Attachments

 

 

Quality Handbook

 

 

 

Programme Specification Template - Undergraduate

 

 

SECTION A:CORE INFORMATION

 

  1.  

Name of programme:

Physiotherapy

 

 

  1.  

Award title:

Bachelor of Science with Honours (BSc. Hons)

 

Interim Awards

 

BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy

Diploma of Higher Education in Rehabilitation Studies

Certificate of Higher Education in Rehabilitation Studies

 

 

  1.  

Programme linkage:

 

 

No

 

  1.  

Is the programme a top-up only?

 

No

 

 

  1.  

Does the programme have a Foundation Year (Level 3) associated with it so that students enter for a four-year programme and progress directly from the Foundation Year to Stage 1 without having to re-apply?

 

 

No

 

  1.  

Level of award:

 

Level 6

  1.  

Awarding Body:

University of Sunderland

 

  1.  

Faculty:

Faculty of Health Sciences and Wellbeing

 

  1.  

Programme Studies Board:

Undergraduate Allied Health Studies Board

 

  1.  

Programme Leader:

 

Chris Carter

 

 

  1. How and where can I study the programme?

 

At Sunderland:

Full-time on campus

          

Part-time on campus

 

As work-based learning full-time

 

As work-based learning part-time

 

As a full-time sandwich course

 

As a part-time sandwich course

 

By distance learning

 

 

At the University of Sunderland London campus: 

X

Full-time on campus

 

Part-time on campus

 

As work-based learning full-time

 

As work-based learning part-time

 

As a full-time sandwich course

 

As a part-time sandwich course

 

By distance learning

 

 

At a partner college:

X

Full-time in the UK 

 

Part-time in the UK

 

Full-time overseas

 

Part-time overseas

 

By distance learning

 

As a full-time sandwich course in the UK

 

As a part-time sandwich course in the UK

 

As a full-time sandwich course overseas

 

As a part-time sandwich course overseas

 

As work-based learning full-time in the UK 

 

As work-based learning part-time overseas

 

Other (please specify)

 

 

 

  1. How long does the programme take?

 

 

Min number of years / months

Max number of years / months

Full-time

3 years

5 years

Part-time

-

-

Distance learning

-

-

Work-based learning

-

-

 

For start-dates please see the current edition of the Prospectus or contact the relevant department at the University. For start-dates for programmes delivered in a partner college, please contact the relevant college.

SECTION B:FURTHER CORE INFORMATION 

 

Use Outline Programme Proposal Form for ADC for questions 13 to 25

 

  1. Learning and teaching strategy

 

Programme development was informed by the UK Quality Code for Higher Education Part A: Setting and Maintaining Academic Standards; The Frameworks for Higher Education Qualifications of UK Degree-Awarding Bodies (2014)[1] and mapped against the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) Standards of Education and Training (2017)[2] and Standards of Proficiency for Physiotherapists (2013)[3], and the Chartered Society of Physiotherapists (CSP) Quality Assurance Standards (2012)[4], CSP Learning and Development Principles (2010)[5], CSP Code of Members’ Professional Values and Behaviours (2011)[6] and CSP Physiotherapy Framework: Putting  Physiotherapy Behaviours, Values, Knowledge & Skills into Practice (2011, updated Sept 2013)[7]. The Programme was also developed with reference to HCPC Standards of Conduct, Performance and Ethics (2016) and Guidance for Ethics and Conduct for Students (2016) [8].

 

There are stringent Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) programme requirements for Physiotherapists entering pre-registration training which are in part met by the learning outcomes of the modules making up this programme, and by the competencies achieved through practice placements. The learning outcomes have been developed to promote and assess the key knowledge and skills required of physiotherapists across a range of employment sectors. The programme meets the Health and Care Professions Council Standards of Education and Training, which consider the level of qualification required, admissions procedures, programme management and resources, and the curriculum including practice placements and assessment strategies. The Health and Care Professions Council Standards of Proficiency directly inform the aims and outcomes of the programme to ensure that graduates meet (and exceed) the required threshold standards for entry level practice to the profession. These standards outline the expectations of a health professional, and knowledge, understanding and skills for practice as a physiotherapist. The programme meets the requirements of the HCPC and CSP enabling graduates to register and practice  as a Chartered Physiotherapist.

 

The CSP Framework (2013) defines and describes the behaviours (and underpinning values), knowledge and skills required for contemporary physiotherapy practice at all levels (from a new support worker through to a senior level registered physiotherapist), across a variety of occupational roles (clinical, educational, leadership, managerial, research and support), in a variety of settings (health and social care, industry and workplaces, education and development, and research environments), across the four nations of the UK. The Framework recognises physiotherapy as being a complex intervention and, as such, defines a unique blend of behaviours, knowledge and skills used by the physiotherapy workforce. The BSc (Hons) in Physiotherapy at the University of Sunderland is designed to produce students who will meet the CSP Framework and HCPC threshold criteria for graduate entry into the profession, and who demonstrate a commitment to life-long learning and continual professional development to augment their future progression in the profession. 

 

Teaching and learning strategies align to the University of Sunderland Strategic Plan 2016-2021[9] and the University Assessment Policy[10].  The programme adopts a holistic view of learning, learners, and the learner experience in programme design, delivery and oversight. The programme celebrates a vibrant and inclusive learning and teaching culture and academic community, informed and enriched by research, pedagogic and professional practice with robust monitoring and review procedures to maintain programme currency, relevance and high academic standards. The programme is designed to inspire student engagement in their learning and help them co-create their learning journey. Staff are committed to staff-student partnerships and to a research-informed curriculum (2014)[11],[12] to form a mutual commitment to a genuine process of continuous learning, dialogue and reflection to evolve and improve teaching and learning. Finally, the student journey will be personalised and supported from first contact to alumni.

 

Teaching and learning strategies are designed to meet a range of learning styles and to be inclusive. The programme will use a range of teaching and learning methods including lectures, seminars, tutorials, workshops, practical work, clinical simulation, project work and active learning through integrated case-based scenarios, online resources, electronic databases, academic journals, textbooks and other self-study and e-learning materials.

 

The programme content is person-focused, in line with the direction of the profession and we aim to develop well-rounded safe and effective physiotherapists who can communicate appropriately to service-users, carers, peers and other healthcare professionals and service personnel with whom they may come into contact. By promoting the integration of science and practical-based knowledge and skills, and encouraging students to learn from applied clinical scenarios, we aim to develop graduates capable of practice at the highest level, within all branches of the profession.

 

The programme aims to help students develop essential skills for continued and lifelong learning to enhance competence and innovation in the continually evolving and developing role of a physiotherapist.

 

The acknowledgement of the need to recognise and develop and value individuality for students for whom Higher Education might never have been possible in previous generations has been a key driver in the University of Sunderland’s design of academic provision.

 

 

 

Physiotherapy

 

Physiotherapy is recognised as a healthcare profession where human movement and function are viewed as central components of individual health, well-being and quality of life. Physiotherapy uses physical approaches in the prevention and treatment of disease, injury and disability recognising that physical, psychological, social and environmental factors may limit movement and function. Physiotherapists apply key knowledge and skills to identify the factors that limit an individual’s movement and function and, in conjunction with the individual and wider professional healthcare partnerships, maximises movement capability to meet individual needs at three levels: maintaining and improving body movement and function during acute illness; enhancing function and independence at home or work through preventative healthcare education and advice and rehabilitation, and; enhancing performance and participation (in community and wider society) by offering advice and challenging the environmental and social barriers that limit participation. Physiotherapy core skills include manual therapy, therapeutic exercise, the application of electro-physical modalities and other physical approaches. However, fundamental to physiotherapy practice, is an awareness and understanding of the psychological, cultural and social factors which influence patient attitudes and behaviours, and role and personal responsibility a patient will take in helping themselves.

 

The CSP Framework for Physiotherapy (2013) identifies four components that contribute to integrated physiotherapy practice (Table 1). Core physiotherapy values inform physiotherapy knowledge (theoretical and applied), professional practice skills and generic behaviours required by the physiotherapy workforce to meet the constantly evolving scope of physiotherapy practice. Knowledge and skills of a competent physiotherapy practitioner will evolve and develop with experience and context of practice but it is expected they will be adapted to personal scopes of practice. The future potential of physiotherapy practitioners will be assured through clinical, educational, leadership and research practice.

 

 

 

Underpinning Educational Philosophy - Curriculum Themes

 

The programme team are committed to nurturing the development of, and providing opportunities for, students so they become safe, autonomous and effective professional practitioners with a commitment to life-long learning. We are committed to produce competent, compassionate and confident professional practitioners, who are grounded with strong values, as well as a strong sense of personal and professional responsibility, and accountability towards their future career in physiotherapy. We will strive to develop professional practitioners who have gained excellent knowledge and skills and who will make safe, sound and compassionate clinical decisions. We will develop professional practitioners who work well with others and are equipped to become future leaders in the profession to enhance service delivery.

 

Students, as social beings, learn through an active learning environment of discovery, reflection and authentic real-world learning opportunities. Though interactions with peers, academic staff, and real-world learning experiences with service-users in practice placements, students will construct meaning through an integrated system of learning that moves them from a factual level of knowledge to functional practical application that reflects the complexity of the real-world and supports higher learning. As students’ progress and the programme complexity increases students will develop skills of clinical reasoning and independent informed decision-making based on evidence to solve problems that cannot rely solely on standard planned routine and reaction.   The programme was developed with this constructivist and transformational learning, teaching and assessment educational philosophy in mind.  The curriculum is designed as a spiral curriculum (Figure 1) where students develop the following essential physiotherapist graduate attributes (Figure 2) in a structured manner:

 

 

Figure 2.  Spiral Curriculum.

 

Competence develops as concepts and skills are re-visited throughout the programme at an increasing level of complexity from foundation level of knowledge and understanding at level 4 to critical, reflective, autonomous, lifelong learners and practitioners, who meet the threshold standards for entry level practice to the profession at Level 6. A positive, strength-focussed, student-centred approach is adopted.

 

 

Figure 2.  Physiotherapy Graduate Attributes.

 

 

At Stage 1, level 4, students develop a foundation knowledge and understanding of normal human function, with brief insight to dysfunction to illustrate how things go wrong with normal function. This also allows students from an early stage, in a supported tutor-led environment, to engage in enquiry based learning, clinical reasoning and problem-solving – skills they will be expected to develop further and apply confidently at level 5. They are introduced to professional values and behaviours, fundamental physiotherapy assessment techniques and develop essential communication skills, all critical for effective physiotherapy practice. Students develop practical skills through practice on peers and later through ethical interactions with patient and carer representatives, equipping them with knowledge, skills and confidence for a four week practice placement at the end of the first year. Students also learn how to become self-aware, reflective learners and practitioners and explore the wider aspects of healthcare services including professional, policy, legal and ethical issues, cultural competence, health and wellbeing, the role of evidence based practice in physiotherapy, and the psychosocial basis of person-centred care.

 

In Stage 2, level 5, students consolidate and build on the learning and skills at level 4. Topics increase in complexity as students explore the pathological foundations of individual neurological, cardiorespiratory and musculoskeletal conditions, commonly seen in physiotherapy practice. Inquiry based learning increases and students are encouraged to become more autonomous in their learning. Teaching embeds real-world case-based problem-based learning opportunities and students are encouraged to work collaboratively in groups to draw on the evidence base to inform clinical reasoning and decision-making for treatment interventions. Students learn how to generate knowledge as their research knowledge and skills develop. Practical skills, clinical reasoning and decision-making continue to be developed using peers and patient and carer representatives as ethically appropriate, and two practice placements of six and five weeks duration respectively, allow the application of knowledge and skills to professional practice within a supportive, supervised clinical environment.

 

In Stage 3, level 6, the curriculum engages with contemporary developments in physiotherapy and introduces students to wider, role emerging opportunities. Professional knowledge and skills consider complex cases involving multiple pathologies and co-morbidities and students will be expected to work within an integrated inter-professional and multi-agency environment, to identify and prioritise treatment interventions, based on case history, complexity and wider physical, mental and social issues. They will  produce a dissertation and complete two practice placements of six and eight week duration.

 

Six themes, informed by the CSP “Physiotherapy Framework: Putting Physiotherapy Behaviours, Values, Knowledge & Skills into Practice (2013)”, underpin the educational philosophy of the BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy programme curriculum. These are summarised below:

 

  1. Critical Inquiry and Evidence Based Practice
  2. Bridging the Conceptual Theory-Practice Gap
  3. Digital Literacy, Innovation and Leadership
  4. Collaborative Partnerships and Inter-professional Working Practice
  5. Personal and Professional Development
  6. Health and Wellbeing: Education and Health Promotion

 

 

Critical Inquiry and Evidence Based Practice

 

The programme has been designed, alongside others in the School of Nursing and Healthcare Sciences, to ensure that throughout their studies, physiotherapy students are afforded the opportunity to become active participants in all of their learning. This may challenge some of the traditional approaches to learning that they are familiar with in that the programme content they study will ensure that value is placed firmly on the need for them to develop a capacity for lifelong learning, not usually characterised by didactic approaches. 

 

The educational framework that the University advocates and proactively implements centres around the pedagogic principles of critical inquiry based learning and evidence based practice.  This permits the clear identification of liminal levels of learning and mechanisms for addressing the need to develop levels of competence within and between all three stages of the degree pathway. Based on Vygotsky’s Zone of Proximal Development, the programme ensures a progression from functional dependence on learning and teaching facilitation in the initial stages of the programme to competence and professional autonomy across all academic and clinical areas upon completion of the programme. Achieving this has been made possible using mechanisms of assessment that are driven by processes of teaching and learning that not only reflect domains of learning but also advocate and facilitate deep as opposed to surface learning.

 

The programme has been designed to promote the development of the levels of knowledge, skills and professionalism commensurate with graduate qualification and eligibility to join the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) and Chartered Society of Physiotherapists (CSP) registers. The role of the physiotherapist is characterised by compassionate, caring and clinically competent approaches to inter-professional working in the healthcare workforce and this educational model promotes capacity building within and between professional disciplines in this context. It also places focus on compassion within the context of person-centred care across the programme and recognises the unique situational contexts that physiotherapists occupy in being able to socially engage with service-users and their families and carers, alongside the provision of clinical and professional interventions in practice.

 

This model of inquiry based learning ensures students are equipped for integration into the regional and national graduate healthcare workplace, whether in the clinical context of the National Health Service, Social Care Service and Private Practice, or new emerging roles in industry and workplaces, education and development, and research environments. The curriculum also affords students the opportunity to integrate Information Technology resources across the programme to drive processes of active learning.

 

 

Bridging the Conceptual Theory-Practice Gap

 

Professional practice placements form an integral part of the learning process and are vital to both academic, personal and professional development. Ensuring that the curriculum design bridged the theory practice gap was a key focus in the curriculum development process to promote the application of theory to practice and the development of clinical reasoning. All theoretical learning across the academic curriculum has been aligned with clinical learning opportunities afforded to students in clinical settings for the development of their physiotherapy practice. Clinical learning opportunities will afford students clinical learning experiences in a diverse array of healthcare contexts and settings of direct relevance to 21st Century physiotherapy practice.

 

Students will be appropriately prepared in advance for each professional practice placement.   Knowledge and skills will be taught, discussed, demonstrated, applied and assessed by staff in practical workshops and seminars. As students gain experience across differing contexts of physiotherapy assessment, diagnosis and management, clinical practice will develop knowledge, skills and professionalism at levels corresponding with their liminal academic levels of learning. Learning opportunities on campus and preparation for practice placements will be facilitated with the use of the purpose built physiotherapy suite at the University’s City Campus, which is an integral part of the new building, specifically designated to the delivery of allied health and medical curricula at the University. Exposure to person-centred care in these settings will be a key mechanism of ensuring that physiotherapy students are afforded the opportunity to develop compassionate and caring approaches to dealing with service-users and their families and carers. 

 

Since clinical learning forms such a high percentage of the programme, students will have the opportunity to engage directly with service-users experiencing physiotherapy treatment and intervention in the context of their education programme. Alongside this, the Faculty’s Patient Carer Patient Involvement (PCPI) provision will enhance students’ ability to engage and understand the emotive and affective experiences of people dealing with specific medical and health conditions of direct relevance to physiotherapy practice. This ensures that functional psychomotor learning can be learned in an ethos of compassion and due regard for the physiotherapy service-users, families and carers students will one day serve in practice. 

 

This integration of our ‘expert service-users’ with specialist facilitation, will provide students with a means of framing their everyday practice and facilitate them with opportunities of consolidating the development of their caring and compassionate approaches to physiotherapy healthcare intervention.

 

Expectations of practice placement educators and the transitions from level 4 to 5 and level 5 to 6 would be discussed in pre-placement tutorial meetings with students. Consolidation and de-brief days scheduled at the end of each placement enable students to reflect on and discuss their placement experiences with staff and peers offering additional  rich, varied and meaningful learning experiences.

 

Practice placement educator training/mentoring programmes and regular updates will be offered by the University of Sunderland. Students are required to give placement feedback via an on-line questionnaire, which then is circulated to the respective university and placement sites to inform the process of placement audits. Teaching strategies vary across clinical sites but as a student you can expect close supervision from senior members of the profession with frequent and timely feedback. Students who engage with and act on that feedback can achieve excellent standards.

