Attachments

1.gif

 

Quality Handbook

 

 

AQH-B2-3a Undergraduate Programme Specification Template

August 2015

 

 

 

 

Faculty of Health Sciences & Wellbeing

School of Nursing & Health Sciences

 

BSc Healthcare Science: Cardiac Physiology

 

 

 

2019-20

 

 

Programme Specification

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Version History

 

Version

Occasion of Change

Change Author

Last Modified

1.0

Version presented for approval

Dr Judith Kuit

Created 23/02/11

2.0

Amendments following institutional approval

Programme Specifications divided up into specific programmes

Dr Judith Kuit

18.07.11

 

Checked learning outcomes and assessments

Dr Judith A. Kuit

01/11/11

 

Correct errors

Dr Judith A. Kuit

31/01/12

3.0

HCS106 assessment number reduced

Dr Judith A. Kuit

09/07/12

4.0

Updated for HEE & RCCP visit

Dr Judith A Kuit

22/05/13

5.0

Updated post HEE and RCCP accreditation and to fit new programme specification template

Dr Judith A. Kuit

25/11/13

6.0

Update module leaders

Dr Judith A. Kuit

07/08/14

7.0

HCS202 and HCS219 replaced with HCS226 and HCS232

Mr Christopher Cox

21/04/2016

8.0

Revision for periodic review

Mr Christopher Cox

May 2016

9.0

HCS332 replaced with HCS337

HCS333 replaced with HCS338

J Armstrong

Aug 2018

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SECTION A: CORE INFORMATION

 

  1. Name  of programme

 

Healthcare Science: Cardiac Physiology

 

 

  1. Award title (eg BA Honours)

BSc Honours

 

  1. Programme linkage

Is this part of group of linked programmes between which students can transfer at agreed points?

 

Yes

 

If yes:

BSc (Hons) Physiological Sciences

 

Students can transfer from Physiological Sciences to Healthcare Science during stage 1, subject to particular requirements

 

  1. Is the programme a top-up only?

 

No

 

  1. Does the programme have a Foundation Year (level 3) associated with it so that students enter for a four-year programme and progress directly from the Foundation Year to Stage 1 without having to re-apply? (ie an ‘Extended Studies’ programme)

 

No

 

  1. Level of award (eg Level 6 for BA/BSc)

 

Level 6

 

  1. Awarding body:

 

University of Sunderland

 

  1. Which department is it in?

 

School of Nursing & Health Sciences

 

 

 

 

  1. Programme Studies Board?

 

Biosciences

 

  1. Programme Leader

 

Mr Christopher Cox

 

  1. How and where can I study the programme?

Tick all boxes that apply

 

At Sunderland:

 

Full-time on campus

X

Part-time on campus

 

As work-based learning full-time

 

As work-based learning part-time

 

As a full-time sandwich course

 

As a part-time sandwich course

 

By distance learning

 

 

At the University of Sunderland London campus: 

 

Full-time on campus

 

Part-time on campus

 

As work-based learning full-time

 

As work-based learning part-time

 

As a full-time sandwich course

 

As a part-time sandwich course

 

By distance learning

 

 

At a partner college:

 

Full-time in the UK 

 

Part-time in the UK

 

Full-time overseas

 

Part-time overseas

 

By distance learning

 

As a full-time sandwich course in the UK

 

As a part-time sandwich course in the UK

 

As a full-time sandwich course overseas

 

As a part-time sandwich course overseas

 

As work-based learning full-time in the UK 

 

As work-based learning part-time overseas

 

Other (please specify)

 

 

  1. How long does the programme take?

 

 

Min number of years / months

Max number of years / months

Full-time

3

5

Part-time

 

 

Distance learning

 

 

Work-based learning

 

 

 

For start-dates please see the current edition of the Prospectus or contact the relevant department at the University. For start-dates for programmes delivered in a partner college, please contact the college.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SECTION B – FURTHER CORE INFORMATION 

 

Use Outline Programme Proposal Form for ADC (AQH-B2-2), for questions 13 to 25

 

  1. Learning and teaching strategy. 

 

All aspects of the learning environment and course organisation support learning, which is at the heart of the University of Sunderland culture. In line with the University’s Learning and Teaching Plan, the methods employed on this programme aim to produce graduates competent in a range of subject-specific knowledge and skills, as well as transferrable skills. The teaching and learning strategy is designed to progressively develop the ability to learn independently and facilitate academic and professional success within a supportive and productive learning environment. The teaching and assessments on the programme have been constructively aligned with the intended outcomes of student achievement. The programme integrates traditional lecture- and laboratory-based learning with active, experiential and enquiry-based learning, alongside integrated work placements, which are a key element of the programme.

 

The curriculum has been designed by Healthcare Science practitioners working with the National School of Healthcare Science (formerly Health Education England Healthcare Science Programme Board) to define the theoretical underpinning, knowledge and skills acquisition required to be a Healthcare Science Practitioner within the chosen specialism. The programme delivers the Modernising Scientific Careers (MSC) Healthcare Science Practitioner Training Programme (PTP) Physiological Sciences: Cardiovascular Physiology curriculum and is a partnership between the University and the NHS/health service. The teaching and learning methods employed reflect this dual purpose of fitness to practice in terms of competence and fitness to practice in terms of knowledge. The delivery of the programme therefore employs not only academic staff from the university but also Healthcare Science Practitioners working in the university and in the workplace to provide the clinical focus of the programme. The diversity of clinical skills and knowledge employed in the delivery is a major strength of the programme which provides a vocational training as well as academic learning.

 

Teaching and learning methods are designed to support and challenge students, develop investigative and problem-solving skills and encourage creativity, and include a range of approaches to reflect different ways of learning, such as lectures, laboratory sessions, workshops/seminars, case-based learning, group work, one-to-one tutorials, as well as directed and independent study and use of the virtual learning environment (VLE). Assessment practices are an integral part of learning and teaching and a variety of formative and summative assessment types are incorporated to reflect the full range of programme learning objectives, with assessments based on threshold levels of learning.  Formative feedback is often rapid, for example through the use of peer review or interactive response tool software (which also facilitates monitoring of student learning). Summative assessments have staggered submissions dates to provide regular assessment and promote constructive use of feedback (which is provided within four working weeks). Both formative and summative assessment feedback contributes to academic development and is intended to support further learning as well as reflection and self-assessment.

 

There is an increasing amount of experiential learning undertaken in the work place alongside progress through each stage and this will result in a clinical logbook demonstrating assessment of competence and a professional portfolio recording evidence and critical reflection.

 

In addition, all students will have the opportunity to gain experience of the approach to, practice and appraisal of scientific research through an individual research project. Students will use the knowledge and skills learnt in the first two years to generate, analyse and evaluate scientific data and present this in the form of a conference poster and research paper.

 

 

  1. Retention strategy

 

High quality student support (both academic and pastoral) is integrated with the programme and aims to build a culture which enables a sense of belonging and partnership. Successful completion of the programme demands student engagement and appropriate support from those involved in teaching, learning and pastoral care. Inclusivity, equality and diversity are embedded in the Institution values and act to enrich curricular, learning and teaching. A range of practices are implemented to promote student retention, and include support during the student journey (induction, on-going personal tutoring, attendance monitoring, social events), academic support (inclusive teaching and learning approach, assistive technologies to aid learning, supportive learning environment), placement support (placement coordinator and work-based supervisor/mentor) as well as systems to support students with personal difficulties and disabilities. Furthermore, consistent and meaningful engagement with the student voice acts as a continual feedback mechanism to improve the student experience.

