Attachments

 

Quality Handbook

 

 

 

Postgraduate Programme Specification

 

 

SECTION A: CORE INFORMATION

  1.  

Name  of programme:

Tourism and Hospitality

 

  1.  

Award title:

MSc Tourism and Hospitality

PGCert HE Tourism and Hospitality

PGDip HE Tourism and Hospitality

 

  1.  

Programme linkage:

 

Is this part of group of linked programmes between which students can transfer at agreed points? (e.g. a group of programmes with a common set of taught modules)

Yes

 

If yes:

This programme is one of a group of related programmes which also includes:

 

MSc Tourism and Events

 

It is possible to transfer between these programmes at certain points. This may be subject to particular requirements.

 

  1.  

Is the programme a top-up only?

No

  1.  

Level of award:

Level 7

 

  1.  

Awarding body:

University of Sunderland

 

  1.  

Department:

Sunderland Business School

 

  1.  

Programme Studies Board:

Tourism, Hospitality and Events

 

  1.  

Programme Leader:

Dr Nicole Mitsche

 


 

  1. How and where can I study the programme?

 

At Sunderland:

 

Full-time on campus

X

Part-time on campus

X

As work-based learning full-time

 

As work-based learning part-time

 

As a full-time sandwich course

 

As a part-time sandwich course

 

By distance learning

 

 

At the University of Sunderland London campus: 

 

Full-time on campus

X

Part-time on campus

 

As work-based learning full-time

 

As work-based learning part-time

 

As a full-time sandwich course

 

As a part-time sandwich course

 

By distance learning

 

 

At a partner college:

 

Full-time in the UK 

 

Part-time in the UK

 

Full-time overseas

X

Part-time overseas

X

By distance learning

 

As a full-time sandwich course in the UK

 

As a part-time sandwich course in the UK

 

As a full-time sandwich course overseas

 

As a part-time sandwich course overseas

 

As work-based learning full-time in the UK 

 

As work-based learning part-time overseas

 

Other (please specify)

 

 

The London Campus teaches all parts of the programme using materials developed at the Sunderland Campus.  The London Campus also has a dissertation only route.

 

MDIS Singapore teaches all parts of the programme using materials developed under the approval of Sunderland Campus.

 

  1. How long does the programme take?

 

 

Min number of years / months

Max number of years / months

Full-time

1 year

4 years

Part-time

2 years

6 years

Distance learning

 

 

Work-based learning

 

 

 

For start-dates please see the current edition of the Prospectus or contact the relevant department at the University. For start-dates for programmes delivered in a partner college, please contact the college.

 

 

SECTION B – FURTHER CORE INFORMATION

 

Use Outline Programme Proposal Form for ADC, for questions 12 to 23

 

  1. Learning and teaching strategy.

 

The aim of the University’s LTA Strategy is to define for each member of the institution  the means by which the organisation of learning will contribute to the realisation of the University’s mission.  The Strategy is intended to establish objectives, plans and structures that will enable relevant aspects of the University’s ambitions to be achieved.  These ambitions include:      

  • sustaining the high quality of University awards
  • sustaining a high quality learning environment which enriches the student experience
  • widening participation to groups not yet in contact with higher education
  • fostering independence of learning, employability and the development of high order skills
  • utilising information and communications technology effectively to serve both staff and students and open up new markets for University provision

 

The objectives of the University’s LTA Strategy are to:

 

a)       provide a challenging up to date curriculum that is relevant to the development of the skills and knowledge our students need for employment, lifelong learning and intellectual fulfillment

b)       adopt best practice in the management of learning and assessment

c)       stimulate, motivate and monitor student activity and achievement across the range of outcomes specified for their award and beyond to the development of skills for life, employability and their role as citizens

d)      provide support which enhances the progression and retention of students

e)       provide an infrastructure of strategy, policy and resources which is robust and responsive to the changing demands of Higher Education in the 21st Century

f)        assure the quality of our academic provision and continually strive to enhance all aspects of quality

 

The Tourism, Hospitality and Events Department’s LTA Strategy is in keeping with the university wide strategy although tailored to suit the particular needs of the Department and our students.   The strategy is intended to establish objectives, plans and structures that will enable the Department’s ambitions to be achieved.  The aims are to achieve and sustain high quality in all aspects of programme delivery in order to enhance student experience, learning and employability. Meeting the aims and learning outcomes of the MSc Tourism and Events requires an LTA strategy that delivers relevant knowledge, encourages appropriate skills and provides suitable additional learning opportunities in order that students are equipped to act responsibly and positively in demanding and challenging subject areas. 

 

A student-centred approach, under which students are given considerable independence and responsibility and where students’ ideas, values and attitudes are valued, is a long-standing part of the ethos of the Department and has become a standard to which all of the programmes aspire. Similarly, a diverse range of assessment methods are employed throughout the programme that is appropriate to the learning outcomes of each of the modules.  Structured feedback on assessed work is provided through the Department’s feedback sheet attached to written assignments (which mirrors the generic marking criteria for postgraduate programmes) and is also provided electronically via the VLE.  Follow-up tutor meetings are also held to discuss feedback. Oral presentations are used in a formative environment and scheduled to provide students with feedback on their learning journey. Such structured feedback is viewed as fundamental to the LTA strategy. 

 

The objectives of the Tourism, Hospitality and Events Department’s LTA Strategy are:

 

Quality

  • To provide challenging and up-to-date curricula that are relevant to the development of the skills and knowledge our students need for employment, life-long learning and intellectual fulfillment
  • To adopt best practice in the management of learning and assessment
  • To stimulate, motivate and monitor student activity and achievement across the range of outcomes specified for their award
  • To provide support which enhances the progression and retention of students
  • To promote an interactive learning culture
  • To incorporate research agendas into learning and teaching practice

Personal Development

            To develop transferable skills through the embedding of the personal development planning and continuing professional development mechanisms

Independence

To continue to provide and develop carefully designed programmes and related learning and teaching modes which progressively nurture the emergence of able, autonomous and independent students.

