Attachments

 

 

Quality Handbook

 

 

Programme Specification Template - Undergraduate

 

Please note:

  • Guidance notes for staff or suggestions for the design and functionality of the database are in grey highlight.  Guidance notes should be deleted in the final version.

 

SECTION A:CORE INFORMATION

 

  1.  

Name of programme:

Marine Engineering (Stage 3)

  1.  

Award title:

BEng Honours

  1.  

Programme linkage:

 

Is this part of group of linked programmes between which students can transfer at agreed points?

No

 

  1.  

Is the programme a top-up only?

 

Yes

  1.  

Does the programme have a Foundation Year (Level 3) associated with it so that students enter for a four-year programme and progress directly from the Foundation Year to Stage 1 without having to re-apply?

 

No 

 

 

 

  1.  

Level of award:

 

Level 6

  1.  

Awarding Body:

University of Sunderland

  1.  

Department:

Faculty of Technology, School of Engineering

  1.  

Programme Studies Board:

Marine Programme/Module Studies Board

  1.  

Programme Leader:

 

Dr Martin Jones

 


  1. How and where can I study the programme?

 

At Sunderland:

 

Full-time on campus

 

Part-time on campus

 

As work-based learning full-time

 

As work-based learning part-time

 

As a full-time sandwich course

 

As a part-time sandwich course

 

By distance learning

 

 

At the University of Sunderland London campus: 

 

Full-time on campus

 

Part-time on campus

 

As work-based learning full-time

 

As work-based learning part-time

 

As a full-time sandwich course

 

As a part-time sandwich course

 

By distance learning

 

 

At a partner college:

 

Full-time in the UK 

X

Part-time in the UK

 

Full-time overseas

 

Part-time overseas

 

By blended learning

X

As a full-time sandwich course in the UK

 

As a part-time sandwich course in the UK

 

As a full-time sandwich course overseas

 

As a part-time sandwich course overseas

 

As work-based learning full-time in the UK 

 

As work-based learning part-time overseas

 

Other (please specify)

 

 

 

  1. How long does the programme take?

 

Min number of years / months

Max number of years / months

Full-time

1 year

4 years

Part-time

 

 

Distance learning

 

 

Work-based learning

 

 

Blended learning

2 years

6 years

 

For start-dates please see the current edition of the Prospectus or contact the relevant department at the University. For start-dates for programmes delivered in a partner college, please contact the relevant college.

 

SECTION B:FURTHER CORE INFORMATION 

 

Use Outline Programme Proposal Form for ADC for questions 13 to 25

 

The main deliverable objective of this award is to provide the academic knowledge and skills to enable the practicing Marine Engineer Officers to further extend their employment opportunities within today’s maritime industries. The programme strategy mirrors the established and accepted practice of integrating the practical and theoretical elements to provide a programme that develops new analytical skills, enhances individual independent learning and encourages team work to solve problems and suggest design changes to improve performance..

 

The BEng programme will require students to understand engineering concepts, techniques used to analyse engineering systems and the processes used for the synthesis of solutions to engineering problems. Students will need to demonstrate that they can apply their knowledge and understanding to an increasingly complex and realistic range of engineering systems.

 

The key skills of organisation and time management will also need to be exercised, in both an individual and a team context, to produce timely solutions to assignments, together with communication and presentation skills to adequately describe their solutions, either in reports, or by presentation to staff and their peers. Thus, a range of learning and teaching methods, appropriate to the subject and the situation will be utilised, to encourage understanding, develop skills and abilities and to motivate students.

 

The initial knowledge and skills undertaken within stage 1 will enable the range of knowledge and skills to be expanded and utilised within stage 2 modules. The amount of independent learning will be increased as the course progresses. IT skills are developed by the use of industry standard software to analyse the design of system components within marine plant.

The stage 2 modules involve both a design and a project module. The design module enables the student to work as an integral part of a team, developing and using team management skills as well as working as an individual. The project module allows the sponsored student to investigate a mutually beneficial subject.

 

The assessment strategy integrated within the programme provides a range of assessment methods which aims to enable the student to show their demonstration of knowledge and competencies in a range of topics. These assessments range from practical tests and experiments, individual and group research, unseen examinations and individual and group reports and presentations.

