Attachments

 

Programme Specification

 

 

 

SECTION A: CORE INFORMATION

 

  1.  

Name  of programme:

Film and Cultural Studies

 

  1.  

Award title:

MA Film and Cultural Studies

Postgraduate Diploma in Film and Cultural Studies

Postgraduate Certificate in Film and Cultural Studies

 

  1.  

Programme linkage:

Is this part of group of linked programmes between which students can transfer at agreed points? (e.g. a group of programmes with a common set of taught modules)

 

Yes – MA Media and Cultural Studies

 

 

  1.  

Is the programme a top-up only?

No

 

  1.  

Level of award:

Level 7

 

  1.  

Awarding body:

University of Sunderland

 

  1.  

Department:

Arts and Creative Industries

 

  1.  

Programme Studies Board:

Film, Media and Cultural Studies

 

  1.  

Programme Leader:

Professor Trish Winter

 

  1. How and where can I study the programme?

 

At Sunderland:

 

Full-time on campus

Part-time on campus

 

  1. How long does the programme take?

 

 

Min number of years / months

Max number of years / months

Full-time

1

4

Part-time

2

4

 

For start-dates please see the current edition of the Prospectus or contact the relevant department at the University. For start-dates for programmes delivered in a partner college, please contact the college.

 

 

SECTION B:  FURTHER CORE INFORMATION

 

  1. Learning and teaching strategy

 

The learning and teaching strategy for this programme is designed to encourage and develop independent, active and reflective learners, as well as offer students a combination of core competencies and flexible specialisms in Film and Cultural Studies. 

 

The programme seeks to address the student experience in terms of both subject-specific knowledge and competencies and generic or transferable skills and abilities. The diversity of teaching, learning and assessment methods used on the undergraduate programmes at Sunderland is continued in this MA programme and is designed to enable students to develop as autonomous learners and researchers, encouraging the high degree of self-direction and responsibility that is the hallmark of work for a Masters award. Students are encouraged to develop their own theoretical and methodological perspectives to inform their future educational, professional and personal practices. The programme provides a learning environment within which the growth of subject-specific knowledge, analytic abilities, generic and specific skills can be developed and assessed. The teaching and learning strategy is designed to inspire students to approach their engagement with the programme content with curiosity, enthusiasm and intellectual rigour.

 

  1. Retention strategy

 

The University has a range of strategies in place to guide and support students which help to maintain retention.

 

Induction

Students enrolling on this programme have an induction day, introducing them to the University, the staff, support staff and fellow students. These usually include inductions to the library, IT support, social and student union activities, and are all designed to help students make friends, settle in to University life, find their way around and get ready for their studies.

 

Student handbook

All students have access to a student handbook that explains important details about their academic studies, how and where to get advice and support, and directs them to some of the wider support systems in place for students.

 

Attendance

The University has a system of attendance monitoring whereby students swipe in electronically each contact session. Any unexplained absences are noted and admin staff contact each missing student to make sure everything is okay and to ask if they need any support. Further unexplained absences result in more formal letters being sent to ask for a meeting with the student at which any issues can be resolved.

 


Student Reps

Students on all MA programmes elect a student representative who can speak for them at the various committees and forums where decisions are made about how their programme is run.

 

Staff Student Liaison Committee (SSLC)

Each area holds SSLC meetings at least once per term at which students and staff are invited to identify elements that are worth commending about the operation of each programme, as well as things that need to be addressed. An action plan ensures that all agreed actions are followed up and addressed.

 

 

Personal tutor

All students are allocated a personal tutor who is there to turn to and who can support them or direct them to where appropriate help may be obtained. Students can request a change of tutor without any questions asked.