To encourage critical thought and creativity

Widening Participation

To provide opportunities for widening participation and creation of new markets 

The differentiation of our range of programmes in order to address new markets

To facilitate and support progression from BSc to MSc levels 

Employability

To develop and deliver relevant curricula with learning experiences which reflect and capitalise on industry/community links

To continue to review, update and revise the curriculum to incorporate or reflect current practices and policies from industry and the community

To positively encourage staff to integrate Information and Communication Technologies into the curriculum.

 

Meeting the Objectives of the Department’s LTA Strategy

Carefully balanced assessment regimes and appropriate feedback are critical to learner development and to the meeting of the objectives of the LTA strategy. Assessment tasks throughout the programmes have formative and summative roles. Some tasks are designed to put students through processes of developing new skills, while others enable the course team to judge whether learning outcomes have been achieved and to what standard. A wide-range of assessment methods are used in order to adequately assess the meeting of module learning outcomes, and to ensure that programme knowledge and skills outcomes are also met. Assessments set clearly match the learning outcomes in terms of subject-specific knowledge and skills. The graded assessment criteria set out in each module guide informs students of the degrees of proficiency and skills required in order to achieve marks within particular degree classifications for each piece of work.  Feedback to students failing assessments or achieving lower marks explicitly flags deficiencies in terms of the meeting of learning outcomes.

 

See Appendix 2 – Matrix of Modes of teaching, Learning and Assessment

See Appendix 3 – Postgraduate Generic Assessment Criteria

 

  1. Retention strategy

 

The extensive student support services and facilities provided by the University and the Faculty are intended to contribute significantly to student retention as described in the Student Support Section of this document.  In addition registers are taken weekly for each module and used to determine which students are not engaging with their programme of study and to ensure that appropriate follow-up is undertaken to address this. 

 

  1. Any other information

 

 

SECTION C - TEACHING AND LEARNING

 

  1. What is the programme about?

 

The program aims:

 

(1)    To enhance students’ understanding of the nature, global complexity and range of impacts  of the tourism and hospitality industries and the  interrelationships between  them

(2)    To enable students to critically apply social science and management theories,  concepts and frameworks to enhance their knowledge of tourism and hospitality

(3)    To professionalise the tourism and hospitality industries through the development of higher level thinking, problem solving and practical management skills

(4)    To develop students ability to think creatively and independently through planning and conducting research and effectively communicating findings in oral and written formats

 

  1. What will I know or be able to do at the end of the programme?

 

Learning Outcomes Postgraduate Certificate – Skills

By the end of this part of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

  • S1. Utilised an appropriate range of approaches in design and appraisal of tourism and hospitality development(s).
  • S2. Demonstrated the ability to analyse, synthesise and diagnose issues and opportunities in tourism and hospitality
  • S3. Reflected critically on the relationship between theory and practice in tourism and hospitality.

 

Learning Outcomes Postgraduate Certificate – Knowledge

By the end of this part of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

  • K1. Demonstrated advanced knowledge of theories and practices pertinent to tourism and hospitality.
  • K2. Critically evaluated current research and scholarship relating to tourism and hospitality development.
  • K3. Evaluated the implications of the globalisation of tourism and hospitality development and management.

 

  Learning Outcomes Postgraduate Diploma – Skills

By the end of this part of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

  • S4. Demonstrated creativity in the application of understanding of tourism and hospitality management and development.
  • S5. Demonstrated the ability to engage and influence others in rational, informed and reasoned argument pertaining to tourism and hospitality issues.

 

Learning Outcomes Postgraduate Diploma – Knowledge

By the end of this part of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

  • K4. Demonstrated an advanced knowledge and systematic understanding of a range of hospitality and tourism products in the context of synergies between tourism and events.
  • K5.  Critically evaluated policies and practices commonly used in tourism and hospitality management and development.

 

Learning Outcomes Masters – Skills

By the end of this part of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

  • S6. Demonstrated self-direction and originality and autonomy in tackling and solving problems
  • S7.  Played a pro-active role in personal and professional development.

 

Learning Outcomes Masters – Knowledge

By the end of this part of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

  • K6. Contributed to theoretical or professional innovation in the field of tourism and hospitality.

 

  1. What will the programme consist of?

 

Taught postgraduate programmes generally consist of a number of taught modules leading to the award of a Postgraduate Certificate (60 credits) or Postgraduate Diploma (120 credits). A Masters qualification (180 credits) usually culminates in a major piece of independent work such as a project or dissertation. All modules are at postgraduate level (level 7 in the UK’s national scheme). The summary below describes briefly what is contained in the programme. The programme structure, including a detailed list of modules, can be found in the programme regulations.

 

The programme consists of four (4) taught modules all of which are core to the programme and a major project.  These are briefly described below:

 

Semester 1

Research Methods for the Services Sector – this module focuses on developing students’ knowledge and skills in the key theories, methodologies, philosophies and methods adopted in tourism, hospitality, aviation and events research.  It includes practical workshops where students’ are enabled to develop skills in using quantitative data analysis software.  This module is important as it provides a foundation for students to undertake their independent research project in Semester 3.

 

Tourism Concepts and Issues  - This module introduces the complex and ever exciting world of tourism.. The module addresses three basic questions. First, it asks how we can understand tourism as a social and cultural practice.  The second question concerns tourist subjectivities. The final question addresses the spatial dimension of tourism, what sort of places tourism generates, including hospitality and events. While sitting firmly within the Social Sciences, the module will include perspectives from different disciplines. This eclecticism serves to emphasize the multiple connections and dimensions of tourism.

 

Semester 2

Current Practices in the Visitor Economy - This module is conceived as an open platform for students to engage with current practices in tourism, hospitality, aviation and events. The module offers the opportunity to gain an inside knowledge of current trends in these industries and as such the module content will change from year to year as new developments occur in these fields. Important to this module is an optional residential field trip to a UK destination where students will be able to understand current practices through first-hand experience of the management of these industries.

