Attachments

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Faculty of Education and Society School of Education

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Approval of Postgraduate Certificate in Education (PGCE)

 

 

 

 

12th & 13th December 2016


 

Contents

 

 

Page

Postgraduate Certificate in Education (PGCE) Programme Specification

3-70

 

 

Module Descriptors

EDP380

Practice of Teaching

L6 30 credits

71-73

EDP381

Subject Studies

L6 30 credits

74-77

EDP382

Negotiated Curriculum Study in Education

L6 30 credits

75-80

EDP383

Development of Professional Learning (Critical Study)

L6 30 credits

81-83

EDP384

Reflective work-based learning experience in an educational setting

L6 30 credits

84-86

EDP385

Subject Studies -French and Spanish

L6 30 credits

to follow

EDPM01

Development of Learning: A Case Study

L7 30 credits

87-89

EPDM97

Negotiated Curriculum Study in Education

L7 30 credits

90-92


 

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Faculty of Education and Society School of Education

 

 

POSTGRADUATE CERTIFICATE IN EDUCATION (PGCE)

 

 

 

PROGRAMME SPECIFICATION

 

 

 

 

 

Version History

 

Please complete each time a new version is drafted e.g.

 


 

 

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Quality Handbook

 

 

AQH-B2-3b Transitional Postgraduate Programme Specification Template

 

TRANSITIONAL PERIOD

 

Transitional Postgraduate Programme Specification Template

 

SECTION A: CORE INFORMATION

 

1.         Name of programme

          Business Education

          Computer Science Education

          Design and Technology Education

          English Education

          Geography Education

          Mathematics Education

          Primary Education

          Science with Physics Education

          Science with Biology Education

          Science with Chemistry Education

          Education

 

          All of the above and the subjects below are offered as School Direct Salaried and/or Tuition and Self-funded

          Art and Design

          Health and Social care

          History

          Media Studies

          Modern Foreign Languages

          Music

          Physical Education

          Religious Education

 

2.         Award title

Postgraduate Certificate in Education (PGCE) (with recommendation for QTS) Postgraduate Certificate in Education (PGCE) (without recommendation for QTS)

 

3.         Programme linkage

Is this part of a group of linked programmes between which students can transfer at agreed points? (e.g. a group of programmes with a common set of taught modules)

 

 

4.    Is the programme a top-up only?

 


5.         Level of award: Level 6 and 7

 

6.         Awarding body: University of Sunderland

 

7.         Which department is it in? School of Education

 

8.         Programme Studies Board:

Undergraduate and Postgraduate Secondary Education and School Direct, Education Studies and BA (PT) Education and Training and SKE’s PSB/

 

Undergraduate and Postgraduate Primary Education and School Direct PSB PGCE International PSB

 


9.         Programme Leaders: Business Education English Education

Computer Science Education Geography Education Mathematics Education Science with Physics Education Science with Biology Education

Science with Chemistry Education Design and Technology

 

Education

 

Primary

Primary School Direct

 

School Direct Secondary

Art and Design

Health and Social care History

Media Studies Music

Physical Education Religious Education Modern Foreign Languages International

Primary


Steven Haswell Sharon Turnbull Lynne Dagg Amber Riches John Below Robert Hughes Robert Hughes Robert Hughes Angela Sandwith

 

Dionne Ross

 

Victoria Stokes Terry Coatham

 

Samantha Tate Samantha Tate Samantha Tate Samantha Tate Samantha Tate Samantha Tate Samantha Tate Samantha Tate To be confirmed Dionne Ross Victoria Stokes


Primary School DirectTerry Coatham

 

10.     How and where can I study the programme?

 

At Sunderland:

 

Full-time on-campus

Part-time on-campus

 

As work-based learning full-time

As work-based learning part-time

 

As a full-time sandwich course

 

As a part-time sandwich course

 

By distance learning


 

11.        How long does the programme take?

 

Min number of years / months

Max number of years / months

Full-time

1

3

Part-time

 

 

Distance learning

1

3

Work- based learning

1

3

 

For start-dates please see the current edition of the Prospectus or contact the relevant department at the University. For start-dates for programmes delivered in a partner college, please contact the college.

 

23.   Learning and teaching strategy.

The high quality teaching ratings that our programmes receive from external assessors such as Ofsted ensures that students experience the very best teaching and support available. The basic rationale for the learning and teaching methods used within the programme is that students should learn in a manner which will contribute both to their personal and professional development. It is intended that a wide range of strategies will be used to help students improve their own ability to learn and to acquire the skills and techniques which are essential for the preparation and organisation of learning activities for students. The strategies employed in any part of a module have been selected for their appropriateness to the needs of the students as learners including those who are Distance Learners. Blended learning strategies are used where appropriate to meet the particular demands of particular routes to meet the aims and content of that module. For example, International and School Direct students. Teaching using a blended approach involves the recording of on-campus lectures and learning materials on the Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) to be used as a resource for all learners attached to modules. Strategies will provide opportunities for exposition by the lecturer, group discussion, observation of classroom teaching, appropriate practical work, the use of information communication technology and supported self-study.

 

Matrix mapping Teaching & Learning methods across modules Postgraduate Certificate in Education route

 

Module

L

S

P/T

CS

IR

DR

EDP380 Practice of Teaching  L6 30 credits

 

 

EDPM01 Development of Learning: A case Study L7 30 credits

 

EDP381 Subject Studies L6 30 credits/** EDP385 Subject Studies -French and Spanish

 

 

EPDM97 Negotiated Individual Study in Education L7 30 credits

 

 

*EDP384 Reflective work-based learning experience in an educational setting (non-teaching route)

L6 30 credits

 

 


* The programme structure allows students flexibility if they do not successfully complete EDP380 Practice of Teaching L6 30 credits and to take EDP384 Reflective Work-Based Learning Experience in an Educational Setting (non-teaching route) L6 30 credits in its place. This will enable students to acquire 120 credits be awarded a Professional Graduate Certificate in Education Studies. If they meet the requirements of EDP380 Practice of Teaching L6 30 credits and do not pass EDPM01 Development of Learning: A case Study L7 30 credits they may follow the Professional Certificate in Education.

 

**The Modern Foreign Languages students take EDP385 Subject Studies (French and Spanish) module in place of EDP381 Subject Studies.

 

Professional Certificate in Education route

 

Module

L

S

P/T

CS

IR

DR

EDP380 Practice of Teaching - L6 30 credits

 

 

 

EDP383 Development of Professional Learning (Critical Study) - L6 30 credits

EDP381 Subject Studies - L6 30 credits/EDP385 Subject Studies -French and Spanish

 

 

EDP382 Negotiated Curriculum Study in Education - L6 30 credits

 

 

EDP384 Reflective work-based learning experience in an educational setting (non-teaching route)

L6 30 credits

 

 

 

 

 

Figure 6: Map of learning and teaching methods across the programme

 

Key:

L – Lecture

S - Seminar

P/T - Practical/Tutorial

IR-Independent reading/research

CS – Case Studies

DR–Directed Reading/self study

 

The programme is designed to support and develop a broad spectrum of students, including teachers new to the classroom, those with extensive and established experience in schools and colleges and those already involved with management and/or curriculum development including those in an international context. Throughout the programme, great importance is placed on the identification of students’ individual needs and a range of strategies are in place to address this issue. This process begins at interview for on-campus students when successful students’ potential and needs are assessed in order to enable Personal Tutors to plot a development trajectory to inform student support and guidance throughout the programme. This requires a range of teaching and learning strategies relevant to the learning outcomes of the programme.