 

In the full-time delivery route, theoretical concepts will be taught in lectures, practical experiments will be undertaken in workshops and laboratories, and support provided by tutorials sessions. In the blended learning route, some of the lectures will be replaced with online learning resources which can be accessed remotely and at a time convenient to the students. The practical sessions will continue to be held on campus. Support sessions will be arranged with video conference software, along with face-to-face sessions when the students are on campus.

 

  1. Retention strategy.  

Most students entering this programme will have at least 12 months industrial experience and may be sponsored by an industrial partner. A strong emphasis within the program of the design and survey work that could be undertaken by graduates reinforces the benefits of the course to future employability within the maritime sector.

 

Direct input to the course by visiting lecturers and various presentations held by the Institute of Marine Engineering, Science and Technology enables students to network within their chosen field.

 

Student personal development planning is embedded within the programme to ensure integration of the transferable skills. Students will be informed of this development via the student handbook, and this is reinforced / updated during the tutorial support sessions.

 

A support mechanism network is in place and established to aid students with their personal and academic issues. Should further support be required by the student, permanent personal counsellors are available, as well as an established support mechanism for academic support and advise.

 

  1. Any other informationPlease add anything you think may be useful to the approval panel.

Flexible blended learning route consisting of approximately half the content studied at SSMS and half the content studied independently. This route will allow serving engineer officers in the merchant navy to utilise their off-duty time when at sea to further their training and qualifications.

 

SECTION C:TEACHING AND LEARNING

  1. What is the programme about?

 

  • Provide rational, and coherent programmes of study which are relevant to the specific needs of Marine Engineer officers and employers;
  • Facilitate the professional development of the student and lay the foundations for a successful career in the marine engineering field and academic progression;
  • Provide a sound knowledge base in the fundamentals of Marine Engineering and develop the wider process skills of information technology, problem solving, team working, time/task management, engineering design and technical investigations;
  • Foster the development of an enquiring, open-minded and creative attitude, tempered with scientific discipline and social awareness, which encourages lifelong learning.
  • Compliment and augment the existing study programmes for maritime studies.

 

  1. What will I know or be able to do at each Stage of the programme?

 

Learning Outcomes Stage 3 – Skills

 

By the end of this Stage of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

 

  1. Integrate theory and own existing industrial practice.
  2. Analyse, evaluate or interpret the results of investigations and controlled experiments.
  3. Use a range of varied techniques to demonstrate understanding of an engineering topic in the maritime sector.
  4. Apply and critically evaluate the applications / limitations of various engineering designs.
  5. Use a range of information/data from a variety of sources and industrial publications.
  6. Apply engineering principles to the solution of complex problems relating to a marine environment.
  7. Formulate and test hypotheses created to fulfil assignment submissions.
  8. Present research findings via a variety of presentational methods.

 

Learning Outcomes Stage 3 – Knowledge

 

By the end of this Stage of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

 

  1. The influence of dynamic mechanical forces on vessel design.
  2. Selection of engineering materials for operational considerations
  3. Control and electrical systems relevant to marine applications.
  4. Broadening academic skills over a range of engineering related topics
  5. The principles of system design focused on the operational factors, and investigating the design to minimise failure in service
  6. Apply a range of varied techniques to demonstrate understanding of a research engineering topic closely related to a marine theme.

 

  1. What will the programme consist of?

 

Each undergraduate programme consists of a number of Stages from a minimum of 1 to a maximum of 4, each of which is equivalent to a year’s full-time study. The summary below describes briefly what is contained in each Stage. Most programmes have a mixture of core (ie compulsory) modules and optional ones, often with increasing choice as you move through the programme and gain in experience. In some programmes the choice of optional modules gives you particular ‘routes’ through the programme. The programme structure including a detailed list of modules can be found in the programme regulations.

 

Stage 3: (Honours Degree) – 120 credits

 

ST60 Applied Mechanics, 20 credits

This unit introduces the principles of two dimensional stress and strain analysis and its application in torsion, bending and pressure vessels. Standard methods for analysing structural elements such as beams, straits and flumes, are introduced. Consideration is given to the kinematics of particles, rigid bodies and mechanisms. Frames of reference and their various methods of solution are considered in detail. This unit also contains material on vibration analysis and engineering structures, the analysis of free and damped vibrating systems and the application of transmissibility and absorbers to engineering systems.