Hospitality Management StudiesThis module is intended to provide a solid introduction to hospitality as a global industry and covers key issues such as the complex structure of the industry particularly in terms of ownership, and employment practices.  The module also addresses the industry’s impacts in terms of triple bottom line indicators (economic, socio-cultural and environmental).  The module uses a range of teaching and learning methods including hospitality case studies.

 

Semester 3

Tourism and Hospitality Major Project – this is an independent piece of work which is integral to achieving the Master degree.  In this module students are expected to critically apply the knowledge and skills acquired throughout the course of the programme to a tourism or hospitality related research project.

 

In order to achieve a PGCert in Tourism and Hospitality you must achieve a minimum pass in two modules, namely Tourism Concepts and Issues and Hospitality Management Studies.  In order to achieve a PGDip in Tourism and Hospitality you must achieve a pass in all four core modules.  The MSc Tourism and Hospitality  will be awarded to those students who achieve a pass in all four core modules plus the Tourism and Hospitality major project module.

 

  1. How will I be taught?

 

Scheduled teaching activities

X

Independent study

X

Placement

 

 

The main teaching and learning methods employed are a combination of lectures, seminars, workshops, group work, fieldwork, laboratory-based work, WWW-based work, library-based work, case studies  and most critically, independent study.  Lectures provide the theoretical underpinning of the fields of tourism and events while seminars provide more interactive opportunities to raise questions and debates individually and in groups and to apply theories and principles learned in lectures to practical case study examples.  Workshops provide hands on experience especially of using quantitative data analysis software while field visits enable students to be able to understand the management and development of the tourism and hospitality industries in a real life context.

 

The focus is on doing, as well as retrieving and processing information. In Semester 3 students are expected to conduct a major piece of independent research involving both field work and reference to suitable academic books, journals, visual aids, and the WWW.  Additionally, at this stage of the programme students will be more responsible for their own time and management of their project which will encourage the development of efficient working practices and the production of higher level graduates who are confident and capable of coping with the pressures prevalent in the tourism and hospitality industries. Meeting the aims and learning outcomes of the programme requires a learning strategy which delivers relevant knowledge, and encourages appropriate skills in order to equip students to act responsibly and positively in demanding and challenging subject areas. A student-centred approach, under which students are given considerable independence and responsibility and where ideas, values and attitudes are valued, is a long-standing part of the ethos of the Tourism, Hospitality and Events Department. 

 

Extensive use is made of the virtual learning environment by all members of the Department.  All modules on existing tourism programmes have a substantial presence that includes module guides, lecture presentations, guidance notes, glossaries, discussion boards and other related materials.  Assignments are submitted online and feedback is normally provided electronically.  The Tourism, Hospitality and Events Department have been at the forefront of the development and application of the VLE, making use of programme space, module space and discussion tools from an early stage. 

 

A list of the modules in the programme can be found in the Programme Regulations.

 

A summary of the types of teaching, learning and assessment in each module of the programme can be found in the Matrix of Modes of Teaching at Appendix 2

 

  1. How will I be assessed and given feedback?

 

Written examinations

 

Coursework

X

Practical assessments

X

 

A summary of the types of teaching, learning and assessment in each module of the programme can be found in the Matrix of Modes of Teaching.

 

The generic assessment criteria which we use can be found here. Some programmes use subject-specific assessment criteria which are based on the generic ones.

 

This programme uses the Generic University Assessment Criteria

YES

 

This programme uses the Subject Specific Assessment Criteria

 

NO

 

The University regulations can be found here.

 

Carefully balanced assessment regimes and appropriate feedback are critical to learner development. Assessment tasks throughout the programme have formative and summative roles. Some tasks are designed to put students through processes of developing new skills, while others enable the programme team to judge whether learning outcomes have been achieved and to what standard. The Tourism, Hospitality and Events Department use a wide-range of assessment methods in order to adequately assess the meeting of module learning outcomes, and to ensure that programme knowledge and skills outcomes are also met. The precise mixture of these assessment methods varies across the modules. 

 

Assessment methods include the following:

 

  • word-processed assignments;
  • practical exercises, based particularly around fieldwork and field study visits;
  • case study analyses
  • seminar presentations; and
  • the major project. 

 

The major project forms a substantial element of the MSc assessment regime.  It requires the application of a high degree of applied intellectual analysis, and ultimately assesses the ability to formulate a coherent research proposal, devise an appropriate strategy for meeting research aims, conduct careful research, and evaluate and conclude upon study findings with reference to appropriate academic literature. In the major project module, students define the topic and manner of investigation in negotiation with their supervisor.  A research proposal is developed by all students, in consultation with tutors, and put forward for approval by the module teaching team. There is considerable choice of topic for the major project, but all have to be relevant to Tourism and/or Hospitality.  All major projects have to exhibit a clear thread of argument, a firm database, an appropriate degree of evaluation, critical analysis and synthesis, and conclusions and/or recommendations.

 

While it is difficult to predict individual research interests and enthusiasms, the kinds of major projects that we would expect students to complete might include investigations in the following broad topic areas:

 

                   Hospitality Supply and Demand

                   Marketing and E-Marketing for tourism and hospitality businesses

                   Human Resource Management in hospitality

                   Customer satisfaction in hospitality

                   New trends in accommodation provision

                   Service quality in hospitality environments

 

The assessment procedure is secure and fair and is regularly monitored. Broader and deeper monitoring takes place through the University of Sunderland and Faculty of Business, Law and Tourism annual monitoring procedures.  Each module is entirely marked by one member of staff to ensure consistency within the module, while moderation by a colleague ensures consistency and rigour across the programme.  This consistency, rigour and fairness is further enhanced as a result of the sampling of all modules by the external examiner as a part of his/her broader remit.  Major Projects are marked by the supervisor and are all (100%) moderated by another member of staff.    

