Attachments

 

Quality Handbook

 

 

 

Postgraduate Programme Specification 2019-20

 

SECTION A - CORE INFORMATION

 

  1. Name  of programme

 

          Practice Development

 

  1. Award title

 

Post Graduate Certificate Practice Development (Childhood and Family Studies)

Post Graduate Diploma Practice Development (Childhood and Family Studies)

MSc Practice Development (Childhood and Family Studies)

 

Post Graduate Certificate Practice Development (Community and Youth Work)

Post Graduate Diploma Practice Development (Community and Youth Work)

MSc Practice Development (Community and Youth Work)

 

Post Graduate Certificate Practice Development (Criminal Justice)

Post Graduate Diploma Practice Development (Criminal Justice)

MSc Practice Development (Criminal Justice)

 

Post Graduate Certificate Practice Development (Education Studies)

Post Graduate Diploma Practice Development (Education Studies)

MSc Practice Development (Education Studies)

 

Post Graduate Certificate Practice Development (Health and Social Care)

Post Graduate Diploma Practice Development (Health and Social Care)

MSc Practice Development (Health and Social Care)

 

Post Graduate Certificate Practice Development (Social Work)

Post Graduate Diploma Practice Development (Social Work)

MSc Practice Development (Social Work)

 

  1. Programme linkage

 

Is this part of a group of linked programmes between which students can transfer at agreed points?

 

 

 

This programme is one of a group of related programmes which also includes:

 

  Post Graduate Certificate Practice Development (Childhood and Family Studies)

  Post Graduate Diploma Practice Development (Childhood and Family Studies)

  MSc Practice Development (Childhood and Family Studies)

 

Post Graduate Certificate Practice Development (Community and Youth Work)

Post Graduate Diploma Practice Development (Community and Youth Work)

MSc Practice Development (Community and Youth Work)

 

  Post Graduate Certificate Practice Development (Criminal Justice)

  Post Graduate Diploma Practice Development (Criminal Justice)

  MSc Practice Development (Criminal Justice)

 

Post Graduate Certificate Practice Development (Education Studies)

Post Graduate Diploma Practice Development (Education Studies)

MSc Practice Development (Education Studies)

 

  Post Graduate Certificate Practice Development (Health and Social Care)

  Post Graduate Diploma Practice Development (Health and Social Care)

  MSc Practice Development (Health and Social Care)

 

 

  Post Graduate Certificate Practice Development (Social Work)

  Post Graduate Diploma Practice Development (Social Work)

  MSc Practice Development (Social Work)

 

  1. Is the programme a top-up only?

 

 

 

 

  1. Level of award: Level 7

 

  1. Awarding body: University of Sunderland

 

  1. School: Social Sciences

 

  1. Programme Studies Board: Social Sciences PG

 

  1. Programme Leader: Matt Durey

 

  1. How and where can I study the programme?

 

At Sunderland:

Full-time on campus

Part-time on campus

As work-based learning full-time

 

As work-based learning part-time

 

As a full-time sandwich course

 

As a part-time sandwich course

 

By distance learning

 

 

  1. How long does the programme take?

 

 

Min number of years

Max number of years

Full-time

1

3

Part-time

2

6

Distance learning

 

 

Work-based learning

 

 

 

Start Date: September 2015

 

SECTION B – FURTHER CORE INFORMATION

 

Use Outline Programme Proposal Form for ADC, for questions 12 to 22

 

  1. Learning and teaching strategy.

The Programme learning and teaching strategy is consistent with and reflects the aims of both the current University and Faculty based Learning and Teaching Plans 2013-16. In support of the Faculty Learning and Teaching Plan, the Faculty aims to:

 

Improve the use of library resources across the subject disciplines to support learning

Enhance the use of digital pedagogies

 

The Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) (Canvas) eLearning portal will play a significant role in the    students’ experience. Learning resources and material from class-based sessions will be available through the virtual classroom. Students will also be encouraged to communicate with each other and staff via the VLE.