 

The VLE is organised by course and then module and is used to provide a central hub for all students enrolled on the programme that will allow them to access all important documents related to the course. The PGCE Education, Primary and Secondary spaces will be an active learning space including discussion threads, online tasks, pod casts and vodcasts to engage and support learners in their ongoing academic and professional development. It will also contain the resources and Power Points used throughout the University sessions. This will allow students to revise their lessons and keep up-to-date with their studies and for International and UK-based students studying via Independent Distance Learning (IDL) to be better involved with the learning community.


The development of the e-learning provision has been one of the most important factors in all our programmes. With the support of Learning Technologies team and the Library, students have access to a range of resources and materials including video lectures. Live streaming of on-campus lectures is now integrated into our delivery.  Students require access to the internet from their home computer and those who have not studied on-line before often require additional support to begin to access on-line material. This is effectively addressed through ‘front-loading’ materials on the Programme section of the VLE, Skills for Learning and personal tutor support

 

All students on this programme are required to set up an e-portfolio. All key evidence is uploaded to the e-portfolio for example, weekly meeting forms accompanied by Individual Training Plans with specific targets for development, teaching practice observation forms, any Intervention or Action Plans and Grade Point Assessments. Tracking of  trainee progress is transparent and current throughout the programme.

 

An integral part of the programme will be support for students in developing skills necessary for working at Level 7. For on-campus students this will take the form of conference days prior to the start of the course and these will be made available to students studying via IDL through the VLE. In addition, study support will be incorporated into the two Level 7 modules in the form of tutorials (including on-line tutorials), seminars, reading tasks and formative assessment. Learning is supported through guided self-study materials in the research modules for all phases. The aim is to provide knowledge, understanding and critical appreciation of pedagogy, key skill acquisition and to develop appropriate intellectual skills and aptitudes throughout the programme. The opportunity to negotiate a learning focus in Level 7 modules helps to develop higher order communication skills. Reporting on experiential learning within educational contexts encourages reflective learning and generalisation of diverse experience. Through the medium of the level 7 classroom-based enquiry and a curriculum study at Level 6, students will develop into thoughtful and reflective practitioners. It is intended that a wide range of strategies will be used to help students improve their own ability to learn and to acquire the skills and techniques which are essential for the preparation and organisation of learning activities for students. The strategies employed in any part of a module have been selected for their appropriateness to the needs of the students as learners and the particular demands of the aims and content of that module. For example, there is a strong focus on academic writing and critiquing published papers in the early part of the first Level 7 module EDPM01 to prepare students to research and write at Level 7. The programme now includes a two day research conference prior to the start of the course to strengthen the students understanding of linking theory to practice.

 

During placements, students are required to integrate their reading with practice, drawing on it to inform reflection on, and evaluation of, their experience. Students are encouraged to use as wide a range as possible of the different approaches to teaching and learning introduced in their taught modules, to give constructive support to peers, to practice reflective self-evaluation and to engage in reflective dialogue with University tutors, peers, class teachers and school based trainers. EDP380 Practice of Teaching - L6 30 credits and EDP381 Subject Studies - L6 30 credits are delivered throughout the academic year. This allows for greater integration and synthesis of school-based and University-led learning.

 

The modules on the programme will be delivered in an attractive and stimulating learning environment in which students can develop their subject knowledge and skills. Teaching rooms are organised to allow for collaborative learning and group work and appropriate display provides a medium through which students’ thinking may be developed and challenged. For example in Business Education, students take an active part in their learning by taking part in a Trade Game and Market Research to understand how their subject might be taught  in  a  school  classroom.  Subject specialist  rooms  in  Design  and Technology,


Computing Science and Physics, Biology and Chemistry are used as much as possible to allow ready access to resources and materials which can support and enhance students’ learning. Rooms are also equipped with video, computers, document  readers and interactive whiteboards which allow staff and students to work in a range of creative ways.

 

The team is committed to trialing new developments and initiating different approaches to working with students.  In EDP381 Subject Studies on-campus students will be taking  part in a ‘Teaching outside the Classroom’ initiative which has just been introduced across subjects. For example, on-campus English students participate in behind the scenes theatre work, business students have been involved with the local Law courts and the science students host an Anatomy Day with local sixth formers. Whilst on-campus primary students benefit from visits to art galleries and museums to support cross curricular approaches to learning and teaching.

 

The programme team is currently developing the use of new ways of using discussion facilities on school placements as part of the student academic and pastoral support on the programme and utilising the new ‘Skype for Business’ initiative and Journal facility as part of the VLE.

 

Scholarly study is an essential dimension of any education programme and the Library Services provide a wide range of facilities including texts, journals in on-line facilities to support students’ evaluative and critical reflections. The module descriptors for the programmes identify appropriate e-resources and innovative use of ‘My Module Resources’.

 

24.   Retention strategy

The programme will have a sharp, focussed set of four core modules which meet and exceed the professional body requirements without unnecessary repetition and elaboration in order to reduce the assessment burden on the students. This means there will be a reduction in credits from 150 credits (Secondary) and 160 (Primary) to 120 credits. EDP380 Practice of Teaching - L6 30 credits is the school-based element of the programme where students might struggle with the demands of teaching in school. The course leaders are proactive and email trainees weekly to offer their support to students and to guide them on what they need to be doing as part of the module. Programme Leaders also invite students in during the practice to meet socially and share any concerns.

 

The teaching on the PGCE will encourage a supportive atmosphere in which students are given the opportunity to share their views on the programme at regular points through Staff Student Liaison Committees and Personal tutorials. Blended modules taught on-campus will frequently begin with a face to face session which will allow the students to meet and exchange ideas. The blended mode of teaching offers the opportunity for different type of students to come to the fore in discussions as the two modes of participations (face-to-face or via asynchronous discussions) caters for different personalities to express themselves. Fully IDL modules are monitored closely for students’ engagement.

 

Furthermore, the students on-campus will be encouraged to be involved in the wider teaching community developed in the Faculty of Education and Society. This will allow on- campus students to be part of a wider group of off-campus postgraduate students and to be supported throughout their programme with these links. The participation of students from all phases and locations will aid their professional development. Events that share common professional key skills such as critical writing will be organised for all students across the School. For students off campus there will be the opportunity to access the sessions via live- streaming, videos, podcasts and Skype for Business. This is beneficial in allowing students to capture the varied experiences of what is on offer and to consider inter-disciplinary approaches.


25.   Any other information

The merging of modules to form four core modules and create a common training year for International and UK based Education, Primary and Secondary students will allow us to share best practice to develop an enhanced understanding of our pedagogical practice across the School of Education. The student experience will be improved because the reduction in credits will help us to improve student experience by reducing their workload and this is expected to have a positive impact on retention. The reduction in credits will also bring the programme in line with other HEI programmes which will make us more competitive. The rationalisation of modules to enable all ITE programmes to share the same modules will bring us economies of scale which will make the routes more viable for the future. The primary programme is extending the course and will give Trainees the opportunity to elect for either a 3-7 Early Primary pathway or a 7-11 Upper Primary routeway to the PGCE primary qualification. This supports the employment needs of the Partnership and makes the Programme both relevant and marketable in the region. The Programme will also enable Trainees to elect for and develop a subject “enhancement” area.