 

Feedback to students on assignments is important in consolidating achieved learning outcomes as well as flagging shortcomings in assessed work and providing guidance on future direction.  The Tourism, Hospitality and Events Team endeavours to provide feedback within the recommended 4 week period through written comments on assignment submission sheets and returning an original and annotated script to the student.  Particular assessments (e.g. major projects) additionally require a particular format (e.g. feedback forms, interviews) for the provision of written or verbal feedback.  Notable in this regard is the Tourism and Hospitality Major Project module which  incorporates verbal and written feedback on sample chapters as a part of guidance through the halfway point of the research project. Module Leaders and the Programme Leader are also usually available to provide additional feedback, guidance and support for any student either desiring or requiring such. 

 

The Academic Misconduct Regulations and associated guidance can be found here. It is the responsibility of students to ensure they are familiar with their responsibilities in regards to assessment and the implications of an allegation of academic misconduct.

 

Students should refer to the University Regulations for information on degree classifications.

 

 

  1. Teaching, learning and assessment matrix (see Appendix 2)

 

  1. How does research influence the programme? 

 

The majority of staff in the Tourism, Hospitality and Events Department have, or are pursuing their PhD degrees. A particular strength of the tourism, hospitality and events teaching is that it is underpinned by existing and emerging research strengths. The research being undertaken within the staff team directly feeds into the teaching on this programme.  The module contents reflect the current research undertaken by staff.  Research knowledge and skills are developed in the Critical Theories and Methods for Tourism, Hospitality and Events module in Semester 1 and in the Major project module in Semester 3.  The Research Board at the entrance to the Faculty illustrates some of the areas of research in which staff are engaged.  The Department has developed a successful strategy for carefully managing the administration of research excellence framework capability funds. The Team of eight full-time staff are all research active and produces work of national and international excellence that feeds directly into specialist teaching in this programme .Similarly, the Tourism, Hospitality and Events Team has substantial consultancy, applied research and reach-out experience – this enables both the incorporation of case-studies into teaching and the facilitation of presentations by industrial practitioners.

 

 

SECTION D EMPLOYABILITY

 

  1. How will the programme prepare me for employment?

 

The programme gives you the opportunity to develop advanced skills and knowledge which you can use in the future. Some postgraduate programmes are associated with a particular career path but most skills can be applied to a range of employment situations. The skills which this programme is designed to develop are listed below.

 

This programme enables students to develop generic skills in a number of areas which will prepare them for higher level employment within the tourism and events industries.  These skills are mirrored in the Programme Learning outcomes and are developed in all the core modules and the major project.  These include:

  • the ability to utilise an  appropriate range of approaches in design and appraisal of tourism and events development(s).
  • the ability to analyse, synthesise and diagnose issues and opportunities in tourism and events
  • the ability to reflect critically  on the relationship between theory and practice in tourism and events.
  • creativity in the application of understanding of tourism and events management and development.
  • the ability to engage and influence others in rational, informed and reasoned argument pertaining to tourism and events issues.
  • self-direction, originality and autonomy in tackling and solving problems
  • the ability to be pro-active in personal and professional development.

 

The award will also enable students to progress into higher study and research.  Students completing this programme are expected to assume career paths which might include:

 

There are also opportunities for on-campus students outside your programme of study

 

From time to time opportunities to engage in volunteering or paid part time work is circulated to students so that they might be able to hone their practical skills in tourism and /or events.  Indeed students are actively encouraged to take up these opportunities as and when they arise.

 

For information about other opportunities available to our students who study on campus, click here.

 

Additional opportunities to develop your experiences more widely will vary if you study at one of our partner colleges. For information about the extra-curricular activities available in any of our colleges please contact the college direct. 

 

  1. Particular features of the qualification

 

  1. Professional statutory or regulatory body (PSRB) accreditation.

 

PSRB accreditation is not relevant to this programme 

x

PSRB accreditation is currently being sought for this programme

 

This programme currently has PSRB accreditation

 

The programme is currently accredited until: N/A

 

The relevant PSRB(s) is/are: N/A

 

The terms of the accreditation are as follows: N/A

 

The programme is recognised as: N/A

 

The programme is accredited dependent on: N/A

 

This depends upon successful completion of the programme.

 

There are programme-specific regulations relating to the following. Details are given in the programme regulations:

 

The modules to be studied

 

Pass-marks for some or all modules and/or parts

(elements) of modules 

 

Placement requirements

 

Attendance requirements

 

Professional practice requirements

 

Final or overall mark for the award  

 

Other 

 

 

 

 

Interim or exit awards are not accredited. 

 

 

 

SECTION E PROGRAMME STRUCTURE AND REGULATIONS

 

Please complete and insert Part B of the Programme Regulations Form, for questions 37 and 39

 

 

SECTION F ADMISSIONS, LEARNING ENVIRONMENT AND  SUPPORT

 

  1. What are the admissions requirements?

 

The University’s standard admissions requirements can be found in the university regulations.

Programme-specific requirements which are in addition to those regulations are given below. 

 

The minimum qualification for entry to the programme is normally a good Honours Degree or other qualifications or appropriate experience deemed to be equivalent. Our expectation is that in most cases this experience would amount to at least one year of full-time experience or the equivalent at a supervisory or managerial level. It is anticipated that students will come from a variety of backgrounds and with a variety of different qualifications, sometimes form unrelated disciplines.  Non standard-entry applications might be considered by following the University’s APL procedures on an individual basis. The decision is made by the programme leader.

 

Candidates must also demonstrate the University’s required proficiency in English language for Masters study if English is not their first language.

 

Can students enter with advanced standing?

 

No

 

If yes, to which Stages?

Stage 1

 

Stage 2

 

Stage 3

 

Stage 4

 

 

If yes, with what qualifications?

 

The University has a process by which applicants whose experience to date already covers one or more modules of the programme they are applying for may seek Accreditation of Prior Learning (APL). Full details can be found here but if you think that this may be relevant to you, please contact the department which offers the programme you are interested in.

 

  1. What kind of support and help will there be?
    1. in the department: describe the student support in place in the department/ faculty

 

A number of mechanisms and facilities are in place to support students.  The programme leader and module leaders will ordinarily be available to assist with day-to-day problems and to dispense study advice and pastoral support. The Programme Leader will ensure that students have completed core modules and sufficient credits for progression between awards. Meetings with student representatives will take place formally at both module and programme boards, and discussion meetings are held informally during each semester.

