be successfully passed for progression to further modules or to the next academic year of study


 

  1. How does research influence the programme? 

 

Opportunities to develop research skills are embedded throughout the programme. Students will receive an initial academic orientation in the expectations in terms of their own application of research. These skills will be developed in each modules e.g. students will be presented with both academic papers and technical documentation to review and evaluate in the context of a given industrial scenario. The project/dissertation module will require students to identify, plan and execute a significant piece of research work. Support and guidance will be provided in the planning stage and students will be supported by research active supervisors during the execution stage.

 

The programme content is influenced and based on the wide variety or research that is taking place in the faculty to include:

 

  • Research into Advanced Maintenance Strategies and their adoption in a variety of industries.
  • The application and benefits of Advanced Instrumentation and Industry 4.0 technology in modern industrial environments.
  • Research and Knowledge Transfer activities relating to new product development processes.
  • Investigation in to the Human Factors and Psychology involved in industrial training activities and how new technologies can be deployed to enhance skills development.
  • Activities carried out through the Institution for Automotive and Manufacturing Advanced Practice (AMAP) whose mission is to support industry in applying the latest research and advancements in engineering practice.
  • The University hosts and manages the North-East Maintenance Forum (NEMF) which is attended regularly by a significant range of Industrial representatives to share research and best practice.

 

These research and reach-out activities will be used throughout the programme to inform case studies and provide topics for assignment and the final project/dissertation module.

 

 

SECTION D EMPLOYABILITY

 

  1. How will the programme prepare me for employment?

 

The programme gives you the opportunity to develop advanced skills and knowledge which you can use in the future. Some postgraduate programmes are associated with a particular career path but most skills can be applied to a range of employment situations. The skills which this programme is designed to develop are listed below.

 

  • The curriculum of the programme has been developed to meet the current needs of employers across diverse fields, both national and international, in line with the guidance of the relevant professional institutes [The Association of Project Management (APM) and the Project Management Institute (PMI)] via their respective “Body of Knowledge” publications.

 

  • The curriculum predominately consists of technical knowledge and skills to enable the pursuit of a career in a wide variety of Engineering Management environments. 
  • In addition, close attention has been given to ensuring that the curriculum is at the forefront of the academic discipline and clearly at “M” level in line with QAA framework benchmarks for postgraduate qualifications.

 

There are also opportunities for on-campus students outside your programme of study.

 

Students are encouraged to join their relevant Engineering Council professional association. The University holds Academic Partner status with the Institution of Engineering and Technology (IET) and has close links with both the local branch and various technical committees within the IET providing students with opportunities to attend a range of events and lectures.

 

Students are also encouraged to join the Association for Project Management (APM).  Student representatives attend APM Committee meetings (held monthly) and thereby gain access to expert practitioners and potential employment opportunities. In addition, monthly talks/seminars by external speakers are a valuable feature of the APM provision.

 

For information about other opportunities available to our students who study on campus, click here.

 

Additional opportunities to develop your experiences more widely will vary if you study at one of our partner colleges. For information about the extra-curricular activities available in any of our colleges please contact the college direct. 

 

  1. Particular features of the qualification. (optional)

 

 

 

  1. Professional statutory or regulatory body (PSRB) accreditation.

 

PSRB accreditation is not relevant to this programme 

 

PSRB accreditation is currently being sought for this programme

This programme currently has PSRB accreditation

 

Accreditation from the Project Management Institute will be investigated in 2018/19.

 

 

SECTION E:  PROGRAMME STRUCTURE AND REGULATIONS

 

Please complete and insert Part B of the Programme Regulations Form, for questions 37 and 39

 

SECTION F:  ADMISSIONS, LEARNING ENVIRONMENT AND SUPPORT

 

  1. What are the admissions requirements?

 

 

The University’s standard admissions requirements can be found in the university regulations.

Programme-specific requirements which are in addition to those regulations are given below. 

 

The entry requirement for the MSc Engineering Management programme is normally a good honours degree (2:2 or above) or equivalent in an engineering discipline.

 

 

Can students enter with advanced standing?

Yes

No

 

The University has a process by which applicants whose experience to date already covers one or more modules of the programme they are applying for may seek Accreditation of Prior Learning (APL). Full details can be found here but if you think that this may be relevant to you, please contact the department which offers the programme you are interested in.

 

  1. What kind of support and help will there be?
  1. in the department:

 

The MSc Engineering Management programme will have an active Programme Space on the university’s virtual learning environment. This provides a powerful mechanism to maintain communication between students whilst at the University and to provide will provide:

 

  • Information (programme handbook and specification)
  • Frequently Asked Questions
  • Calendar (key events can be highlighted)
  • Communication (email and discussion tool)
  • Relevant link sites (e.g. to relevant professional bodies)

 

The overall strategy for support and guidance is three-pronged: accessibility to staff and resources; provision of relevant and reliable information; and operation of a responsive system for managing problems as they arise.

 

All students have individual access to their Programme and Module leaders. All engineering staff comply with the University policy document “Guidance and Good Practice on Responses to Student Emails and other Student Contact” and supplement this with an open-door policy. There is also extensive use of face to face and online interaction to provide flexible and efficient communication on day to day issues.

 

The first term of study is treated as one continuous induction period into University life. Close monitoring of student attendance is undertaken by both module and programme leaders and, where necessary, one-to-one interviews with students who default on expected attendance levels to identify any underlying issues.

 

In line with University guidelines Personal Tutor meetings are arranged with the Personal Tutor for each student in the cohort during the first and second terms.