 

 

Using Professional Development Portfolios to Reflect on Practice

 

Throughout their studies, students will engage with a Professional and Academic Development (PAD) Portfolio that will incorporate sessions for critical reflection. It will also support and aid them in developing their capacity to change practice in the light of things they might reflect on. This will not just be specific to clinical physiotherapy practice; it will incorporate reflections on theoretical academic knowledge and skills (including clinical), leadership qualities and skills, generic employability skills, and research knowledge and skills to ensure students’ holistic learning experience. It will engender and nurture an ethos of critical reflexivity, political awareness and higher order thinking in relation to the professional role of the physiotherapist.

 

 

Clinical Practice Placement Experience

 

The clinical component of the course will equate to a minimum of 1000 clinical hours as required by the Chartered Society of Physiotherapy .  Clinical competency will be achieved during Clinical Practice and Elective Practice placement opportunities, and modules involving work with service-users. Clinical competency will be progressively developed and achieved through five Practice Placements; one at Level 4 (4 weeks, 150 hours), two at Level 5 (6 weeks, 225 hours and 5 weeks, 187.5 hours) and two at Level 6 (6 weeks, 225 hours and 8 weeks, 300 hours). Practice placements are strategically aligned within the programme to allow the timely application of the professional and physiotherapy knowledge and skills, developed within the taught modules, to practice clinically.

 

As previously outlined, student practice placement experiences have been, and will continue to be, developed in collaboration with local NHS Trusts, Primary Care providers primarily across, but not limited to, the North East of England. Private practice and community providers so that they have designated mentorship and supervisory support as an adjunct to their academic learning pathways. The integration of theory and practice at the front line of patient care ensures that their clinical competency is established and the development of their professional attitude and behaviours is validated by experienced and established clinicians from the clinical discipline of physiotherapy.

 

The underpinning theoretical knowledge across every module of the programme will be substantiated by engagement with accompanying module handbooks and there will be ongoing formative assessment opportunities across the programme.

 

Experiential practice placements will drive:

 

  • An identification and strategic focus on authentic clinical issues. From their practice placement experiences external to the University of Sunderland students will have the opportunity to reflect and develop their existing level of learning and independently benchmark where their current level of knowledge is in relation to their everyday clinical practice and professional practice skills.

 

  • An opportunity to critically reflect on their practice within a collaborative group context, which captures the dynamic of working in the context of physiotherapy practice in different healthcare settings.

 

  • Establishment of the notions of personal autonomy and individual responsibility in practice which will be used to drive the processes of teaching, learning and assessment through the implementation of inquiry based learning.

 

  • Integration of theoretical learning and the clinical application of new and developing or emergent knowledge to practice through the course of the programme.

 

This approach to education provides a dynamic mechanism by which student learning can be flexibly provided, effectively managed and continually updated. A strong physical infrastructure of academic and practice placement educator staff with a shared vision of equipping a high quality healthcare workforce will underpin all of their learning and teaching experiences.

 

As a profession, physiotherapists have evolved from an historic training in vocational skill to becoming key contributors to the interdisciplinary and multi-disciplinary healthcare team, as practitioners with a unique niche and contribution to inter-professional working. As a signature discipline, physiotherapy remains at the fore of caring and compassionate healthcare practice within the context of a respected professional body which engenders high expectation from its own discipline and others.

 

The engagement students are afforded in the context of authentic person-centred interaction and care is a platform ensuring that the construction of meaning has:

 

  1. Strategic relevance
  2. Currency
  3. Tangible impact in terms of their capacity for communication, care and compassion

 

The significance of evidence based approaches to physiotherapy is embedded across the programme. All modules have been designed to ensure that students can acknowledge the need to ensure critical higher order thinking underpins every clinical decision they make. We aim to ensure that students are not only equipped to recognise the key tension between reflective practice and evidence based practice in terms of the potential for subjective approaches; we aim to equip them with the systematic approaches necessary to frame and contextualise clinical experience and clinical decision making in a rational and objective framework. We also aim to ensure that whilst physiotherapists make fundamentally challenging decisions in practice, that our physiotherapy students have had the opportunity to contemplate the impact that their individual decision making can have on the lives of others, for better or for worse.

 

Digital Literacy, Innovation and Leadership

 

Educational provision across the programme also recognises the need for a driven and motivated workforce to be equipped with digital literacy proficiency (computer and IT skills) and knowledge of current policy and legislation driving healthcare provision, and deliberately incorporates this into the learning experiences offered. First and foremost the University is committed to developing people and their societal contribution and we believe that this ethos will develop a body of physiotherapists capable of contributing to a high quality workforce and maximising their individual capacity to develop in the profession of physiotherapy.

 

The BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy programme developments acknowledge Health Education England “Maximising Leadership Learning in the Pre-Registration Healthcare Curricula Model and Guidelines for Healthcare Education Providers” (2018) on how best to integrate leadership learning into the pre-registration clinical healthcare curricula – putting leadership development as a core component of our curriculum directly supporting the ambitions of the NHS leadership and improvement framework Developing People, Improving Care[13]. The ambition of these guidelines is to enable each newly qualified healthcare professional to graduate and enter the healthcare workforce with the skills, knowledge, mind-set, behaviours and tools to be a leader of people and service improvement at the start of their careers. The 3 stages of developing as a leader during pre-registration education are identified as:

 

Stage 1: Focus on self: developing self-awareness and self-efficacy to foster understanding of one’s own beliefs, attitudes, values, knowledge, attributes and skills in order to build and develop leadership behaviours.

 

Stage 2: Working with others: understanding how one interacts and connects with the diversity of other people in organisations and learning how to develop positive team working in a multi-professional and complex clinical environment.

 

Stage 3: Improving healthcare: developing and leading teams to instigate and action positive change in practice to assure quality, safety of care and continuous improvement of services through evidence-based approaches.

 

The programme builds up leadership in stages from ‘Focus on self’ (Level 4), to ‘Working with others’ (Level 5) and finally ‘Improving healthcare through service evaluation, improvement and change’ (Level 6) with some flexibility within the spiral curriculum to develop, continually build on and re-visit key leadership skills.

 

We envisage our physiotherapy students will graduate with a clear, shared understanding of how to be excellent leaders, who from the start of their professional careers can help drive positive change and continuously improve the quality of healthcare services to enhance the future experiences for service users.

 

 

Integrating Service User Perspectives, Collaborative Partnerships and Inter-professional Working

 

"Inter-Professional Education occurs when two or more professions learn with, from and about each other to improve collaboration and the quality of care" (Centre for the Advancement of Inter-professional Education 2002). Recent national policies highlight the need for future health and social care practitioners to work across professional boundaries, within a framework of core knowledge and core values (Francis 2013, Higher Education England 2015). Opportunities for inter-professional working have been integrated into the curriculum to create an environment that facilitates inter-professional learning with each other and about each other, exploring common knowledge base and values. Inter-professional learning opportunities include shared module delivery, specialist training to develop skills such as basic life support, moving and handling, staff/patient safety, leadership and research and evidence based skills.

 

Inter-professional education (IPE) and Inter-professional Learning (IPL);

 

The Physiotherapy programme, working in partnership with other programmes in the Faculty, is committed to inter-professional education and learning. The purpose of inter-professional education and learning within the programme is to enhance collaboration between the health and social care (and other) professions, to improve quality and to apply person centred approaches.

 

Whilst the terms IPE and IPL are used interchangeably the Physiotherapy programme differentiates these into two distinct concepts;

  • Inter-professional Education (IPE) – where students learn from and about each other
  • Inter-Professional Learning (IPL) – where students learn alongside each other

 

To meet the ambitions of ‘person centred care’ and be equipped to contribute to the recent national drivers for integration of services Physiotherapy students must understand the concepts of teamwork, collaboration and respect and be able to demonstrate these concepts through communication, their understanding of other professions roles, problem solving, conflict resolution, personal reflection and creating then working towards common goals for the benefit of the people they serve.

 

To prepare students for practice, not only in terms of their core physiotherapy knowledge and skills but in terms of their ability to work within, and be an integral part of, multi-disciplinary and multiagency teams, it is vitally important that from the outset students are provided with opportunities to learn with, from and about students from other professional disciplines during their studies at the University of Sunderland. This learning will develop the student’s attitudes and behaviours to equip them for the collaborative practice required during their placements and as graduate Physiotherapists. This will enable them to deliver person centred approaches through working in partnership with other professionals across the traditional boundaries that exist across teams, organisations and within health and social care systems.    

 

The Physiotherapy Programme incorporates the Faculty Strategy for inter-professional education (IPE), where students learn about and from each other, into the modules below:

 

  • PTY 101: Personal and Professional Development 1

Included in the taught element of this module are an introduction to the health and social care professions, the roles and responsibilities of other professionals, person centred approaches, teamwork and communication.

  • PTY 201: Personal and Professional Development 2

Included in the taught element of this module are contemporary issues in health and social care, collaboration, working with others, problem solving, and conflict resolution.

  • PTY 301: Personal and Professional Development 3

Included in the taught element of this module are service improvement, leadership and inter-professional working including inter-professional ethical considerations.

 

Each of these personal and professional development modules include a variety of active participation, simulated practice scenarios where students are required to work together to meet a person’s needs or to solve a practice problem in collaboration. The scenarios will simulate a person’s ‘journey’ through a practice pathway and will provide students from physiotherapy, occupational therapy, medicine, pharmacy, nursing (adult, mental health and learning disability branches), paramedic science, psychology and social work the opportunity to collaborate, learn about and from each other within the context of contemporary practice with the shared goal of being person centred.

 

Each of the simulation scenarios include bespoke learning outcomes that have been mutually agreed between the programmes involved. Students will be expected to reflect on these simulated scenarios and demonstrate their learning about and from the other disciplines as well as the learning and feedback received from the IPE event as part of the assessed element of the module demonstrated in their personal development portfolio.   

 

The IPE strategy is person centred and driven which means that the scenarios presented to students are authentic and contemporary. The disciplines and professions chosen to participate in the Faculty IPE strategy are representative of the MDTs and practice based problems and scenario’s that physiotherapy students are likely to encounter in practice. Each scenario will be planned to ensure that students from no one individual profession can problem solve without the full collaboration of the person with lived experience and at least one other professional discipline.

 

The Physiotherapy Programme also incorporates inter-professional learning (IPL), where students learn alongside each other, into all of the taught content of the Research strand at all levels of the programme where methods of scholarly enquiry are linked with evidence based practice in the context of contemporary (inter-professional) practice:

 

  • PTY 100: Introduction to Research 1
  • PTY 200: Evidence Based Practice and Research 2
  • PTY 300: Dissertation (whilst the module is an IPL module, the content of the Physiotherapy students’ dissertation will be of relevance to the Physiotherapy profession).

 

Inter-professional learning, where students learn alongside each other, also occurs in one of the modules in year 1 (PTY 104; Human Function and Lifespan Development); this module differs from the research modules in that it includes inter-professional learning as well as profession specific teaching where lifespan development is applied to human function from physiotherapy specific perspective; this ensures that there is sufficient profession specific teaching within the module. 

 

Wherever possible we will use the infrastructure of ‘expert service-users’ and their families and carers available at the University to provide and illuminate their experiences of living with medical and social conditions, which are reflective of the service-users with whom physiotherapists engage on a day to day basis. We are fortunate enough to have an established infrastructure for this PCPI provision resourced by service-users who can articulate their experience of clinical assessment, diagnosis and management of their specific medical and surgical conditions. Competent and compassionate physiotherapy practice necessitates an empathic engagement with service-users and their families and carers in an individualised and tailored response to care need. Consolidating this level of professionalism and holistic care is the need to engage with often complex clinical decision making indicative of an adept and confident physiotherapy practitioner. Central to student learning across all these domains will be the opportunity for them to reflect and engage with service-users at the front line of care provision. Not only will students be afforded the privilege of working directly with these service-users, all problem based learning, simulation and integration of theory with practice will integrate real life clinical scenarios that challenge, provoke and stimulate higher order thinking skills. It is the development of these skills which will ensure students’ adaptive capacity to operationalise and transfer generic learning into practice since they will be more able to re-construct knowledge and apply it across a diversity of care settings. They will also develop due regard for their role as an independent, reflective practitioners upon registration with the HCPC on successful completion of their education programme and within the context of inter-professional engagement, and interdisciplinary and multi-disciplinary teamwork. Not only is this a mechanism of driving educational practice in incorporating the patient voice into truly person-centred curricula; it is an explicit opportunity for the integration of clinical and theoretical learning across every module of the programme. This is reflected in a corresponding and strategic approach to assessment and continuous triangulated feedback. The patient is therefore an integral part of the educational experience, not merely a contributor to the process. Throughout the programme the teaching teams will select service-users who can provide feedback on their performance, especially in relation to student capacity to be a compassionate practitioner with due regard for individual need and a professional approach.  The physiotherapy programme will effectively harness a holistic yet strategic approach to service user involvement. The approach is a fundamental attribute and expectation of any Pre-Registration Physiotherapy Programme with the enhancement of patient contribution to the strategic design of healthcare provision and education programmes.

 

As a direct result of stakeholder meetings and academic curriculum planning, the University has committed to the strategic design of the degree pathway that is aligned to the development of graduate skill sets which align all student learning throughout their educational experience. Rather than thinking about segmented brackets of information, the deliberate integration of knowledge across the whole physiotherapy programme can be used to ensure the relevance of all academic and clinical modules to the professional discipline of physiotherapy. Stakeholder involvement and their valuable contribution to curriculum planning is presented in Appendix 1.

 

 

Personal and Professional Development and Research

 

Personal and Professional Development and Research modules are incorporated into the curriculum across all programme levels.  The Personal and Professional Development (PPD 1, PPD2 and PPD 3) and Research (Introduction to Research, Evidence-Based Enquiry and Research 2, and Dissertation)  level 4, level 5 and level 6 modules have core strands embedded covering essential academic, employability and research knowledge and skills (Figure 3).

 

At level 5 the ‘Personal and Professional Development and Research 2’ strand aligns to ‘Working with others’. Here students will learn to understand how they interact and connect with the diversity of other people in organisations and how to develop positive team working relationships in a multi-professional and complex clinical environment. Students will be encouraged to collaborate with, learn with, learn from (and learn about) each other and will be actively encouraged during their practice placements to spend time with other professionals to gain an understanding of roles within the multi-disciplinary team. Building upon the students’ clinical experience is important as is the opportunity to learn about effective leadership and to further develop leadership skills and show emerging competency. Leadership development will be informed by the Clinical Leadership Competency Framework (NHS Leadership Academy 2011)[14] and the Healthcare Leadership Model (NHS Leadership Academy 2013)[15].

 

Figure 3.  Core themes: Personal Professional and Development and Research

 

 

Through the Evidence-Based Practice and Research module at level 5 students will develop the knowledge of research from Level 4, and learn how to design and conduct rigorous, robust and ethical positivist and interpretivist research studies. They will learn the fundamental principles of data analysis and interpretation.  They will conduct two small tutor-led and tutor-directed research studies to put the knowledge into practice in a step by step, structured and supported environment. Students will learn to analyse, interpret and present the data in written and verbal formats and will be assessed on these skills in preparation for their independent research project at Level 6.  They will learn how to review the evidence-base for a specialist topic, systematically collating and reviewing information from a variety sources to inform clinical reasoning and decision-making. They will learn how to write, and be assessed on writing, a research proposal. 

 

Leadership and Improving healthcare through service evaluation, improvement and change’ underpins the “Personal and Professional Development and Research 3” module at level 6. Equipped with self-awareness and an ability to connect to others and be part of and/or lead a successful team, students will be introduced to the theory and models that underpin service audit, evaluation, improvement and change. During their Stage 3 practice placements students will be expected to identify and critically evaluate an aspect of service provision and offer suggestions towards implementing service change. Students will be introduced to new emerging roles in physiotherapy. Students will be taught how to develop, lead and manage teams, how to identify service innovation and how to action positive change in practice to assure quality, safety of care and continuous service improvement through evidence-based approaches, across constantly evolving and challenging environments. Students will graduate equipped as professional, safe practitioners with the ability to communicate and collaborate safely and effectively across professional boundaries. Students will be equipped to embrace being a leadership role model from the point they graduate and enter the healthcare workforce.

 

Finally, for the research strand at level 6, students will have the opportunity to choose from completing an independent research project or a literature review negotiated with, and guided by an academic research supervisor. They will, where necessary apply for ethical approval and be expected to comply fully with professional, legal, ethical expectations with honesty and integrity and where necessary will collect (or systematically review) data, analyse data, interpret data and disseminate research outcomes in written and verbal formats.

 

 

Health and Wellbeing: Education and Health Promotion

 

Healthcare practitioners are well placed to provide health education and health promotion advice to improve individual health and wellbeing. As such, the curriculum embeds ‘health and wellbeing’ as a core theme across the programme in line with the National Institute for Clinical Excellence Guidance on Behaviour Change: General Approaches[16] and the NHS “Implementation Guide and Toolkit for Making Every Contact Count: Using every opportunity to achieve health and wellbeing”[17] resources. At Level 4, 5, 6 students will be progressively taught to increase their self-awareness of their own lifestyle behaviours and health (Level 4) and that of others (Levels 5 and 6) through the Personal and Professional Development suite of modules. They will be taught and expected to apply principles of behaviour change to encourage themselves and others to adopt a healthier lifestyles through the provision of education and training and the delivery of individual and community-based programmes and programmes aimed at specific populations. In addition to Personal and Professional Development modules, health and wellbeing are core themes embedded within the following modules: Level 4, “Fundamentals of Physical Activity and Exercise” and Human Function and Lifespan Development; Level 5, Psychosocial Foundations for Holistic Practice and Physical Activity and Exercise for Long Term Conditions; Level 6, Complex Integrated Physiotherapy Practice modules and “Contemporary Perspectives in Physiotherapy Practice” modules.  