 

 

SECTION C:  TEACHING AND LEARNING

 

  1. What is the programme about?

 

  • facilitate  a high level of research  enabling  individual  students  to explore  the relationship between their specialist discipline of Film and the broadly based context of Cultural Studies;
  • develop  critical  awareness  of the interdisciplinary  study  of Film  and  Cultural Studies;
  • encourage students to identify, explore, develop and debate their own research interests as they relate to those of their peers, contemporary film and/or culture and contextualised within current theoretical issues and debates;
  • encourage the development of advanced research skills through the exploration of a broad range of approaches, perspectives, themes and issues;
  • produce postgraduates capable of advanced and independent research in the area of Film and Cultural Studies.

 

  1. What will I know or be able to do at the end of the programme?

 

Learning Outcomes Postgraduate Certificate – Skills

By the end of this part of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

  • S1 Demonstrate the ability to select and compare relevant information from a range of theories from the field of Film and Cultural Studies
  • S2 Demonstrate the ability to employ a range of academic skills
  • S3 Use a range of learning resources, manage information and undertake research or investigative tasks independently.

 

Learning Outcomes Postgraduate Certificate – Knowledge

By the end of this part of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

  • K1 Critically evaluate and discuss how established techniques of research and enquiry could be used to create and interpret knowledge in Film and Cultural Studies
  • K2 Demonstrate originality in their approach to research issues and perspectives and evidence of self-directed investigation and engagement with research processes.

 

Learning Outcomes Postgraduate Diploma – Skills

By the end of this part of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

  • S4 Demonstrate the ability to adapt and apply knowledge, concepts or theories in new contexts
  • S5 Demonstrate the ability to critically reflect on their own and others’ work in order to improve their research skills and engage confidently in academic and professional communication with others.

 

Learning Outcomes Postgraduate Diploma – Knowledge

By the end of this part of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

  • K3 Demonstrate understanding of theories and methodologies appropriate to interdisciplinary studies of Film and culture
  • K4 Apply conceptual ideas and advanced analytical skills to the study of Film and Culture

 

Learning Outcomes Masters – Skills

By the end of this part of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

  •         S6 Demonstrate the skill and critical awareness to analyse, synthesise, evaluate and interpret ideas and information, and work with it at the forefront of the discipline
  •         S7 Demonstrate expertise in research and analytical skills
  •         S8 Demonstrate initiative and decision making abilities, the ability to organise and present information, and the independent learning skills required for further               academic study (eg progression to a PhD in a related area of study) and/or               professional development (eg employment requiring the exercise of initiative and               personal responsibility).

 

Learning Outcomes Masters – Knowledge

By the end of this part of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

  • K5 Demonstrate depth and systematic understanding of specialised knowledge in Film and Cultural Studies
  • K6 Demonstrate mastery of a specialised area of Film and/or Cultural Studies

 

  1. What will the programme consist of?

 

Taught postgraduate programmes generally consist of a number of taught modules leading to the award of a Postgraduate Certificate (60 credits) or Postgraduate Diploma (120 credits). A Masters qualification (180 credits) usually culminates in a major piece of independent work such as a project or dissertation. All modules are at postgraduate level (level 7 in the UK’s national scheme). The summary below describes briefly what is contained in the programme. The programme structure, including a detailed list of modules, can be found in the programme regulations

 

 

In term 1, students will take:

 

Key Thinkers: Engaging with Theory (30 credits)

On this module, students are encouraged to engage critically with theoretical issues that will help to inform their broader film and cultural studies at Masters level. The approach employed is to engage with a range of key thinkers. While the precise list might change from year to year, it would include such theorists/thinkers as Judith Butler, Manuel Castells, Jürgen Habermas, Henry Jenkins, Laura Mulvey, Janice Radway, Edward Said and Raymond Williams.

 

Consumption in Everyday Life (30 credits)

This module begins with a consideration of why consumption and everyday life have become important areas of study in recent years. Students will explore debates about structure and agency in relation to everyday consumption practices, as well as look at more specific cases of consumption in everyday life. For example, these cases may include: the consumption of fashion, popular literature and popular music, as well as the consumption of video games, television, film and online content. In addressing these various cases, students will encounter a range of theories and research methods.