 

 

  1. Any other information.

 

The Practitioner Training Programme (PTP) Cardiovascular Physiology curriculum contains a large proportion of work-based training which will be unpaid and mainly provided by hospital trusts. For this reason, the length of time that the student is expected to engage with the programme increases annually. Stage 1 is 36 weeks long including 10 weeks work-based training, Stage 2 is 40 weeks long including 15 weeks work-based training, and Stage 3 is 46 weeks long including 25 weeks work-based training. The availability of training places is underpinned by trust need based on workforce planning.

The University, placement provider and student will sign placement agreements and learning contracts prior to the discipline specific work-based training in stages 2 and 3.

 

 

 

SECTION C - TEACHING AND LEARNING

 

  1. What is the programme about?

 

The Healthcare Science programme aims to deliver a program that gives graduates the knowledge, skills, experiential learning and associated personal qualities / professionalism required to work safely and effectively in NHS as a Healthcare Science Practitioner specialising in cardiac physiology.

 

In accordance with the curriculum set out by the National School of Healthcare Science the programme will:

 

  • Integrate a wide range of underpinning scientific principles, key subjects and current research leading to an understanding of the causes, diagnosis, monitoring and treatment of cardiac and respiratory disease
  • Promote the importance of patient centred care
  • Provide a range of skills in the analysis, interpretation and evaluation of diagnostic data appropriate to cardiac physiology
  • Inspire independent, active and reflective learning through innovative and diverse learning and assessment methods

 

  1. What will I know or be able to do at each Stage of the programme?

 

Learning Outcomes Stage 1 (level 4) - Skills  

 

By the end of this Stage of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

 

S1 Perform a range of practical techniques relevant to physiological sciences utilising basic professional and clinical skills

S2 Communicate concepts and ideas using a variety of appropriate methods

S3 Identify and reflect upon interpersonal, transferable and study skills

S4 Effectively apply principles of health and safety legislation to the clinical environment

 

 

Learning Outcomes Stage 1 (level 4) – Knowledge

 

By the end of this Stage of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

 

K1 Discuss a wide range of mechanisms and processes of life, from the molecular and cellular level through to those of the whole body systems

K2 Explain the structure, function and control of major systems of the human body.

K3 Recognise the role and professional practice of healthcare science practitioners specialising in cardiac physiology

K4 Understand the importance of health and safety in the workplace

K5 Outline how a patient centred approach is central to the structure and processes within the NHS

 

 

Learning Outcomes Stage 2 (level 5)  – Skills

 

By the end of this Stage of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

 

S5 Employ an analytical approach to routine techniques used within Cardiology specialism to obtain valid, high quality measurements that can be used in the diagnosis of disease

S6 Analyse and interpret clinical data from routine investigations

S7 Evaluate and synthesise information, arguments and analyses supported by evidence from appropriate sources

S8 Effectively communicate information, arguments and analyses by a variety of techniques to a variety of specialist and non-specialist audiences including patients and carers

S9 Critically review and evaluate protocols in relation to core skills in health and safety, human rights, patient identification, communication skills and quality assurance

 

 

Learning Outcomes Stage 2 (level 5)  – Knowledge

 

By the end of this Stage of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

 

K6 Articulate using appropriate terminology fundamental knowledge of the mechanisms of disease and pathological responses relevant to cardiovascular and respiratory science

K7 Explain the principles of current techniques underpinning the assessment of cardiac function and disease including the capabilities, limitations, risks and benefits of each technique

K8 Effectively benchmark the principles and practices relevant to routine investigations and procedures within a quality assurance and legislative framework

 

 

Learning Outcomes Stage 3 (level 6) – Skills

 

By the end of this Stage of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

 

S10 Evaluate the application of a range of established techniques that for the basis of pathological diagnosis

S11 Evaluate the relevance and significance of scientific information

S12 Apply research and analytical methodologies to an individual research project

S13 Effectively apply the competence and professional standards of conduct expected of a Healthcare Science Practitioner in a practice-based setting

S14 Professionally perform the routine tasks expected of a Healthcare Science Practitioner specialising in cardiac physiology

 

 

Learning Outcomes Stage 3 (level 6) – Knowledge

 

By the end of this Stage of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

 

K9   Demonstrate an advanced knowledge of the underpinning and emerging principles and practices used in cardiac physiology procedures and their application to patient diagnosis and treatment

K10 Critically assess the structure, processes and management of healthcare services and systems

K11 Critically evaluate the role of patient centred care from the perspectives of the healthcare professional, patient and patient carer recognising the diversity of the patient experience

K12 Recognise the importance of professional development and continual lifelong learning in the role of the Healthcare Science Practitioner

 

 

Learning Outcomes – Interim Awards

 

As the BSc (Hons) Healthcare Science is a dedicated training programme for the National School of Healthcare Science, then in order to comply with the practitioner training programme all students must be able to achieve all of the designated credits which make up the programme. Any student who fails to do this at any stage cannot be awarded the named BSc (Hons) Healthcare Science: Cardiac Physiology as it would misrepresent their ability to practice.

 

In cases, where the student does not fulfil all the above requirements for the BSc (Hons) Healthcare Science degree, they could be eligible for a University interim award of:

  • Certificate of Higher Education in Healthcare Science
  • Diploma in Higher Education in Healthcare Science

 

 

  1. What will the programme consist of?

 

Each undergraduate programme consists of a number of Stages from a minimum of 1 to a maximum of 4, each of which is equivalent to a year’s full-time study. The summary below describes briefly what is contained in each Stage. Most programmes have a mixture of core (ie compulsory) modules and optional ones, often with increasing choice as you move through the programme and gain in experience. In some programmes the choice of optional modules gives you particular ‘routes’ through the programme. The programme structure including a detailed list of modules can be found in the programme regulations.

 

Context

 

The BSc (Hons) Healthcare Science programmes are designed to meet the requirements of a Department of Health Initiative known as Modernising Scientific Careers (MSC). The MSC initiative covered a broad range subject specialities within healthcare science with individual curricula and learning guides developed for each subject specialty. The content of the BSc (Hons) Healthcare Science: Cardiac Physiology programme has been prescribed by the MSC curriculum.

 

Cardiac physiology is one subject specialism, within the Physiological Sciences division of the MSC training programme. At each stage (level) the curriculum is divided into generic elements common to all Healthcare Science specialisms, division specific modules required for all programmes teaching the Physiological Sciences division and subject specialist modules for the cardiac physiologist programme. All of the modules described are core and must be completed for the programme to be recognised as a training route for Healthcare Science Practitioners working within the NHS.

 

The Healthcare Science training programme adopts an integrated approach to academic content and work-based training. The curriculum expects that the work-based training be used to build upon the knowledge and skills taught in the academic content. Placement modules are core at each stage, with work-based training increasing in length each year to reflect the achievement of PTP learning outcomes for each year of study. The length of the academic year is extended to accommodate work placement.

 

Students undertaking clinical placements will be subject to the University Fitness to Practice Regulations (AQH-F-11).