We have considered recent government reports on ITE core content and work based reform to inform our thinking for example the use of data to impact on pupil learning and progress. In addition, although we train students to teach in the 11-19 age range for secondary programmes we will be offering QTS for the 11-16 age range and this will ease pressure on placements whilst offering a stronger student experience for Post 16 enhancement.

 

SECTION C - TEACHING AND LEARNING

 

26.   What is the programme about?

Students develop subject and pedagogical knowledge on this programme to enable them to become an outstanding teacher for Primary or Secondary schools in a national or international setting. Experience working in a school as a trainee teacher supported by those already in the profession and by the University academic staff team is central to the programme.              Students   who   successfully   complete   the   on-campus/School  Direct programmes will have spent a specified minimum of 120 days on placement and will be recommended to the NCTL for Qualified Teacher Status (QTS).  The PGCE Education (IDL) programme is designed to support and develop a broad spectrum of students, including teachers new to the classroom, those with extensive and established experience in schools and colleges and those already involved with management and/or curriculum development in their specific context however the latter students are not recommended for QTS.

 

27.     What will I know or be able to do at the end of the programme?

The PGCE programme is designed so that on-campus, off-campus and school-based trainee teachers will attain a level of professional competence appropriate to that of a newly qualified teacher as reflected in current government legislation.

Learning Outcomes Postgraduate Certificate AIMS OF THE PROGRAMME

The core aim of this programme is to develop outstanding teachers.

 

The PGCE one year programme is a full-time programme offered to high-quality graduates by the University of Sunderland.

 

The standard University terminology of ‘Student’ has been used. The programmes address the most recent DfE/NCTL publication in which the learner is designated ‘Trainee’ for the on- campus and school-based routes and this will be used to facilitate the use of the documentation in programme handbooks, specifications and marketing purposes.


The aims of the programme are to enable students to:

 

1.       meet the prescribed standards and adopt the professional values expected of newly qualified teachers appropriate to their subject and the ages, abilities and backgrounds of the students they teach;

 

2.       develop confidence, resilience and professionalism necessary for the relentless pursuit of excellence in the classroom;

 

3.       develop a systematic understanding and critical awareness of educational policy, theory and practice;

 

4.       apply acquired knowledge, understanding and skill to making informed judgments on educational issues in context;

 

5.       achieve a grounding in the application of subject knowledge which gives an appropriate level of subject knowledge for teaching in schools;

 

6.       learn about pupils as learners, both from research and professional experience;

 

7.       develop competence in implementing the curriculum and other relevant syllabus/specifications;

 

8.       understand teaching as a profession, and how schooling may be applied in different contexts;

 

9.       examine their subject/s teaching critically in relation to the individual educational needs of pupils and addressing the whole curriculum and wider educational issues;

 

10.   develop the organisational and transferable skills central to professional autonomy.

 

LEARNING OUTCOMES OF THE PROGRAMME2.3

The year is designed so that trainees will attain a level of professional knowledge appropriate to that of a newly qualified teacher. Specifically trainees will be able to demonstrate the skills necessary:

 

1.       to teach their subject/s at a level appropriate to the key stages they are training to teach (e.g. addressing relevant Programmes of Study and examination specifications as appropriate to phase) and a comprehension of the whole framework within which they will operate;

 

2.       to create and maintain a stimulating and appropriate learning environment;

 

3.       to apply their understanding of the assessment of students and the selection and application of appropriate assessment techniques;

 

4.       to evaluate with a view to improving their own teaching and the learning of the students they teach;

 

5.       to deploy their subject knowledge in a form which is appropriate to the needs of the learner both in terms of content and teaching methodology and meets the curriculum demands of the partnership institution in which they are placed


to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of:

 

6.       the wider role of the teacher, including professional, pastoral and administrative responsibilities;

 

7.       the individual needs of learners appropriate to their age, ability, language and cultural background;

 

8.       subject and pedagogical knowledge to become an effective teacher impacting upon children’s progress over time.

 

In addition, the following academic learning will be achieved to demonstrate the skills

necessary to:

 

9.       critically analyse, synthesise, interpret and evaluate a wide range of data, information and ideas from either primary or secondary sources;

 

10.   distinguish and employ a range of quantitative and qualitative research methods;

 

11.   demonstrate responsibility and accountability when working as an individual and in groups;

 

12.   communicate effectively in written form, through formal presentations, in visual forms and through the internet and world-wide web;

 

13.   develop a range of study, research and organisational skills that will lay the foundation for their teaching career;

 

In addition, those attaining the Postgraduate Certificate in Education will be able to:

 

14.   engage in critically informed professional reflection;

 

15.   undertake systematic inquiry into questions arising in or from the context of their working environment.

 

These last two learning outcomes have been extracted from the Certificate level Learning outcomes of the Faculty of Education and Society M.A in Education Programme to ensure parity with Masters’ level study in Education.

 

28.     What will the programme consist of?

All students enrol for the Postgraduate Certificate in Education for the one year programme. The programme prepares students following the on-campus and school-led secondary age phase to teach pupils in the 11-19 age range with Qualified Teachers Status (QTS) 11-16. In Business Education QTS will be in the 14-19 age range. For those students following the on-campus and school-led primary route, the programme will give Trainees the opportunity to elect for either a 3-7 Early Primary pathway or a 7-11 Upper Primary routeway to their PGCE Primary qualification. This supports the employment needs of the Partnership and makes the Programme both relevant and marketable in the region. The Programme will also enable Trainees to elect for and develop a subject “enhancement” area.

The IDL students follow both primary and secondary routes however they are not recommended for QTS.

The programme also forms the final year of the undergraduate routes and they follow the Level 6 route.

 

The modules designated on each of the two awards are followed by all students with the exception of those students following the Modern Foreign Languages route. In order to present as qualified teachers able to deliver their subject according to best practice in Communicative Language Teaching, graduates need to be fully confident in the use of their foreign language, and able to conduct teaching in the target language accurately and without


hesitation in the register appropriate to the level taught. In order to ensure that this level of fluency and confidence is reached and maintained, continual development, reinforcement and enhancement is required in the four skills throughout Stage 3. To achieve this regular attendance at taught classes and workshops designed to enhance language skills is required, and assessment specific to those skills. Accordingly, the Modern Foreign Languages Education degree routes incorporate an alternative Subject Studies module to EDP381, EDP385: Subject Studies – French and Spanish, incorporating this specific subject enhancement as well as the outcomes relating to pedagogy of EDP381.

 

Students who do not complete EDP380 Practice of Teaching in the final phase of the module will be offered EDP384 The Reflective Work-Based Learning Experience in an Educational Setting to enable them to complete the Postgraduate Certificate in Education Studies.

 

The following diagram illustrates the modules to be studied on the final year on the undergraduate programme and Postgraduate/Professional Route.


Please note: The Modern Foreign Languages students take EDP385 Subject Studies (French and Spanish) module in place of EDP381 Subject Studies.

 

Taught postgraduate programmes generally consist of a number of taught modules leading to the award of a Postgraduate Certificate (60 credits) or Postgraduate Diploma (120 credits). A Masters qualification (180 credits) usually culminates in a major piece of independent work such as a project or dissertation. All modules are at postgraduate level (level 7 in the UK’s national scheme). The summary below describes briefly what is contained in the programme. The programme structure, including a detailed list of modules, can be found in the programme regulations.

 

The PGCE programme is structured around a 36 week University-based course during which the students spend a specified minimum of 120 days on placement in partnership educational institutions. Students who successfully complete the on-campus and school - based programmes will be recommended to the NCTL for QTS.