 

Teaching, Learning and Assessment

Teaching and learning will be allowed to drive the assessment processes adopted through the programme and learning outcomes. Teaching methodologies and processes of assessment have been constructively aligned to reflect this. In terms of physical infrastructure:

 

  • The University has a state of the art Virtual Learning Environment (Canvas) and Social Learning Platform (Physiotherapy Navigator System) which can be used to enhance and define the student learning experience. It also has the extensive supporting infrastructure to equip students in the relevant skills of critical synthesis they need to be a critical thinker.

 

  • The Faculty of Health Sciences and Wellbeing boasts four exceptionally cohesive, Schools; the School of Medicine, the School of Nursing and Healthcare Sciences, the School of Pharmacy and the School of Psychology. It is notable in relation to the development of the Physiotherapy programme that the University has a range of subject disciplines, which can be delivered by staff with specific expertise from such subjects as medicinal chemistry, pharmaceutical chemistry, microbiology, immunology, cardiac physiology, epigenetics, paramedic science, medicine, physiotherapy, occupational therapy, public health and sport and exercise science.  Programmes at the University of Sunderland are characterised by, and embrace, core concepts of innovative practice and teaching methodologies and integrated inter-professional working opportunities, This addresses  the need to not only to respond to change in healthcare provision but to lead it in practice. The proposed BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy programme will be a pivotal mechanism in further integrating the inter-professional relations within and between all of these teams with staff contributing across the delivery of their programmes alongside their own comprehensive portfolio health based educational provision.

 

  • The provision of optimal patient and family care in the future will depend on the education, training and facilitation of physiotherapy practitioners who are acknowledged as having individual learning styles and learning needs within an infrastructure which is pragmatically designed, resourced with appropriate staff and that provides authentic learning experiences.

 

 

 

 

  1. Retention strategy

 

Programme success is our priority, which means staff will do everything they can to support students on the programme, and with their longer term career goals. Where necessary academic staff will sign-post students towards wider support services available to students across the university (e.g., Student Journey and Students Union).

 

The University has a robust and historical infrastructure specifically designed and continuously developed to support student retention in academic and clinical settings. Key examples are our flagship Master of Pharmacy programme, Biomedical Sciences and Healthcare Sciences degree pathways and the Overseas Nurses Programme all of which are accredited by professional bodies in accordance with statutory requirements for healthcare education.  Key University of Sunderland policies include Work-based Learning, Placements Guidance, the University Learning and Teaching Plan and the University Academic Strategy. By continually supporting students in their practice placement areas as an integral part of the University Academic Strategy, we can ensure they are individually valued as members of their student cohort. We operationalise this by methodologically triangulating our focused identification of students who might be lost to attrition, lacking progression or exhibiting signs of personal difficulty. Typically:

 

Ensuring their initial collaborative orientation upon commencement of the programme. This will serve as a means of defining their cohort in terms of their social identity and establish a sense of belonging to both the University and the providers in which they undertake their practice placements.

 

Using the University’s Personal Tutor System as a first point of contact for students, should they experience difficulties in clinical practice. They will be designated an academic from the Programme Team throughout the three year programme. This system will drive intensive systems of holistic personal and professional support through the provision of one to one support for them.

 

Complementing and enhancing the existing successful mentorship infrastructure by integrating academic support and service user perspectives into execution within educational provision.

 

University Student & Learning Support supporting students with disabilities or specific learning needs, e.g. mature students returning to study.

 

Providing support with learning and teaching approaches that students may not have experienced before and using this as a mechanism for driving their support in practice.

 

Formalising Placement Agreements and placement support via the University Physiotherapy  Practice Placement Support Team  to ensure students gain the right experience at the right time.

 

Ensuring that the ongoing programme delivery process ensures recognition and support, in instances where students may struggle, personal tutor support, through formative feedback, pastoral support to enhance their retention and progression across the programme. 

 

Responding proactively to their individual feedback on all aspects of programme delivery in relation to practice placement educator engagement and individual placements.

 

Action planning for resilience will be a key contribution to preparing students for the healthcare workforce and also their retention on the pre-registration programme. Identification of the key risk factors can be outlined in terms of the characteristics that students demonstrate such as:

 

  • Need for personal autonomy
  • Extreme and overt conscientiousness
  • Perfectionism
  • Self-giving
  • Impatience
  • Intolerance
  • Low self-esteem or confidence
  • No recognition of personal limits
  • Need for approval
  • Type D personality –which is defined as the tendency towards negative affective emotional responses (e.g. excessive worry, irritability, gloominess)
  • Social inhibition (lack of self – confidence and social withdrawal)

 

Enabling student resilience in these key areas will be facilitated by embedding workshops on resilience across the programme and also integrating social learning and social activity alongside formal curricula activities. Our approach to developing resilience also aligns with the need for social learning, interactive dialogue and a mechanism of driving all assessment and work placed contribution with learning and teaching strategies that will potentially develop resilient characteristics.

 

 

  1. Any other information.

 

This is a new degree pathway programme leading to the award of BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy. It has three exit points, and is delivered full-time to students who wish to work in the National Health Service, Private Practice or wider emerging roles.

 

The University is in the position to be able to embed public health across all our allied health and professional programmes, in accordance with new guidelines for the healthcare professions. This will ensure that tomorrow’s healthcare workforce is equipped with an holistic skill set that addresses commonly encountered public health issues in practice, such as smoking, obesity and  sedentary behaviour. Physiotherapists are likely to work as an integral part of inter-disciplinary and multi-disciplinary teams in practice and the integrated healthcare provision within this operates, is reflected across the physiotherapy curriculum. This requires knowledge and a skill set that supports the fluidity of healthcare provision.

 

The programme content is designed to ensure standards of educational practice as outlined by the Chartered Society of Physiotherapists and the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) standards for education and training are both met by providing educational content based around the HCPC Physiotherapy Standards of Proficiency. As well as looking at developments of the profession to ensure that the University of Sunderland provides a practitioner that is fit for purpose.

 

Registration with the Health and Care Professions Council acts as a mechanism of safeguarding formal entry to the profession of physiotherapy and assures the competence of those physiotherapy practitioners registered.  The University of Sunderland’s BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy degree pathway has been designed to reflect the HCPC Standards of Education and Standards of Proficiency (for physiotherapists) and each clinical physiotherapy placement is reflective of the professional requirements of the Chartered Society of Physiotherapy, the HCPC and the Department of Health.

 

From a regional perspective, the programme is underpinned by Health Education England’s (HEE) mandate to support the delivery of excellent healthcare and health improvement to the service-users and public of England ensuring that the workforce of today and tomorrow has the right numbers, skills, values and behaviours, at the right time and in the right place. This also underpins and supports the ethos behind the HCPC’s Service User and Carer engagement via the University of Sunderland’s own robust and established infrastructure of Patient and Carer Public Involvement (PCPI).

 

The programme leads to a professional qualification and students are expected to follow the ‘standards for physiotherapy professionals’, therefore 100% attendance is expected from students. Any student whose attendance falls below 80% without extenuating circumstances during one semester will be required to withdraw from their programme. If a student is unable to attend the university s/he must inform the university and follow the relevant absence reporting procedure, including the need to provide supporting evidence where necessary.

 

The degree pathway has been specifically designed to provide students with the opportunity to fulfil the requisite 1000 hours of practice in three years and also incorporates a degree of contingency to accommodate additional hours in instances of mitigating or extenuating circumstance such as illness or the need to repeat modules in which students have been formally referred.

 

The University of Sunderland will maintain a brand new purpose built physiotherapy suite at City Campus, in newly modernised buildings housing an array of other medical and allied healthcare disciplines such as medicine, paramedic science, nursing, pharmacy and occupational therapy. Here, students will be introduced to clinical practice in safe and well managed clinical environments, which also house a state of the art clinical simulation suite, point of care testing centre and wet and dry anatomy laboratories. From the earliest stages of the programme, integrated sessions with our Patient and Carer Public Involvement group, will ensure students are provided with the opportunity of developing professional values alongside core clinical competence with a sound theoretical underpinning, facilitated by staff from a range of health and academic disciplines across the faculty.

 

As a graduate from the BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy programme at Sunderland, students will be equipped to demonstrate professionalism in all their interactions with service-users and their families and carers and their peers. Emphasis will be placed on the need to demonstrate high standards of professional conduct and professional behaviour at all times. Numbers of service-users in practice living with the long term complications of conditions such as Diabetes mellitus are rising and the NHS is increasingly treating ‘high risk’ service-users. The programme content and delivery will ensure that students will gain ‘hands on’ experience with ‘low risk’ service-users as a means of scaffolding the learning of physiotherapy students as they gain confidence and competence during the trajectory of the programme.

 

Effective communication is the keystone to quality across all healthcare provision and Sunderland students will be equipped to articulate both in written and verbal form. In addition to the general physiotherapy care undertaken on the University campus, formal placement experience will include the provision of physiotherapy assessment, diagnosis and management to some of the most vulnerable members of society, including those who are very young, the elderly, those with mental illness, learning and physical disabilities and those who have faced circumstances beyond their control, which have left them vulnerable. In order to ensure all of the service-users and their families and carers are safeguarded in relation to their protection and safety, students will be expected to abide by the regulatory and professional body guidance for physiotherapy students and to adhere to Standards of the HCPC. The assessment of the conduct of students as being highly professional at all times, will form an integral part of the assessment of their clinical practice.

 

Every person aspiring to become formally registered as a physiotherapist with the HCPC upon completion of the BSc (Hons) physiotherapy programme must provide evidence that he or she is in ‘good health and of good character’ at the commencement of the programme, throughout their studies and beyond. Each will be required to declare any  relevant change in  circumstances which may have an impact on this important requirement and we have specialist support available across the University’s wider students support facilities,  at all times to advise students in the event of any such changes. Further details will be available to students in their programme handbooks and directly from the HCPC website. 

 

The Faculty of Health Sciences and Wellbeing has built on its traditional values whilst advancing contemporary healthcare practice and has been successful in embedding a research active curriculum and strong links to research based practice. Students of the BSc (Hons) physiotherapy programme will have the opportunity to see ‘live’ research projects from the contexts of Public Health, National Health Services research and the National Institute of Healthcare Research (NIHR), where our academic staff contribute to research across the region and nationally. The feedback from employers on the quality of our students from the Faculty of Health Sciences and Wellbeing is excellent and reflects the quality of the student support provided during their studies at the University. A key feature of practice placement support is that all practice placement educators are provided with the opportunity to undertake educational qualifications in mentorship in addition to their established skills and knowledge gained as physiotherapists in practice. Successful completion of the BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy programme and registration with the HCPC will entitle graduates from the University of Sunderland to use the protected professional title of Physiotherapist. They will also be eligible  to join the Chartered Society of Physiotherapists.

 

The programme will ensure an effective education for the development of physiotherapy practice and ensure appropriate knowledge and skills to provide the appropriate management and care plans for the full range of service-users and needs.

 

The university will ensure the programme delivers education that enables physiotherapists to recognise the changing environment for physiotherapy healthcare provision and ensure the currency of their foundational healthcare qualification in physiotherapy. It will also equip physiotherapy students with the transferrable skill set necessary to adapt to change in practice over the course of their career trajectories in physiotherapy.

 

The normal entry point is at Stage 1, having met the specified admissions criteria. Students with a level 4 qualification (or equivalent) may be able to access Stage 2 of the BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme. For those students wishing to join the programme at a higher level the University AP(E)L regulations will be adhered to

 

 

 

SECTION C:TEACHING AND LEARNING

 

  1. What is the Programme About?

 

The University of Sunderland’s BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy degree pathway has been designed to fulfil the requirements of the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) Standards of Proficiency and Education and Training, alongside the specific curricula guidance advocated by the Chartered Society Physiotherapists (CSP). The underpinning educational aims of this pathway have been designed to:

 

 

Aims

 

A1.Produce physiotherapist practitioners who has an understanding of the complexities of the health and social care systems in the United kingdom, and who are fit for practice, purpose and academic award, according to the Standards of Education and Training and Standards of Proficiency as specified by the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC), and the Learning and Development Principles and Core Standards as specified by the Chartered Society of Physiotherapy (CSP), with eligibility to apply for entry to the HCPC register and eligibility to apply for professional membership of the Chartered Society of Physiotherapy.

 

A2.Produce physiotherapist practitioners who are able to practise autonomously and demonstrate accountability within the standards set by the regulatory and professional bodies with regard to conduct, performance and ethics as well as adhere to employer regulations and relevant policies, procedures and legislation.

 

A3.Develop a person-centred, safe, competent and reflective physiotherapist practitioner well-equipped to practise safely and effectively as an autonomous professional, in a fair and non-discriminatory way, exercising their own professional judgement within their scope of practice, and within the legal and ethical frameworks of the profession.

 

A4.Develop a professional practitioner who is adaptable and resilient to change, and ready for employment within existing, changing and emerging multi-disciplinary healthcare, social care and well-being environments, and is capable of leading the profession into the future.

 

A5.Produce a physiotherapist practitioner who can build, work and sustain effective partnerships with others including service users, carers, support staff and other professionals, and who is confident to initiate, respond and adapt positively to changes in standard and non-standard contexts of professional practice, and to the diversity of healthcare services.

 

A6.Develop a physiotherapist practitioner who will develop and maintain effective working relationships, both therapeutically and professionally, and work in partnership with individuals, groups, communities, societies and/or populations to promote health.

 

A7.Develop a physiotherapist practitioner who can work, adapt practice and communicate effectively in a non-discriminatory manner as part of a multidisciplinary and multi-agency health and social care team, with dignity and respect for all service users, carers, support workers and other professionals taking into consideration the impact of culture, equality and diversity on practice, across diverse settings.

 

A8.Develop a physiotherapist practitioner, who can influence change through active engagement with continuous evaluation and improvement of quality to promote and develop the physiotherapy profession.

 

A9.Nurture leadership skills and business acumen including legislation, audit, review and quality assurance, and an understanding of entrepreneurship, business service evaluation, sustainability and related commissioning models that impact upon professional practice.

 

A10.Provide an integrated, evidence-based, research-informed and clinical practice-led curriculum, within an inclusive, supportive, collaborative, inter-professional and multidisciplinary active-learning learning environment, that:

 

  1. Develops the core subject-specific knowledge, skills, personal attributes, values and behaviours required to practise safely and effectively in physiotherapy.
  2. Develops understanding and critical appraisal of the underpinning and influencing philosophies, knowledge and theories relating to physiotherapy practice.
  3. Advances independent learning ability.
  4. Nurtures critical evaluation, clinical reasoning and self-reflection on emerging knowledge, skills and competencies to plan appropriate actions.
  5. Promotes student creativity and originality in tackling and solving problems.
  6. Advocates increasing autonomy in academic study and professional practice.
  7. Cultivates competency in verbal and written communication to clearly present simple and complex information to specialist and non-specialist audiences.
  8. Fosters a commitment towards life-long learning and professional development, across existing and emerging healthcare and well-being environments.

 

A11.Promote digital literacy around contemporary developments in health informatics and technology to support research, professional practice and enhanced practice.

 

 

BSc(Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Structure

 

 


LEARNING OUTCOMES

 

 

To be eligible for the award of a University Certificate of Higher Education in Rehabilitation Studies at FHEQ Stage 1, Level 4, a student must have successfully studied and completed 120 Level 4 credits and students will be able to:

 

 

Knowledge

 

K1.Explain the anatomy and physiology of the human body emphasising the dynamic relationships of human structure and function and focusing on the cardiorespiratory, musculoskeletal and nervous systems at rest and during exercise.

 

K2.Describe simple anatomical, physiological and pathological dysfunction, in the context of health.

 

K3.Explain human growth and development across the lifespan.

 

K4.Identify factors that influence health and physiotherapy practice from a public health perspective.

 

K5.Explain the role of the physiotherapist within an inter-professional team of healthcare professionals.

 

K6.Explain the importance of communication, person-centred care, evidence-based practice, reflective practice, life-long learning, work-based partnerships and leadership within healthcare professions.

 

K7.Understand the concept of ‘professionalism’ in physiotherapy.

 

K8.Identify the main research paradigms and methods of enquiry, and the importance of research in physiotherapy practice. 

 

K9.Identify the professional, ethical, legal and professional agendas that inform and shape physiotherapy practice.

 

K10.Identify the professional, statutory and regulatory codes of practice and outline the expected threshold professional standards, attributes and capabilities for graduate entry registration for physiotherapy, as defined by the Health and Care Professions Council.

 

Skills

 

S1.Gather, review and critically analyse information from a wide variety of sources and by a variety of methods.

 

S2.Apply basic analytical skills to interpret and present qualitative and quantitative data, research and policy, in order to develop lines of argument and make judgements in accordance with basic theories and concepts relevant to health.

 

S3.Show awareness of the relevant elements of clinical physiotherapy practice commensurate with their level of learning through the safe, ethical and lawful selection and application of a range of appropriate, basic assessment techniques aligned to non-complex, uncomplicated cardiorespiratory, musculoskeletal and neurological case study scenarios.