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stage 1 (level 4)

 

Module

Code

Credits

Human Physiology

HCS102

20

Molecular and Cellular Biology

HCS113

20

Microbes and Host Defences

HCS114

20

Clinical & Professional Practice for Healthcare Science

HCS116

20

Introduction to Cardiovascular, Respiratory & Sleep Science

HCS109

20

Introduction to the Practice of Cardiovascular, Respiratory & Sleep Science

HCS110

20

 

The aim of stage 1 (level 4) is to ensure that students have a sufficient level of scientific development in core subject areas and to introduce clinical and professional skills that will be developed throughout the programme.

 

Generic Modules Common to any Division of Healthcare Science: Scientific Basis of Healthcare Science (HCS102, HCS113 and HCS114)

 

The overall aim of these modules is to ensure that students have the underpinning knowledge of the biological dimensions of health to provide the foundations for study in any three of the divisions of healthcare science as defined by MSC. The core modules will introduce students to human biology, cell biology, genetics, molecular biology, immunology and microbiology. Each module will facilitate the development of practical skills alongside transferable skills such as numeracy, data handling and the use of information technology. There will be an incremental development of knowledge prior to undertaking the division specific modules.

 

Generic modules common to all healthcare science: Professional practice (HCS116)

 

The Clinical and Professional Practice for Healthcare Science module contextualises the student’s academic studies into a professional context. Students will be introduced to the principles and practices of working in a clinical environment, relevant professional standards and appropriate attitudes and behaviours, as well as self-management and reflective practice. The module will incorporate a six week work-based placement within a diagnostic cardiology department. The aim of the placement is to provide the students with an appreciation of the broad range of work undertaken within healthcare science and provide a motivational element as they work towards a career in the NHS. Throughout the placement students will undergo a range of assessments linked to the competency logbook and start to develop a portfolio of evidence that will be developed during stages 2 and 3. The module will also include an element of division specific knowledge delivered during the clinical placement.

 

Division specific modules: Physiological sciences (HCS109/HCS110)

 

The overall aim of these modules is to develop the student’s knowledge of cardiac, vascular, respiratory and sleep physiology. The module will build on the knowledge gained in other modules and students will then learn how to apply this knowledge safely and effectively in clinical practice to obtain a range of physiological measurements. 

Stage 2 (level 5)

 

Module

Code

Credits

Research and Analytical Skills for Bioscience

HCS226

20

Professional Practice and Work-Based Training in Physiological Sciences 1

HCS209

20

Pathophysiology of Common Cardiovascular and Respiratory Disease

HCS232

20

Instrumentation, Signal Processing and Imaging

HCS210

20

Cardiac Physiology: Electrocardiography

HCS218

20

Cardiac Physiology: Ambulatory Monitoring and Exercise Electrocardiography

HCS233

20

In Stage 2 (level 5) of the programme students undertake a common pathway that will build upon the knowledge and skills developed at stage 1 and introduce specialist modules in preparation for the first extended placement module.

 

Generic science modules (HCS226)

 

Students will undertake a Research and Analytical Skills for Bioscience module (HCS226) that will focus on the role of statistics in healthcare research and evidence-based medicine, as well as the principles and practice of scientific research. This module will prepare the students for undertaking a research project in stage 3.

 

Division Specific Modules (HCS232/HCS210)

 

Students will undertake two division specific modules. The Pathophysiology of Common Cardiovascular and Respiratory Disease module (HCS232) will further develop the students understanding of pathophysiological processes that can occur at a cellular, tissue, and whole system level. Instrumentation, Signal Processing and Imaging (HCS210) will ensure that the student understands the underpinning principles and properties of the measurement techniques that form the foundation of investigations in cardiovascular, respiratory and sleep science.

 

Specialist Modules (HCS233 / HCS218)

 

The specialist modules Cardiac Physiology: ECG Interpretation (HCS218) and Cardiac Physiology: Ambulatory Monitoring and Exercise Electrocardiography (HCS233) will ensure the students understand the breadth of the application of science within the specialist area of Cardiac Physiology, and build on previous learning to develop skills in applying knowledge and understanding to practical situations.

 

Work-based training (HCS209)

 

The first large discipline specific element of work-based training is delivered in HCS209. Students will undertake 15 weeks of work-based training in a diagnostic cardiology department where they will gain the knowledge, skills and experience of routine investigations in this specialist area. Development of the framework for the accompanying Professional Portfolio in their specialist area will define their levels of competency.

 

 

Stage 3 (level 6)

 

Module

Code

Credits

Professional Practice and Work-Based Training in Physiological Sciences 2

HCS311

30

Healthcare Science Research Project

HCS325

30

Applying Cardiac Physiology: Non-Invasive Cardiology

HCS337

20

Patient Centred Care & Clinical Leadership

HCS338

20

Applying Cardiac Physiology: Invasive Cardiology

HCS334

20

The aim of stage 3 (level 6) is to demonstrate application to practice and includes increased experiential learning.

 

Specialist modules (HCS337/HCS338/HCS334)

 

The specialist modules will aim to ensure the student begins to gain a wider knowledge of investigations undertaken in a diagnostic cardiology department, particularly provocative electrocardiography, pacing and diagnostic cardiac catheterisation in adults and children. These modules will also build on earlier work to develop themes of public health and epidemiology of cardiovascular disease, risk factors, risk assessment and primary prevention including behavioural change management.

 

Specialist Research Project (HCS325)

 

The students will undertake a research or audit project as part of HCS325 that provides an opportunity to demonstrate the knowledge, skills and experience gained during the research methods module.  Projects will be undertaken in the workplace and involve a topic that is relevant and innovative to cardiac physiology.

 

Work-based training (HCS311)

 

The second large element of the work-based training will be delivered in HCS311 lasting 25 weeks. The module will commence in terms one and proceed through term two of stage three after the student has acquired the theoretical underpinning provided in the modules HCS337, HCS338 and HCS334. The work-based training will provide the students with experience of the importance of patient-centred care, evidence-based practice, clinical audit and multidisciplinary team working. The module will incorporate a mix of both generic scientific knowledge and professional practice as well as specialist training.  

 

 

 

Management of Work-Based Activities

 

The University has an excellent relationship with Health Education England North East (HEE NE) and has worked closely with them to ensure that there are sufficient and appropriate placements available for students in regional hospital trusts. Currently the University has placement provision in the following hospitals:

  • Cumberland Infirmary, Carlisle
  • Darlington Memorial Hospital, Darlington
  • University Hospital of North Durham, Durham
  • Freeman Hospital, Newcastle upon Tyne
  • Friarage Hospital, Northallerton
  • University Hospital of Hartlepool, Hartlepool
  • James Cook University Hospital, Middlesborough
  • University Hospital of North Tees, Stockton on Tees
  • North Tyneside General Hospital, North Shields
  • Wansbeck General Hospital, Ashington
  • South Tyneside District Hospital, South Shields
  • Sunderland Royal Hospital, Sunderland

 

A selection process will be conducted during the first semester of stage 1, involving a selection panel comprising representatives from industry, patient and patient carers involvement group (PCPI) and university staff. Successful students will be allocated a placement with one of the placement providers listed. Students residing out of the region may be placed in a suitable diagnostic cardiology department elsewhere, however the University must confirm the appropriateness of the placement department prior to acceptance onto the programme.

 

The role of the work-based supervisor is critical to the success of the placement as they must be appropriately experienced and committed to supporting the student. Their good practical expertise and well developed communication skills will enable them to act as a role-model for the student to emulate during clinical practice. Work-based supervisors will be supported by the University through a mentoring course, train the trainer workshops, placement visits by University staff and regular scheduled meetings with the placement co-ordinator.