 

The modules that are key to the programme’s aims and learning outcomes are four core

modules which include two Level 7s for the Postgraduate route as set out in the table below:

 

Core

EDP380 Practice of Teaching - L6 30 credits

Core

EDPM01  Development of Learning:  A Case Study  - L7 30 credits

Core

EDP381 Subject Studies - L6 30 credits/ *EDP385 Subject Studies -French and Spanish

Core

EPDM97 Negotiated Individual Study in Education – L7 30 credits

Alternative route Modules

EDP384 Reflective Work-Based Learning Experience in an Educational Setting L6 30 credits. Students not completing EDP 380 may take EDP384 - L6 30 credits to gain an interim award

 

*EDP385 Subject Studies -French and Spanish (taken by MFL students only)

 

The structure allows students flexibility in taking alternative routes through the programme should this be necessary so they are able to achieve an interim award. If a student is not successful in completing the final part of EDP380 Practice of Teaching L6 30 credits then they make take EDP384 Reflective Work-based Learning Experience in an Educational Setting L6 30 credits. This will enable them to make up deficient credits and be awarded a Postgraduate Certificate in Education Studies.

 

In exceptional circumstances, if a student is not successful in the first Level 7 assessment they are able to resubmit at Level 6 by taking EDP383 Development of Professional Learning (Critical Study) - L6 30 credit in its place and follow the Level 6 route to receive a Professional Graduate Certificate in Education  (recommendation for QTS)

 

Routes

 

Modules for the Postgraduate Certificate in Education

Core

EDP380 Practice of Teaching - L6 30 credits

Core

EDPM01  Development of Learning: A Case Study  - L7 30 credits

Core

EDP381 Subject Studies - L6 30 credits/ EDP385 Subject Studies -French and Spanish

Core

EPDM97 Negotiated Individual Study in Education – L7 30 credits

Alternative Module

EDP384 Reflective Work-Based Learning Experience in an Educational Setting L6 30 credits is available to students who do not complete EDP380.


Modules for the Professional Certificate in Education

Core

EDP380 Practice of Teaching - L6 30 credits

Core

EDP383 Development of Professional Learning (Critical Study) - L6 30 credits

Core

EDP381 Subject Studies - L6 30 credits/ EDP385 Subject Studies -French and Spanish

Core

EDP382 Negotiated Curriculum Study in Education - L6 30 credits

Alternative Module

EDP384 Reflective Work-Based Learning Experience in an Educational Setting - L6 30 credits

 

The four core modules will allow students to get a firm grasp of the professional, pedagogical and theoretical underpinnings of the discipline. They will engage with the main current educational debate and with the methods used by teachers in their practice. These modules will provide students with the skills and knowledge they need to become outstanding practitioners within their chosen age phase and context. The Modern Foreign Languages students take EDP385 Subject Studies (French and Spanish) module in place of EDP381 Subject Studies. EDP384 Reflective Work-based Learning experience in an educational setting - L6 30 credits is for those students who do not meet the requirements for the teaching practice module EDP380 Practice of Teaching.

 

All four core modules are 30 credits and cover subject, pedagogical and practical knowledge required to become an outstanding teacher, able to fulfil the requirements of government legislation, current at the time of study, for professional expertise. Each module complements one another to support the student to become an outstanding teacher. Academic modules overlap the practical teaching elements when it is appropriate. EDP380 Practice of Teaching - L6 30 credits is delivered as a long thin module which enables students to develop against the teaching standards across the year and modules feed directly into the development of the teaching standards.

 

29. How will I be taught?

 

Scheduled teaching activities

Independent study

 

The PGCE (and the final year of the undergraduate programmes) is designed as a blended programme. Some modules will be taught fully in IDL mode while others will mix both IDL and face-to-face teaching. IDL teaching will involve a range of on-line tasks supported by VLE (asynchronous discussions, video material from campus lectures, streaming live sessions and access to video lectures). All teaching sessions and activities are held in a friendly and relaxed, yet academically rigorous, environment. In the on-campus sessions, all modules both depend on and encourage discussion and the inclusivity of all students present in the seminar groups. IDL students are encouraged to debate educational issues within an on-line discussion forum and also with their ‘PAT’ (personal academic tutor).

 

The teaching will take the format of key note lectures for the on-campus provision, live streamed and videoed for IDL and follow-up seminars. The essence of the teaching sessions will be found in following these key note sessions in the morning with subject application sessions in the afternoon to place their learning in a clear subject context. A focus in recent years has been the development of critical reading and writing workshops to analyse journal papers: an approach which demands of the student adequate preparation and a willingness to engage constructively in debate.


The teaching will take the format of lectures in which student participation will be as crucial as the participation of the lecturer. The essence of the teaching sessions will be found in the in-depth discussion and analysis of selected reading: an approach which demands of the student adequate preparation and a willingness to engage constructively in debate. Fundamental to the two Level 7 modules will be that students develop confidence and fluency in discussing education topics. Module leaders will be flexible in adopting methods that galvanize and bring the best out of the students.

 

This fluidity in teaching sessions and the importance of student input and work at Level 7 will be encouraged in the use of a variety of face-to-face and on-line school-based tasks set out for the students. These will be discussed in seminars and will encourage the students to learn from one another and to develop their writing skills and to encourage them to develop the critical mind-set needed to evaluate the work of their peers but also their own work.

 

Learning and teaching strategies reflect our sense that intending teachers will be expected to equip themselves in their own time with knowledge of basic facts and contexts. This will be encouraged via discussions in the school settings with debates with school mentors. Students as teachers will be encouraged to be critically self-reflective in their learning and teaching in school, in not just reflecting on their own teaching but also in being conscious of the methodological underpinnings of such reflections. The teaching and learning strategies prioritise critical reflection over the bare assimilation of what to teach.

 

The need to be proactive in reflecting current educational debates in modules means the teaching sessions need to involve practising teachers and those expert in areas such as PREVENT to enable students to have access to current thinking in the field. Therefore module leaders in the two Level 7 modules on the PGCE programme will be flexible in providing current material as education is constantly changing.

 

In the subject sessions, on-campus students are encouraged to learn from one another and to share their experiences in the variety of schools settings in which they are placed. The PGCE is designed as a blended programme and can be delivered flexibly. The organisation of the split in individual modules between IDL and face-to face teaching will be decided by individual module leaders to fit the requirements of each module IDL teaching will involve a range of on-line tasks supported by VLE (asynchronous discussions, book reviews, short essay writing, etc.). This will be supplemented where appropriate by archive/exhibition visits and fieldwork. Within this overall framework provision will be made for individual counselling and discussion of assignments. Regular attendance and participation in both face to face and on-line tasks is mandatory and monitored.

 

The on-campus teaching will take the format of workshops and lectures in which student participation will be as crucial as the participation of the lecturer. The lecturer will have a role of moderator and facilitator of discussions and exchange of ideas. The essence of the teaching sessions will be found in the in-depth discussion and analysis of selected reading: an approach which demands of the student adequate preparation and a willingness to engage constructively in debate.

 

A list of the modules in the programme can be found in the Programme Regulations.

 

A summary of the types of teaching, learning and assessment in each module of the programme can be found in the Matrix of Modes of Teaching.


30.   How will I be assessed and given feedback?

 

Written examinations

 

Coursework

x

Practical assessments

x

 

A summary of the types of teaching, learning and assessment in each module of the programme can be found in the Matrix of Modes of Teaching.