 

These two Postgraduate Certificate modules are designed to generate discussion around and engagement with a range of key thinkers and theories and to enable students to begin to apply theoretical approaches to their own particular areas of interest.

 

In term 2, student will take:

 

Research Methods in Film, Media & Cultural Studies (30 credits)

This module fosters and develops the skills necessary for the completion of the MA and independent research more generally, including preparing students for progressing to PhD study. Via a series of case studies – covering such approaches as film analysis, researching film history, feminist methods, archival research and ethnography – students will engage with a number of methodological traditions and practical skills in researching areas of film and cultural studies.

 

Independent Study Topic in Film & Cultural Studies (30 credits)

This module is independent study, allowing students to engage in a small-scale self-directed piece of research in order to produce an extended essay of 6000 words. Topics are agreed in negotiation with the module leaders to ensure they are appropriate for the named award.

 

These two Postgraduate Diploma modules are designed to equip students with more advanced research skills to enable them to explore in more depth and complexity those particular areas of the broader field field which interests them. The modules allow greater scope for independent learning and the development of research interests.

 

In term 3, students will take:

 

Dissertation (60 credits)

This module is an independent, self-directed study, which enables students to undertake a substantial research project and produce a 12000–14000 word dissertation. Topics are agreed in negotiation with the module leaders to ensure they are appropriate for the named award.

 

This final Masters module draws on all the elements of the previous modules to enable students to deliver an individually initiated and authored major project, which exhibits the high level of initiative and independent work that is expected at Masters level.

 

  1. How will I be taught?

Scheduled teaching activities

Independent study

Placement

N/A

 

Lectures: to disseminate historical, contextual and theoretical knowledge and to provide the basis for generating further debate in seminars or tutorials or for further enquiry in independent learning or research.

 

Screenings and/or field trips:  to provide a shared experience of ‘consumption’ to provide the basis for group of the application of theories and critical approaches to understanding film and culture.

 

Seminars: to provide opportunities for group debate of theories, contexts and approaches which in turn allow students to describe, develop and explore their areas of interest and get feedback on their ideas and perspectives from lecturers and the peer group. Seminars can be student-led allowing individuals and groups the opportunities to present topics of research, develop skills in formulating materials for an audience, and refine their oral communication skills and build confidence in presentation.

 

Supervision: to provide students with individual academic guidance specifically in relation to the two independent study modules, the Diploma level Independent Study Topic, and the Masters level Dissertation

 

Tutorials: to provide students with individual academic guidance, encouragement and feedback as well as more focused discussion and debate than might be generally attainable within group seminars.

 

The two Postgraduate Certificate modules are both taught modules, with some content delivered via lectures. Group discussion is an important part of the learning and teaching strategy here, with the aim of fostering a critical awareness of a broad range of perspectives, issues and approaches, along with starting to develop students’ ability to apply them to their own areas of interest. Since some students on the programme might have academic backgrounds in areas outside of Film and Cultural Studies, the learning and teaching strategy on these two modules is intended to cater for their learning needs whilst helping to develop the understanding of students who are more familiar with these fields at the outset. This is a difficult balance to strike – but the interdisciplinary approaches of Film and Cultural Studies enable connections to be made with other areas in the arts, humanities and social sciences.

 

The Diploma ‘Research Methods’ module is also a taught module with some content delivered via lectures, but greater emphasis is placed on class discussion, with students being invited to enter into a critical dialogue with staff and fellow students.  These discussions are designed to be flexible, allowing students to participate in shaping the dialogue, so enabling them to explore ideas relating to research methods and their uses critically at an advanced level, laying the groundwork for transition to more independent learning. At the same time, this module has a clear framework organised around a structured selection of methods that allows a range of possible research interests to be explored. This strategy is in line with the aim of fostering in students core competencies and flexible specialisms, with a view to producing postgraduates who are capable of advanced and independent research in the area of Film and Cultural Studies. The Diploma level ‘Independent Study Topic’ and Masters level ‘Dissertation’ modules allow students to pursue the interests they have developed in the preceding taught modules through independent study.