 

During the work-based training periods, students will be required to follow their specialist Healthcare Science Practitioner Training Programme Training Manual. It is the student’s responsibility to complete this Training Manual and the student will be visited regularly by appropriate university staff to ensure that progress is being made through it and that there are no student performance issues.  As the requirements for work-based training are determined externally by the accrediting body, any student who is absent for any part of the designated time will be required to make up this time at a later stage. In addition to the Training Manual, students will be expected to complete a ten credit-bearing professional practice portfolio in HCS209 and HCS311 where they will demonstrate their reflections on their work-based training and compile evidence of in-house training, presentations etc. By the end of the three year programme the student will have the underpinning knowledge and accompanying skills and attitudes to work effectively as a Healthcare Science Practitioner.

 

 

 

  1. How will I be taught?

Scheduled teaching activities

Lectures, seminars, laboratory based practical sessions, simulation based practical sessions, patient involvement sessions, problem-based learning, oral presentations, poster presentations. 

Independent study

Virtual learning environment, directed learning

Placement

Work-based training

 

The strategy for teaching and learning, while adhering to the curriculum prescribed by the MSC initiative, is to use a range of diverse and innovative methods that will promote self-learning and self-development and lead to graduates that can fulfil their role as independent reflective practitioners working within cardiac physiology. The programme integrates traditional lecture and practical-based learning with active, experiential and enquiry-based learning both on campus and in the work-based environment. The programme will encourage the progressive acquisition of subject knowledge and skills by moving from study methods that have a greater degree of support gradually towards more independence and self-direction.

 

Seminal lectures

Key subject knowledge will be delivered in lectures throughout the programme. These sessions incorporate various methods to convey ideas and concepts (such as verbal and visual presentation of information, demonstrations, multimedia and external speakers) with integrated active learning approaches (such as quizzes, brainstorming activities, and use of interactive response tool software) which can be used to inform teaching practice as well as assess learning and monitor progression. The active learning approach will progress from the early stage (Level 4), where activities test the acquisition of knowledge and understanding, to the final stage (Level 6) where activities are designed to promote analytical and critical thinking (in line with summative assessments).

 

Laboratory and practical classes

Laboratory and practical classes are an essential part of the learning experience, and are designed to promote development of a wide range of discipline-specific techniques and transferrable skills, as well as to demonstrate and reinforce material taught in lectures. The practical session throughout the programme will use various forms. At stage 1 (level 4) there will be a greater focus on laboratory based practical sessions to develop the students understanding of key scientific principles in cell science, genetics and microbiology. The sessions will develop competence in basic scientific skills and provide an awareness of safe-working practices. As the students’ progress to stage 2 (level 5) and 3 (level 6) of the programme there is a greater focus on simulation based practical sessions. The Point of Care Facility provides the students with an opportunity to practice discipline-specific techniques on volunteer patients recruited through the Patient and Patient Carers Involvement Group (PCPI). The students will have the opportunity to use identical equipment to that used within hospital departments, allowing skills gained during the practical session to be quickly implemented throughout the work-based training. The learning experience will be enhanced with a number of new simulation equipment allowing the students to experience 360° views of the heart. Patient involvement allows the development of transferrable skills such as verbal communication, patient interaction and professional behaviour.

 

Enquiry-based learning

A number of strategies are adopted throughout the programme to promote active student learning. The use of case studies, clinical scenarios and case based discussions taken from real cases and facilitated by academic staff can provide the skills to manage problems systematically. The technique can be very useful for the development of analysis and interpretive skills essential for the students chosen specialism. 

 

E-learning

 

Independent study is facilitated through the virtual learning environment (VLE) which gives access to learning materials, self-assessment exercises, sample data and virtual experiments, and discussion group facilities, as well as submission of work electronically.

 

Work-based training

 

Work-based training in the form of clinical placements forms a significant portion of the learning throughout all three years of the programme. The role of the clinical placement is to provide experience working within a clinical department, developing not only the analytical skills required, but to gain practical experience of professional behaviour, patient care, working within a multidisciplinary team, reflective practice. The experiences described by students on placement are varied reflecting the diversity of the various clinical departments within the region; however it is an aspect of the course that continually receives very positive feedback from students as it allows them to put the skills gained throughout the academic year into practice.

 

The student whilst on placement will be supervised by a work-based mentor who will work collaboratively with academic staff to develop a learning strategy whilst on placement. All work-based mentors receive guidance from the University in the form of a mentorship course, and the students have a clinical logbook that provides a general structure for learning through assessment. Students will be assigned a placement tutor that will act as a point of contact with the University whilst on placement. The placement tutor will have a role in monitoring progression, and will visit the student at least during each of the extended placements.

 

There is an increased amount of experiential learning undertaken as the student progresses through each stage of the programme leading to the development of a professional portfolio. Students are responsible for maintaining the portfolio and ensuring all assessments are completed.

 

Independent / Directed Learning

 

Students will be expected to become increasingly independent during their learning. Students will be supported with directed reading prior to prior to and following each session. As the student progresses it is expected that they will move towards more independent study.

 

A summary of the types of teaching, learning and assessment in each module of the programme can be found in the Matrix of Modes of Teaching (appendix)

 

  1. How will I be assessed and given feedback? 

 

Written examinations

Multiple choice questions

Short/long answer questions

Problem-solving

Case study and data interpretation

Coursework

Laboratory report, portfolio, health and safety review, information leaflet, descriptive essay, reflective essay, evaluative report, case study, oral presentation, poster, research proposal, dissertation, professional portfolio, PTP portfolio

Practical assessments

Direct Observation of Practical Skills (DOPS)

Case Based Discussions (CbDs)

Mini Clinical Examinations (miniCex)

 

A summary of the types of teaching, learning and assessment in each module of the programme can be found in the Matrix of Modes of Teaching (Appendix)

The generic assessment criteria which we use can be found here. Some programmes use subject-specific assessment criteria which are based on the generic ones.

 

This programme uses the Generic University Assessment Criteria

YES

 

This programme uses the Subject Specific Assessment Criteria

YES

 

 

The University assessment regulations can be found here.

 

The assessment strategy has been developed in line with University policy, but also aims to build on good practice developed in the department to date. Assessments are designed to become more demanding as the programme progresses in line with the development of skills in the interpretation and evaluation of scientific information.

 

Written examinations

 

Written examinations are included in the majority of modules on the programme. The format and requirements of the examinations will change throughout the programme reflecting the progression of students through the various stages. Examinations at stage 1 (level 4) involve predominantly multiple choice or short answers that focus on the recall and understanding of knowledge, whereas examinations at stage 2 (level 5) and 3 (level 6) will involve short and long answers introducing problem solving, application of knowledge in healthcare ultimately leading to questions that require the students to analyse and interpret clinical data and relate this to patient management.

 

Coursework

 

All modules have a coursework component, and the aim is to include a diverse range of assessment that promotes active learning by the student.

 

At stage 1 (level 4) as students are developing their underpinning scientific knowledge there is a focus on laboratory reports and short essays to promote scientific writing and demonstrate application of knowledge and skills. Working in groups the students will be expected to prepare and deliver oral presentations, to demonstrate their ability to organise and prioritise knowledge, structure the presentation into an appropriate format, present information to varied audiences and develop transferable skills such as team work and time management. A reflective assignment will be written to introduce students to the process of reflective writing prior to commencement of their work-based training. A professional portfolio will also be prepared containing short written essays both reflective and descriptive to demonstrate the student’s appreciation of key skills required in professional practice such as hand washing, basic life support and care of substances hazardous to health.