 

ST61 Energy Conversion Systems, 20 credits

This unit introduces the Second Law of Thermodynamics to demonstrate the theoretical constraints applicable to all thermodynamic systems, and the relevance of dimensionless groups, and model testing, to a range of engineering problems. Detailed studies of mixtures, combustion, compressible flows and fluid energy systems, and psychrometry and its applications are introduced. Energy transfer devices, both positive displacement and rotodynamic machines, and the corresponding thermodynamic cycles, Otto, Joule, Diesel etc. are analysed. Convective and radiative heat transfer mechanisms are developed m some detail. Gas turbine cycle analysis is developed to allow for real effects and for the inclusion of additional components and hence more complex plant.

 

ST62 Marine Propulsion Systems Analysis, 20 credits

This unit introduces the overall operation of a marine electrical power system. It is developed through the integration of the main components for generation, distribution and utilisation.  The unit is designed to give the marine engineer sufficient knowledge and analytical skill to be able to make decisions which influence design and operation of the ship. Electric circuit and machine characteristics, calculations and computer analysis tools will be used to examine the control and protection requirements for safe operation. Electronic power switching methods for variable speed motor control are examined with particular reference to electric ship propulsion. Advanced methods of vibration and stress analysis are considered. Matrix methods, Holtzer's method and Rayleigh's principle are used for vibration analysis. Analytical and Finite Element methods are used for thermal and mechanical stress assessments.

 

ST63 Vessel Dynamics and Materials, 20 credits

This unit provides the practicing marine engineer with an extended knowledge and understanding of the behaviour of vessels at sea, and the stress and loading considerations necessary within the context of ship design and operation. The fundamental principles relating to the properties of materials used within the marine industry are considered along with methods of improving their properties and failure mechanisms. Further study of engineering theory enhance the study and analysis of marine mechanical and electrical plant including control systems. The theory is extensively applied in laboratory practical work using equipment found in real situations on board merchant ships. Students will analyse the operation of the plant and investigate the connectivity and interaction found between the diverse systems used to safely propel the ship as well as the hotel services found on board. An investigative project will be undertaken, with a practical training period on board being an ideal opportunity to analyse real data of systems and procedures.

 

ST64 Marine Propulsion Design, 20 credits

The unit is designed to provide the marine engineer with extended knowledge and understanding of the design and operation of marine propulsion systems. Specialised studies of real engineering systems are undertaken of typical examples in marine plant. Candidates work as part of a design team.

 

ST65 Marine Project, 20 credits

The individual project provides an opportunity for the student to undertake a substantive piece of self-directed work which will integrate many aspects of mechanical engineering studied elsewhere in the programme. This technical investigation will be characterised by the:

  • Selection of a subject area, establishing aims and objectives, and developing a problem statement.
  • Selection of appropriate theory to support the experimental or explorative investigations, including a critical evaluation of published literature.
  • Development of appropriate investigation methods and techniques with an evaluation of their limitations and accuracy.
  • Execute a structured experimental or explorative programme, including refinement and validation as appropriate.
  • Analysis of experimental and/or modelling data, presentation of significant results and the drawing of conclusions.
  • Writing of a technical report and presenting results to inform a professional audience.

 

N.B. in accordance with standard University of Sunderland programme regulations, students who do not complete 120 Stage 3 Credits may be offered an Ordinary degree provided they have completed 60 Stage 3 Credits from the above modules.              

 

  1. How will I be taught?

 

Full-time route

Scheduled teaching activities

Lectures. Laboratory practicals. Workshops. Seminars

Independent study

Self-study. Directed reading. Open learning. Preparation for assessment. Project work.

Placement

No

 

Blended learning route

Scheduled teaching activities

Laboratory practicals; workshops; seminars

Independent study

Online learning resources, interactive quizzes, lecture videos; video conferencing.

Directed reading. Open learning. Preparation for assessment. Project work.