 

Taught contact time reduces as students’ progress through the Diploma level modules in preparation for the final Masters level module and as expectations increase for the students to develop Masters level transferable skills such as self-reliance, initiative and ability to manage complex situations. The nature of contact time with students’ changes from largely seminars and lectures at the Certificate and Diploma levels to mainly individual supervision by the final Masters level.

 

In addition to the scheduled teaching activities, students are expected to attend the Research Seminars organised by the Centre for Research in Media & Cultural Studies (CRMCS), where a range of internal and external speakers present research in progress and new projects. On occasions, the programme team also organise research symposia or conferences where speakers present their latest research, and students on the MA will be invited to attend. These events offer excellent opportunities to students to gain an understanding of the range and multiplicity of approaches, methodologies and traditions within Film and Cultural studies and to be motivated by the vibrancy of the field.

 

A list of the modules in the programme can be found in the Programme Regulations.

 

A summary of the types of teaching, learning and assessment in each module of the programme can be found in the Matrix of Modes of Teaching.

 

  1. How will I be assessed and given feedback?

 

Written examinations

N/A

Coursework

Practical assessments

 

A summary of the types of teaching, learning and assessment in each module of the programme can be found in the Matrix of Modes of Teaching.

 

The generic assessment criteria which we use can be found here. Some programmes use subject-specific assessment criteria which are based on the generic ones.

 

This programme uses the Generic University Assessment Criteria

YES

 

This programme uses the Subject Specific Assessment Criteria

 

NO

 

The University regulations can be found here.

 

Assessment strategies at Postgraduate Certificate and Postgraduate Diploma levels are designed to provide a foundation for the independent research and academic skills required to produce the MA level dissertation (between 12,000 and 14,000 words). The Postgraduate Certificate and Diploma modules are assessed by means of shorter projects or essays (equivalent to 6,000 words per 30 credits). On the Certificate level modules, essays will be set in such a way that they test the ability of the student to engage critically with a broader range of ideas. Assessment of – and feedback on – these essays will also focus on the academic writing skills of students, since these skills will be essential later in the preparation of the dissertation. On the Diploma level modules, projects or essays will be set in such a way that they encourage individual exploration, analysis and evaluation in a specific strand of Film and Cultural Studies. The emphasis throughout on assessing individual writing and research is appropriate for a postgraduate programme of this sort, especially when one of the intended learning outcomes is to equip students with the high level of independent learning skills necessary for progression to PhD research and/or professional employment. On the Masters level Dissertation module, submission of an outline proposal and oral presentation of work in progress to staff and fellow students will be required. These are designed to create opportunities for informal feedback to the student and will not be formally assessed.

The University aims to return marked assessments and feedback within 4 working weeks of the assignment submission date after internal moderation process have been completed. If this is not possible, students will be notified by the Module Leaders when the feedback is available and how it can be obtained.

 

The Academic Misconduct Regulations and associated guidance can be found here. It is the responsibility of students to ensure they are familiar with their responsibilities in regards to assessment and the implications of an allegation of academic misconduct.

 

Students should refer to the University Regulations for information on degree classifications.

 

 


  1. Teaching, Learning and Assessment Matrix

 

Matrix of modes of teaching, learning and assessment

NB. Not all option modules may be offered in any one academic year and will depend on the availability of staff and the priorities of the school. In addition, modules will usually need to be selected by a minimum number of students. Option modules may be available on more than one programme and the Programme Leaders will liaise with the Faculty Management Team to ensure there is a reasonable amount of choice in any given year.