 

The generic assessment criteria which we use can be found here. Some programmes use subject-specific assessment criteria which are based on the generic ones.

 

This programme uses the Generic University Assessment Criteria

YES

 

This programme uses the Subject Specific Assessment Criteria

 

NO

 

The University regulations can be found here.

 

Students will be asked to fulfil the requirements of four modules for the completion of the PGCE and the final year of the undergraduate programmes. The various assessment procedures adopted are designed to ensure that students have acquired the knowledge and skills appropriate to each element of the programme with the ability to meet the Teaching Standards. Assessment on the programme will be by written coursework taking various approaches for the Level 6 Subject Studies module and the two Level 7 research-based modules. The Level 6 Practice of Teaching module is entirely school-based and is assessed by providing evidence against the Teaching Standards in an e portfolio.

31.   Teaching, learning and assessment matrix How does research influence the programme?

The PGCE programme is designed to follow the commitment of the University of Sunderland

to a research-active curriculum. To do this, the students will be given the opportunity to engage with the most up-to-date research in their modules, to discuss with the members of the team their research specialism and to engage themselves in research. Thus, students will be both audience and participants in the research-active curriculum. The modules that specifically develop research methods are EDPM01 Development of Learning: A Case Study

-   L7 30 credits and EPDM97 Negotiated Individual Study in Education – L7 30 credits. Those students taking Level 6 Modules will complete EDP383 Development of Professional Learning (Critical Study) and EDP382 Negotiated Curriculum Study in Education.

 

The Team is highly committed to enhancing the student experience. This is achieved through the passion and commitment of team members to their programmes, modules and teaching, as well their dedication to and support for students through the personal tutor system. The School of Education continues to maintain a scholarly community through its conferences and publications. For example: (a small selection is represented here)

 

          Atkinson, S. (2015) ‘How secure are Design and Technology trainee teachers in their understanding of designing, as portrayed in the latest National Curriculum documentation?’ In: M. Chatoney (Ed.)

          Atkinson, S. (2015) PATT29: Plurality & Complementarity of approaches in Design and Technology Education. Marseille France: Marseille University 35-41

          Atkinson, S. (2014) ‘An imaginative use of a formative self-assessment and feedback tool to encourage a learner’s understanding within a Higher Education context’ 9th


International Conference on Imagination and Education: Simon Fraser University Vancouver

          Cooper, B. (2016) Empathy, Emotion, Technology and Learning. Chapter in Tettegah, S Y, McCreedy, M, P (eds) (2016). Emotions, technology and learning. London. Elsevier. Book Series on Emotions and Technology.

          Clyde, H. and Cooper, B. (2014) An inspector palls: the problematic impact of OFSTED on learning and affect in teacher education and implications for policy. BERA 2014, Institute of Education Sept 22nd 2014

          Cooper, B. (2014) Valuing the human – ways forward for learning, teaching and educational leadership. Keynote at Learning enhancement conference Sunderland university July 2014

          Clyde, H. and Cooper, B. (2013) Waiting for OFSTED: affect, learning and the impact of inspection on teacher educators -part 1.BERA Annual conference, Sussex University September 2-5th September 2013

          Cooper. B. (2013) Supporting outstanding pupil progress in an area of social and economic deprivation: a case study in a cluster of five schools. BERA Annual conference, Sussex University September 2-5th September 2013

          Szymanski, K. (2012) Identity and Subjectivity in an age of neoliberal political agendas: Who belongs. The Child and the Book Conference -Towards common ground: Philosophical Approaches to children’s literature. Cambridge University 30th March-1st April 2012 full paper

          Szymanski, K. (2009) Globalisation in teenage fiction texts. Children’s Literature and Cultural Diversity in the past and in the present. International Research Society for Children’s Literature Conference, Goethe University, Frankfurt Aug 2009 (full copy)

          Szymanski, K.(2009) Representative Models of Masculinity for young adult readers through critical analysis. Chapter in Perceptions of Literacy ed Clark, C and Messenheimer, T. Lichfield, UK : Pied Piper Publishing

          G. Crozier, Davies, J, Szymanski, K.( 2009) Identity and Roma Families: teacher's perspectivesand engagement with INSETRom training. Intercultural Education Vol 20 Issue 6 pp 537 -54

          Gregson, M., Hillier, M., Biesta, G., Duncan, S., Nixon, L., Spedding, T, and Wakeling, P. (2005) Reflective Teaching in Further, Adult and Vocational Education. Bloomsbury Press.

          Gregson, M., Nixon, L., Pollard, A and Spedding, T. (2015) Readings for Reflective Teaching in Further, Adult and Vocational Education, Bloomsbury Press.

          Martin-Denham, S. (2015) Teaching Children and Young People with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. London: Sage.

          McKenna, L. (2015) Parental Engagement in the United Kingdom: Examining notions of ‘disadvantaged’ communities. European Teachers’ Education Network Annual Conference, Theme: Experiential Learning. Copenhagen, 16-18th April 2015.

          McKenna, L. (2015) Parental Engagement for the Twenty First Century: A Social Impact Assessment. British Educational Research Association Annual Conference. Belfast, 15-17th September 2015

          McKenna, L. (2008) The Involvement of Men: Changing Notions of Fatherhood. Early Education. Journal Number 56. Autumn 2008.

          McKenna, L. (2007) Engaging with Men In Schnieder, J; Avis, M and Leighton P. (Eds) (Nov 2007) Supporting Children and Families: Lessons from Sure Start for Evidence Based Practice. Jessica Kingsley Publishers.

          McKenna, L. (2004) Parental Partnership: the policy and practice of family learning. Early Education Journal Number 43. Summer 2004.

          Nozedar, C. and Sandwith, A. (2015) PATT 29: Creating links between the design and technology curriculum and global perspectives – an investigation of trainee teachers’ perceptions. Marseilles, France.


          Taras, M. (2015) Student self-assessment: what we have learned and what are the challenges. RELIEVE, 21 (1). ISSN 1134-4032

          Taras, M. (2015) Situating power potentials and dynamics of learners and tutors within self-assessment models. Journal of Further and Higher Education, 39. ISSN 0309-877X Full text not available from SURE.

          Taras, M. (2015) The future of school inspection in England. In: Westminster Education Forum, 10 Feb 2015, Sixty One Whitehall, London . Full text not available from SURE.

          Taras, M. (2015) FA or AfL? That is the question. In: Education and Early Childhood Studies, 21st January 2015, Liverpool John Moores University. (Unpublished) Full text not available from SURE.

          Taras, M. and Davies, M. (2014) Perceptions and realities in assessment definiations and uses. International Research in Education - Macrothink Institute, 2 (1). pp. 93-

102. ISSN 2327-5499 (In Press) Full text not available from SURE.

 

SECTION D EMPLOYABILITY

 

32.   How will the programme prepare me for employment?

The proposed programme is highly practical in focus and develops the capacities of student- teachers to collaborate, problem solve and think critically and creatively. Working alongside highly experienced teachers and teacher-educators, student-teachers on the programme develop a wide-range of characteristics and values which help them to appreciate the realities of working in this sector and how to survive and thrive within it.

 

Teaching Practice Placements are a key component of the programmes and allow student teachers to experience the day to day challenges of teaching, learning and assessment in the sector. Designed to give the opportunity for students to meet the current prescribed standards for QTS (These are also applied to the international and UK-based IDL programme though PSRB regulations will not permit QTS to be awarded). These placements provide opportunities for student-teachers to demonstrate their abilities to potential employers as they build strong professional relationships and work collaboratively with colleagues on a regular basis. They also encourage student-teachers to actively seek out advice in order to further develop their own professional learning by responding to the feedback from their University teacher- educators and their school mentors.