 

S4.Effectively use communication and consultation skills to safely, ethically and lawfully perform appropriate assessment techniques, interpret outcome data and apply clinical reasoning to inform healthcare decisions.

 

S5.Accurately and effectively communicate information, in an oral and/or written form, with structured and coherent arguments.

 

S6.Evaluate the appropriateness of different approaches to solving problems related to health.

 

S7.Demonstrate the qualities and transferable skills necessary for employment requiring the exercise of some personal responsibility.

 

S8.Identify individual learning needs, construct and implement a realistic personal and professional development plan, reflect on personal and professional development, and modify behaviour in the light of experience and advice.

 

.

Holders of a Certificate of Higher Education will have a sound knowledge of the basic concepts of a subject, and will have learned how to take different approaches to solving problems. They will be able to communicate accurately and will have the qualities needed for employment requiring the exercise of some personal responsibility.

 

 

THIS AWARD (LEVEL 4) DOES NOT CONFER ELIGIBILITY TO APPLY FOR REGISTRATION WITH THE HEALTH AND CARE PROFESSIONS COUNCIL (HCPC). 

 

THIS AWARD (LEVEL 4) DOES NOT CONFER PERMISSION FOR AN INDIVIDUAL TO USE THE TITLE “PHYSIOTHERAPIST”. 

 

 

In addition, to be eligible for the award of a University Diploma of Higher Education in Rehabilitation Studies at FHEQ Stage 2, Level 5, a student must have successfully studied and completed 240 credits at Level 4 and Level 5, and students will be able to:

 

 

Knowledge

 

K9.Critically discuss the well-established principles of health and the way in which those principles have developed.

 

K10.Critically discuss and explain the pathological changes and clinical presentation of a range of uncomplicated cardiorespiratory, neurological and musculoskeletal system conditions commonly encountered in physiotherapy and their implications for applied physiotherapy practice.

 

K11.Compare and contrast appropriate assessment and diagnostic techniques for a range of uncomplicated cardiorespiratory, neurological and musculoskeletal system conditions commonly encountered in physiotherapy.

 

K12.Compare and contrast physiotherapy treatment interventions for a range of uncomplicated cardiorespiratory, neurological and musculoskeletal system conditions commonly encountered in physiotherapy.

 

K13.Critically discuss the changes that result from physiotherapy, including physiological, structural, behavioural and functional.

 

K14.Critically discuss and explain the role of the physiotherapist and the implementation of physiotherapy practice within the inter-professional team for patient care.

 

K15.Critically discuss ‘cultural competence’ in professional practice.

 

K16.Compare and contrast the main methods of enquiry in health, and critically discuss the appropriateness of different approaches to solving problems in health.

 

K17.Demonstrate an understanding of the limits of their knowledge, and how this influences analyses and interpretations based on that knowledge.

Skills

 

S9.Demonstrate cultural competence, respect and promote diversity.

 

S10.Judiciously use a range of established techniques to generate, source, analyse and critically evaluate information, and to propose solutions to problems arising from that analysis.

 

S11.Effectively communicate with service-users and carers using formal models of consultation.

 

S12.Apply and integrate knowledge and understanding of human structure and function to applied physiotherapy practice.

 

S13.Accurately, safely, ethically and lawfully perform a range of appropriate person-centred cardiorespiratory, musculoskeletal and neurological clinical assessment and diagnostic techniques in the context of clinical practice with service-users and carers, and simulators.

 

S14.Accurately, interpret outcome data from cardiorespiratory, musculoskeletal and neurological clinical assessment and diagnostic consultations to develop reasoned arguments to inform clinical decisions, and to plan, negotiate and deliver therapeutic interventions aligned to individual patient needs.

 

S15.Actively engage in evidence-based practice to inform clinical reasoning to make sound, diagnostic and therapeutic person-centred clinical judgements.

 

S16.Accurately and effectively communicate and discuss outcomes of cardiorespiratory, musculoskeletal and neurological assessment and diagnostic consultations, clinical reasoning and proposed therapeutic interventions with service-users using a person-centred approach.

 

S17.Work effectively as a team member, develop collaborative partnerships and show emerging leadership skills.

 

S18.Operate within a quality management framework.

 

S19.Operate safely within professional, legal and ethical frameworks.

 

 

Holders of qualifications at Level 5 will have developed a sound understanding of the principles in health, and will have learned to apply those principles more widely. Through this, they will have learned to evaluate the appropriateness of different approaches to solving problems. Holders of qualifications at this level will have the qualities necessary for employment in situations requiring the exercise of personal responsibility and decision-making. 

 

 

THIS AWARD (LEVEL 5) DOES NOT CONFER ELIGIBILITY TO APPLY FOR REGISTRATION WITH THE HEALTH AND CARE PROFESSIONS COUNCIL (HCPC). 

 

THIS AWARD (LEVEL 5) DOES NOT CONFER PERMISSION FOR AN INDIVIDUAL TO USE THE TITLE “PHYSIOTHERAPIST”. 

 

 

In addition, to be eligible for the award of Bachelor Degree with Honours in Physiotherapy at FHEQ Stage 3, Level 6, a student must have successfully studied a total of 360 credits (from a combination of 120 credits at Level 4, 120 credits at Level 5 and a further 120 credits at Level 6) and students will be able to:

 

 

Knowledge

 

K18.Systematically and critically evaluate the key concepts of the knowledge base relevant to their profession including knowledge of human function and dysfunction, the theory and practice of physiotherapy and health and social care policy and provision to meet individual physical, psychological, social and cultural needs.

 

K19.Systematically and critically evaluate, and discuss, a specific area of interest informed by theory and research at the forefront of physiotherapy.

 

K20.Systematically and critically evaluate, and discuss, with reference to the integrated knowledge base, the management of a range of physiotherapy therapeutic cardiorespiratory, musculoskeletal and neurological scenarios, involving multiple pathologies and complex therapeutic interventions.

 

K21.Audit and critically evaluate service provision with a view to enhancing the quality of service provision, service processes and service improvement.

 

Skills

 

S19.Practise safely, efficiently and effectively within their scope of practice, adopting a compassion and caring approach ensuring dignity and respect for all, within the legal and ethical boundaries of their profession.

 

S20.Recognise the limits of their own scope of practice and referring onto other agencies where appropriate.

 

S21.Maintain fitness to practise.

 

S22.Practise as an autonomous professional, applying clinical reasoning, exercising their own professional judgement in the planning, implementation and review of responsibilities at a professional level.

 

S23.Practice and practise in a non-discriminatory manner with a clear awareness of the impact of culture, equality, and diversity on individuals and communities.

 

S24.Understand the importance of, and be able to, maintain confidentiality.

 

S25.Effectively and accurately communicate information, arguments, analysis and outcomes to specialist and non-specialist audiences using written, verbal and non-verbal modes.

 

S26.Work effectively as a member of an inter-professional team within and across diverse settings, in partnership with service-users to provide person-centred health and social care.

 

S27.Use information technology to identify and access information, and to accurately record, manage and maintain patient records appropriately, and to process and analyse research findings. 

 

S28.Critically reflect on and review practice to respond to changing models of health and social care delivery and availability of resources, to influence current practice and lead the profession forward in the future.

 

S29.Assure the quality of their practice using performance indicators and outcomes measures derived from a range of scientific and other measurement approaches.

 

S30.Critically integrate theory and practice, drawing on appropriate knowledge and skills, clinical reasoning and problem-solving skills to assess problems, make judgements, plan, deliver, monitor and evaluate interventions to meet service user and carer needs, based on the quality and judicious use of the best available information within the clinical governance framework.

 

S31.Understand the need to establish and maintain a safe practice environment.

 

S32.Advocate appropriate public health interventions in practice.

 

S33.Promote, maintain and enhance personal health and well-being.

 

S34.Draw upon a range of personal behavioural strategies to manage uncertainty, change and stress.

 

S35.Manage time and workload effectively.

 

S36.Critically discuss the changing and diverse context, including emerging roles, within which physiotherapy is delivered.

 

S37.Plan and manage service delivery with due regard for resource management, cost effectiveness, marketing and promotion of the profession.

 

 

Learning Outcomes – Ordinary degree

 

Students awarded an Ordinary degree will have achieved the majority of the learning outcomes for the programme studied. However they will have gained fewer credits at Stage 3 than students awarded an Honours degree; their knowledge will typically be less broad and they will typically be less proficient in higher-level skills such as critical synthesis. They will NOT be able to register with the HCPC, and will not be permitted to use the protected title “Physiotherapist”.  Depending on the number of credits successfully achieved students would be eligible for the award of an Ordinary Degree in Rehabilitation Studies (300 credits; 240 credits from Level 4 and 5 and 60 credits at Level 6), a Diploma in Higher Education in Rehabilitation Studies (240 credits; at least 100-120 credits at Level 5 and 120-140 at Level 4) or a Certificate in Higher Education in Rehabilitation Studies (120 credits at Level 4) in accordance with University Undergraduate Regulations 2018-19[18]

 

 

  1. What will the programme consist of?

 

The programme structure including a detailed list of modules can be found in Appendix 1.

 

The BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy programme will consist of three stages of study (Stage 1, Level 4; Stage 2, Level 5 and Stage 3, Level 6), each equivalent to one year’s full-time study. Each Stage comprises 120 credits, which must be passed successfully to give the student 360 credits on successful completion of Stage 3.The summary below describes briefly what is contained in each Stage. Students must achieve a pass mark of at least 40% in each graded component of assessment in each module to pass the module. There will be no compensation at module level. Students must pass all modules at each Stage before they may progress to the next programme Stage. No modules may be trailed from one Stage to the next Stage

 

 

Stage 1 (Level 4) 

 

Overarching Theme: ‘Foundations of Physiotherapy Practice’

 

Stage 1 (Level 4) of the BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy programme will be comprised of two compulsory 10 credit modules and five compulsory 20 credit modules (presented below), each providing a fundamental basis for consequent study across the programme. New physiotherapy students will undertake modules designed specifically to introduce them to professionalism and the professional identity of the physiotherapist in 21st Century healthcare and the accompanying values and professional behaviour that characterise the profession (PTY101 Introduction to Personal and Professional Development). The study of inquiry based praxis (PTY 100 Introduction to Research) will act as an introduction to the core concepts of critical inquiry for research with emphasis being placed on the recognition of hierarchies of evidence, capacity to retrieve and select literature. Students will study core physiology of direct relevance to the assessment, diagnosis and management of human pathology in practice (PTY102 Introduction to Physiology and Pathology). Core anatomy and the fundamental principles of biomechanics and human movement (PTY103 Functional Anatomy and Movement) will prepare students for advancing their skills in Level 5 (PTY 204 Musculoskeletal Pathology and Physiotherapy in Practice). The impact of psychosocial factors on human development and function across the lifespan is introduced in PTY 104 Human Function and Lifespan Development.  Communication and basic physiotherapy assessment techniques are introduced in PTY 105 Fundamentals of Communication and Assessment for Therapeutic Practice. Finally, the benefits of physical activity, and the risk of inactivity and sedentary behaviour are discussed in PTY 106 Fundamentals of Physical Activity and Exercise as too are the basic principles of exercise prescription. PTY 105 Fundamentals of Communication and Assessment for Therapeutic Practice will bridge the nexus between clinical and theoretical praxis and emphasis will be placed on developing the capacity of students to work professionally with the University’s infrastructure of Patient and Carer Public Involvement (PCPI’s). This will be accompanied by early exposure to physiotherapy clinical practice in the context of practice placement.

 

PTY102 Introduction to Physiology and Pathology , PTY103 Functional Anatomy and Movement PTY104 Human Function and Lifespan Development, PTY105 Fundamentals of Communication and Assessment for Therapeutic Practice and PTY106 Fundamentals of Physical Activity and Exercise from part of an integrated curriculum at Stage 1 (Figure 4), introducing and integrating the scientific principles that are essential to the development of professional physiotherapy knowledge and practice throughout the programme. The integration of the underpinning sciences into clinical practice will be highlighted throughout this level.  Working together with other students on patient focused case studies and practical problems will provide the opportunity for the underpinning scientific concepts studied in both modules to be explored further and with reference to the care of service-users.

 

Figure 4 – Schematic diagram of integrated course content – Myocardial Infarction

 

 

Students will be prepared for their first practice placement, Practice  placement 1 (4 weeks, 150 h) in the PTY 101 Personal and Professional development module. Practice placement 1 will be scheduled  Practice towards the end of semester 2. Students will be supported prior to their practice placement by a designated academic placement tutor, and whilst in practice by a designated practice placement educator.

 

      Module List

 

PTY100Introduction to Research (10 credits)

PTY101Introduction to Personal and Professional Development (10 credits)

PTY102Introduction to Physiology and Pathology (20 credits)

PTY103`Functional Anatomy and Movement (20 credits)

PTY104Human Function and Lifespan Development: Psychosocial Foundations of Holistic Practice) (20 credits)

PTY105Fundamentals of Communication and Assessment for Therapeutic Practice

(20 credits)

PTY106Fundamentals of Physical Activity and Exercise (20 credits)

 

 

Stage 2 (Level 5)

 

Overarching Theme: ‘Developing Competence and Building Professionalism’ 

 

Stage 2 (Level 5) of the BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy programme will be comprised of two compulsory 10 credit modules and five compulsory 20 credit modules (presented below), developing the knowledge, understanding and skills developed at Stage 1 (Level 4). PTY 200 Evidence Based Practice and Research 2 and PTY 201 Personal and Professional Development 2 modules will run year-long, all other modules will be delivered over one semester.

 

Stage 2 (Level 5) of the BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy programme will equip students with the underpinning knowledge and skills to interrogate the evidence base of physiotherapy practice, to explore hierarchies of evidence and to see their relevance to the independent inquiry they will undertake in the third stage of their studies at the University of Sunderland.

 

PTY200 Research 2 and PTY201 Personal and Professional Development 2 modules build on the knowledge, understanding and professionalism elements introduced in Level 4 to further equip students with the knowledge and skills needed in order to read and critique primary published academic papers (PTY200) and to practice ethically and legally as a physiotherapist in the UK (PTY201). Both knowledge and skills will be developed through the practical simulated physiotherapy classes and seminars.

 

The need to underpin their progressive assessment, diagnosis and management skills in physiotherapy clinical practice will be underpinned by the theoretical study of pathophysiology of direct relevance to cardiorespiratory, musculoskeletal and nervous systems (PTY202, Neurological Pathology and Physiotherapy Practice; PTY203 Cardiorespiratory Pathology and Physiotherapy Practice; and PTY204 Musculoskeletal Pathology and Physiotherapy Practice. Once again the premise adopts the central discussion of a disease as a foundation from which various sections of the syllabus are attached. The work undertaken as an initial introduction to clinical professional practice will be extended to consider the legal, ethical and policy frameworks that underpin accountability and governance in the practice of physiotherapy, and their regulation through quality assurance processes.

 

During PTY202 Neurological Pathology and Physiotherapy Practice, PTY203 Cardiorespiratory Pathology and Physiotherapy Practice and PTY204 Musculoskeletal Pathology and Physiotherapy Practice modules, students will be taught how to conduct a physical examination of the nervous, cardiorespiratory and musculoskeletal systems respectively. Case studies, peers and expert PCPI representatives with their own clinical history to tell are progressively used to develop clinical consultation skills. This approach gradually nurtures confidence and competence and allows relevant discussions of how each disease is managed in practice.

 

Students will be prepared for practice placements during the PTY 201 Personal and Professional Development and core physiotherapy modules (PTY202, PTY203 and PTY204) module. Practice placement 2 (six weeks, 225 h) will be scheduled towards the end of semester 2 with  practice placement 3 (5 weeks, 187.5 h), an elective placement, to be scheduled over the summer months. Students will be expected to take a proactive role in securing their elective placement although support will be available from academic tutors. Students will be supported prior to their placement by a designated academic placement tutor, and whilst in practice by a designated practice placement educator.

Module List

 

PTY 200    Evidence-Based Practice and Research 2 (10 credits)

PTY 201    Personal and Professional Development 2 (10 credits)

PTY 202    Neurological Pathology and Physiotherapy Practice (20 credits)

PTY 203    Cardiorespiratory Pathology and Physiotherapy Practice (20 credits)

PTY 204    Musculoskeletal Pathology and Physiotherapy Practice (20 credits)

PTY 205    Developing Holistic Physiotherapy Practice (20 credits)

PTY 206    Physical Activity for Long Term Conditions (20 credits)


 

Stage 3 (Level 6)

 

Overarching Theme: ‘Achieving Autonomy’

 

Stage 3 (Level 6) of the BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy programme will be comprised of four compulsory 20 credit modules and one compulsory 40 credit module (presented below). All modules will be delivered as year-long modules, over two semesters to accommodate the scheduling of practice placements. Students will return to university early September for two weeks review and consolidation of the Stage 2 elective placement. During this time students will be prepared for their Practice Placement4, which will take place over six weeks (225 h) in semester 1. 

 

The final stage (Stage 3, Level 6) of the undergraduate BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy programme will incorporate extensive opportunities for students to experience inter-professional and multi-disciplinary praxis across modules which reflect their resultant professional autonomy upon completion of their studies. Stage 3 (Level 6) of the programme prepares students fully for registration with the Health and Care Professions Council as a practising physiotherapist and also their eligibility to join the Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Specific emphasis will be placed on the management of high risk service-users. The Dissertation will be an opportunity for students to undertake a research project entailing systematic investigation of a discipline of direct relevance to physiotherapy assessment, diagnosis or management.