 

Postgraduate Certificate

 

Module

Code

Core /

option

Modes of T&L

Modes of

Assessment

LO S1

LO S2

LO S3

LO K1

LO K2

Engaging with Theory

MACM24

Core

Lectures, seminars,

tutorials, small group work, directed independent learning

Coursework (two

essays)

D

T

A

D

T A

 

Consumption in Everyday Life

MEDM06

Core

Lectures, seminars,

tutorials, small group work, directed independent learning

Presentation, Essay

D

A

 

T A

D

T

A

T A

 

Postgraduate Diploma

 

Module

Code

Core /

option

Modes of T&L

Modes of

Assessment

LO S4

LO S5

LO K3

LO K4

Research Methods in Film, Media & Cultural Studies

MACM25

Core

Lectures, seminars,

tutorials, small group work, directed independent learning

Critical review, presentation, research project proposal

D

A

T A

T A

 

 

   Independent Study

  Topic in

Film and

Cultural Studies

MEDM07

Core

Supervised self-

directed independent learning

Research

Project

D

D

D

T

A

 

Masters

 

Module

Code

Core /

optional

Modes of

T&L

Modes of

Assessment

LO S6

LO S7

LO S8

LO K5

LO K6

Dissertation

 

MACM08

Core

Supervised

self-directed independent learning

Presentation,

Essay

D

D

D

T

A

T

A


  1. How does research influence the programme? 

 

Most members of staff hold research degrees at Doctoral and Masters level, and are presently engaged in the wider academic community as external examiners on undergraduate and postgraduate programmes at other institutions. Staff are also active as academic and critical practitioners. Recent research projects have covered a range of theoretical and practical concerns, and outcomes have been disseminated via publication, conference presentation, community work and public engagement activities. Staff research underpins and informs the three taught modules on the programme and facilitates the specialist supervision on the independent study modules. The Diploma level ‘Independent Study Topic’ and Masters level ‘Dissertation’ enable students to engage in their own research projects and develop their research skills.

 

The Media Area continues to consolidate and develop its research activities, skills and methodologies through initiatives based on individual and collaborative research projects, collaborative exchange, industry and community links, and contact with external scholars and funding partners.

 

The Centre for Research in Media and Cultural Studies (CRMCS) research seminars, held fortnightly on Monday evenings, also provide important staff development, and staff from across all parts of the Media Area attend, as well as postgraduate students. Speakers at these events often discuss research in progress that is directly related to the programme. CRMCS also regularly holds conferences or symposia on a range of topics which are open to all staff and students.

 

The Prospect Building at St Peter’s Campus is equipped with a cross-Faculty Learning Resource Centre and specialist Library provision. Staff liaise regularly with these resource providers, who are supportive and generally responsive to expressed needs and provide excellent help with the development of online learning resources.

 

 

 

 

SECTION D EMPLOYABILITY

 

  1. How will the programme prepare me for employment?

 

The programme gives you the opportunity to develop advanced skills and knowledge which you can use in the future. Some postgraduate programmes are associated with a particular career path but most skills can be applied to a range of employment situations. The skills which this programme is designed to develop are listed below.

 

For information about other opportunities available to our students who study on campus, click here.

 

Additional opportunities to develop your experiences more widely will vary if you study at one of our partner colleges. For information about the extra-curricular activities available in any of our colleges please contact the college direct. 

 

 

 

  1. Professional statutory or regulatory body (PSRB) accreditation.

 

PSRB accreditation is not relevant to this programme 

PSRB accreditation is currently being sought for this programme

 

This programme currently has PSRB accreditation

 

 

SECTION E:  PROGRAMME STRUCTURE AND REGULATIONS

 

Regulations apply to students commencing their studies from (please state the date / intake that these regulations will apply to students for each Stage):

 

Regulations apply to students

Date the regulations apply

Intakes affected

Stage 1

2017/18

2017/18

 

Certificate

Core modules:

Code

Title

Credits

MACM24

Engaging with Theory

30

MEDM06

Consumption in Everyday Life

30

 

Diploma

Core modules

Code

Title

Credits

MACM25

Research Methods in Film, Media & Cultural Studies

30

MEDM07

Independent Study Topic in Film and Cultural Studies

30

 