Placement

No

Teaching includes scheduled classroom based lessons, online learning and practical laboratory work with guided and independent learning. In the initial stages where new theory and concepts are developed there is a greater emphasis on directed learning. As the course progresses there becomes greater emphasis on individual and peer group learning culminating in a project module.

 

Describe the type of teaching and learning which students will encounter; explain the way in which it changes over the period of the programme (e.g. greater emphasis on independent learning later on); give some examples of how specific types of knowledge or understanding are acquired through particular methods of teaching and learning. Use plain English but make sure that the text is academically appropriate. If you use a ‘technical’ word explain it and spell out acronyms the first time they are used in the section. (Maximum 500 words)

 

A list of the modules in each Stage of the programme can be found in the Programme Regulations.

 

A summary of the types of teaching, learning and assessment in each module of the programme can be found in the Matrix of Modes of Teaching.

 

  1. How will I be assessed and given feedback? 

Written examinations

Short and long answer questions.

Data interpretation. Mathematical modelling of engineering systems.

Coursework

Laboratory reports. Case study. Posters. Essays. Data interpretation. Reflective assignments. Computer based assignments. Project work. Problem based learning.

Practical assessments

Oral presentation.

 

A summary of the types of teaching, learning and assessment in each module of the programme can be found in the Matrix of Modes of Teaching.

 

The generic assessment criteria which we use can be found here. Some programmes use subject-specific assessment criteria which are based on the generic ones.

 

This programme uses the Generic University Assessment Criteria

YES

 

This programme uses the Subject Specific Assessment Criteria

 

NO

 

The University regulations can be found here.

 

 

  1. Teaching, learning and assessment matrix

 

  1. How does research influence the programme? 

Students are encouraged to include their employer and colleagues in the project module in order to undertake extensive investigative research during the second stage. At this stage the student will possess the professional and analytical skills required to an in depth study to a chosen field.

 

 

SECTION D EMPLOYABILITY

 

  1. How will the programme prepare me for employment?

 

The programme gives you the opportunity to develop skills which you can use in the future. Some skills are more specific than others to the subject area, or to a particular type of activity, but all skills can be applied in a range of employment situations, sometimes in quite unexpected ways. The skills which this programme is designed to develop are listed below.

 

Skills acquisition is an important focus of the programme and its aims are:

  • To provide a programme which provides the academic integrity and professional focus for engineers and technologists in maritime engineering industries.
  • To provide a rewarding and supportive environment where students can develop not only knowledge and practical abilities in specific areas, but also key transferable skills.
  • To produce graduates with the specific knowledge, analytical ability and design skills appropriate for a professional marine engineer and who can apply these skills in the diverse range of maritime industries in which engineers are employed.
  • To produce graduates who can work responsibly and as a professional engineer in accordance with the requirements of the professional engineering bodies.
  • To produce graduates with a range of key transferable and intellectual skills that can be applied to the role of professional Marine Engineer.

Employability is the key feature of this programme and the development of transferable skills including teamwork, problem solving, IT skills, oral & written communication, analytical & critical thinking as well as the essential engineering skills form a fundamental part of the programme.

 

There are also opportunities for on-campus students outside your programme of study.

 

For information about other opportunities available to our students who study on campus, click here.

Additional opportunities to develop your experiences more widely will vary if you study at one of our partner colleges. For information about the extra-curricular activities available in any of our colleges please contact the college direct. 

 

  1. Particular features of the qualification (optional)

 

 

  1. Professional statutory or regulatory body (PSRB) accreditation. 

 

PSRB accreditation is not relevant to this programme 

 

PSRB accreditation is currently being sought for this programme

X

This programme currently has PSRB accreditation

 

 

The programme is currently accredited until:

The relevant PSRB(s) is/are: (pending)

 

The terms of the accreditation are as follows:

 

The programme is recognised as:

 

The programme is accredited dependent on annual review.

 

Accreditation gives graduates:

 

This depends upon successful completion of the programme.

 

There are no programme-specific regulations.

 

 

 


SECTION E PROGRAMME STRUCTURE AND REGULATIONS

 

Use Programme Regulations Form, for questions 39 and 40

 

SECTION F ADMISSIONS, LEARNING ENVIRONMENT AND SUPPORT

 

  1. What are the admissions requirements?

 

The University’s standard admissions requirements can be found in the university regulations. Programme-specific requirements which are in addition to those regulations are given below. 