 

 

Module List

 

PTY 300 Dissertation (40 credits)

PTY 301 Personal and Professional Development 3 (20 credits)

PTY 302 Contemporary Perspectives in Physiotherapy Practice (20 credits)

PTY 303 Complex Integrated Physiotherapy Practice (20 credits)

PTY 304 Evaluating and Improving Physiotherapy Practice (20 credits)

 

 

 

  1. How will I be taught?

At the very first Level (4) of the BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy programme, students will be gradually supported and facilitated through their learning (Vygotsky 1978) via focused seminal lectures, seminars and clinical teaching and their consideration of basic scenarios. What this means is that at the initial stages of the programme students will be largely dependent on the support of academic staff and practice placement educator in practice and that this degree of support will decrease as they  progress through the programme and through different levels and progression points of the programme. At Level 5, these learning opportunities will develop into case based scenarios which they will undertake as problem based learning approaches. Physiotherapy practice placements will further drive and consolidate the relevance of students’ academic learning to clinical practice in person-centred care. 

 

 


 

Specific Teaching Methods

 

The following teaching and learning methods will be used across the BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy programme:

 

 

Lecture Sessions

 

Modular attendance at seminal lectures of the programme will be accompanied by opportunities for physiotherapy students to engage in learning via the use of case based scenarios which will encourage them to develop their knowledge and skills base. This inquiry based learning approach can be used to incorporate innovative approaches such as the ‘flipped classroom’ where students will be provided with resources to facilitate learning in a group of peers whilst being facilitated by a member of academic staff. All taught lectures will be supported by use of the Virtual Learning Environment (Canvas) and wherever possible they will be exposed to expert keynote speakers in the seminal lectures in order to evidence base their approach to physiotherapy healthcare provision. As they progress through the programme there will be less emphasis placed on seminal lecture sessions as they engage with applying theoretical knowledge to practice in small group seminars and also looking at the policy and legislation within which physiotherapy practice is delivered.

 

 

Seminar and Interactive Workshops

 

Seminars and workshops will encourage interaction with tutors and fellow students to develop ideas, solve problems, gather data, analyse data, develop professional skills or explain material. Initially sessions will be routed in knowledge and understanding of fundamental principles, but will progress to include a greater degree of critical thinking, application and case based study.

 

The opportunity for students to develop their communication skills and their ability to articulate and share their perspectives on practice will be an integral part of the teaching strategy. There will be an increasing level of expectation placed upon students to contribute to these sessions as they progress through the programme and this is regarded as a fundamental mechanism of improving their skills of professionalism in practice.

 

 

Problem-Based Learning

 

Problem-based learning (PBL) is an educational approach that is particularly designed for the student as an active self-directed learner, which all healthcare workers must be throughout their working lives.

 

Short case scenarios (cases) will be used to start and guide the processes of student learning at undergraduate level. The emphasis is on the gaps that students discover in their knowledge and skills, and how to bridge these gaps with new knowledge, understanding and behaviour patterns. The PBL approach will aim to enable students to discover and learn for themselves, facilitated by experienced staff. This system replaces traditional didactic teaching methods and enables their learning, through the creation of cohesive learning groups.

 

Clinical Skills Sessions

 

Physiotherapy students will attend a variety of clinical skills sessions in our newly modernised Sciences Complex and/or Living Lab. We are equipped with a full ward, anatomy suite, point of care testing facility; a pharmacy dispensary and extensive simulation facilities which when combined provide a massive resource for teaching and learning. In a risk free environment, students will develop physiotherapy assessment, diagnostic and management skills, communication and consultation skills as well as the confidence to gain critical information from physiotherapy service-users in a structured and systematic manner. Inter-professional learning within and between the medical and healthcare professions represented at the University will form a regular and integral part of these teaching sessions. Students will initially develop skills in assessing basic parameters in healthy service-users and as they progress from Stage 1 to Stage 2 to stage 3 they will progress to the application of clinical and examination skills, where ethical, to the management of complex patient conditions.

 

Students will work collaboratively in developing a firm understanding of clinical skills fundamental to their own branch of clinical professional practice. Workshop sessions are an opportunity for them to share with the student cohort their potential contribution to the field of clinical skills of which all students are an integral part, regardless of their intellectual capacity.

 

Across this integrated curriculum, students will begin with relevant clinical problems and with the help of a member of staff work out how much they know and understand of the underpinning knowledge they already have (and what they do not know). They will then define what they need to learn in order to fully understand the problems students encounter in everyday practice. What they study is therefore more clearly defined by the needs of their own individual professional practice as well as being determined by a robust series of learning opportunities.

 

 

Laboratory sessions: practical work e.g., physiology will require students to produce, analyse and interpret results and information contextualised to a physiotherapy problem with full adherence to risk assessment, COSHH and BIOCOSHH.

 

 

Inter-professional Experiential Learning

 

Inter-professional learning has been championed for several years at the University of Sunderland and is integrated across several of our academic curricula. In moving beyond a purely logistical approach to inter-professional experiential learning the University provides students with the opportunity to work alongside each other (inter-professional learning), the Faculty has an established strategy that allows students from other professions and disciplines to learn about and from each other to equip them with the knowledge, skills and professionalism required in contemporary practice.  This will incorporate a series of practical workshops and seminal lectures to drive processes of inquiry based learning. IPL will also follow an innovative conference day approach, developed by the School of Pharmacy, with students from different health programmes rotating through various sessions facilitated and supported by patients and their carers, academics and practicing clinicians from the respective professional groups.

 


Consolidation Sessions

 

These will provide a means of reviewing and consolidating learning across each academic level. Students will be afforded the opportunity, too, of addressing any issues of concern they might have regarding the programme. It is anticipated that feedback from the mentorship/supervisory infrastructure will also inform the content of consolidation sessions so that as far as possibly these can be individually tailored to student need for remedial support. 

 

 

The Role of Simulation in the Development of Competence

 

We have the capacity to provide opportunities to work with specialist simulation equipment in developing clinical skills and also in being able to see the consequences of suboptimal practice through the use of SIM Man 3G, Sim Mum, Sim Baby within the Living Lab environment. This is of direct relevance to the development of physiotherapy student critical reflexivity and their confidence in dealing with challenging situations in practice. Students will develop proficiency in hands on physical examination skills, core communication and consultation skills such as clinical history taking and will be trained in the logical and coherent development of the process. Simulated practice will not form part of summative assessment of clinical practice across the programme. However it will have been strategically embedded, so that in line with the educational philosophy of the physiotherapy programme our students can become more autonomous in their approaches to applied physiotherapy clinical practice. These sessions are embedded within the inquiry based learning of all of our modules, so that teaching clinical skills is not merely an exercise in the development of functional psychomotor skill but one which stretches the intellectual ‘reach’ of our students in holistic physiotherapy education.

 

 

Webcasts

 

Will be used to support lecture and seminar material, which will be in audio and video format. Webcasts will be in addition to material given in lectures, labs and seminar sessions and will form part of the directed learning time of each module. This type of resource will be used throughout the BSc (Hons) programme.

 

 

Physiotherapy Patient and Professional Contact

 

Through their Physiotherapy Clinical Practice Placements in Levels 4, 5 and 6, students will visit a diverse array of clinical settings in physiotherapy practice settings and encounter real service-users and their carers throughout the programme. This will allow students to practice their communication skills and will contextualise understanding of the disease states covered in the respective modules. As the programme progresses students will encounter service-users with increasingly complex disease states, specialised needs and co-morbidities.

 

The development of reflective practice is pivotal in relation to the professional role that physiotherapy students will go on to occupy in the healthcare workforce and this experiential and situated learning is essential to their progressive development.

 

 

 

Directed and advised Self-Directed Study

 

Physiotherapy students will make use of many modes of study in the various specified learning activities summarised in the module descriptors, including self-directed study of presented material, working through set examples, preparation of laboratory reports, assignments, preparation for workshop presentations or inquiry based learning sessions, prescribed reading or other media work directly related to taught or project work. Where open-learning or similar student-centred schemes are used; these are presented to students in association with keynote lectures. This time is essential to ensure that students can explore the depth of information required to understand physiotherapy medicine holistically and physiotherapy as a professional discipline. All modules require self-directed study time.

 

 

The University of Sunderland Virtual Learning Environment

 

‘Canvas’ is a virtual learning environment that provides round-the-clock access and support for students as they progress through a range of teaching and learning materials especially developed for the programme. The material for any particular module is accessible to all students registered on that module, and can include, for example, information, including pictures and videos, interactive tutorials, on-line assessments, and a discussion board. The number and frequency of students accessing Canvas can be monitored, as can individual achievements on the tutorials and assessments. Tutors can merely monitor or actively contribute to the discussion boards.

 

 

The Physiotherapy Navigator System

 

This is a user friendly adaptation of the University VLE platform which will provide a ‘Physiotherapy Navigator System’ (PNS). This will be used as an adjunct to learning and teaching across the programme and will be used across everything, from initial orientation on the Physiotherapy programme to integration of the research active curriculum, where physiotherapy students can be kept abreast of the work happening across the context of the wider University. The system will provide a key mechanism for integrating physiotherapy clinical and academic learning in terms of available human resources across the programme as well as physiotherapy curriculum content. All use of the Physiotherapy Navigator System will be preceded by a taught training session with central staff from the University of Sunderland Web and Learning Technologies Support Team, who are a valuable asset across the institution in terms of their specific support and guidance for both staff and students using technology to support their learning. 

 

As this is a new programme we are hopeful that students will guide future development of the system so that it can be as user friendly and purposeful as possible in terms of accessibility and availability of materials. Students will play a pivotal role in the development of the Physiotherapy Navigator as the programme progresses for future cohort use. Initially it will be set up to provide relevant information on:

 

 

Orientation Service

Staff Contact Details

Programme and Module Information and Guidelines

‘What you’re Learning and How you’re Learning It’– Making Explicit our Teaching and Learning Strategies

Web Blogs

Chat Rooms

Focus on Physiotherapy Practice Placement Opportunities across the programme

Integrated Learning Tools and Inventories

Class Live

Research Active Curriculum Information – Ensuring students are aware of Research here at the University of Sunderland

Media RSS Feeds of specific relevance to Physiotherapy.

Using Mahara (Support section for the use of the University’s online e-portfolio system)

Social Learning Platforms

‘I Need Help and I Need it Now’ – How to access help and support with any aspect of the Physiotherapy programme

Referencing and Citation

Physiotherapy Mentorship Central Social Hub (where mentors from different clinical areas can organise informal events or potential social meetings)

University ‘Link Up’ Lunch Site (where staff from across the programme can arrange events such as Christmas Lunch and make sure everyone is welcome)

Student Buddy Hub (where students from across the programme can have an access point for communication with students from other levels and stages of learning to act as learning buddies / social organisers)

Sunderland Futures (the University has key opportunities for students to get involved with volunteering and events to aid employability skills, the NNS will ensure that there is a direct link to these opportunities so they can be shared.

Student Union

Staff Student Liaison Information

Chartered Society of Physiotherapy Web links

University Seminar Update Information (as part of our commitment to encouraging interaction within and between Faculties across the University of Sunderland, we will regularly post opportunities to attend the seminar sessions held at the University, as a resource for both staff and students)

Sharing Resources Pool (a formal repository for learning and teaching resources that staff can access across the programme)

Pastoral Support Guidance Hub (where students need non urgent pastoral support or guidance they can look up information regarding support available to them from across the University).

 

Using the Physiotherapy Navigator System allows a flexible and diverse means of providing core support to students as they are working offsite in their practice placement areas. Our capacity to Webcast will also be of great purpose in the programme. This will be used as a resource throughout the physiotherapy programme to motivate students to engage fully with learning opportunities.  It offers a central means of ensuring parity in day to day communication with physiotherapy students and any material from specific modules is accessible by every student of each subsequent cohort.

 

 

A list of the modules in each Stage of the programme can be found in the Programme Regulations.

 

A summary of the types of teaching, learning and assessment in each module of the programme can be found in the Matrix of Modes of Teaching.

 

 

The generic assessment criteria which we use can be found here. Some programmes use subject-specific assessment criteria which are based on the generic ones.

 

 

This programme uses the Generic University Assessment Criteria

YES

 

This programme uses the Subject Specific Assessment Criteria

YES

 

 

 

The University regulations can be found here.

 

The University aims to return marked assessments and feedback within 4 working weeks of the assignment submission date after internal moderation processes have been completed. If this is not possible, students will be notified by the Module Leaders when the feedback is available and how it can be obtained.

 

The Academic Misconduct Regulations and associated guidance can be found here. It is the responsibility of students to ensure they are familiar with their responsibilities in regards to assessments and the implications of an allegation of academic misconduct.

 

Students should refer to the University Regulations for information on degree classifications..

 

 

  1. Assessment Strategy

 

Within any health professions curriculum the assessment strategy needs to address the following imperatives:

 

Fitness to practise – to ensure that students meet the required level of competence for safe and effective practice

 

Fitness for award – to ensure that students reach the academic standard for graduation with a first degree or post graduate award

 

Promotion of life-long learning and student development – by developing and enhancing skills related to identifying learning needs and developing approach to learn which encourage self-awareness and responsibility for knowledge and skill development

 

Assessment across the curriculum therefore has to be multifaceted. At the same time it is vital to ensure that any assessment not only addresses one or more of the imperatives above, but is also valid and reliable in order that practitioners, partners and the wider public can have confidence in the occupational therapy workforce.

 

The BSc (Hons) Occupational Therapy curriculum is spiral in nature with the iterative revisiting of key topics and concepts throughout the programme. Each topic develops in terms of complexity and can therefore be assessed in a different way as the student progresses. To facilitate assessment related to the student’s developing knowledge and skills the assessment strategy is based on Miller’s pyramid. Miller’s pyramid focuses on competence but also explores knowledge (cognition) and the application of knowledge which is essential for effective and competent practice.

 

The assessment strategy aims to assess

knowledge (knows), the application of

knowledge (knows how) competence

(shows how) and performance (does).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In addition, all modules will operate with access to Turn-it in (plagiarism detection software) for staff and students via the electronic learning platform. Students will be asked to run their final submission through this system prior to submission to ensure that cited sources conform to the citation system.

 

 

References

McDowell, L et al (2006) Assessment for Learning: current exemplars from the Centre for Excellent in Teaching and Learning in Assessment for Learning. CETL AfL Occasional Paper 3, CETL Northumbria University: Newcastle-upon-Tyne

 

Miller, GE (1990) The assessment of clinical skills / performance. Academic Medicine (Supplement) 65; S63-S67


  1. How will I be assessed and given feedback? 

 

 

 

Module Name

 

Code

 

Teaching Methodology

 

Formative and Summative Assessment

 

Feedback on Assessment

STAGE 1

 

 

 

 

 

Introduction to Research

 

PTY100

 

Lectures

 

Seminars /Workshops

 

Tutorials

 

Self-Directed Learning

 

 

Assessment 001Critical Review (1000 words)

Written critical review of a research article assessing learning outcomes: (K1, K2, K3, S1, S2, S3). Weighting: 100% of final module mark.

 

The assessment must be successfully completed and passed with a minimum 40% pass mark.

 

Students will be encouraged to submit one draft of their critical review for formative feedback at least two weeks in advance of the summative submission date. Feedback will focus on structure, writing style, general content and referencing. Written feedback will be returned electronically and students invited to meet with tutor to discuss feedback face-to-face.

 

 

Feedback will be provided in accordance with the University’s standard policy on feedback.

 

 

Students will be facilitated in formative and summative feedback sessions in their one-to-one tutorial sessions. This will involve consideration of their individual academic needs and how they are engaging with the module and assessment content.

 

Individual and generic written feedback will be provided via CANVAS.

 

Where a need for remedial support sessions is identified, students will be referred to the module leader and tutors in the first instance. They will also be sign-posted to central support services.

 

Personal and Professional Development 1

 

PTY 101

 

Lectures

 

Seminars /Workshops

Inquiry-based Learning

 

Tutorials

 

Self-Directed Learning

 

Assessment 001Written Assignment (2000 words)

 

Written assignment assessing learning outcomes: (K1, K2, K3, K4, K5, S1, S2).  Weighting: 100% of final module mark.

 

Complete a 2000word assignment to demonstrate your understanding of the need to continue to develop professionally and keep an up to date portfolio of evidence. You must use a minimum of five pieces of evidence from your e-portfolio to support your work. One of the pieces of evidence must be your reflection on your participation in an IPL activity.

 

The assessment must be successfully completed and passed with a minimum 40% pass mark.

 

Assessment 002Core Practice Placement 1. (150 hours)

 

Practice Assessment Document (PAD).  Marked on a pass/fail basis.

 

Pass/fail is aligned to clinical competency standards using the PAD and the Physiotherapy Competence Assessment Tool (P-CAT). Students must pass all placement competency standards, including four P-CAT, which are aligned with HCPC standards and CSP Framework.

 

All elements of assessment have to be passed in order to pass the module.

 

Students will be guided throughout the year by a personal tutor, who will provide on-going verbal formative feedback around the developing portfolio.

 

 

Feedback will be provided in accordance with the University’s standard policy on feedback.

 

Students will be facilitated in formative and summative feedback sessions during meetings with their personal tutor.  This will involve consideration of their individual characteristics and how they are engaging with the module and assessment content.

 

Individual and generic written feedback will be provided via CANVAS.

Where a need for remedial support sessions is identified, students will be supported by their personal tutor or referred to the necessary central support services.