 

Induction support will be provided for all new students studying programmes. During week ‘zero’ each year, the Programme Leader will arrange an agenda which includes discussion of the programme handbook. The handbook will include guidance on programme structure, introduction to University structures and the campus, channels of communication, student resources and all student services, and study skills.

 

Careers information and guidance is available to students from tutors, through the Personal Development Planning process and from the University Careers Advisory Service. Students can meet with personal tutors during the year to discuss personal goals, intentions and how these can be met. In particular, tutors work with students on job search and application skills (e.g. CV preparation). Additionally, the University Careers Advisory Service is publicised on notice boards, all students will have details in their programme handbooks and a representative will deliver an information session tailored to students studying these Programmes. The service offers specialist advice regarding career opportunities and module choices, and provides a comprehensive range of help and facilities including:

 

          Assistance with CVs and applications

          Employer information

          Vacation work

          Company and career presentations

          Computer-aided guidance

 

All on-campus students have access to the University’s central support services including Counselling, Disability Service, Health and Well-being, Chaplaincy, financial support and advice, International Office and Careers and Employability Service. The Students’ Union provides an independent service which offers advice and support across the full range of personal and academic problems which students may encounter. Students wishing to lodge a complaint or an appeal can seek advice from the Students Union or from Academic Services. Full details of all these services can be found on the University’s web-site. Where appropriate, staff in the Faculty will sign-post students to these specialist services.

 

  1. in the university as a whole:

The University provides a range of professional support services including wellbeing, counselling, disability support, and a Chaplaincy. Click on the links for further information.

 

  1. in a partner college:

Please see the relevant college prospectus or website for details of student support if you are planning to study in one of our partner colleges.

 

  1. What resources will I have access to?

On campus

General Teaching and Learning Space

IT

Library

VLE

Laboratory

 

Studio

 

Performance space

 

Other specialist

 

Technical resources 

 

 

Information about the University’s facilities can be found here.

 

University Library & Study Skills Services, (ULSSS), supports students with the provision of a high quality learning environment, comprehensive print and online resource collections, 1400 study places, 300+ PCs, My Module Resources and study skills support.

 

All students have the full use of the University’s two libraries. The libraries are open extensive hours and are staffed for 59 hours a week, including weekends and evenings.  During core teaching weeks, The Murray library is open 24x7 and St Peters library is open until 12 midnight.

 

The ULSSS web site www.library.sunderland.ac.uk provides a gateway to information resources and services for students both on and off campus. Tailored resources and support are available from specific subject areas of the ULSSS web site and a ‘Live Chat’ function enables student to access library support and help 24/7.

 

My Module Resources https://moduleresources.sunderland.ac.uk/

Module reading lists are live interactive resource lists available from within online module spaces on the VLE and the University’s library website.

 

What do you get?

  • Real time library information, both availability and location of print books, plus being able to place reservations on books that are already on loan
  • Allows you to set up RSS alerts for changes and additions to your Module Resource  list
  • Smartphone and tablet friendly – providing QR capture, touch screen functionality and e-resource access

 

How does this help you?

  • Getting the right resources easily from flexible access points
  • Receive guidance from your tutor on what to read  at a point of need by using search filters
  • Access to a wider range of resources to support learning.

 

Study Skills Support

University Library Services includes a robust study skills support offer, available to all our students across the University both on and off campus, contributing to students’ attainment and the quality of their experience.

 

Skills delivery options include:

  • Online Skills Support including:  videos, webinars and Skype sessions and online tutorials. Online assignment drop-ins using Live Chat will be held weekly to engage those students not on campus and provide additional support at the point of contact.
  • On campus assignment skills drop-in events throughout key teaching weeks when students are encouraged to attend with any assignment queries.
  • Embedded skills sessions - Throughout teaching periods embedded skills sessions are a key element to support academic learning. Study skills support team and Liaison Librarians continue to cultivate relationships and provide the support necessary in their subject areas.
  • Dissertation workshops - Dissertation skills support will be provided in early June to ‘Kickstart your Dissertation’. Bookable workshops will be held demonstrating how to begin a dissertation, using University library resources to support your work, and managing references for a substantial project. Sessions will be cross-subject focusing on the skills and resources required for completing a dissertation.
  • One to One - Study Skills Advisers will be on hand to advise and support students in a range of study skills including: effective reading, reporting writing, academic writing and referencing, note taking, critical thinking, analysis and evaluation, reflective writing, group work and presentation skills. Sessions will be booked centrally, catering for embedded academic sessions, study groups and 1 to 1 advice. For those studying independently away from the university campus, 1 to 1 support is available via Skype.

If an embedded skills session best suits student learning outcomes, academic staff will be asked to complete an online request form so that a session can be arranged.

The request form is available from: library.sunderland.ac.uk/services-and-support/services-for-staff/.

 

Access to other libraries

There may be occasions when students studying postgraduate programmes would find it useful to use other university libraries for their studies, in addition to the resources available at the University of Sunderland. Postgraduate students may be able to borrow items or to access collections on a reference basis at a number of institutions throughout the UK by joining the Sconul Access Scheme. www.access.sconul.ac.uk

 

Please see the relevant college prospectus or website for details of college learning resources if you are planning to study in one of our partner colleges.

 

  1. Are there any additional costs on top of the fees?

 

No, but all students buy some study materials such as books and provide their own basic study materials.

 

Yes (optional) All students buy some study materials such as books and provide their own basic study materials. In addition there are some are additional costs for optional activities associated with the programme (see below)

x

Yes (essential) All students buy some study materials such as books and provide their own basic study materials. In addition there are some are essential additional costs associated with the programme (see below)

 

 

There is an optional field visit that runs in the second semester and which is associated with the module ‘Current Practices in Tourism, Hospitality and Events. This visit is normally residential lasting over 3 or 4 days and is normally to a UK city destination where tourism, hospitality and events are central to the regeneration and the economic and social life of the city.  This visit is highly recommended but is optional. The estimated cost of the visit is £200.