 

MA

Core modules

Code

Title

Credits

MACM08

Dissertation

60

 

 

 

Full Time Structure

 

October to February

February to June

June to September

PG Cert

PG Dip

MA

MACM24

Engaging with Theory

30 credits

 

MACM25

Research Methods in Film, Media and Cultural Studies

30 credits

MACM08

Dissertation

60 credits

MEDM06

Consumption in Everyday Life

30 credits

MEDM07

Independent Study Topic in Film and Cultural Studies

30 credits

 

 

 


Part Time Structure

 

Year 1 (90 credits)

October to February

February to June

June to September

MACM24

Engaging with Theory

30 credits

 

and

MEDM06

Consumption in Everyday Life

 

MACM25

Research Methods in Film, Media and Cultural Studies

30 credits

 

 

 

 

Year 2 (90 credits)

 

 

MEDM07

Independent Study Topic

30 credits

MACM08

Dissertation

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SECTION F:  ADMISSIONS, LEARNING ENVIRONMENT AND SUPPORT

 

  1. What are the admissions requirements?

 

Applicants are normally required to have a good honours degree in an appropriate field or discipline (2.1 or above), and those with a 2.2 are considered on a case-by- case basis.

 

As part of the University’s widening participation policy, applicants with no formal academic qualifications will be considered if they have an appropriate professional background or experience. All such applicants are required to demonstrate, through interview, or letter of intent and essay that they have the ability, motivation and commitment to cope with the demands of postgraduate studies.

 

The University’s standard admissions requirements can be found in the university regulations.

Programme-specific requirements which are in addition to those regulations are given below. 

(Maximum 100 words)

 

Can students enter with advanced standing?

 

No

 

The University has a process by which applicants whose experience to date already covers one or more modules of the programme they are applying for may seek Accreditation of Prior Learning (APL). Full details can be found here but if you think that this may be relevant to you, please contact the department which offers the programme you are interested in.

 

  1. What kind of support and help will there be?
  1. in the department:

Pastoral support is provided by the Programme Leader (first point of call), Module Leaders and dissertation supervisors. All teaching staff are available during their publicised office hours and via email for the purpose of providing academic support, guidance and advice on student progress. Students may, at any time, request an alternative support tutor from within the MA or wider Media Team.

 

  1. in the university as a whole:

The University provides a range of professional support services including wellbeing, counselling, disability support, and a Chaplaincy. Click on the links for further information.

 

  1. in a partner college:

Please see the relevant college prospectus or website for details of student support if you are planning to study in one of our partner colleges.

 

  1. What resources will I have access to?

 

On campus

In a partner college

 

By distance learning

 

 

On campus

Tick all that apply

General Teaching and Learning Space

 

IT

Library

VLE

Laboratory

N/A

Studio

N/A

Performance space

N/A

Other specialist

Technical resources 

 

The David Puttnam Media Centre has a range of resources,  including  a large cinema used for viewing films, and is based on the St Peter’s Campus along with the St Peter’s Library, which is an important resource with an excellent stock of books in the film  and culture areas. The University Library Services offer a range of resources, both in print and online, in support of University learning, teaching and research activities. The three site libraries provide information collections, a variety of study spaces, IT facilities and experienced library staff during core hours, with online services and support available at any time off-campus. In addition, both the Murray and St. Peter’s libraries offer 24/7 access during main teaching weeks. On joining the University, all students attend a Library Induction session and library staff are available to help with enquiries during library opening hours. In addition, library staff are experienced in working with academic colleagues in designing and delivering customised Information Skills workshops, either timetabled sessions embedded into core modules or individual sessions provided on request. These workshops provide students with the skills they need to identify and evaluate information from both print collections and electronic sources, including subject specific databases and gateways, online journals and other quality sources available on the Internet. Students can also access subject specific help sheets, online tutorials, FAQs and many more sources of information on the Library website 

 

Information about the University’s facilities can be found here.