 

Introduction to Physiology and Pathology

 

PTY 102

Lectures

 

Seminars /Workshops

 

Inquiry-based Learning

 

Tutorials

 

Self-Directed Learning

 

Assessment  001                           

 

MCQ / Written Exam assessing learning outcomes: (K1, K2, K3, K4, S1, S2, S3).  Weighting: 100% of final module mark.

 

Breadth and depth of knowledge and understanding of physiology will be assessed in the multiple choice (MCQ) (Section A) component of an unseen two hour written examination.  Understanding of the underpinning principles of physiology will be assessed through a short answer section (Section B), with clinical relevant and application assessed through a clinical report (Section C).  The exam will cover normal physiology, common pathologies and application of physiological data to the understanding of the individual condition.  Further details of the exam are included below:

 

2 hour end of module formal exam consisting of:

 

  • a multiple choice section (Section A) consisting of 50 MCQ (20%)
  • short answer section (Section B) where students will choose two questions from a choice of three (40%)
  • a clinical report (Section C) where students will choose one question from a choice of two (40%)

All components of assessment must be successfully completed and passed with a minimum 40% pass mark.

 

 

Students will be encouraged to submit one draft of their scientific report (scientific article) for formative feedback at least two weeks in advance of the summative submission date. Feedback will focus on structure, writing style, general content and referencing. Written feedback will be returned electronically and students invited to meet with tutor to verbally discuss feedback face-to-face.

 

This module assesses whether students have an underpinning cognitive knowledge of core medical sciences. Emphasis will be placed on supporting students to see the relevance of the underpinning cognitive basis of these sciences to applied physiotherapy practice with service-users. The short answer section allows an opportunity to demonstrate depth of understanding. In preparation for the exam students will be offered the opportunity to complete a mock exam and answers will be discussed in class.  Example MCQ questions will be uploaded onto CANVAS for self-directed learning and exam preparation.

 

Formative assessment in this module will entail a series of mock examination questions where students can receive specific feedback on areas they need to improve on in preparation for their final summative assessment requirements for the module. 

 

Feedback will be provided in accordance with the University’s standard policy on feedback.

 

Students will be invited to meet individually with the module leader to discuss summative feedback. This will involve performance in the assessments and suggestions how they can improve future performance. Individual and generic written feedback will be provided via CANVAS.

Where a need for remedial support sessions is identified, students will be referred to the necessary central support services.

 

 

 

Functional Anatomy and Movement

 

PTY 103

 

Lectures

 

Seminars

 

Laboratory/Workshops

 

Self-directed study

Assessment 001MCQ /Written Exam

MCQ / Written Exam assessing learning outcomes: (K1, K2, K3, K4).  Weighting: 100% of final module mark.

 

1.5 hour end of module MCQ Exam consisting of 50 questions plus one written longer answer question.  This component of assessment must be successfully completed and passed with a minimum 40% pass mark.

 

Assessment 002OSCE (Objective, structured, clinical examination) (30 minutes)

OSCE (objective, structured, clinical examination) assessing learning outcomes: (K1, K2, K4, S1, S2, S3).  Marked on a pass / fail basis.

 

Students will be expected to accurately take a patient history and conduct a basic physiotherapy assessment one from the musculoskeletal, cardiorespiratory or neurological systems.

 

All elements of assessment have to be passed in order to pass the module.

 

Formative assessment in this module will entail a series of mock examination questions where students can receive specific feedback on areas they need to improve on in preparation for their final summative assessment requirements for the module. 

OSCE (Objective, structured, clinical examination). Students will be expected to accurately take a patient history and conduct a basic physiotherapy assessment involving one from the musculoskeletal, cardiorespiratory or neurological systems. The OSCE facilitates the structured assessment of key knowledge and understanding as well as early professional practice skills of service-user assessment, history taking, recording data, communication, empathy, interpretation and basic decision-making. The assessment prepares students for professional practice placements.

 

Formative assessment and feedback naturally follows the student journey and progression through the module developing knowledge and skills, first from tutor demonstrations, then assessments on peers and finally assessment on patient representatives. Formative assessment will involve opportunities for tutor observations and verbal feedback within the module as well as verbal feedback from peers.

 

Feedback will be provided in accordance with the University’s standard policy on feedback.

 

Students will be invited to meet individually with the module leader to discuss summative feedback. This will involve performance in the assessments and suggestions how they can improve future performance. Individual and generic written feedback will be provided via CANVAS.

 

Where a need for remedial support sessions is identified, students will be referred to the necessary central support services.

 

 

 

Human Function and Lifespan Development: Psychosocial Foundations for Holistic Practice

 

PTY 104

 

Lectures

 

Seminars

 

Discussions

 

Self-directed study

 

Assessment  001 Written Account (1000 words)

Written account assessing learning outcomes: (K1, K2, K3, K4, K5, K6, S1).  Weighting: 100% of final mark.

 

The written account is an opportunity for the students to explore

the developmental life stages demonstrating knowledge of how

the biological, psychological, sociocultural approaches impact on

contemporary holistic physiotherapy practice.  Students are

expected to outline the developmental stages  highlighting the key

implications to contemporary holistic physiotherapy practice with

an appreciation of key social, cultural and political drivers for

change within the physiotherapy profession.

 

This component of assessment must be successfully

completed and passed with a minimum 40% pass mark.

 

Students will be encouraged to submit one draft of their written acount for formative feedback at least two weeks in advance of the summative submission date. Feedback will focus on structure, writing style, general content and referencing. Written feedback will be returned electronically and students invited to meet with tutor to discuss feedback face-to-face.

 

 

 

 

Feedback will be provided in accordance with the University’s standard policy on feedback.

 

Students will be invited to meet individually with the module leader to verbally discuss performance on formative and summative assessments. Feedback will highlight areas of strength and areas for improvement.

 

Again, where a need for remedial support sessions is identified, students will be referred to the necessary central support services.

 

 

 

Fundamentals of Communication and Assessment for Therapeutic Practice

 

PTY 105

 

Lectures

 

Seminars

 

Laboratory/Workshops

 

Self-directed study

 

Patient involvement

 

Discussions

Assessment 001 Integrated OSCE (Objective, structured, clinical

examination)

 

Two-Station 45 minute Integrated OSCE (Objective, structured,

clinical examination) assessing learning outcomes (K1, S1, S2,

S3, S4). Weighting 100% of final module mark.

 

The first station of the integrated OSCE the student will be provided with 20 minutes to conduct an assessment of a Patient, Carer and Public Involvement (PCPI) and provide feedback and a recommended action plan to the PCPI based on main assessment findings. 

 

The second station of the integrated OSCE the student will have 25 minutes to document the findings of the assessment of the PCPI in a recognised format accepted by the physiotherapy profession.   Incorporated into this second station the student will be expected to identify and explain potential personal, societal, cultural and spiritual barriers to communication within the context of contemporary holistic physiotherapy practice. 

 

This component of assessment must be successfully completed and passed with a minimum 40% pass mark.

 

Formative assessment and feedback naturally follows the student journey and progression through the module developing knowledge and skills, first from tutor demonstrations, then assessments on peers and finally assessment on patient representatives. Formative assessment will involve opportunities for tutor observations and verbal feedback within the module as well as verbal feedback from peers.

 

Students will be encouraged to reflect on their interactions with peers and patient representatives This should motivate student learning and provides an insight into what their individual contribution to the professional physiotherapy workforce.

 

Students will be guided throughout the year by the module leader/tutor, who will provide on-going verbal formative feedback around the OSCE expectations. Mock OSCEs will be scheduled so students are familiar with the process.

 

Feedback will be provided in accordance with the University’s standard policy on feedback.

 

Students will be facilitated in generic formative and summative feedback sessions during tutorial sessions. They may also book one-to-one tutorials with the module tutor.

 

Again, where a need for remedial support sessions is identified, students will be referred to the necessary central support services.

 

Fundamentals of Physical Activity and Exercise

 

PTY 106

 

Lectures

 

Seminars

 

Gym-based exercise Workshops

 

Self-directed study

 

Discussions

Assessment 001Practical Exam (20minutes)

Practical Exam assessing learning outcomes: (S3, S4, S5). Weighting: 40% of final module mark.

Practical exam where the student will instruct a peer client how to exercise safely and appropriately in a gym environment.

Assessment 002Reflective Account (1500 words)

Reflective Account assessing learning outcomes: (K1, K2, K3, K4, K5, S1, S2, S5).  Weighting: 60% of final mark.

The reflective account is an opportunity for the student to reflect on the design and delivery of an exercise programme for a client.  This client could be a peer student, member of staff, friend or family member. The exercise programme should align to Government and industry guidelines following the appropriate assessment of the individual client needs. The reflective account will include pre-participation heath screening and risk assessment tasks, the design of a safe, progressive exercise programme and evidence of monitoring and evaluating client progress. 

 

All components of assessment must be successfully completed and passed with a minimum 40% pass mark.

 

Formative assessment and feedback naturally follows the student journey and progression through the module developing knowledge and skills, first from tutor demonstrations and then assessments on peers. Formative assessment will involve opportunities for tutor and peer observations with follow-up tutor and peer verbal feedback within the module.

 

Formative assessment will involve the opportunity for the submission of draft components of the essay and reflective account. Students will be encouraged to submit one draft of their reflective essay for formative feedback at least two weeks in advance of the summative submission date. Feedback will focus on structure, writing style, general content and referencing. Written feedback will be returned electronically and students invited to meet with tutor to discuss feedback face-to-face.

 

Students will be guided throughout the year by the module leader/tutor, who will provide on-going verbal formative feedback.

 

Feedback will be provided in accordance with the University’s standard policy on feedback.

 

Students will be facilitated in generic formative and summative feedback sessions during tutorial sessions. They may also book one-to-one tutorials with the module tutor.

 

Again, where a need for remedial support sessions is identified, students will be referred to the necessary central support services.

 


 

 

Module Name

 

Code

 

Teaching Methodology

 

Formative and Summative Assessment

 

Feedback on Assessment

 

STAGE 2

 

 

 

 

 

 

Evidence Based Practice and Research 2

 

 

 

 

PTY 200

 

Lectures

 

Seminars

 

Group Tutorials

 

One-to-one Tutorials

 

Inquiry Based Learning Sessions

 

Self-Directed Study

 

 

Assessment 001Research Proposal Presentation (1500 words)

Research Proposal Presentation assessing learning outcomes: (K1, K2, K3, S1, S2, S3). Weighting: 100% of final module mark.

 

Students will critically review the scientific evidence related to a defined area of physiotherapy research and formulate a well-defined and focused research question. They will use their knowledge of research methods to write a proposal for a specified research. Students will adopt an appropriate methodological approach, design a robust protocol, take into consideration, patient and public involvement, legal and ethical issues and identify key measurement outcomes. At each stage students will justify the decisions they make to demonstrate in-depth knowledge, understanding and application of research methods to research practice.

 

The assessment must be successfully completed and passed with a minimum 40% pass mark.

 

Students will be encouraged to submit one draft of their written research proposal for formative feedback at least two weeks in advance of the summative submission date. Feedback will focus on structure, writing style, general content and referencing.

 

 

 

Feedback will be provided in accordance with the University’s standard policy on feedback.

 

Students will be facilitated in generic formative and summative feedback sessions during tutorial sessions. They may also book one-to-one tutorials with the module tutor.

 

Individual written formative feedback will be returned electronically and students invited to meet with tutor to verbally discuss feedback face-to-face.

 

Individual written summative feedback will align closely to assessment criteria. Written feedback will be returned electronically and students invited to meet with tutor to discuss feedback face-to-face.

 

Generic summative feedback will be posted on canvas.

 

Where a need for remedial support sessions is identified, students will be referred to the necessary central support services.

 

 

Personal and Professional Development 2

 

PTY201

 

Seminal Lectures

 

Inquiry based learning seminars

 

Workshops e.g., Stress Management and Resilience, Law and Ethics Interactive Workshop

 

One-to-one tutorials

 

Discussions

Self-directed study

 

Assessment 001 Portfolio (2000 words, guidance only)

Portfolio assessing learning outcomes: (K1, K2, S1, S2, S3, S4, S5).  Weighting: 100% of final module mark.

 

Using an appropriate Personal and Professional Development Framework and associated tools to guide their personal and professional development students will produce a portfolio assessing all learning outcomes that includes evidence of engagement in class activities e.g., a critical review of academic and professional progress to date, reflections of feedback from academic tutors and clinical practitioners/practice facilitators, evidence of engagement in the process for securing an elective placement and reflections around their team-working skills and ability to ‘work with others’. The portfolio will include reflective accounts related to Learning Outcomes K1, K2, S1, S2, S3 and a risk assessment aligned to an activity based intervention which assessed Learning Outcomes K1 & S4. The portfolio will include reflective accounts related to the learning outcomes as well as the IPE scenarios, LO K2.

 

The assessment must be successfully completed and passed with a minimum 40% pass mark.

 

Formative assessment will involve the opportunity for the submission of draft components of the professional practice portfolio and risk assessment at least two weeks in advance of the submission date.

 

 

Feedback will be provided in accordance with the University’s standard policy on feedback.

 

Students will be facilitated in feedback sessions in their one-to-one tutorial sessions.

 

Written formative feedback will be returned electronically and students invited to meet with tutor to verbally discuss feedback face-to-face.

 

Written summative feedback will align closely to assessment criteria. Written feedback will be returned electronically and students invited to meet with tutor to discuss feedback face-to-face.

 

Generic summative feedback will be posted on canvas.

 

Where a need for remedial support sessions is identified, students will be referred to the necessary central support services.

 

 

 

 

 

Neurological Pathology and Physiotherapy Practice

 

PTY202

 

Inquiry Based Learning

 

Seminal Lecture Sessions

 

Seminars

 

Group Tutorial Sessions

 

Interactive service-user workshops

 

Demonstrations

 

Consolidation Sessions

 

Individual Tutorial Sessions

Assessment 001Critical Case Study Written (2000 words) OR Oral Presentation (30 minutes)

A critical case study is either to be written OR presented orally and assesses learning outcomes: (K1, K2, K3, K4, S1).  The choice of completing this as a written essay or presentation is up to the individual student.  Weighting 100% of final module mark.

 

Students will be expected to write OR present critical case study based on a patient with a neurological pathology. The choice of completing this as a written essay or presentation is up to the individual student.  They will present a detailed case history outlining the pathology and justifying the proposed physiotherapy assessment and treatment techniques.  They will include discussing fundamental movement patterns, functional limitations and impact of the pathology upon the individual.  They will be expected to draw from evidence base practice informing appropriate assessment and treatment interventions that are safe and effective. They will also be expected to acknowledge the importance of multi-agency and inter-professional collaborations.  This component of assessment must be successfully completed and passed with a minimum 40% pass mark.

 

 

Assessment 002 OSCE (Objective, structured, clinical examination)

OSCE (objective, structured, clinical examination) assessing

learning outcomes: (K1, K2, K3, K4, S2).  Marked on

pass/fail basis.

 

Students will be expected to accurately take a patient history

and conduct a person-centred assessment of a patient’s

individual needs using appropriate verbal and non-

verbal communication skills. Students will be marked against

pre-determined structure criteria, which clearly align to

effective communication skills. Students will be expected to

perform a safe, ethical and effective neurological assessment justifying the assessment techniques used.  Demonstrate clear and effective clinical reasoning and decision-making skills. Using outcomes of assessment and drawing from evidence based practice students will be expected to propose and justify a safe and effective neurological treatment intervention.

 

All elements of assessment have to be passed in order to pass the module.

 

Formative assessment in this module will entail a series of mock case studies and practical examination opportunities where students can receive specific feedback on areas they need to improve on in preparation for their final summative assessment requirements for the module. Informal formative feedback will also come from peers.

 

Feedback will be provided in accordance with the University’s standard policy on feedback.

 

Feedback on this module will be designed to give students specific guidance on how to improve their assessment, diagnostic and clinical reasoning skills as they seek to understand a pathological disruption to normal physiological function and the impact the pathology and wider determinants of health, have on the service-user and physiotherapy practice.

 

Students will be facilitated in feedback sessions in their one-to-one tutorial sessions.

 

Written formative feedback will be returned electronically and students invited to meet with tutor to verbally discuss feedback face-to-face.

 

Written summative feedback for both assessments will align closely to assessment criteria. Written feedback for all assessments will be returned electronically and students invited to meet with tutor to verbally discuss feedback face-to-face.

 

Generic summative feedback will be posted on canvas.

 

Where a need for remedial support sessions is identified, students will be referred to the necessary central support services.

 

 

 

Cardiorespiratory Pathology and Physiotherapy Practice

 

PTY 203

 

Inquiry Based Learning

 

Seminal Lecture Sessions

 

Seminars

 

Group Tutorials

 

Individual Tutorials

 

Interactive service-user workshops

 

Demonstrations

 

Consolidation Sessions

 

Individual Tutorial Sessions

 

Self-directed learning

Assessment 001Critical Case Study Written (2000 words) OR Oral Presentation (30 minutes)

A critical case study is either to be written OR presented orally and assesses learning outcomes: (K1, K2, K3, K4, S1).  The choice of completing this as a written essay or presentation is up to the individual student.  Weighting 100% of final module mark.