 

Coursework at stage 2 (level 5) introduces a greater degree of problem-solving and application of knowledge and skills. Written descriptive essays continue to be utilised for some modules, however there is an increased use of clinical data that requires interpretation and the introduction of evaluative reports gives the students the opportunity to not only how to write clinical reports but the importance of report structure. A health promotion leaflet provides an opportunity for the students to consider the larger issues of epidemiology and prevention of disease. Students will be expected to prepare and deliver a solo oral presentation that will further develop those skills gained at stage 1. Overall throughout stage 2 there will be an aim to increase the use of assessment to be as much a learning tool as a means for demonstrating progression.

 

In stage 3 (level 6), assessment methods are designed to encourage critical evaluation of information and data interpretation in the content of complex problems, clinical cases or innovation in healthcare. All written work will be expected to demonstrate appropriate scientific style, evidence-based practice and appropriate referencing of sources. The range of assessments delivered at stage 3 will include written essays, oral and poster presentations that will prepare the students to design and perform a work-based project demonstrating relevant and innovative research or audit.  

 

Marking guidelines are used for all assessments, which undergo internal and external review, and are used to ensure consistency of marking. Assessments are marked according to the University of Sunderland generic assessment criteria, and all modules undergo standard moderation procedures to ensure fair assessment. Formative feedback is given throughout the programme, either informally through interactive learning activities, or formally in selected modules. Summative assessment feedback is provided according to University guidance, promoting constructive feed-forward throughout the programme. Past examination papers are provided for revision purposes, and sessions are scheduled to discuss exam technique using past questions as examples. In the final year the students are required to complete a research project.

 

The VLE is used extensively to deliver assessments and provide feedback, with significant use of Turnitin and Grademark. This is a very useful strategy to promote information literacy as originality reports generated by Turnitin are available, therefore identifying inappropriate writing practices.

 

Clinical logbook / Portfolio Assessment Strategy

 

The assessment of competence will be performed in the workplace by qualified Healthcare Science Practitioners or equivalent who in addition to their professional training, are also qualified assessors. Training for assessment is provided by the programme team for those NHS staff who wish to undertake this role. Their assessment skills are reinforced through CPD support days at the University. Assessment is through both the demonstration of clinical competence and experiential learning.

 

Demonstration of clinical competence by the students is through the completion of a series of clinical competencies. Each competency will be completed through a number of individual assessments. Assessment will take the form of:

 

  1. Direct Observation of Practical Skills (DOPS) is the observation and evaluation of a procedural/technical or practical skill performed by a student in a live environment.

 

  1. Case Based Discussions (CBDs) are designed to provide structural teaching and feedback in a particular area of clinical or technical practice by evaluating decision making and the interpretation and application of evidence. They also enable the discussion of the context, professional, ethical and governance framework of practice, and in all instances, they allow students to discuss why they acted as they did. CBDs are used throughout training and should encourage a reflective approach to learning.

 

A number of competencies will be assessed throughout the programme and each technique will be assessed using multiple DOPD and CBDs. The minimum number of assessments required for each competency will be a collective decision between the academic staff and the work-based mentors. As each assessment is performed the student builds up a logbook of evidence and as each competency is completed and assessed the student’s logbook contains evidence which confirms their competency in a specific technique.

 

Assessment of clinical experiential learning will require the students to record a reflective diary of their activities whilst on placement. Information recorded in the reflective diary will be used to answer specific questions from the logbook. 

 

The completed clinical logbook and portfolio of evidence built up by the trainee is then moderated by a clinical tutor to ensure that all elements have been assessed and that the standard of training is appropriate. It is the responsibility of the student to maintain their own portfolio and ensure all assessments are completed on time.

 

  1. Teaching, learning and assessment matrix

 

  1. How does research influence the programme? 

 

Teaching on the programme is delivered by the Biosciences team, which contains a mixture of research-active staff and active healthcare science practitioners. This mixture of staff ensures that the programme contains current leading-edge research in a range of scientific fields as well as clinical experience and innovative practices being utilised within healthcare departments.

 

In stage 3 of the programme students undertake a work-based research project that adds new knowledge to this specialist field. In recent years projects have measured the effects of changing ECG positions, auditing the quality of ECG electrode positions amongst various staff groups, measuring the effectiveness of specialist services in Trusts including implantable loop recorder service at one North East Trust and implantable cardiovertor defibrillators (ICD) at another. Research projects are completed in the workplace in hospital departments throughout the region, and students are expected to present their findings to the hospital departments to ensure the findings are disseminated through the profession.

 

 

SECTION D EMPLOYABILITY

 

  1. How will the programme prepare me for employment?

The programme gives you the opportunity to develop skills which you can use in the future. Some skills are more specific than others to the subject area, or to a particular type of activity, but all skills can be applied in a range of employment situations, sometimes in quite unexpected ways. The skills which the programme is designed to develop are listed below.

 

The Healthcare Science program meets the requirements of the Modernising Scientific Careers initiative meaning that successful graduates are qualified as Healthcare Science Practitioners in their chosen field. This training programme ensures that the students have the necessary specialist skills to practice safely within a diagnostic cardiology department.  Currently at least 99% of students graduating from the Healthcare Science (Cardiac Physiology) programme have obtained a role in a diagnostic cardiology department as a Healthcare Science Practitioner within 6 months of graduating. Generally very positive feedback has been provided by employers regarding graduating students from the programme.

 

In addition to the specialist knowledge and skills, throughout the programme is the emphasis on professional development and transferable skills, through dedicated modules (HCS116/HCS209/HCS311) or embedded within all other modules. Practical experience in the workplace promotes time management; team working, effective communication and professional conduct all beneficial skills that can be used for a wide range of careers both within and beyond the healthcare environment.  Other career options that may be considered upon graduation are:

 

  • Undertake research through a PhD programme
  • Apply for the NHS Scientist Training Programme
  • Enrol on a postgraduate teaching course
  • Technical representative for a medical devices company

 

The University has developed Fitness for Practice Regulations. This takes into account a range of ‘appropriate’ behaviours (including respect, honesty, responsibility) and this will be monitored on this programme through the clinical professional module by a ‘Suitability to Practice Panel’ which will include NHS-based colleagues who provide work-based training.

 

  1. Particular features of the qualification (optional)

 

The BSc Healthcare Science: Cardiac Physiology programme is regarded as the only training pathway for Healthcare Science Practitioners in Cardiac Physiology.

The programme is accredited with both the National School of Healthcare Science and the Registration Council for Clinical Physiologists, meaning that upon graduation students are qualified to apply for voluntary registration with both the Academy for Healthcare Science and the Registration Council for Clinical Physiologists.

 

 

  1. Professional statutory or regulatory body (PSRB) accreditation.  Choose one of the following.

 

The programme currently has PSRB accreditation

 

The programme is currently accredited until:     2019

The relevant PSRB(s) is/are:

       National School of Healthcare Science

       Registration Council for Clinical Physiologists

 

NB: if accreditation is being sought please complete the following section as if it had been awarded on the basis of the usual arrangements; leave blank anything you cannot yet answer. This section will have to be finalised once accreditation has been agreed.