 

  1. How are student views represented?

All taught programmes in the University have student representatives for each programme who meet in a Student-Staff Liaison Committee (SSLC) where they can raise students’ views and concerns. The Students’ Union and the faculties together provide training for student representatives. SSLCs and focus groups are also used to obtain student feedback on plans for developing existing programmes and designing new ones. Feedback on your programme is obtained every year through module questionnaires and informs the annual review of your programme. Student representatives are also invited to attend Programme and Module Studies Boards which manage the delivery and development of programmes and modules.  Faculty Academic Committee also has student representation. This allows students to be involved in higher-level plans for teaching and learning. At university level students are represented on University level Committees by sabbatical officers who are the elected leaders of the Students’ Union.

 

The University’s student representation and feedback policy can be found here.

 

Every two years we participate in the national Postgraduate Taught Experience Survey (PTES) which is run by the Higher Education Academy.

 

Programmes offered in partner colleges: If you are studying in one of our partner colleges the college will have its own mechanisms for obtaining student feedback. Some of these may be the same as those on-campus at the University but others may be different. You should ask your college for further information.

 

For distance learning operated from Sunderland: if you are studying by distance learning you will have slightly different arrangements from those used on campus. In particular you  are likely to have virtual rather than physical meetings and discussions. However these arrangements  should provide comparable opportunities for you to give feedback. Details are given below.  

 

The staff in the Tourism, Hospitality and Events Department also ensures that students are able to meet with them on a regular basis either face to face, through the VLE or through email.  Staff in the Department also regularly uses social media platforms such as Facebook to communicate with students

 

 

SECTION G QUALITY MANAGEMENT 

 

  1. National subject benchmarks

 

The Quality Assurance Agency for Higher Education publishes benchmark statements which give guidance as to the skills and knowledge which graduates in various subjects and in certain types of degree are expected to have. They do not cover all subjects at postgraduate level but those which exist can be found at here.

 

Are there any benchmark statements for this programme?

 

No

 

The subject benchmark(s) for this programme is/are:

 

There is no specific subject benchmark statement for Masters level programmes in Tourism and Hospitality but the programme does draw on the QAA Benchmark statements for Masters programmes in Business and Management

 

The QAA also publishes a Framework for Higher Education Qualifications (FHEQ) which defines the generic skills and abilities expected of students who have achieved awards at a given level and with which our programmes align. The FHEQ can be found here.

 

  1. How are the quality and standards of the programme assured?

 

The programme is managed and quality assured through the University’s standard processes. Programmes are overseen by Module and Programme Studies Boards which include student representatives. Each year each module leader provides a brief report on the delivery of the module, identifying strengths and areas for development, and the programme team reviews the programme as a whole.  The purpose of this is to ensure that the programme is coherent and up-to-date, with suitable progression through the programme, and a good fit (alignment) between what is taught and how students learn and are assessed - the learning outcomes, content and types of teaching, learning and assessment. Student achievement, including progress through the programme and the way in which the final award is made, is kept under review. The programme review report is sent to the Programme Studies Board and the Faculty in turn reports issues to the University’s Quality Management Sub-Committee (QMSC).

 

External examiners are appointed to oversee and advise on the assessment of the programme. They ensure that the standards of the programme are comparable with those of similar programmes elsewhere in the UK and are also involved in the assessment process to make sure that it is fair. They are invited to comment on proposed developments to the programme. Their reports are sent to the Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Academic) as well as to the Faculty so that issues of concern can be addressed.

 

All programmes are reviewed by the University on a six-yearly cycle to identify good practice and areas for enhancement. Programmes are revalidated through this review process. These reviews include at least one academic specialist in the subject area concerned from another UK university. Quality Assurance Agency (QAA) review reports for Sunderland can be found here.

 

Further information about our quality processes can be found here.


 

Quality Handbook

 

 

Appendix 1

SITS SUMMARY PROGRAMME/SHORT COURSE DETAILS

(Form to be completed electronically by the Faculty and forwarded to the Quality Support Officer supporting the Approval event, or sent to Planning & MI for faculty devolved processes before sending to Quality Support (with the exception of Short Courses and GRS))

This form is to be completed when a new programme has been validated and approved so that the programme codes and progression and awards rules can be set up in SITS.  This also needs to be completed at periodic course review when there have been significant modifications to the course.

 

Please note that all details entered onto this form will go onto every student’s record that is attached to this programme and it is therefore imperative that the information is correct. 

 

1 Programme Details

New/ Modification/Review:

Please ensure the minor modification document is included

Modification

Full Programme Title:

MSc Tourism and Hospitality

If replacement for existing course, specify title and course code:

 

Qualification Aim:

e.g. Foundation degree of Science, Bachelor of Arts (Honours)

MSc

Qualification Level (NQF level):

7

JACS 3.0 code

JACS code = e.g. (V100) History, (I100) Computing Science, etc. See HESA Website https://www.hesa.ac.uk/jacs3

N832

Is the programme Open or Closed:

A course is defined as closed when specifically designed for a certain group of people and not also available to other suitably qualified candidates. It may be designed for a particular company however if the same course is also run for other suitably qualified candidates, not employed by the company, then the course is not closed.

Open

Faculty and School:

Business, Law and Tourism

Sunderland Business School

Location of study:

e.g. SAGE, Sunderland in London, Sunderland

Sunderland

Last Date Registration (PBI) Number of days:

The number of days after the start date of the course that it is possible for students to register onto it. It is also referred to as the migration date.

 

Programme Leader:

Dr Nicole Mitsche

Academic Team for the programme:

Tourism, Hospitality and Events

Date of Approval/Modification/Review:

April 2018 (Modification)

Date of next review (QS to complete):

2021/2022

Accrediting Body or PSRB
If yes please attach a completed PSRB form

No

 

Programme Specific Regulations

If yes, please attach a completed Programme Specific Regulations form

No

 

Does this programme come under the Key Information Set return?