  • Foundation Degree in Marine Engineering.
  • HND in Marine Engineering plus additional bridging course of Further Mathematics.
  • STCW Chief Engineer Unlimited Certificate
  • STCW Second Engineer Unlimited Certificate with Chief Engineer Exemptions.

 

Can students enter with advanced standing?

Yes

 

 

 

  1. What kind of support and help will there be?
    1. in the department: describe the student support in place in the department/ faculty

In the event of any issues, the programme leader is the first port of call. If they are unable to help, they can direct students to the relevant services in the college.

 

  1. in the university as a whole:

The University provides a range of professional support services including health and well-being, counselling, disability support, and a Chaplaincy. Click on the links for further information.

 

  1. in a partner college:

Academic support is available as needed. Various tutorials run in the evening for students to attend if they wish. Lecturers are available outside class hours to advise and counsel students on their progress. The college library is open seven days a week and provides relevant resources to aid studied.

 

Al students are allocated a tutor, who they have regular contact time. The tutor will give guidance on study techniques, time management, etc. and speak with each student one-to-one. The tutor is available for advice on academic studies and also personal issues.

 

For blended learning students: the tutor will make arrangements to contact the student at regular intervals, at times convenient to both. This may be a combination of telephone calls, emails, instant messaging and video conferencing. Technical questions will be relayed to a subject specialist for give a response, or if necessary an additional meeting can be arranged with them.

 

Various support services are available within the college including counselling, financial advice, dyslexia support, college nurse, etc. All are accessible via Student Services.

 

 

  1. What resources will I have access to?

 

On campus

 

In a partner college

X

By distance learning

X

 

 

In partner college

Tick all that apply

General Teaching and Learning Space

X

IT

X

Library

X

VLE

X

Laboratory

X

Studio

 

Performance space

 

Other specialist

X

Technical resources 

X

 

Text for details listed above:

Specialist areas include extensive workshops with fully functioning marine motors, generators and switchboards. An industry leading simulator suite and modern navigational and communications equipment allow full investigation into systems, procedures and faults.

 

Via blended learning

Tick all that apply

General Teaching and Learning Space

X

IT

X

Library

X

VLE

X

Laboratory

 

Studio

 

Performance space

 

Other specialist

X

Technical resources 

 

 

 

Information about the University’s facilities can be found here.

 

Please see the relevant college prospectus or website for details of college learning resources if you are planning to study in one of our partner colleges.

 

  1. Are there any additional costs on top of the fees?

 

No, but all students buy some study materials such as books and provide their own basic study materials.

X

Yes (optional) All students buy some study materials such as books and provide their own basic study materials. In addition there are some are additional costs for optional activities associated with the programme (see below)

 

Yes (essential) All students buy some study materials such as books and provide their own basic study materials. In addition there are some are essential additional costs associated with the programme (see below)

 

 

  1. How are student views represented?

All taught programmes in the University have student representatives for each Stage (year-group) of each programme who meet in a Student-Staff Liaison Committee (SSLC) where they can raise students’ views and concerns. The Students’ Union and the faculties together provide training for student representatives. SSLCs and focus groups are also used to obtain student feedback on plans for developing existing programmes and designing new ones. Feedback on your programme is obtained every year through module questionnaires and informs the annual review of your programme. Student representatives are also invited to attend Programme and Module Studies Boards which manage the delivery and development of programmes and modules.  Various Faculty committees, particularly Faculty Student Success Committee, Academic Development Committee and Quality Management Sub-Committee also have student representation. This allows students to be involved in higher-level plans for teaching and learning. There is a parallel structure at university level on which students are represented by sabbatical officers who are the elected leaders of the Students’ Union.

The University’s student representation and feedback policy can be found here.

 

Undergraduate programmes only: Final-year students are also invited to complete a National Student Survey (NSS) which asks a standard set of questions across the whole country. The results of this are discussed at Programme Studies Boards and at Faculty Student Success Committee to identify good practice which can be shared and problems which need to be addressed. We rely heavily on student input to interpret the results of the NSS and ensure that we make the most appropriate changes.