 

Please see the relevant college prospectus or website for details of college learning resources if you are planning to study in one of our partner colleges.

 

  1. Are there any additional costs on top of the fees?

 

No, but all students buy some study materials such as books and provide their own basic study materials.

Yes (optional) All students buy some study materials such as books and provide their own basic study materials. In addition there are some are additional costs for optional activities associated with the programme (see below)

 

Yes (essential) All students buy some study materials such as books and provide their own basic study materials. In addition there are some are essential additional costs associated with the programme (see below)

 

 

  1. How are student views represented?

 

All taught programmes in the University have student representatives for each programme who meet in a Student-Staff Liaison Committee (SSLC) where they can raise students’ views and concerns. The Students’ Union and the faculties together provide training for student representatives. SSLCs and focus groups are also used to obtain student feedback on plans for developing existing programmes and designing new ones. Feedback on your programme is obtained every year through module questionnaires and informs the annual review of your programme. Student representatives are also invited to attend Programme and Module Studies Boards which manage the delivery and development of programmes and modules.  Faculty Academic Committee, also has student representation. This allows students to be involved in higher-level plans for teaching and learning. At university level on Students are represented on University level Committed by sabbatical officers who are the elected leaders of the Students’ Union.

 

The University’s student representation and feedback policy can be found here.

 

Every two years we participate in the national Postgraduate Taught Experience Survey (PTES) which is run by the Higher Education Academy.

 

SECTION G: QUALITY MANAGEMENT 

 

  1. National subject benchmarks

 

The Quality Assurance Agency for Higher Education publishes benchmark statements which give guidance as to the skills and knowledge which graduates in various subjects and in certain types of degree are expected to have. They do not cover all subjects at postgraduate level but those which exist can be found at here.

 

Are there any benchmark statements for this programme?

 

NO

 

The QAA also publishes a Framework for Higher Education Qualifications (FHEQ) which defines the generic skills and abilities expected of students who have achieved awards at a given level and with which our programmes align. The FHEQ can be found here.

 

  1. How are the quality and standards of the programme assured?

 

The programme is managed and quality assured through the University’s standard processes. Programmes are overseen by Module and Programme Studies Boards which include student representatives. Each year each module leader provides a brief report on the delivery of the module, identifying strengths and areas for development, and the programme team reviews the programme as a whole. The purpose of this is to ensure that the programme is coherent and up-to-date, with suitable progression through the programme, and a good fit (alignment)  between what is taught and how students learn and are assessed - the learning outcomes, content and types of teaching, learning and assessment. Student achievement, including progress through the programme and the way in which the final award is made, is kept under review. The programme review report is sent to the Programme Studies Board and the Faculty in turn reports issues to the University’s Quality Management Sub-Committee (QMSC).

 

External examiners are appointed to oversee and advise on the assessment of the programme. They ensure that the standards of the programme are comparable with those of similar programmes elsewhere in the UK and are also involved in the assessment process to make sure that it is fair. They are invited to comment on proposed developments to the programme. Their reports are sent to the Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Academic) as well as to the Faculty so that issues of concern can be addressed.

 

All programmes are reviewed by the University on a six-yearly cycle to identify good practice and areas for enhancement. Programmes are revalidated through this review process. These reviews include at least one academic specialist in the subject area concerned from another UK university. Quality Assurance Agency (QAA) review reports for Sunderland can be found here.

 

Further information about our quality processes can be found here.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SITS SUMMARY PROGRAMME/SHORT COURSE DETAILS

(Form to be completed electronically by the Faculty and forwarded to the Quality Assurance and Enhancement (QAE) Quality Officer supporting the Approval event, or sent to Management Information and Systems Development (MISD) for faculty devolved processes before sending to QAE)

PROGRAMME/SUBJECT/SHORT COURSE DETAILS

 

Exit Award: Title of programme/award

MA Film and Cultural Studies

If replacement for existing, specify title of old

 

Faculty(ies):

Arts and Creative Industries

Department:

Journalism, Media and Cultural Studies

SITS Programme/Short Course code[1]

 

Programme Studies Board[2]

Film, Media and Cultural Studies

UCAS code[3] (if applicable).  If other please state method.