 

Students will be expected to write OR present critical case study based on a patient with a cardiorespiratory pathology. The choice of completing this as a written essay or presentation is up to the individual student.  They will present a detailed case history outlining the pathology and justifying the proposed physiotherapy assessment and treatment techniques.  They will include discussing fundamental movement patterns, functional limitations and impact of the pathology upon the individual.  They will be expected to draw from evidence base practice informing appropriate assessment and treatment interventions that are safe and effective. They will also be expected to acknowledge the importance of multi-agency and inter-professional collaborations.  This component of assessment must be successfully completed and passed with a minimum 40% pass mark.

 

 

Assessment 002 OSCE (Objective, structured, clinical examination)

OSCE (objective, structured, clinical examination) assessing learning outcomes: (K1, K2, K3, K4, S2).  Marked on pass/fail basis.

 

Students will be expected to accurately take a patient history and conduct a person-centred assessment of a patient’s individual needs using appropriate verbal and non-verbal communication skills. Students will be marked against pre-determined structure criteria, which clearly align to effective communication skills. Students will be expected to perform a safe, ethical and effective cardiorespiratory assessment justifying the assessment techniques used. Demonstrate clear and effective clinical reasoning and decision-making skills. Using outcomes of assessment and drawing from evidence based practice students will be expected to propose and justify a safe and effective cardiorespiratory treatment intervention.

 

All elements of assessment have to be passed in order to pass the module.

 

Formative assessment in this module will entail a series of mock case studies and practical examination opportunities where students can receive specific feedback on areas they need to improve on in preparation for their final summative assessment requirements for the module. Informal formative feedback will also come from peers.

 

Feedback will be provided in accordance with the University’s standard policy on feedback.

 

Feedback on this module will be designed to give students specific guidance on how to improve their assessment, diagnostic and clinical reasoning skills as they seek to understand a pathological disruption to normal physiological function and the impact the pathology and wider determinants of health, have on the service-user and physiotherapy practice.

 

Students will be facilitated in feedback sessions in their one-to-one tutorial sessions.

 

Written formative feedback will be returned electronically and students invited to meet with tutor to verbally discuss feedback face-to-face.

 

Written summative feedback for both assessments will align closely to assessment criteria. Written feedback for all assessments will be returned electronically and students invited to meet with tutor to verbally discuss feedback face-to-face.

 

Generic summative feedback will be posted on canvas.

 

Where a need for remedial support sessions is identified, students will be referred to the necessary central support services.

 

Musculoskeletal Pathology and Physiotherapy in Practice

 

PTY 204

 

Inquiry Based Learning

 

Seminal Lecture Sessions

 

Seminars

 

Group Tutorials

 

Individual Tutorials

 

Interactive service-user workshops

 

Demonstrations

 

Consolidation Sessions

 

Individual Tutorial Sessions

 

Self-directed learning

Assessment 001Critical Case Study Written (2000 words) OR Oral Presentation (30 minutes)

 

A critical case study is either to be written OR presented orally and assesses learning outcomes: (K1, K2, K3, K4, S1).  The choice of completing this as a written essay or presentation is up to the individual student.  Weighting 100% of final module mark.

 

Students will be expected to write OR present critical case study based on a patient with a musculoskeletal pathology. The choice of completing this as a written essay or presentation is up to the individual student.  They will present a detailed case history outlining the pathology and justifying the proposed physiotherapy assessment and treatment techniques.  They will include discussing fundamental movement patterns, functional limitations and impact of the pathology upon the individual.  They will be expected to draw from evidence base practice informing appropriate assessment and treatment interventions that are safe and effective. They will also be expected to acknowledge the importance of multi-agency and inter-professional collaborations.

 

This component of assessment must be successfully completed and passed with a minimum 40% pass mark.

 

 

Assessment 002 OSCE (Objective, structured, clinical examination)

OSCE (objective, structured, clinical examination) assessing learning outcomes: (K1, K2, K3, K4, S2).  Marked on pass/fail basis.

 

Students will be expected to accurately take a patient history

and conduct a person-centred assessment of a patient’s

individual needs using appropriate verbal and non-verbal

communication skills. Students will be marked against pre

determined structure criteria, which clearly align to effective

communication skills. Students will be expected to perform a safe, ethical and effective musculoskeletal assessment justifying the assessment techniques used.  Demonstrate clear and effective clinical reasoning and decision-making skills. Using outcomes of assessment and drawing from evidence based practice students will be expected to propose and justify a safe and effective musculoskeletal treatment intervention.

 

All elements of assessment have to be passed in order to pass the module.

 

Formative assessment in this module will entail a series of mock case studies and practical examination opportunities where students can receive specific feedback on areas they need to improve on in preparation for their final summative assessment requirements for the module. Informal formative feedback will also come from peers.

 

 

Feedback will be provided in accordance with the University’s standard policy on feedback.

 

Feedback on this module will be designed to give students specific guidance on how to improve their assessment, diagnostic and clinical reasoning skills as they seek to understand a pathological disruption to normal physiological function and the impact the pathology and wider determinants of health, have on the service-user and physiotherapy practice.

 

Students will be facilitated in feedback sessions in their one-to-one tutorial sessions.

 

Written formative feedback will be returned electronically and students invited to meet with tutor to verbally discuss feedback face-to-face.

 

Written summative feedback for both assessments will align closely to assessment criteria. Written feedback for all assessments will be returned electronically and students invited to meet with tutor to verbally discuss feedback face-to-face.

 

Generic summative feedback will be posted on canvas.

 

Where a need for remedial support sessions is identified, students will be referred to the necessary central support services.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Developing Holistic Physiotherapy Practice

 

PTY 205

 

Introductory Workshop Sessions

 

One to One Mentorship Tutorials

 

Self-Directed Study

 

Assessment 001  Core Practice Placement 2. (225 hours)

Practice Assessment Document (PAD). Marked on a pass/fail basis.

 

Pass/fail is aligned to clinical competency standards using the PAD and the Physiotherapy Competence Assessment Tool (P-CAT). Students must pass all placement competency standards, including four P-CAT, which are aligned with HCPC standards and CSP Framework. 

 

Assessment 002 Written Essay (2000 words)

A written essay assessing learning outcomes: (K1, K2, K3, S1).  Weighting: 100% of final module mark.

 

Students will be expected to draw from wider research evidence to critically discuss the notion of ‘cultural competence’ within the promotion of individual and population health within physiotherapy taking into consideration psychological, sociological and public health perspectives. They would be expected to discuss the determinants of health and illness and the wider consequences of living in particular cultures taking into account the debates and dilemmas that may arise with respect to the current public and social health care agendas. They would be expected to draw attention to the importance of inter-professional and multi-agency roles, responsibilities and partnerships. This component of assessment must be successfully completed and passed with a minimum 40% pass mark.

 

All elements of assessment have to be passed in order to pass the module.

 

Formative assessment will entail repeated opportunities for continuous feedback in practice in the context of physiotherapy clinical practice. This exposure at this stage of the programme will incorporate service-users. Students will be asked to consider how the skills they learn in practice align with HCPC and the Chartered Society of Physiotherapy’s formal requirements for professional practice.

 

 

 

Feedback will be provided in accordance with the University’s standard policy on feedback.

 

Formative assessment will ensure that the formalities of initial, mid-point and end point feedback are aligned with the requirements for fulfilment of practice based assessment competencies across Stage 2 / Level 5. This will be delivered within individualised sessions with Practice placement educators. 

 

Feedback on this module will be designed to give students specific guidance on how to improve their assessment, diagnostic and clinical reasoning skills as they seek to understand a pathological disruption to normal physiological function and the impact the pathology and wider determinants of health, have on the service-user and physiotherapy practice.

 

Students will be facilitated in feedback sessions in their one-to-one tutorial sessions.

 

Written formative feedback will be returned electronically and students invited to meet with tutor to verbally discuss feedback face-to-face.

 

Written summative feedback for both assessments will align closely to assessment criteria. Written feedback for all assessments will be returned electronically and students invited to meet with tutor to verbally discuss feedback face-to-face.

 

Generic summative feedback will be posted on canvas.

 

Where a need for remedial support sessions is identified, students will be referred to the necessary central support services.

 

Physical Activity and Exercise in Long Term Conditions

 

PTY206

 

Inquiry Based Learning Sessions Self-Directed Study

Seminal Lectures

Group Seminar Presentation

One to one Tutorials

Group Tutorials

 

Assessment 001Case Study Report (2000 words)Case study report assessing learning outcomes: (K1, K2, K3, S1, S2, S3, S4).  Weighting 100% of final module mark.

Students will consider a single patient with a long term health condition and design a safe and effective six week exercise programme for them drawing from knowledge of the medical condition and evidence based practice to inform their recommendations.  They adopt an holistic approach and will identify key outcome measures evaluated against person-centred and person-negotiated goals. Students will draw on their knowledge of motivational and behaviour change theory to consider the patients readiness to change and maintain physical activity/exercise behaviour, preparing and planning for potential non-compliance or relapse to sedentary behaviour. The programme should align to Government and industry guidelines following the appropriate assessment of the individual patient’s needs. The case study will consider pre-participation heath screening and risk assessment tasks, the monitoring of patient progress using digital technology and self- reflection and future action planning.

Students must complete and successfully achieve a minimum of 40% in the assessment.

 

Formative assessment will involve the opportunity for the submission of draft components of the case study analysis.

 

Feedback will be provided in accordance with the University’s standard policy on feedback.

 

Formative assessment will ensure that the formalities of initial, mid-point and end point feedback are aligned with the requirements for fulfilment of practice based assessment competencies across Stage 2 / Level 5. This will be delivered within individualised sessions with Practice placement educators. 

 

Feedback on this module will be designed to give students specific guidance on how to improve their assessment, diagnostic and clinical reasoning skills as they seek to understand a pathological disruption to normal physiological function and the impact the pathology and wider determinants of health, have on the service-user and physiotherapy practice.

 

Students will be facilitated in feedback sessions in their one-to-one tutorial sessions.

 

Written formative feedback will be returned electronically and students invited to meet with tutor to verbally discuss feedback face-to-face.

 

Written summative feedback for both assessments will align closely to assessment criteria. Written feedback for all assessments will be returned electronically and students invited to meet with tutor to verbally discuss feedback face-to-face.

 

Generic summative feedback will be posted on canvas.

 

Where a need for remedial support sessions is identified, students will be referred to the necessary central support services.

 


 

Module Name

 

Code

 

Teaching Methodology

 

Formative and Summative Assessment

 

Feedback on Assessment

 

STAGE 3

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dissertation

 

PTY300

 

Lectures

 

Supervision

 

Self-Directed Study

Assessment 001Dissertation (10,000 words)

A written assignment (dissertation) of 10,000 words in length assessing learning outcomes: (K1, K2, S1, S2, S3, S4, S5). Weighting: 100% of final module mark.

 

The assessment must be successfully completed and passed with a minimum 40% pass mark.

 

Formative assessment will take the form of ongoing submission of iterations of the dissertation across the process of one to one tutorial supervision.

 

 

 

Feedback will be provided in accordance with the University’s standard policy on feedback.

 

Students will enter a dialogic feedback cycle with their supervisor to ensure that they have the opportunity to have regular one-to one support with their final dissertation submission.

 

Again, where a need for remedial support sessions is identified, students will be referred to the necessary central support services.

 

Personal and Professional Practice 3

 

 

PTY301

 

Seminal Lecture Sessions

 

Inquiry Based Learning

 

Tutorials

 

Self-Directed Learning

 

 

 

Assessment 001Portfolio (3000 words, guidance only)

Portfolio assessing learning outcomes: (K1, K2, K3, K4, K5, S1, S2, S3).  Weighting: 100% of final module mark.

 

Students will use an appropriate Personal and Professional Development Framework to guide their personal and professional development students will produce a portfolio assessing all learning outcomes. The portfolio will include reflective accounts related to the learning outcomes as well as the IPE scenarios. Students will be expected to reflect critically on their leadership attributes and personal leadership and mentoring style. Students will reflect using experiences from clinical placement and peer-mentoring sessions, incorporating feedback received from practice placement educators, patients, tutors, Patient, Carer, Public Involvement (PCPIs) and peers.  Students will need to integrate and critically analyse the evidence-based concerning contemporary models and frameworks of leadership and management in health and social care settings, debate the notions of followership versus leadership and capacity for both in any given context and explain the role of leadership and management in promoting collaborative team working.

 

The assessment must be successfully completed and passed with a minimum 40% pass mark.

 

 

Feedback will be provided in accordance with the University’s standard policy on feedback.

 

Students will receive ongoing feedback on their capacity to reflect and be reflexive on their learning experiences. They will also be asked to share their experiences of learning in inter-professional learning environments and they will hear others’ accounts of the same. 

 

Where a need for remedial support sessions is identified, students will be referred to the necessary central support services.

 

One to one tutorial support with academic staff will ensure that students are supported in developing their knowledge and skills. Where necessary they can be referred to central learning support services for specific help with, for example exam technique.

 

 

 

Contemporary Perspectives in Physiotherapy Practice

 

PTY302

 

Seminal lecture sessions

 

Inquiry based & clinically based learning

 

Tutorials

 

Assessment 001Elective Practice Placement 3. (187.5 hours)

Practice Assessment Document (PAD).  Marked on a pass/fail basis.

 

187.5 hours of Elective Practice Placement, organised independently or with guidance from the programme team in any area of physiotherapy practice including independent, 3rd sector and non-governmental organisations. 

 

This will be marked on a pass/fail basis aligned to Level aligned clinical competency standards using the Practice Assessment Document (PAD) and the Physiotherapy Competence Assessment Tool (P-CAT). Students must pass all placement competency standards, including four P-CAT, which are aligned with HCPC standards and CSP Framework. 

 

 

Assessment 002Core Practice Placement 4. (225 hours)

Practice Assessment Document (PAD).  Marked on a pass/fail basis.

 

This will be marked on a pass/fail basis aligned to Level aligned clinical competency standards using the Practice Assessment Document (PAD) and the Physiotherapy Competence Assessment Tool (P-CAT). Students must pass all placement competency standards, including four P-CAT, which are aligned with HCPC standards and CSP Framework. 

 

Assessment 003Critical review (2500 words)

Critical review assessing learning outcomes: (K1, K2, K3, S1, S2). Weighting: 100% of final module mark.

 

Students will be expected to select and critically review an area of contemporary physiotherapy practice and justify an emerging, and innovative service delivery initiative, reflective of contemporary physiotherapy practice, within the context of the modern, evolving and changing health and social care environment.  This component of assessment must be successfully completed and passed with a minimum 40% pass mark.

 

 

All elements of assessment have to be passed in order to pass the module. 

 

Students will be encouraged to submit one draft of their written work for formative feedback at least two weeks in advance of the summative submission date. Feedback will focus on structure, writing style, general content and referencing.

 

 

Feedback will be provided in accordance with the University’s standard policy on feedback.

 

Students will receive ongoing feedback on their capacity to reflect and be reflexive on their learning experiences. They will also be asked to share their experiences of learning in inter-professional learning environments and they will hear others’ accounts of the same. 

 

One to one tutorial support with academic staff will ensure that students are supported in developing their knowledge and skills.

 

Where a need for remedial support sessions is identified, students will be referred to the necessary central support services.

 

 

 

 

Complex Integrated Care

 

PTY303

 

Workshop Sessions

 

One to One Mentorship Tutorials

 

Self-Directed Study

 

 

Assessment 001 Written Account (2500 words)

A written account assessing learning outcomes: (K1, K2, K3, K4, S2).  Weighting 75% of final module mark.

 

Students will be expected to write an account that conceptually maps the outline of a patient’s journey from acute admission to discharge and beyond.  Students will debate the patients management plan and be expected to synthesize evidence from a variety of sources pertaining to a complex patient-centred physiotherapy management within a framework of interdisciplinary professional practice and inter-professional workingStudents will explore the distinctive approaches to care represented across public, allied health and medical professions in the healthcare workforce and the accountability of the physiotherapist within it. They will show awareness of the legal, professional and ethical issues arising from inter-professional working and the interdisciplinary and multi-disciplinary management and critically evaluate the implications in this particular case.

 

 

Assessment 002Clinical Letter (500 words)

Clinical Letter assessing learning outcomes (K1, K2, S1).  Weighting: 25% of final module mark.

 

Clear and articulate letter to another health professional e.g., GP reporting on outcome of case management meeting. Relating to the case presentation from Assessment 001. 

 

 

 

All assessment components must be passed with at least a minimum mark of 40%. There is no compensation within, or between modules.

 

Students will be encouraged to submit one draft of their written work for formative feedback at least two weeks in advance of the summative submission date. Feedback will focus on structure, writing style, general content and referencing.

 

 

Feedback will be provided in accordance with the University’s standard policy on feedback.

 

Students will receive ongoing feedback on their capacity to reflect and be reflexive on their learning experiences. They will also be asked to share their experiences of learning in inter-professional learning environments and they will hear others’ accounts of the same. 

 

One to one tutorial support with academic staff will ensure that students are supported in developing their knowledge and skills.

 

 Where a need for remedial support sessions is identified, students will be referred to the necessary central support services.

 

Evaluating and Improving Physiotherapy Practice

 

PTY304

 

Self-Directed Study

 

Inquiry Based Learning

 

Group Seminars

 

Individual Tutorials

 

Patient Educator Sessions

 

 

 

Assessment 001Elective Practice Placement 5. (300 hours)

Practice Assessment Document (PAD).  Marked on a pass/fail basis.