 

Overall, the programme gives students the opportunity to develop advanced skills and knowledge which they can use in the future as it is designed to prepare students to enter the teaching profession.

 

For information about other opportunities available to our students who study on-campus, click here.

 

Additional opportunities to develop your experiences more widely will vary if you study at one of our partner colleges. For information about the extra-curricular activities available in any of our colleges please contact the college direct.

 

33.   Particular features of the qualification. (optional)

 

34.   Professional statutory or regulatory body (PSRB) accreditation.

PSRB accreditation is not relevant to this programme

 

PSRB accreditation is currently being sought for this programme

 

This programme currently has PSRB accreditation

X


The relevant PSRB(s) is/are: The National College of Teaching and Leadership (NCTL) for QTS

 

The terms of the accreditation are as follows: The University fulfils the Government requirements as set out for QTS providers

 

Accreditation: The Programme is approved by the NCTL. Successful completion of all elements and the NCTL skills tests will lead to Qualified Teacher Status (QTS). The Programme is subject to inspectors by the Office for Standards in Education (OFSTED)

 

There are programme-specific regulations relating to the following. Details are given in the programme regulations:

 

The modules to be studied

Pass-marks for some or all modules and/or parts (elements) of modules

Requirements for progression between one Stage and another

Placement requirements

 

Attendance requirements

Professional practice requirements

 

Degree classification

Other

 

 

Interim or exit awards are not accredited.

 

1.       PGCE students who successfully complete four level 6 modules will be awarded an Interim Award of Professional Graduate Certificate in Education.

 

2. Students unable to successfully complete EDP 380 Practice of Teaching and who successfully complete EDP384 Reflective Work Based Learning in an Educational Setting will exit with an Interim Award of Post Graduate Certificate in Education Studies ( non-teaching qualification route)

 

 

SECTION E PROGRAMME STRUCTURE AND REGULATIONS

 

Use Programme Regulations Form, for questions 36 and 37

 

 

SECTION F ADMISSIONS, LEARNING ENVIRONMENT AND SUPPORT

 

38.   What are the admissions requirements?

The  University’s  standard  admissions  requirements  can  be  found  in       the

university

regulations. Programme-specific requirements which are in addition to those regulations are

given below.

 

The programme team welcomes applicants from a variety of routes and are always happy to advise potential applicants about both their qualifications and how to obtain the qualifications necessary for the programme.


Application requirements for PGCE strands are:

 

Route

Requirements

All routes

Those seeking admission to programmes leading to QTS (in England only) MUST have successfully passed the NCTL Professional Skills Tests in Numeracy and Literacy prior to admission.

1 year PGCE

We welcome applications from holders of an honours degree, 2:2 (Hons) or above in a related subject. Those seeking admission to programmes leading to QTS (in England only) require Mathematics and English GCSE at Grade C (or Grade 4 for 2017 onwards) or above or equivalent through Equivalency Testing.com. Primary applicants need Grade C (or Grade 4 for 2017 onwards) in Science as well as the above.

IELTS is required for applicants where English is not their first language: a minimum of 6.5 average, 6.5 in writing and 6.0 in other cells.

 

 

 

Can students enter with advanced standing?

 

No

 

 

39.   What kind of support and help will there be?

The Secondary, Primary and International Phase Leads have executive responsibility for the operation and development of the programme, which involves:

 

          being available for students to talk about their experience on the programme as a whole (this is achieved formally through student representation on the Programme Studies Board);

          liaising with the Module Leaders about the delivery or development of modules;

          counselling students with respect to their choice and progress within the programme and, where necessary, approving changes of module choice;

          collecting information relating to extenuating circumstances claimed by students to have affected their performance and transmitting this to module leaders.

 

Module Leaders have responsibility for the operation and development of the module, including:

 

          responding to any particular inquiries or points that are made. Module leaders will normally identify times when students can expect any communication to be read and responded to;

          communicating effectively to students on the module via e mail, Sunspace or through the module guide;

          communicating with other members of staff who are also teaching the module regarding all the learning and assessment procedures and schedules;

          ensuring any extenuating circumstances affecting trainee performance are reported to the Module Assessment Board;

          development of methods of learning and teaching;

          liaising with the Programme Manager about delivery or development of modules to meet the needs of programmes for which they are core/option.

 

Programme leaders have responsibility for the operation of the programme at subject level including:

 

          acting as personal tutor;

          regular liaison with each other and the programme manager;


          providing first point of contact to students;

          collection, assessment procedures and distribution of assignments;

          placement moderation visits and support of most aspects of modules.

 

All applicants are advised that some programme materials are available through the VLE and course literature provides a clear statement of system and user requirements. Prior to the commencement of the programme, all students are given VLE access and the ‘Getting Started’ material includes a link to an e-learning package designed to develop on-line study skills. Further to this, students are given specific advice on accessing the VLE and Library resources, and in modules, information is given in the module guide on how to access e- books.

 

Tutorials are an opportunity to raise in confidence any other issues that may affect the life of a trainee. In this case the programme leader or programme manager will act in a ‘pastoral’ capacity and may with the trainee’s agreement refer them to relevant services for more specialised help.

 

Students are advised that if at any time they have a concern or problem about their studies or the programme, they should discuss this with their Personal Tutor /Programme Leader in order that appropriate support can be given. All tutorial staff are familiar with the support services of the University and if appropriate they recommend that student to refer themselves to key services for example student support, disability support or counselling. They are further advised of the University of Sunderland formal Complaints Procedure. Details of this (and other documents which students may find useful for reference)can be accessed at ‘Docushare’, University of Sunderland Publication Scheme, section 5 Student Administration and Support. (https://my.sunderland.ac.uk).

 

The high quality of training on programmes leads to the qualification of excellent teachers. There is a high degree of coherence between university and school based training. The programmes are very responsive to new initiatives and can be flexible in their delivery to ensure the needs of students are met. Trainee support in the university and in schools is excellent and there are robust mechanisms in place to ensure this.

 

Support particular to a stage in the programme is outlined in the table below and is adapted as appropriate for IDL applicants via the VLE.

Programme Stage

Explanation

1.Pre-application

Potential applicants are given guidance about qualifications and how to make an application by email, telephone, tutorials and at Open Events.

2. Interview

Interviewees are sent invitations via email which contain information about the interview process and the programme. N/A for IDL

3.Post-application

Unsuccessful candidates may be given feedback about their application and interview.

4. Pre-course

Students are given pre-course subject knowledge targets and information to help them prepare for the start of the Programme

5. Induction

Students follow a week-long Induction Programme that includes meeting the Programme Team; an explanation of the Programme; guidance on choosing options; library and Student Union introductions; support and help with registration, accommodation and finance etc.

Students are given information about the support and guidance available through the Programme Handbook. In addition to this students also meet with their programme leader when completing their subject audit. The programme leaders operate an ‘open door policy’ which is available through either a visit to the office or through telephone and email contact.


 

6.Review Week 1

On campus students meet with their personal tutor/programme leader when readdressing their subject audit/s. Students complete a Personal Development Profile which they then discuss with their personal tutor/programme leader. Students access a First Appointments Conference where they are given advice and guidance about obtaining a first appointment. On-campus programme leaders operate an ‘open door policy’ which is available through either a visit to the office or through telephone and email contact.