CID172

JACS code[4]

P300

Qualification Level / Qualification Aim

Level 7

 

Modes of delivery and duration:

 

(delete yes/no as necessary)

Full time       yes/ one year

On-campus  yes

Off-campus  no 

CSP Only. Other subject combinations not allowed with this subject:

 

Programme/Subject/Short Course Leader:

Professor Trish Winter

Date of Approval /Modification/Review

April 2018

Date of next review (QAE to complete)

 

Start date of programme/Short Course

October 2018

Number of intakes per annum and likely month(s) intake(s) starts.

one

 

FUNDING DETAILS

 

Confirm funding arrangements for programme e.g. HEFCE/TDA/NHS/Other[5]

HEFCE

If it is TDA, is it primary/secondary/F.E./Other (please state)

 

Is the programme Open or Closed[6]:

Open

 

ACCREDITING BODY

NO

If yes please attach completed form AQH-Ciii2

 

PROGRAMME SPECIFIC REGULATIONS

Are there to be programme specific regulations?

NO

If yes, please attach completed form AQH-B3 Appendix 2 or AQH-B8.

 

COLLABORATIVE:

Please complete details

UK no

 

Overseas no

Institution                                      Collaborative model[7]         Funding arrangements[8]

 

…………………………………………..            ………………………………         ….……………………..

 

…………………………………………..            ………………………………         ………………………..

 

…………………………………………..            ………………………………         …………………………

 

 

  INTERIM AWARD SCHEDULE

 

Interim award title

Credits required

Interim structure

Please show mandatory requirements if applicable e.g. core module codes

Postgraduate Certificate in Film and Cultural Studies

60

MACM24

MEDM06

 

 

Postgraduate Diploma in Film and Cultural Studies

120

MACM25

MEDM07

 

 

 

 

 

 

   DETAILS SUPPLIED BY:Professor Trish Winter

04 April 2018

 

 

 


 

Award, Route (if applicable) and Level

New/Existing/ Modified  Module (N/E/MM)

Module Title

Module Code

Module Credit Value

Whether core or option

Must choose (ie designated option):

Assessment weighting – give % weight for each assessment item

Pre-/co-requisites

Module leader

Other comment (if required)

Date of Entry on SITS.

N/MM only

( After event)

JACS Code

Level 7

E

Engaging with Theory

MACM24

30

core

n/a

1 – 40%

2 – 60%

 

Shaun Moores

 

 

 

 

M

Consumption in Everyday Life

MEDM06

30

core

n/a

1 – 25%

2 – 75%

 

Clarissa Smith

 

 

 

 

E

Research Methods

MACM25

30

core

n/a

1 – 25%

2 – 25%

3 – 50%

 

Shaun Moores

 

 

 

 

M

Independent Study Topic

MEDM07

30

core

n/a

1 – 100%

 

Steve Cannon

 

 

 

 

E

Dissertation

MACM08

60

core

n/a

1 – 100%

 

Trish Winter

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


[1] To be allocated in consultation with MISD team in Planning and Finance

[2] Programme Studies/Assessment Board that will have management responsibilities for the programme.

[3] Please contact Admissions Manager for code

[4] JACS code = e.g. (V1) History, (G5) Computing Science, etc. for information contact relevant Faculty Associate Dean (See QAA Website http://www.qaa.ac.uk/WorkWithUs/Documents/jacs_codes.pdf)

[5] Please confer with Amanda Watson for funding status for programme

[6] An Open programme constitutes an open admissions policy.  A Closed programme is normally specific to one client only.  If in doubt please consult Academic Services or Planning and Finance.

 

[7] As per QAE guidelines

[8] Please contact Amanda Watson for confirmation of funding details