 

The terms of the accreditation are as follows:

Successful completion of the programme and all modules passed

 

There are programme-specific regulations relating to the following. Details are given in the programme regulations:

 

The modules to be studied

 

Pass-marks for some or all modules and/or parts

(elements) of modules 

X

Requirements for progression between one Stage and another

 

Placement requirements

 

Attendance requirements

 

Professional practice requirements

 

Degree classification  

 

Other 

 

 

 

 

Interim or exit awards are not accredited. 

 

 

SECTION E PROGRAMME STRUCTURE AND REGULATIONS

 

Use Programme Regulations Form, for questions 39 and 40

 

 

 

 

 

SECTION F ADMISSIONS, LEARNING ENVIRONMENT AND SUPPORT

 

  1. What are the admissions requirements?

 

The University’s standard admissions requirements can be found in the university regulations. Programme-specific requirements which are in addition to those regulations are given below. 

 

Students will be admitted on to the BSc Physiological Sciences programme in the first instance. This is because the Healthcare Science programme requires the student to undertake the Practitioner Training Programme (PTP) which is dependent on the availability of training places within an NHS Trust. In order to undertake the work-based training you will need a satisfactory disclosure from the Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) and a medical check and be subject to interview by the hospital placement provider. Subject to meeting these criteria, students will transfer to the BSc Healthcare Science (Cardiac Physiology).

 

Our typical offer is 112 UCAS points from a minimum of two A Levels or equivalent (e.g. 1 x AVCE double award) including biology or chemistry. Please note we do not accept General Studies AS or A Level. Read more on the new UCAS Tariff point system for 2017.

We accept a maximum of 20 points from Level 3 Key Skills qualifications. We also require three passes at GCSE grade C or above, which must include Mathematics and English Language, or a minimum of Level 2 Key Skills in Communication, Application of Number and Information Technology.

Access Courses: We would require successful completion of an Access to Higher Education course that is accredited by the Quality Assurance Agency. We would also require a minimum of grade C in GCSE in Mathematics and English Language or the equivalent as part of your course.

If English is your second language we require a minimum of IELTS 7.0 (or equivalent) with a minimum of 6.0 in each element

 

 

Can students enter with advanced standing?

Yes

 

 

If yes, to which Stages?

Stage 1

X

Stage 2

X

Stage 3

X

Stage 4

 

 

The University has a process by which applicants whose experience to date already covers one or more modules of the programme they are applying for may seek Accreditation of Prior Learning (APL). Full details can be found here but if you think that this may be relevant to you, please contact the Faculty which offers the programme you are interested in. Eligibility for APL is decided on a case by case basis by the Admissions Tutor.

 

Notes:

For undergraduate programmes Standard entry requirements must be qualifications listed in the UCAS Tariff and must include the UCAS Tariff points required - advice on this can be sought from the Admissions Office;

Where Entry with advanced standing is given (ie Stage 2 or 3 entry to an undergraduate programme or after the Certificate or Diploma phase of a Masters award) you will need to

  • ensure that the entry route is approved
  • map the learning outcomes of the entry qualification  to the relevant Stage of this programme  (this requires Faculty approval – seek advice from your AD Student Experience)

See AQH-I4 Articulation and Related Processes for details or consult Academic Services.

 

  1. What kind of support and help will there be?
    1. in the department

 

Induction Week

 

At the start of semester 1 the department and the wider university have a number of scheduled activities both academic and social as part of an induction event for new students. The aim is to familiarise the new student with university life and provide opportunities to meet academic staff and fellow students. There will be an introduction to the various systems commonly used in the department such as email, timetabling and an introduction to the virtual learning environments (SunSpace and My Module Resources). Academic staff will also provide sessions that provide detailed explanation of the structure of the programme, methods of effective learning as well as team building sessions.

 

Personal Tutoring

 

Each student will be assigned a personal tutor during induction. The personal tutor will be available throughout the course to act as an academic mentor or to provide support and guidance in the event of difficulties. Students will be contacted by their personal tutor during the first few weeks of the course to organise an introduction, and will maintain a regular communication with the student throughout their time at University. Personal tutors are a useful first-line contact to approach as they have access to the University’s central support services such as Counselling, Disability Services, Health and Well-being, Chaplaincy, Financial Support and Advice, International Office and Careers and Employability Service.

 

A significant portion of the student’s time will be spent off campus and on placement. This can lead to students feeling isolated. In stage 2 and 3 of the programme during prolonged placements a member of the academic staff will visit each student at least once to ensure the student is coping with being on placement and progressing as expected. The aim is that the member of staff visiting the department will be the student’s personal tutor to maintain communication, however this cannot be guaranteed. Each student will also be assigned a work-based mentor throughout their time on placement.

 

  1. in the university as a whole:

 

Students Union

 

The Students’ Union provides an independent service which offers advice and support across the full range of personal and academic problems which students may encounter. Students wishing to lodge a complaint or an appeal can seek advice from the Students’ Union or Academic Services. Full details of these services can be found on the University’s website.

 

Support Services

 

The University provides a range of professional support services including health and well-being, counselling, disability support, and a Chaplaincy. Click on the links for further information.

 

  1. in a partner college:

 

Please see the relevant college prospectus or website for details of student support if you are planning to study in one of our partner colleges.

 

  1. What resources will I have access to?

 

On campus

X

In a partner college

 

By distance learning

 

 

 

On campus

Tick all that apply

General Teaching and Learning Space

X

IT

X

Library

X

VLE

X

Laboratory

X

Studio

 

Performance space

 

Other specialist

 

Technical resources 

X

 

Text for details listed above:

 

Laboratory / Teaching Facilities

 

The laboratory facilities are of a high standard and there is excellent technical support to deliver practical sessions across the curriculum. A recent upgrade to laboratory facilities has greatly enhanced the access to analytical instrumentation, the latest teaching and learning facilities, simulation technology and problem based learning.

Physiology laboratories are used extensively by students and are equipped with specialist equipment and instrumentation to teach cardiac, vascular and respiratory physiology.

The Living Laboratory is a recent addition to the campus that hosts a number of areas designed to simulate the clinical environment, including the Point of Care Facility, Mock Ward, Simulation Suite and OSCE Suite. Both the Point of Care Facility and the Mock Ward have been designed with clinical practice in mind, and aim to simulate the clinical environment as accurately as possible. Two multipurpose consultation rooms are available to host a range of clinical scenarios and both facilities are equipped with technology and instrumentation identical to that currently used in healthcare. Simulation is a vital part of training new healthcare professionals and this is achieved by the recent investment of new technologies such as SimMan, the ultrasound simulator and with the new simulation suite aimed at providing an immersive simulated environment.

 

Virtual Learning Environment

 

The University VLE, SunSpace is a key resource that underpins their delivery of teaching material and enables easy communication with students. There are existing successful programme spaces for frequently asked questions, and each module has a space for guides, handbooks, lecture notes and other resources (relevant web links, media etc).  The majority of modules make use of the plagiarism detection software (TurnItIn) and also provide feedback within SunSpace (eg in Grademark).

 

Library Resources

 

The Murray library offers an excellent physical and electronic resource to students. Over the past three years, through three major refurbishments, there has been investment into creating exciting, innovative 24/7 study spaces that reflect how students have indicated they want to use their libraries.  In addition to books, journals, computers and printing facilities, and quiet study areas, there are study areas students can book for group work activities. University Library Services also administer the handing in of assignments and the return of marked assignments to students through their Assignment Services.