If yes, please attach a completed KIS form

No

Is this an undergraduate programme whose primary (but not necessarily only) purpose is to improve the effectiveness of practitioners registered with a professional body? If yes, please specify which body:

http://www.hefce.ac.uk/media/HEFCE,2014/Content/Pubs/2016/201622/HEFCE2016_22.pdf  (Page 88, paragraph f)

e.g. a short course aimed at registered nurses

No


Professional Body:

 

 

Interim  Awards

If a student does not achieve their qualification aim, what lower awards might they be entitled to, assuming they have the credits?  The subject title for any lower level award should be given where this is different from the subject of the qualification aim.

 

Interim Award Title

Credits Required

Interim Structure

Please show mandatory requirements if applicable e.g. core module codes

1

Postgraduate Certificate Tourism and Hospitality

60

It is required to achieve a pass in the following two modules:

  • CHTM35 Tourism Concepts and Issues
  • CHTM27 Hospitality Management Studies

2

Postgraduate Diploma Tourism and Hospitality

120

It is required to achieve a pass in the following four core modules:

  • CHTM35 Tourism Concepts and Issues
  • CHTM38 Research Methods for the Service Sector
  • CHTM27 Hospitality Management Studies
  • CHTM37 Current Practices in the Visitor Economy

3

 

 

 

 

Combined Subjects Programmes only

Will the subject run as Major/Minor/Dual:

 

Any subject(s) not permitted to be combined with this subject:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2 Mode Of Attendance

01                          Full-time

Full-time students are those expected to study for more than 24 weeks per year, for a minimum of 21 hours per week and are paying the full-time fee.

02                          Other Full-time

Students who attend full-time for a period less than 24 weeks per year

 

31Part-time

Students who are expected to study for less than 21 hours per week.

31Part-time at Full-time Rate

Students who are studying full-time credits over part-time attendance

 

 

 

3 Admissions

An admissions or MCR code will be created to allow student applications.

Tick appropriate

UUCAS

Universities and Colleges Admission Services

Required for full-time undergraduate programmes only.

 

DDirect Entry

Required for FT, PT, PG and PGR, only where students will be admitted though the admissions teams or where the programme needs to be advertised on the web

GGTTR

Graduate Teacher Training Registry

Education only, where applicable

 

 

 

4Collaborative Provision

UK

 

Overseas

 

Institution

Collaborative Model

Funding Arrangements

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

5aCourse Block

Full-time - Overall length of the programme in months:

12 months

Part-time - Overall length of the programme in months:

24 months

Does this course offer a sandwich placement?

If yes, please indicate which programme year this placement is to take place.

No

Programme Year:

Is this compulsory or optional?

Compulsory/Optional

Does this course offer a study abroad year out? If yes, please indicate which programme year this placement is to take place.

No

Programme Year:

Is this compulsory or optional?

Compulsory/Optional

 

 

 

6   Major Source of Funding

Please note this relates to funding for the programme and not individual students

HEFCE

Higher Education Funding Council for England

Skills Funding Agency/EFA/Degree Apprenticeship

 

NCTL

National College for Teaching and Leadership

 

Wholly NHS Funded

Partially NHS Funded

Departments of Health/NHS/Social Care. For all Health funded programmes please indicate whether the programme is eligible for an NHS Bursary

-  Eligible for NHS BursaryY/N

 

 

 

Standard Fee

If no then the Learning Resources Form should be attached

Yes/No

Other Funding:

 

– Please Specify:

 

 

7   Education Programmes Only

This section must be completed for any programmes marked above as ‘NCTL’ funded

Teacher Training Identifier:

 

Teacher Training Scope:

 

Qualification Aim:

QTS and academic award, QTS only, QTS by assessment only

 

 

 

   DETAILS SUPPLIED BY:………………………………………        DATE:………………………..

 

 


Module List

Award, Route (if applicable) and Level

New/

Existing/ Modified  Module (N/E/MM)

Module Title

Module Code

Module Credit Value

Whether core or option

Must choose (ie designated option):

Assessment weighting – give % weight for each assessment item

Pre-/co-requisites

Other comment (if required)

Date of Entry on SITS.

N/MM only

( After event)

JACS Code

PGCert, PGDip, MSc

E

Tourism Concepts and Issues

CHTM35

30

Core

Yes

30% Review

70% Essay

 

 

 

F800

PGDip, MSc

N

Research Methods for the Services Sector

CHTM38

30

Core

Yes

50% Report

50% Project proposal

 

 

 

N832

PGCert, PGDip, MSc,

E

Hospitality  Management Studies

CHTM27

30

Core

Yes

70% report

30% Presentation

 

 

 

N832

PGDip, MSc

N

Current Practices in the Visitor Economy

CHTM37

30

Core

Yes

50% Essay

50% Case Study

 

 

 

N832

MSc, Tourism and Hospitality

E

Tourism and Hospitality Major Project

CHTM29

60

Core

Yes

100% Dissertation

 

 

 

N832


Appendix 2Matrix of modes of teaching, learning and assessment

 

a)       Knowledge

Module

Code

Core / optional

Modes of T&L

Modes of Assessment

K1

K2

K3

K4

K5

K6

Tourism Concepts and Issues

CHTM35

Core

Lectures, private study, seminars

30% Review

70% Essay

TDA

TDA

TDA

TDA

TDA

TDA

Research Methods for the Services Sector

CHTM38

Core

Lectures, private study, group work,  seminars, workshops

50% Report

50% Project Proposal

TDA

TDA

TDA

TDA

TDA

TDA

Hospitality Management Studies

CHTM27

Core

Lectures, private study, seminars, case studies

70% Essay

30% Presentation

TDA

TDA

TDA

TDA

TDA

D

Tourism and Hospitality Major Project

CHTM32

Core

Tutorials, lectures, private study, seminars, workshops

100% Dissertation

DA

DA

DA

 

 