7.Review Week

On campus students complete the Career Entry NQT Target Profile (or equivalent) in conjunction with the personal tutor/School-based tutor and Programme leader. Programme leaders operate an ‘open door policy’ which is available through either a visit to the office or through telephone and email contact. Students are given further advice and guidance about obtaining a first appointment and their post-qualifying options. The Programme Leader and personal tutor operate an ‘open door policy’ on-campus which is available through either a visit to the office or through telephone and email contact. Skype is available for international students.

8.Formative assessment

There are opportunities throughout the programme for students to be given formative feedback on their progress within modules, both academic and practical teaching. This ensures that students are clearly aware of their strengths and areas for development. Those providing formative feedback include placement mentors as well as university academic staff.  For example,  the Level 7 work in particular,  in order to support students’ academic development and address their academic needs, students are asked to submit detailed proposals on a pass/fail basis with appropriate formative developmental feedback

9.Post-qualifying

Students are provided with a full reference request service.

 

The approach to work-based learning has been identified as a particular strength by all of  the stakeholders involved in the programme. Students are involved in two placements during the year. Both placements are assessed through a combination of a professional e portfolio file and practical teaching.

 

Students are supported whilst in school by a number of tutors. The core of this support is provided by University-based tutors (UBT) and School-based Tutors (SBT), as identified below:

 

Tutor

Role

School Liaison Tutor

(SLT)

The SLT is a UBT who is responsible for the welfare and progress of all on campus students in a placement, irrespective of their subject. The SLT keeps in regular contact with their placement institution through email, telephone and visits.

Moderating Tutor (MT) Secondary (on-campus) School-based

The MT is a subject specialist UBT who visits students within their subject to moderate the assessment judgements of the placement tutors.

 

Mentor

The  Mentor  who has responsibility for the overall welfare and progress of all students within their institution, irrespective of their phase/route/specialism.

Subject Mentor – Secondary on- campus and School-based

The Subject School-Based Mentor is a mentor who has the main responsibility for the training and assessment of the trainee on a day to day basis.


 

The University provides a range of professional support services including health and well- being, counselling, disability support, and a Chaplaincy. Click on the links for further information.

 

Please see the relevant college prospectus or website for details of student support if you are planning to study in one of our partner colleges.

 

 

40.   What resources will I have access to?

There are many resources available to students through the VLE module space as mentioned above.

 

On-campus

x

In a partner college

 

By distance learning

x

 

On-campus

Tick all that apply

 

General Teaching and Learning Space

IT

Library

VLE

Laboratory

Studio

 

Performance space

 

Other specialist

 

Technical resources

 

 

Information about the University’s facilities can be found here.

 

41.   Are there any additional costs on top of the fees?

 

No, but all students buy some study materials such as books and provide their own basic study materials.

 

Yes (optional) All students buy some study materials such as books and provide their own basic study materials. In addition there are some are additional costs for optional activities associated with the programme (see below)

Yes (essential) All students buy some study materials such as books and provide their own basic study materials. In addition there are some are essential additional costs associated with the programme (see below)

 

 

Additional costs that students will need to make include travel to their placement school. Students attending any field trips for example in Geography Education will be required to meet the costs. There will also be visits to schools other than placements schools for special events that will enhance the student experience but these will be notified at the interview process.


42.   How are student views represented?

 

The University’s student representation and feedback policy can be found here.

 

Every two years we participate in the national Postgraduate Taught Experience Survey (PTES) which is run by the Higher Education Academy.

 

Students will have access to their Personal Tutors/Programme Leaders during teaching practice.

 

SECTION G QUALITY MANAGEMENT

 

43.   National subject benchmarks

 

The Quality Assurance Agency for Higher Education publishes benchmark statements which give guidance as to the skills and knowledge which graduates in various subjects and in certain types of degree are expected to have. They do not cover all subjects at postgraduate level but those which exist can be found at here.

 

Are there any benchmark statements for this programme?

 

NO

 

 

44.   How are the quality and standards of the programme assured?

 

External examiners are appointed to oversee and advise on the assessment of the programme. They ensure that the standards of the programme are comparable with those of similar programmes elsewhere in the UK and are also involved in the assessment process to make sure that it is fair. They are invited to comment on proposed developments to the programme. Their reports are sent to the Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Academic) as well as to the Faculty so that issues of concern can be addressed.


All programmes are reviewed by the University on a six-yearly cycle to identify good practice and areas for enhancement. Programmes are revalidated through this review process. These reviews include at least one academic specialist in the subject area concerned from another UK university. The University is subject to external review by the Quality Assurance Agency for Higher Education on a six-year cycle. Their review reports for Sunderland can be found at here.

 

Further information about our quality processes can be found here.

 

 

Please also complete the SITS form.


Appendix 1

 

PART B  PROGRAMME REGULATION/S

 

Name of Programme:

Postgraduate Certificate in Education (PGCE) (with recommendation for QTS) Postgraduate Certificate in Education (PGCE) (without recommendation for QTS)

 

Title of final award:

Postgraduate Certificate in Education (PGCE) (with recommendation for QTS) in x Postgraduate Certificate in Education (PGCE) (without recommendation for QTS) in x

 

          Business Education

          Computer Science Education

          Design and Technology Education

          English Education

          Geography Education

          Mathematics Education

          Primary Education

          Science with Physics Education

          Science with Biology Education

          Science with Chemistry Education

          Education

 

          All of the above and the subjects below are offered as School Direct Salaried and/or Tuition and Self-funded

          Art and Design

          Health and Social care

          History

          Media Studies

          Modern Foreign Languages

          Music

          Physical Education

          Religious Education

 

Interim awards1:

PGCE On-campus – only

Professional Graduate Certificate in Education (with recommendation for QTS) in X

 

The following awards are not recommended for QTS PGCE On-campus and IL

Postgraduate Certificate of Higher Education in Education Studies

 

PGCE IL – only

Professional Graduate Certificate in Education in

 

PGCE On-campus

Postgraduate Certificate in Education in Education Studies


Accreditation: indefinitely by the DfE/Training Agency

 

University Regulations: 6.1.3, 2.3.4, 3.3.5, 4.2.1, 5.2.1, 4.3.2, 6.5.2

 

Interim Award (6.1.3)

To include ‘studies’ on the end of interim awards. This distinguishes between those students who are eligible for Qualified Teaching Status (QTS).

 

Programme-specific regulations to meet Professional Body requirements:

 

For all teacher training programmes leading to a professional qualification 100% attendance is expected. Any student whose attendance falls below 80% without extenuating circumstances will be required to withdraw from their programme. (2.3.4)

 

There will be no compensation between any of the modules each of which must be passed with an average of 40%, The learning within each of these modules is key in terms of required subject knowledge and pedagogy in order for trainees to be effective in the classroom. (4.2.1, 5.2.1)

 

The Re-assessment of Modules - In the case of a student failing a teaching experience module, the student may be reassessed in that module once only at the discretion of the appropriate Assessment Board. Reassessment of teaching experience modules is subject to availability of a satisfactory school placement to be found by the University.(4.3.2)

 

Applicants whose first language is not English must achieve a minimum IELTS band score of 6.5, with 6.5 in writing and no sub section below 6.