 

This will be marked on a pass/fail basis aligned to Level aligned clinical competency standards using the Practice Assessment Document (PAD) and the Physiotherapy Competence Assessment Tool (P-CAT). Students must pass all placement competency standards, including four P-CAT, which are aligned with HCPC standards and CSP Framework. 

 

 

 

Assessment 002Clinical Audit OR a Service Evaluation Report (2500 words)

Clinical Audit OR Service Evaluation Report assessing learning outcomes: (K1, K2, S1, S2, S3, S4, S5, S6).  Weighting: 100% of final module mark.

 

Students will be expected to negotiate a component of physiotherapy practice from their practice placement, for which they can design or participate in a current clinical audit or service evaluation. Students are expected to adopt a critical stance taking into consideration the most relevant approach for audit or evaluation, and justifying the use of appropriate outcomes measures. Students will present a summary of the audit or evaluation, including the findings and recommendations, in a written report. This component of assessment must be successfully completed and passed with a minimum 40% pass mark.

 

 

All elements of assessment have to be passed in order to pass the module. 

 

Students will be encouraged to submit one draft of their written clinical audit OR service evaluation for formative feedback at least two weeks in advance of the summative submission date.

 

 

Feedback will be provided in accordance with the University’s standard policy on feedback.

 

Formative assessment will ensure that the formalities of initial, mid-point and end point feedback are aligned with the requirements for fulfilment of all practice assessment learning outcomes across the final stage of the degree pathway. This will be delivered within individualised sessions with Practice placement educators.

 

Again, where a need for remedial support sessions is identified, students will be referred to the necessary central support services.

 

Mandatory Training

 

Non Accredited

 

Active Participation Workshops e.g.,

 

Manual Handling

Basic Life Support

Violence & Aggression

 

Across all three levels mandatory training will be a formalised but non accredited component of the academic curriculum. It is likely that this will be undertaken alongside / with other allied health students.

 

Feedback will be provided via mandatory training facilitators.

 


  1. Teaching, learning and assessment matrix

 

Stage 1 Modular Learning Outcomes Knowledge Numbers (K1- K10)

 

Module

Code

Core  / optional

Modes of T&L

Modes of Assessment

LO

K1

LO

K2

LO

K3

LO

K4

LO

K5

LO

K6

LO

K7

LO

K8

LO

K9

LO

K10

Introduction to Research

PTY100

CORE

  • Lectures
  • Seminars
  • Group work
  • Tutorials
  • Self-directed study
  • VLE
  • Inter-professional Learning

 

Critical Review

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TDA

 

 

 

 

T

 

Personal and Professional

Development 1

PTY101

CORE

  • Lectures
  • Seminars
  • Inquiry based learning
  • Observational placement
  • Tutorials
  • Self-directed study
  • VLE
  • Inter-professional Learning
  • Library: Skills for Learning Support Sessions
  • Interactive Patient Workshops

 

Written Assignment

 

 

 

 

 

TDA

 

 

 

TDA

 

 

 

 

TDA

 

 

 

 

 

 

TDA

 

 

 

 

TDA

 

 

Introduction to Physiology and Pathology for Physiotherapy

PTY102

CORE

  • Lectures
  • Seminars
  • Laboratory practical
  • Inquiry based learning
  • Tutorials
  • Self-directed study
  • VLE
  • Inter-professional Learning

 

Exam

MCQ/Written

 

TDA

 

 

 

 

TDA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stage 1 Modular Learning Outcomes Knowledge Numbers (K1- K10)

 

Module

Code

Core  / optional

Modes of T&L

Modes of Assessment

LO

K1

LO

K2

LO

K3

LO

K4

LO

K5

LO

K6

LO

K7

LO

K8

LO

K9

LO

K10

Functional Anatomy and Movement for Physiotherapy

PTY103

CORE

  • Lectures
  • Seminars
  • Laboratory practical
  • Inquiry based learning
  • Tutorials
  • Self-directed study
  • VLE
  • Inter-professional Learning
  • Interactive Patient Workshops

 

Exam

MCQ/Written

 

OSCE

 

TDA

 

 

TDA

 

TDA

 

 

TDA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Human Function and Lifespan Development: Psychosocial Foundations for Holistic Practice

 

PTY104

CORE

  • Lectures
  • Seminars
  • Laboratory practical
  • Inquiry based learning
  • Tutorials
  • Self-directed study
  • VLE
  • Inter-professional Learning

 

Written Account

 

 

 

 

 

TDA

 

 

 

 

TDA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fundamentals of Communication and Assessment for Therapeutic Practice

PTY105

CORE

  • Lectures
  • Seminars
  • Laboratory practical
  • Inquiry based learning
  • Tutorials
  • Self-directed study
  • VLE

 

Integrated OSCE

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TDA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fundamentals of Physical Activity and Exercise

PTY106

CORE

  • Lectures
  • Seminars
  • Gym based workshops
  • Tutorials
  • Self-directed study
  • VLE

 

 

Practical Exam

(Instructing Exercise)

 

Reflective Account

 

 

TDA

 

TDA

 

 

TDA

 

 

 

 

TDA

 

 

 

 

 

 

TD

 

TD

 

 

 

 

TD

 


 

Stage 1: Modular Learning Outcomes: Skills Numbers (S1-S9)

 

Module

Code

Core  / optional

Modes of T&L

Modes of Assessment

LO

S1

LO

S2

LO

S3

LO

S4

LO

S5

LO

S6

LO

S7

LO

S8

Introduction to Research

PTY100

CORE

  • Lectures
  • Seminars
  • Group work
  • Tutorials
  • Self-directed study
  • VLE
  • Inter-professional Learning

 

 

Critical Review

 

 

TDA

 

 

 

 

 

TD

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TDA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Personal and Professional

Development 1

PTY101

CORE

  • Lectures
  • Seminars
  • Inquiry based learning
  • Observational placement
  • Tutorials
  • Self-directed study
  • VLE
  • Inter-professional Learning
  • Library: Skills for Learning Support Sessions
  • Interactive Patient Workshops

 

 

Written Assignment

 

 

TD

 

 

 

 

 

TDA

 

 

 

 

TDA

 

 

TDA

Introduction to Physiology and Pathology for Physiotherapy

PTY102

CORE

  • Lectures
  • Seminars
  • Laboratory practical
  • Inquiry based learning
  • Tutorials
  • Self-directed study
  • VLE
  • Inter-professional Learning

 

Exam

MCQ/Written

 

TDA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TDA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stage 1: Modular Learning Outcomes Skills Numbers (S1- S9)

 

Module

Code

Core  / optional

Modes of T&L

Modes of Assessment

LO

S1

LO

S2

LO

S3

LO

S4

LO

S5

LO

S6

LO

S7

LO

S8

Functional Anatomy and Movement for Physiotherapy

PTY103

CORE

  • Lectures
  • Seminars
  • Laboratory practical
  • Inquiry based learning
  • Tutorials
  • Self-directed study
  • VLE
  • Inter-professional Learning
  • Interactive Patient Workshops

 

Exam

MCQ/Written

 

OSCE

 

TDA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TDA

 

 

 

 

TDA

 

 

 

 

 

TDA

 

 

 

Human Function and Lifespan Development: Psychosocial Foundations for Holistic Practice

 

PTY104

CORE

  • Lectures
  • Seminars
  • Laboratory practical
  • Inquiry based learning
  • Tutorials
  • Self-directed study
  • VLE
  • Inter-professional Learning

 

Written Account

 

 

TDA

 

 

 

TDA

 

TDA

 

 

 

 

TDA

 

TDA

 

Fundamentals of Communication and Assessment for Therapeutic Practice

PTY105

CORE

  • Lectures
  • Seminars
  • Laboratory practical
  • Inquiry based learning
  • Tutorials
  • Self-directed study
  • VLE

 

Integrated OSCE

 

 

 

 

TDA

 

 

TDA

 

 

 

TDA

 

 

 

TDA

 

 

 

TDA

 

 

 

 

 

Fundamentals of Physical Activity and Exercise

PTY106

CORE

  • Lectures
  • Seminars
  • Gym based workshops
  • Tutorials
  • Self-directed study
  • VLE

 

Practical Exam

(Instructing Exercise)

 

 

Reflective Account

 

TDA

 

 

 

 

 

TDA

 

 

 

TDA

 

 

 

 

 

TDA

 

 

TDA

 

 

 

 

 

TDA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TDA

 

TDA

 

 

 

 

 

TDA

 

 

Stage 2:   Modular Learning Outcomes Knowledge Numbers (K9- K17)

 

Module

Code

Core  / optional

Modes of T&L

Modes of Assessment

LO

K9

LO

K10

LO

K11

LO

K12

LO

K13

LO

K14

LO

K15

LO

K16

LO

K17

Evidence Based Practice and Research

 

PTY200

 

CORE

  • Lectures
  • Seminars
  • Group work
  • Tutorials
  • Self-directed study
  • VLE
  • Inter-professional Learning

 

Research

Proposal

 

 

 

TDA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TDA

 

 

 

 

TDA

 

 

 

Personal and Professional Development 2

 

PTY201

 

CORE

  • Lectures
  • Seminars
  • Inquiry based learning
  • Self-directed study
  • VLE
  • Inter-professional Learning

 

 

Portfolio

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TDA

 

 

Neurological Pathology and Physiotherapy Practice

PTY202

CORE

  • Lectures
  • Seminars
  • Workshops
  • Inquiry based learning
  • Tutorials
  • Self-directed study
  • VLE
  • Interactive Patient Workshops
  • Inter-professional Learning

 

 

Case Study OR Presentation

 

OSCE

 

 

 

 

 

TDA

 

 

TDA

 

 

 

TDA

 

 

 

 

 

TDA

 

 

 

 

 

TDA

 

 

 

 

 

TDA

 

 

 

TDA

 

 

 

TDA

 

 

 

TDA

Cardiorespiratory Pathology and Physiotherapy Practice

PTY203

CORE

  • Lectures
  • Seminars
  • Workshops
  • Inquiry based learning
  • Tutorials
  • Self-directed study
  • VLE
  • Inter-professional Learning
  • Interactive Patient Workshops

 

Case Study

OR Presentation

 

OSCE

 

 

 

 

TDA

 

 

TDA

 

 

TDA

 

 

TDA

 

 

TDA

 

 

TDA

 

 

TDA

 

 

TDA

 

 

TDA

 

 

Stage 2:    Modular Learning Outcomes Knowledge Numbers (K9- K17)

 

Module

Code

Core  / optional

Modes of T&L

Modes of Assessment

LO

K9

LO

K10

LO

K11

LO

K12

LO

K13

LO

K14

LO

K15

LO

K16

LO

K17

Musculoskeletal Pathology and Physiotherapy Practice

PTY204

CORE

  • Lectures
  • Seminars
  • Laboratory practical
  • Inquiry based learning
  • Tutorials
  • Self-directed study
  • VLE
  • Inter-professional Learning

 

 

Case Study OR Presentation

 

 

OSCE

 

 

 

 

 

TDA

 

 

 

TDA

 

 

 

 

TDA

 

 

 

 

 

TDA

 

 

 

 

 

TDA

 

 

 

 

 

TDA

 

 

 

 

 

TDA

 

 

 

 

 

TDA

 

 

 

 

 

TDA

 

 

Developing Holistic Physiotherapy Practice

PTY205

CORE

  • Lectures
  • Seminars
  • Laboratory practical
  • Inquiry based learning
  • Tutorials
  • Self-directed study
  • VLE

 

PAD

 

Written Essay

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TDA

 

TDA

 

 

TDA

 

TDA

 

 

 

 

 

TD

 

TD

Physical Activity and Exercise in Long Term Conditions

PTY206

CORE

  • Lectures
  • Seminars
  • Gym based workshops
  • Tutorials
  • Self-directed study
  • VLE

 

 

Case Study

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TDA

 

 

 

TDA

 

 

 

TDA

 

 

 

TDA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TDA

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

Stage 2: Modular Learning Outcomes: Skills Numbers (S9-S19)

 

Module

Code

Core  / optional

Modes of T&L

Modes of Assessment

LO

S9

LO

S10

LO

S11

LO

S12

LO

S13

LO

S14

LO

S15

LO

S16

LO

S17

LO

S18

LO

S19

Evidence Based Practice and Research

 

PTY200

 

CORE

  • Lectures
  • Seminars
  • Group work
  • Tutorials
  • Self-directed study
  • VLE
  • Inter-professional Learning

 

Research

Proposal

 

 

 

 

TDA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TDA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Personal and Professional Development 2

 

PTY201

 

CORE

  • Lectures
  • Seminars
  • Inquiry based learning
  • Self-directed study
  • VLE
  • Inter-professional Learning

 

 

Portfolio

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TDA

 

 

 

 

TDA

 

 

TDA

Neurological Pathology and Physiotherapy Practice

PTY202

CORE

  • Lectures
  • Workshops
  • Inquiry based learning
  • Tutorials
  • Self-directed study
  • VLE
  • Interactive Patient Workshops
  • Inter-professional Learning

 

Case Study OR Presentation

 

OSCE

 

 

 

TDA

 

 

 

 

 

TDA

 

 

TDA

 

 

TDA

 

 

TDA

 

 

TDA

 

 

TDA

 

 

TDA

 

 

TDA

 

 

TDA

 

 

TDA

 

 

TDA

 

 

TDA

 

 

TDA

 

 

TDA

 

 

TDA

 

 

TDA

 

 

TDA

 

 

TDA

 

 

TDA

 

 

TDA

Cardiorespiratory Pathology and Physiotherapy Practice

PTY203

CORE

  • Lectures
  • Workshops
  • Inquiry based learning
  • Tutorials
  • Self-directed study
  • VLE
  • Inter-professional Learning
  • Interactive Patient Workshops

 

Case Study OR Presentation

 

OSCE

 

 

 

TDA

 

 

 

 

 

TDA

 

 

TDA

 

 

TDA

 

 

TDA

 

 

TDA

 

 

TDA

 

 

TDA

 

 

TDA

 

 

TDA

 

 

TDA

 

 

TDA

 

 

TDA

 

 

TDA

 

 

TDA

 

 

TDA

 

 

TDA

 

 

TDA

 

 

TDA

 

 

TDA

 

 

TDA

 

 

 

Stage 2: Modular Learning Outcomes Skills Numbers (S9- S19)

 

 

Module

Code

Core  / optional

Modes of T&L

Modes of Assessment

LO

S9

LO

S10

LO

S11

LO

S12

LO

S13

LO

S14

LO

S15

LO

S16

LO

S17

LO

S18

LO

S19

Musculoskeletal Pathology and Physiotherapy Practice

PTY204

CORE

  • Lectures
  • Workshops
  • Inquiry based learning
  • Tutorials
  • Self-directed study
  • VLE
  • Inter-professional Learning

 

Case Study OR Presentation

 

OSCE

 

 

 

TDA

 

 

 

 

TDA

 

 

TDA

 

 

TDA

 

 

TDA

 

 

TDA

 

 

TDA

 

 

TDA

 

 

TDA

 

 

TDA

 

 

TDA

 

 

TDA

 

 

TDA

 

 

TDA

 

 

TDA

 

 

TDA

 

 

TDA

 

 

TDA

 

 

TDA

 

 

TDA

 

 

TDA

Developing Holistic Physiotherapy Practice

PTY205

CORE

  • Lectures
  • Seminars
  • Laboratory practical
  • Inquiry based learning
  • Tutorials
  • Self-directed study
  • VLE

 

PAD

 

Written Essay

 

 

 

TDA

 

TDA

 

 

 

TDA

 

TDA

 

 

 

TDA

 

TDA

 

 

 

TDA

 

TDA

 

 

 

TDA

 

TDA

 

 

 

TDA

 

TDA

 

 

 

TDA

 

TDA

 

 

 

TDA

 

TDA

 

 

 

TDA

 

TDA

 

 

 

TDA

 

TDA

 

 

Physical Activity and Exercise in Long Term Conditions

PTY206

CORE

  • Lectures
  • Seminars
  • Gym based workshops
  • Tutorials
  • Self-directed study
  • VLE

 

 

Case Study

 

 

 

 

 

 

TDA

 

 

 

TDA

 

 

 

 

 

TDA

 

 

 

TDA

 

 

 

 

TDA

 

 

 

TDA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stage 3:   Modular Learning Outcomes Knowledge Numbers (K18- K21)

 

Module

Code

Core  / optional

Modes of T&L

Modes of Assessment

LO

K18

LO

K19

LO

K20

LO

K21

Dissertation

 

PTY300

 

CORE

 

 

 

  • Lectures
  • Seminars
  • Group work
  • Tutorials
  • Self-directed study
  • VLE
  • Inter-professional Learning

 

 

Dissertation

 

 

 

DA

 

 

 

 

DA

 

 

 

 

D

 

Personal and Professional Development 3

 

PTY301

 

CORE

 

 

Portfolio

 

 

DA

 

 

 

 

 

DA

 

 

TDA

Contemporary Perspectives in Physiotherapy Practice

PTY302

CORE

 

 

 

 

  • Lectures
  • Seminars
  • Workshops
  • Inquiry based learning
  • Tutorials
  • Self-directed study
  • VLE
  • Interactive Patient Workshops
  • Inter-professional Learning

 

 

 

Critical Review

 

 

 

DA

 

 

 

 

TDA

 

 

 

 

DA

 

 

 

 

Complex Integrated Physiotherapy Practice

PTY303

CORE

 

Written Account

 

Letter

 

 

DA

 

TDA

 

 

TDA

 

DA