DA

Current Practices in the Visitor Economy

CHTM37

Core

Lectures, private study, group work,  seminars, field visit

50% Essay

50% Case Study

TDA

TDA

D

TDA

TDA

 

n.b. T = Taught, D=Developed, A = Assessed

 

b)       Skills

Module

Code

Core / optional

Modes of T&L

Modes of Assessment

S1

S2

S3

S4

S5

S6

S7

Tourism Concepts and Issues

CHTM35

Core

Lectures, private study, seminars

30% Review

70% Essay

TDA

TDA

TDA

TD

TDA

TDA

D

Research Methods for the Services Sector

CHTM38

Core

Lectures, private study, group work,  seminar, workshops

50% Report

50% Project proposal

TD

TD

TDA

D

TDA

TDA

D

Hospitality Management Studies

CHTM27

Core

Lectures, private study, seminars, case study

70% Report

30% Presentation

TD

TDA

TDA

TDA

TDA

TDA

D

Tourism and Hospitality Major Project

CHTM29

Core

Tutorials, lectures, private study, seminars, workshops

100% Dissertation

TDA

TDA

TDA

 

 

 

TDA

Current Practices in the Visitor Economy

CHTM37

Core

Lectures, private study, group work,  seminars, field visit

50% Essay

50% Case Study

D

TDA

TDA

D

TDA

TDA

D


Appendix 3Assessment Criteria at the level of the target award

 

Generic Assessment Criteria – Postgraduate

 

Categories

 

Grade

Relevance

Knowledge

Analysis

Argument and Structure

Critical Evaluation

Presentation

Reference to Literature

Pass

86 – 100%

The work examined is exemplary and provides clear evidence of a complete grasp of the knowledge, understanding and skills appropriate to the Level of the qualification.  There is also ample excellent evidence showing that all the learning outcomes and responsibilities appropriate to that Level are fully satisfied. At this level it is expected that the work will be exemplary in all the categories cited above. It will demonstrate a particularly compelling evaluation, originality, and elegance of argument, interpretation or discourse.

76-85%

The work examined is outstanding and demonstrates comprehensive knowledge, understanding and skills appropriate to the Level of the qualification.  There is also excellent evidence showing that all the learning outcomes and responsibilities appropriate to that level are fully satisfied. At this level it is expected that the work will be outstanding in the majority of the categories cited above or by demonstrating particularly compelling evaluation and elegance of argument, interpretation or discourse.

 

70 – 75%

The work examined is excellent and is evidence of comprehensive knowledge, understanding and skills appropriate to the Level of the qualification.  There is also excellent evidence showing that all the learning outcomes and responsibilities appropriate to that level are satisfied  At this level it is expected that the work will be excellent in the majority of the categories cited above or by demonstrating  particularly compelling evaluation and elegance of argument, interpretation or discourse.

 

60 – 69%

Directly relevant to the requirements of the assessment

A substantial knowledge of relevant material, showing a clear grasp of themes, questions and issues therein

Comprehensive analysis - clear and orderly presentation

Well supported, focussed  argument which is clear and logically structured.

Contains  distinctive or independent thinking; and begins to formulate an independent position in relation to theory and/or practice. 

Well written, with standard spelling and grammar, in a readable style with acceptable format

Critical appraisal of up-to-date and/or appropriate literature.  Recognition of different perspectives.  Very good use of a wide range of sophisticated source material. 

 

50 – 59%

Some attempt to address the requirements of the assessment: may drift away from this in less focused passages

Adequate knowledge of a fair range of relevant material, with intermittent evidence of an appreciation of its significance

Significant analytical treatment which has a clear purpose

Generally coherent and logically structured, using an appropriate mode of argument and/or theoretical mode(s)

May contain some distinctive or independent thinking; may begin to formulate an independent position in relation to theory and/or practice. 

Competently written, with only minor lapses from standard grammar, with acceptable format

Uses a good variety of literature which includes recent texts and/or appropriate literature,  including a substantive amount beyond library texts.  Competent use of source material.

40 – 49%

Some correlation with the requirements of the assessment but there is a significant degree of irrelevance

Basic understanding of the subject but addressing a limited range of material

Some analytical treatment, but may be prone to description, or to narrative, which lacks clear analytical purpose

Some attempt to construct a coherent argument, but may suffer loss of focus and consistency, with issues at stake stated only vaguely, or theoretical mode(s) couched in simplistic terms

Sound work which expresses a coherent position only in broad terms and in uncritical conformity to one or more standard views of the topic

A simple basic style but with significant deficiencies in expression or format that may pose obstacles for the reader

Evidence of use of appropriate literature which goes beyond that referred to by the  tutor.  Frequently only uses a single source to support a point. Weak use of quotation

Fail

35 – 39%

Relevance to the requirements of the assessment may be very intermittent, and may be reduced to its vaguest and least challenging terms

A limited understanding of a narrow range of material

Largely descriptive or narrative, with little evidence of analysis

A basic argument is evident, but mainly supported by assertion and there may be a  lack of clarity and coherence

Some evidence of a view starting to be formed but mainly derivative.

Numerous deficiencies in expression and presentation; the writer may achieve clarity (if at all) only by using a simplistic or repetitious style

Barely adequate use of literature.  Over reliance on

material provided by the tutor. 

The evidence provided shows that the majority of the learning outcomes and responsibilities appropriate to that Level are satisfied. 

30 – 34%

 

The work examined provides insufficient evidence of the knowledge, understanding and skills appropriate to the Level of the qualification.  The evidence provided shows that some of the learning outcomes and responsibilities appropriate to that Level are satisfied.  The work will be weak in some of the indicators.

15-29%

The work examined is unacceptable and provides little evidence of the knowledge, understanding and skills appropriate to the Level of the qualification.  The evidence shows that few of the learning outcomes and responsibilities appropriate to that Level are satisfied. The work will be weak in several of the indicators.

0-14%

The work examined is unacceptable and provides almost no evidence of the knowledge, understanding and skills appropriate to the Level of the qualification.  The evidence fails to show that any of the learning outcomes and responsibilities appropriate to that Level are satisfied. The work will be weak in the majority or all of the indicators.