 

Students will be invited to attend two different learner forums during their studies. The Higher Education Learner Forum is a college forum for all HE courses and meets termly. There are also programme specific learner forums, chaired by the programme leader, and these are also held termly. To ensure that the voice of the blended learning students is heard, each student will be asked prior to the meetings if they wish to submit anything for discussion. The minutes of these meetings will be forwarded to all.

 

SECTION G QUALITY MANAGEMENT 

 

  1. National subject benchmarks

 

The Quality Assurance Agency for Higher Education publishes benchmark statements which give guidance as to the skills and knowledge which graduates in various subjects and in certain types of degree are expected to have. These can be found here.

 

Are there any benchmark statements for this programme?

 

NO

 

The subject benchmark(s) for this programme is/are:

 

There are no benchmarks for this programme.

 

The QAA also publishes a Framework for Higher Education Qualifications (FHEQ) which defines the generic skills and abilities expected of students who have achieved awards at a given level and with which our programmes align. The FHEQ can be found here.

 

  1. How are the quality and standards of the programme assured?

 

The programme is managed and quality assured through the University’s standard processes. Programmes are overseen by Module and Programme Studies Boards which include student representatives. Each year each module leader provides a brief report on the delivery of the module, identifying strengths and areas for development, and the programme team reviews the programme as a whole.  The purpose of this is to ensure that the programme is coherent and up-to-date, with suitable progression from one Stage to another, and a good fit (alignment)  between what is taught and how students learn and are assessed - the learning outcomes, content and types of teaching, learning and assessment. Student achievement, including progress between Stages of the programme and degree classification, is kept under review. The programme review report is sent to the Faculty Quality Management Sub-Committee which in turn reports issues to the University’s Quality Management Sub-Committee (QMSC) and Academic Development Committee (ADC).

 

External examiners are appointed to oversee and advise on the assessment of the programme. They ensure that the standards of the programme are comparable with those of similar programmes elsewhere in the UK and are also involved in the assessment process to make sure that it is fair. They are invited to comment on proposed developments to the programme. Their reports are sent to the Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Academic) as well as to the Faculty so that issues of concern can be addressed.

 

All programmes are reviewed by the University on a six-yearly cycle to identify good practice and areas for enhancement. Programmes are revalidated through this review process. These reviews include at least one academic specialist in the subject area concerned from another UK university. The University is subject to external review by the Quality Assurance Agency for Higher Education on a six-year cycle. Their review reports for Sunderland can be found here.

 

Further information about our quality processes can be found here.

 

Please also complete the SITS form.

 

  1. Teaching, learning and assessment matrix

 

NB Text in the table below is an example. You will need some means of cross-referring to each of the learning outcomes (LO) specified for the programme. Here they are labelled LO / S (for skills) / 1, 2 etc.; LO / K (for knowledge) / 1, 2 etc. but you do not need to follow that approach. One matrix sheet must be completed for each stage of the programme.

 

 



Stage 3 semester 1

 

Module

Code

Core / optional

Modes of T&L

Modes of Assessment

S1

S2

S3

K1

K2

K3

Applied mechanics

ST60

Core

Lectures, seminars, laboratory

Lab report, exam

D

T, A

D

T, A

T, A

D

Energy conversion systems

ST61

Core

Lectures, seminars, laboratory

Lab report, exam

D

T, A

D

 

D

D

Marine propulsion systems analysis

ST62

Core

Lectures, seminars, practicals

2 written assignments, exam

D

D

D

T, A

D

T, A

 

Stage 3 semester 2

 

Module

Code

Core / optional

Modes of T&L

Modes of Assessment

S4

S5

S6

S7

S8

K4

K5

K6

Vessel dynamics and materials

ST63

Core

Lectures, seminars, practicals

Assignment, exam, lab report

T, A

D, A

T, A

T, A

D

T, A

D

D

Marine propulsion design

ST64

Core

Tutorials, seminars, practicals

2 design assignments, log book

T, A

D, A

D, A

T, A

D, A

D, A

T, A

D, A

Project

ST65

Core

Tutorials, seminars

2 written reports, oral presentation

D, A

T, A

D, A

D, A

D, A

D, A

D

D, A

 

D = Developed, T = Taught; A = Assessed