 

Healthcare Science has been taught at the University of Sunderland for a number of years and consequently there is a mature but regularly updated collection of relevant text books and journals.

 

IT Services

 

IT services enable students to register wi-fi phones / PDAs or laptops and provide access to relevant software (SPSS ) at no cost to the student. Students have access a shared drive so that saved information can be opened on any of the University computers.

 

Further information about the University’s facilities can be found here.

 

Please see the relevant college prospectus or website for details of college learning resources if you are planning to study in one of our partner colleges.

 

 

  1. Are there any additional costs on top of the fees?

 

No, but all students buy some study materials such as books and provide their own basic study materials.

X

Yes (optional) All students buy some study materials such as books and provide their own basic study materials. In addition there are some are additional costs for optional activities associated with the programme (see below)

 

Yes (essential) All students buy some study materials such as books and provide their own basic study materials. In addition there are some are essential additional costs associated with the programme (see below)

 

 

 

  1. How are student views represented?

 

All taught programmes in the University have student representatives for each Stage (year-group) of each programme who meet in a Student-Staff Liaison Committee (SSLC) where they can raise students’ views and concerns. The Students’ Union and the faculties together provide training for student representatives. SSLCs and focus groups are also used to obtain student feedback on plans for developing existing programmes and designing new ones. Feedback on your programme is obtained every year through module questionnaires and informs the annual review of your programme. Student representatives are also invited to attend Programme and Module Studies Boards which manage the delivery and development of programmes and modules. Various Faculty committees, particularly Faculty Student Success Committee, Academic Development Committee and Quality Management Sub-Committee also have student representation. This allows students to be involved in higher-level plans for teaching and learning. There is a parallel structure at university level on which students are represented by sabbatical officers who are the elected leaders of the Students’ Union. The University’s student representation and feedback policy can be found here.

 

Undergraduate programmes only: Final-year students are also invited to complete a National Student Survey (NSS) which asks a standard set of questions across the whole country. The results of this are discussed at Programme Studies Boards and at Faculty Student Success Committee to identify good practice which can be shared and problems which need to be addressed. We rely heavily on student input to interpret the results of the NSS and ensure that we make the most appropriate changes.

 

Programmes offered in partner colleges: If you are studying in one of our partner colleges the college will have its own mechanisms for obtaining student feedback. Some of these may be the same as that on-campus at the University but others may be different. You should ask your college for further information.

 

 

SECTION G QUALITY MANAGEMENT 

 

  1. National subject benchmarks

 

The Quality Assurance Agency for Higher Education publishes benchmark statements which give guidance as to the skills and knowledge which graduates in various subjects and in certain types of degree are expected to have. These can be found here.

 

Are there any benchmark statements for this programme?

YES

 

 

The subject benchmark(s) for this programme are:

 

Statement of Common Purpose for subject benchmarking statements for the health and social care professions

 

https://www.qaa.ac.uk/academicinfrastructure/benchmark/health/StatementofCommonPurpose06.asp

 

Statement for Clinical Science

 

http://www.qaa.ac.uk/Publications/InformationAndGuidance/Pages/Subject-benchmark-statement-Health-care-programmes---Clinical-science.aspx

 

The QAA also publishes a Framework for Higher Education Qualifications (FHEQ) which defines the generic skills and abilities expected of students who have achieved awards at a given level and with which our programmes align. The FHEQ can be found here.

 

  1. How are the quality and standards of the programme assured?

 

The programme is managed and quality assured through the University’s standard processes. Programmes are overseen by Module and Programme Studies Boards which include student representatives. Each year each module leader provides a brief report on the delivery of the module, identifying strengths and areas for development, and the programme team reviews the programme as a whole.  The purpose of this is to ensure that the programme is coherent and up-to-date, with suitable progression from one Stage to another, and a good fit (alignment)  between what is taught and how students learn and are assessed - the learning outcomes, content and types of teaching, learning and assessment. Student achievement, including progress between Stages of the programme and degree classification, is kept under review. The programme review report is sent to the Faculty Quality Management Sub-Committee which in turn reports issues to the University’s Quality Management Sub-Committee (QMSC) and Academic Development Committee (ADC).

 

External examiners are appointed to oversee and advise on the assessment of the programme. They ensure that the standards of the programme are comparable with those of similar programmes elsewhere in the UK and are also involved in the assessment process to make sure that it is fair. They are invited to comment on proposed developments to the programme. Their reports are sent to the Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Academic) as well as to the Faculty so that issues of concern can be addressed.

 

All programmes are reviewed by the University on a six-yearly cycle to identify good practice and areas for enhancement. Programmes are revalidated through this review process. These reviews include at least one academic specialist in the subject area concerned from another UK university. The University is subject to external review by the Quality Assurance Agency for Higher Education on a six-year cycle. Their review reports for Sunderland can be found here.

 

Further information about our quality processes can be found here.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Appendix

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Stage 1

Module

Code

Core/Option

Modes of Teaching and Learning

Modes of Assessment

Learning Outcomes

K1

K2

K3

K4

K5

S1

S2

S3

S4

Human Physiology

HCS102

Core

L, LP, W, DS, IS, GW

Ex, PO

TDA

TDA

 

 

 

T

TDA

TD

 

Molecular and Cellular Biology

HCS113

Core

L, LP, W, DS, IS, GW

Ex, LR

TDA

 

 

T

 

 

TDA

TD

 

Microbes and Host Defences

HCS114

Core

L, LP, W, DS, IS, GW

Ex, IL

TDA

 

 

TD

 

 

TDA

TD

 

Introduction to Cardiovascular, Respiratory and Sleep Science

HCS109

Core

L, GW, DS, IS, 

Ex, PO

TDA

TDA

 

 

 

TD

TDA

TD

 

Introduction to the Practice of Cardiovascular, Respiratory and Sleep Science

HCS110

Core

L, LP, SP, PI, DS, IS

Ex, ER, ED, LR

TDA

TDA

 

TDA

TD

TDA

TDA

TDA

TDA

Clinical and Professional Practice for Healthcare Science

HCS116

Core

L, W, DS, IS

HSR, P, PTP

 

 

TDA

TDA

TDA

TDA

 

TDA

TDA

 

Modes of Teaching and Learning: DS = Directed Study, GW = Group Work, IT = Individual Tutorial, IS = Independent Study, L = Lecture, LP = Laboratory Practical, SP = Simulation Based Practical, PI = Patient Involvement Session, PBL = Problem Based Learning, RE = Research Engagement, W = Workshop, PPr = Professional Practice

Modes of Assessment: ED = Descriptive Essay, EE = Evaluative Essay, ER = Reflective Essay, Ex = Examination, IL = Information Leaflet, LR = Laboratory Report, P = Portfolio, PO = Oral Presentation, PP = Poster Presentation, CS = Case Study, PTP = work based practice, HSR = Health & Safety Review, RP = Research Proposal

T = Taught, D = Developed, A = Assessed

 

Stage 2

Module

Code

Core/Option

Modes of Teaching and Learning

Modes of Assessment

Learning Outcomes

K6

K7

K8

S5

S6

S7

S8

S9

Instrumentation, Signal Processing and Imaging

HCS210

Core

L, LP, W, PBL, DS, IS

Ex, PO

 