 

Programme teams meet with student representatives each term in Staff Student Liason Committees (SSLCs) in order to formally address issues around the student experience. In many instances, issues can quickly and easily be resolved in this way. In some cases they need referral to the Boards of Study. In either event, the VLE is used as a mechanism for formally feeding back to the students regarding the resolution or otherwise of the issues raised.

 

 

  1. in the university as a whole:

The University provides a range of professional support services including wellbeing, counselling, disability support, and a Chaplaincy. Click on the links for further information.

 

  1. in a partner college:

Please see the relevant college prospectus or website for details of student support if you are planning to study in one of our partner colleges.

 

  1. What resources will I have access to?

 

On campus

In a partner college

By distance learning

 

 

On campus

Tick all that apply

General Teaching and Learning Space

IT

Library

VLE

Laboratory

 

Studio

 

Performance space

 

Other specialist

 

Technical resources 

 

 

The programme has excellent teaching resources including:

 

  • The latest teaching and learning facilities, including the new Learning Laboratory, IT suites providing access to engineering simulation software, some of which are available to students at no cost for installation on their own computers.
  • Social learning spaces including:
    • Student learning areas adjacent to the PC cells in the Goldman Building.
    • Open access computers (with technical support) with access to the usual range of Microsoft Office applications.

 

Information about the University’s facilities can be found here.

 

Please see the relevant college prospectus or website for details of college learning resources if you are planning to study in one of our partner colleges.

 

  1. Are there any additional costs on top of the fees?

 

No, but all students buy some study materials such as books and provide their own basic study materials.

Yes (optional) All students buy some study materials such as books and provide their own basic study materials. In addition there are some are additional costs for optional activities associated with the programme (see below)

 

Yes (essential) All students buy some study materials such as books and provide their own basic study materials. In addition there are some are essential additional costs associated with the programme (see below)

 

 

 

 

  1. How are student views represented?

 

All taught programmes in the University have student representatives for each programme who meet in a Student-Staff Liaison Committee (SSLC) where they can raise students’ views and concerns. The Students’ Union and the faculties together provide training for student representatives. SSLCs and focus groups are also used to obtain student feedback on plans for developing existing programmes and designing new ones. Feedback on your programme is obtained every year through module questionnaires and informs the annual review of your programme. Student representatives are also invited to attend Programme and Module Studies Boards which manage the delivery and development of programmes and modules.  Faculty Academic Committee, also has student representation. This allows students to be involved in higher-level plans for teaching and learning. At university level on Students are represented on University level Committed by sabbatical officers who are the elected leaders of the Students’ Union.

 

The University’s student representation and feedback policy can be found here.

 

Every two years we participate in the national Postgraduate Taught Experience Survey (PTES) which is run by the Higher Education Academy.

 

If you are studying in one of our partner colleges the college will have its own mechanisms for obtaining student feedback. Some of these may be the same as those on-campus at the University but others may be different. You should ask your college for further information.

 

Supplementing the standard university processes for student support and representation of views and opinions, the team operate an ‘open-door policy’. This can be accessed in person or for example by telephone or email to arrange a meeting with personal tutors, module teams or programme leaders. This allows for views to be expressed and addressed with the appropriate level of formality in a timely fashion.

 

The VLE also offers an effective means by which students and staff can communicate to assure the smooth running of modules and programme.

 

SECTION G: QUALITY MANAGEMENT 

 

  1. National subject benchmarks

 

The Quality Assurance Agency for Higher Education publishes benchmark statements which give guidance as to the skills and knowledge which graduates in various subjects and in certain types of degree are expected to have. They do not cover all subjects at postgraduate level but those which exist can be found at here.

 

Are there any benchmark statements for this programme?

YES

NO

 

The subject benchmark(s) for this programme is/are: Engineering Subject Benchmark Statement (February 2015)

 

The QAA also publishes a Framework for Higher Education Qualifications (FHEQ) which defines the generic skills and abilities expected of students who have achieved awards at a given level and with which our programmes align. The FHEQ can be found here.

 

  1. How are the quality and standards of the programme assured?

 

The programme is managed and quality assured through the University’s standard processes. Programmes are overseen by Module and Programme Studies Boards which include student representatives. Each year each module leader provides a brief report on the delivery of the module, identifying strengths and areas for development, and the programme team reviews the programme as a whole. The purpose of this is to ensure that the programme is coherent and up-to-date, with suitable progression through the programme, and a good fit (alignment)  between what is taught and how students learn and are assessed - the learning outcomes, content and types of teaching, learning and assessment. Student achievement, including progress through the programme and the way in which the final award is made, is kept under review. The programme review report is sent to the Programme Studies Board and the Faculty in turn reports issues to the University’s Quality Management Sub-Committee (QMSC).

 

External examiners are appointed to oversee and advise on the assessment of the programme. They ensure that the standards of the programme are comparable with those of similar programmes elsewhere in the UK and are also involved in the assessment process to make sure that it is fair. They are invited to comment on proposed developments to the programme. Their reports are sent to the Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Academic) as well as to the Faculty so that issues of concern can be addressed.

 

All programmes are reviewed by the University on a six-yearly cycle to identify good practice and areas for enhancement. Programmes are revalidated through this review process. These reviews include at least one academic specialist in the subject area concerned from another UK university. Quality Assurance Agency (QAA) review reports for Sunderland can be found here.

 

Further information about our quality processes can be found here.

 

Please also complete and insert the SITS form.