 

Regulationsapplyto students

Date the regulations apply

Intakes affected

Stage 1

Sept 2017 onwards

All

Stage 2

Sept 2017 onwards

All

Stage 3

Sept 2017 onwards

All

 

Stage 1Core modules:

 

Code

Title

Credits

EDP380

Practice of Teaching

30

EDPM01

Development of Learning: A case Study

30

EDP381

/EDP385

Subject Studies

Subject Studies -French and Spanish

30

EPDM97

Negotiated Curriculum Study in Education

30

EDP384

Reflective work-based learning experience in an educational setting (non QTS route)

30


Modules for the Professional Certificate in Education

 

Code

Title

Credits

EDP380

Practice of Teaching

30

EDP383

Development of Professional Learning (Critical Study)

30

EDP381

/EDP385

Subject Studies

Subject Studies -French and Spanish

30

EDP382

Negotiated Curriculum Study in Education

30

EDP384

(for non- teaching route)

Reflective work-based learning experience in an educational setting

30


 

Appendix 2Matrix of modes of teaching, learning and assessment Postgraduate

 

Module

Code

Core

/ optio nal

Modes of T&L

Modes of Assessment

S1

S2

S3

S4

S5

K6

K7

K8

S9

S10

S11

S12

S13

S14

S15

Practice of Teaching

EDP380

Core

Lectures private study, seminars

e portfolio and ILP

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

 

Subject Studies

EDP381

Core

Lectures private study, seminars

Written assignment action plan and e portfolio

x

 

 

x

x

x

x

x

x

 

x

x

x

x

 

Negotiated Individual study in Education

EPDM97

Core

Lectures private study, seminars

Proposal and Final Report

x

 

 

x

 

 

x

x

x

x

 

x

x

x

x

Development of Learning: A Case Study

EDPM01

Core

Lectures private study, group work, seminars

Proposal

Case Study

x

 

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

 

x

x

x

x

Reflective Work-based learning Experience in an Educational Setting

EDP384

Core Non- Teac hing route

 

Portfolio

 

x

x

 

 

x

 

 

 

 

x

x

 

x

x


 

 

Appendix 2Matrix of modes of teaching, learning and assessmentProfessional

 

 

Module

Code

Core

/ optio nal

Modes of T&L

Modes of Assessment

S1

S2

S3

S4

S5

K6

K7

K8

S9

S10

S11

S12

S13

S14

S15

Practice of Teaching

EDP380

Core

Lectures private study, seminars

e portfolio and ILP

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

 

Subject Studies

EDP381

Core

Lectures private study, seminars

Written assignment and action plan and e portfolio

x

 

 

x

x

x

x

x

x

 

x

x

x

x

 

Negotiated Curriculum study in Education

EDP382

Core

Lectures private study, seminars

Curriculum critical study

x

 

 

x

 

 

x

x

x

x

 

x

x

 

 

Development of Professional Learning: Critical Study

EDP383

Core

Lectures private study, group work, seminars

Critical Study

x

 

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

 

x

x

 

 

Reflective Work-based learning Experience in an Educational Setting

EDP384

Core Non- Teac hing route

 

Portfolio

 

x

x

 

 

x

 

 

 

 

x

x

 

x

x


Appendix 3

 

QUICK REFERENCE

Panel:External Internal

Programme:  New  

Replacement for existing

 

 

 

 

 

SITS SUMMARY PROGRAMME/SHORT COURSE DETAILS

(Form to be completed electronically by the Faculty and forwarded to the Quality Assurance and Enhancement (QAE) Quality Officer supporting the Approval event, or sent to Management Information and Systems Development (MISD) for faculty devolved processes before sending to QAE)

 

PROGRAMME/SUBJECT/SHORT COURSE DETAILS

 

Exit Award: Title of programme/award

PGCE Business Education On-campus

School Direct Tuition, Salaried and Self-funded

If replacement for existing, specify title of old

 

Faculty(ies):

Faculty of Education and Society

Department:

School of Education

SITS Programme/Short Course code2

SECONDARYPGT

Programme Studies Board3

Secondary  - Studies Board

UCAS code4  (if applicable).  If other please state

method.

On-campus N1X1

For School Direct UCAS codes will be done via Lead School and will be different for each Lead School

JACS code5

N100

Qualification Level / Qualification Aim

PGCE (020)

T-T indicator On-campus 1

School Direct TBC

The T-T Scope TBC (14-19?)

 

New intended award is required

 

 

Modes of delivery and duration:

Full time on-campus School Direct – 1 Year FT

CSP Only. Other subject combinations not allowed with this subject:

 

Programme/Subject/Short Course Leader:

Steven Haswell

Date of Approval /Modification/Review

December 2016

 

 

To be allocated in consultation with MISD team in SRBP

3 Programme Studies/Assessment Board that will have management responsibilities for the programme.

4 Please contact Admissions Manager for code

5 JACS code = e.g. (V1) History, (G5) Computing Science, etc. for information contact relevant AD


 

Date of next review (QAE to complete)

 

Start date of programme/Short Course

September 2017

Number of intakes per annum and likely month(s) intake(s) starts.

One September

 

 

FUNDING DETAILS

 

Confirm funding arrangements for programme e.g. HEFCE/TDA/NHS/Other6

NCTL

If it is TDA, is it primary/secondary/F.E./Other (please state)

Secondary

Is the programme Open or Closed7:

Open

 

 

ACCREDITING BODY

Yes/No

If yes please attach completed form AQH-Ciii2

 

 

PROGRAMME SPECIFIC REGULATIONS

Are there to be programme specific regulations? Yes

If yes, please attach completed form AQH-B3 Appendix 2 or AQH-B8.

 

COLLABORATIVE:

Please complete details

UKNo

 

OverseasNo

 

 

INTERIM AWARD SCHEDULE

 

 

Interim award title

 

Credits required

 

Interim structure

 

Please show mandatory requirements if applicable e.g. core module codes

Professional Graduate Certificate in Education (with recommendation for QTS) in Business Education

120

EDP380, EDP381, EDP382, EDP383

Postgraduate Certificate in Education in Education Studies

120

EDPM01, EPDM97, EDP381, EDP384

PGCE On-campus and IL

Postgraduate Certificate of Higher Education in Education Studies

60

EDPM01, EPDM97

 

 

6  Please confer with David Balme for funding status for programme

7  An Open programme constitutes an open admissions policy. A Closed programme is normally specific to one client only. If in

doubt please consult Academic Services or Planning and Finance.


 

 

SITS SUMMARY PROGRAMME/SHORT COURSE DETAILS

(Form to be completed electronically by the Faculty and forwarded to the Quality Assurance and Enhancement (QAE) Quality Officer supporting the Approval event, or sent to Management Information and Systems Development (MISD) for faculty devolved processes before sending to QAE)

 

 

PROGRAMME/SUBJECT/SHORT COURSE DETAILS

 

Exit Award: Title of programme/award

PGCE Computer Science Education On-campus

School Direct Tuition, Salaried and Self-funded

If replacement for existing, specify title of old

 

Faculty(ies):

Faculty of Education and Society

Department:

School of Education

SITS Programme/Short Course code8

SECONDARYPGT

Programme Studies Board9

Secondary  - Studies Board

UCAS code10  (if applicable).  If other please state

method.

On-campus IX99

For School Direct UCAS codes will be done via Lead School and will be different for each Lead School

JACS code11

I100

Qualification Level / Qualification Aim

PGCE (020)

T-T indicator On-campus 1

School Direct TBC

The T-T Scope is 81 (11-19) New intended award is required

 

 

Modes of delivery and duration:

(delete yes/no as necessary) Full time