TDA

 

TDA

 

TD

TDA

T

Cardiac Physiology: Ambulatory Monitoring & Exercise Electrocardiography

HCS233

Core

L, SP, PBL, GW, DS, IS

Ex, EE

TDA

TDA

 

TDA

TDA

TD

TDA

TD

Cardiac Physiology: Electrocardiography

HCS218

Core

L, W,GW, DS, IS

Ex, ED, ED

TDA

TDA

 

TD

TDA

TDA

TDA

TD

Research & Analytical Skills for Bioscience

HCS226

Core

L, LP, W, DS, IS, RE

Ex, RP

 

TD

 

 

TDA

TDA

TD

 

Pathophysiology of Common Cardiovascular and Respiratory Disease

HCS232

Core

L, RE, DS, IS

IL, Ex

TDA

TD

 

T

T

TD

TDA

T

Professional Practice and Work-Based Training for Physiological Sciences 1

HCS209

Core

DS, IS, PPr, W

PTP

TDA

TD

TDA

TDA

TDA

 

TDA

TDA

 

Modes of Teaching and Learning: DS = Directed Study, GW = Group Work, IT = Individual Tutorial, IS = Independent Study, L = Lecture, LP = Laboratory Practical, SP = Simulation Based Practical, PI = Patient Involvement Session, PBL = Problem Based Learning, RE = Research Engagement, W = Workshop, PPr = Professional Practice

Modes of Assessment: ED = Descriptive Essay, EE = Evaluative Essay, ER = Reflective Essay, Ex = Examination, IL = Information Leaflet, LR = Laboratory Report, P = Portfolio, PO = Oral Presentation, PP = Poster Presentation, CS = Case Study, PTP = work based practice, HSR = Health & Safety Review, RP = Research Proposal

T = Taught, D = Developed, A = Assessed

Stage 3

Module

Code

Core/Option

Modes of Teaching and Learning

Modes of Assessment

Learning Outcomes

K9

K10

K11

K12

S10

S11

S12

S13

S14

Applying Cardiac Physiology: Non-Invasive Cardiology

HCS337

Core

L, PI, GW, RE, DS, IS  

Ex, ED , PO

TDA

T

TD

T

TD

TDA

 

T

 

Patient Centred Care & Clinical Leadership

HCS338

Core

L, PBL, SP, DS, IS

Ex, PP

TDA

TDA

TDA

TD

TDA

TDA

 

TD

TD

Applying Cardiac Physiology: Invasive Cardiology

HCS334

Core

L, PBL, W, DS, IS

Ex, EE

TDA

TDA

TDA

T

TDA

TDA

 

TD

TD

Healthcare Science Research project

HCS325

Core

W, IT, DS, IS, RE

Pp, Po, RR

 

 

 

 

 

TDA

TDA

 

 

Professional Practice and Work-Based Training for Physiological Sciences 2

HCS311

Core

DS, IS, PPr, W

PTP

D

D

D

DA

 

D

 

TDA

TDA

 

Modes of Teaching and Learning: DS = Directed Study, GW = Group Work, IT = Individual Tutorial, IS = Independent Study, L = Lecture, LP = Laboratory Practical, SP = Simulation Based Practical, PI = Patient Involvement Session, PBL = Problem Based Learning, RE = Research Engagement, W = Workshop, PPr = Professional Practice

Modes of Assessment: ED = Descriptive Essay, EE = Evaluative Essay, ER = Reflective Essay, Ex = Examination, IL = Information Leaflet, LR = Laboratory Report, P = Portfolio, PO = Oral Presentation, PP = Poster Presentation, CS = Case Study, PTP = work based practice, HSR = Health & Safety Review, RP = Research Proposal

T = Taught, D = Developed, A = Assessed

 


PART B   -  Programme  Regulation/s

 

Name of programme: Healthcare Science (Cardiac Physiology)

 

Title of final award: BSc with Honours Healthcare Science (Cardiac Physiology)

 

Interim awards: Certificate in Higher Education in Healthcare Science; Diploma in Higher Education in Healthcare Science

 

Accreditation: Healthcare Science (Cardiac Physiology) is accredited until 2019 by the National School of Healthcare Science and until 2018 by the Registration Council of Clinical Physiologists (RCCP)

 

University Regulation (please state the relevant University Regulation)

AQH-F1-1: https://docushare.sunderland.ac.uk/docushare/dsweb/View/Collection-2780

 

 

Programme specific regulations to meet Professional Body requirements:

 

1)       Admissions regulations: Overseas applicants from countries whose first language is not English are required to produce evidence of advanced competence in English. This will require an IELTS test score of 7.0 or equivalent (with a minimum of 6.0 in each element)

2)       A whole module score must not be below the University definition of a pass – this means compensation between modules is not allowed

3)       For work-based modules (HCS116, HCS209, HCS311), every element of assessment must attain a pass mark (40%)

4)       Maximum period of registration on a programme of study will be 5 years for full-time students

5)        Interim awards/exit qualifications are titled ‘Healthcare Science’

 

 

 

Regulations apply to students commencing their studies from (please state the date / intake that these regulations will apply to students for each Stage):

 

Regulations apply to students

Date the regulations apply

Intakes affected

Stage 1

September 2017

2017 onwards

Stage 2

September 2017

2017 onwards

Stage 3

September 2017

2017 onwards

 

 

Stage 1

 

Code

Title

Credits

HCS110

Introduction to the practice of cardiovascular, respiratory and sleep science

20

HCS102

Human Physiology

20

HCS109

Introduction to cardiovascular, respiratory and sleep science

20

HCS113

Molecular and Cellular Biology

20

HCS114

Microbes and Host Defences

20

HCS116

Clinical and Professional Practice for Healthcare Science

20

 

Progression Regulations

 

To meet the requirements of the National School of Healthcare Science the following restrictions have been approved by Academic Board on the provisions of the university regulations:

 

Modules cannot be compensated so you must pass each module with an overall mark of 40%.

 

Students must also achieve a pass mark of 40% in each element of assessment in HCS116

Stage 2

 

Code

Title

Credits

 

HCS209

Professional practice and work based training in physiological sciences 1

20

HCS232

Pathophysiology of common cardiovascular and respiratory conditions

20

HCS226

Research and Analytical skills for Biosciences

20

HCS210

Instrumentation, signal processing and imaging

20

HCS218

Cardiac physiology (electrocardiography)

20

HCS233

Cardiac physiology (Ambulatory monitoring and exercise electrocardiography)

20

 

 

Progression Regulations

 

To meet the requirements of the National School of Healthcare Science the following restrictions have been approved by Academic Board on the provisions of the university regulations:

 

Modules cannot be compensated so you must pass each module with an overall mark of 40%.

 

 

Stage 3

 

Core modules

 

Code

Title

Credits

HCS325

Healthcare Science Research Investigation

30

HCS311

Professional Practice and work based training in physiological sciences 2

30

HCS337

Applying cardiac physiology: Non-Invasive Cardiology

20

HCS338

Patient centred care and clinical leadership

20

HCS334

Applying cardiac physiology (invasive cardiology)

20

 

 

Progression Regulations

 

To meet the requirements of the National School of Healthcare Science the following restrictions have been approved by Academic Board on the provisions of the university regulations:

 

Modules cannot be compensated so you must pass each module with an overall mark of 40%.