 

Learning technologies will be utilised within and outside the classroom. For example, this has particular relevance in active learning with software packages NVivo and Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS).  My Module Resources (MMR) will be used for every module on Canvas.

 

Working closely with the Liaison Librarian for Social Science will ensure that students receive an Initial library welcome/induction. This will be followed up by tailored skills sessions at key points in the course to ensure that all students are aware of the full range of print and electronic library resources that are available to support their studies and know how to access and utilise the full range of resources and their associated platforms to support their learning throughout the course. In addition, the Programme handbook will emphasise the importance of having a good grasp of the University Library and attending the Library Skills sessions.

 

My Module Resources (MMR) and Skills for Learning (S4L) are both available via the Library website and also embedded into every Canvas module.

 

MMR enables seamless digital access to key reading lists and offers information about the availability of individual resources.  Where possible, an electronic version of key resources (books, chapters, journal articles, scanned extracts) will be made available online to enable instant multi-user access to key module resources from anywhere with an internet connection. 

 

Skills for Learning is a collection of e-learning resources, available online which enable students to independently develop their academic skills, an essential part of successful study both at university and for future employability.  Academic skills include understanding academic language, questioning and thinking, finding and evaluating information, critical thinking, working with others and research skills. Learning materials include guides, videos and activities developed by Skills for Learning and released under the terms of a Creative Commons licence.

 

Ensure the quality and consistency of feedback on assignments.

Students will have access via the VLE to the Programme Handbook, including the aims and outcomes,    and to all the modules which contain their aims and outcomes, so that they understand what they have to achieve to successfully complete them. The assessment methods used consist of both formative and summative elements; they are linked to the learning outcomes which in turn inform the detailed feedback that students will receive.

 

The School of Social Sciences has a very good reputation with external examiners and with students for its fair and rigorous approach to assessment and constructive feedback, the latter is given through Turnitin. The same principle will be upheld in the proposed Programme.

 

Secure cohort identity, empowering students to make the most of their University experience and take responsibility for their learning

Provide student support for progression and achievement

Encourage student engagement at module level to respond effectively to individual concerns

 

Cohort identity will be addressed at the very beginning of the Programme during the welcome and induction period. Throughout the Programme students will be provided with opportunities to be part of the community of learning and develop networks - learning to-gether with each other and staff, sharing knowledge, solving problems and exchanging ideas and frustrations. The VLE, as an interactive tool, will play a significant role in the development of the community of learning. Moreover, students will appoint their representatives who will ensure that their views, as a cohort, are heard and acted upon. Further details are provided in section 42 of this document. Moreover, cohort identity will be further strengthened by students dealing with an identified staff member who will be the Programme Leader and with the Programme Team who consist of academic, administrative and library staff.

 

Adult learning principles underpin the strategy aimed at empowering students to make the most of their University experience and take responsibility for their learning. During the welcome and induction period and throughout the Programme, students will be informed of the range of services, curricular and extra-curricular facilities that are available at the University; full details of such facilities are provided in sections 39 and 40 of this document. Students will be advised that, consistent with adult learning principles, they will be expected to be active and independent learners, taking responsibility for their own learning. Hence, they will note that lectures are kept to a minimum; the learning and teaching approaches that will be used are aimed at empowering, enabling and facilitating students to be independent learners, having the confidence and skills  to take responsibility for their learning, demonstrating self-direction, sound time management skills in completing tasks/assignments, developing transferable skills, linking theory and practice in creative and innovative ways and critically evaluating, synthesising and applying new learning to initiate, implement and sustain development in their practice areas.

 

In addition, students will be informed that they will submit their assignments electronically through Turnitin which impacts positively on students’ learning as it provides feedback on plagiarism detection. Students will be able to check their presentation of references/citations and their similarity scores. 

 

High quality students’ support is an integral and key component of the learning and teaching strategy. Students will be informed of the full range of help and support that are available at Programme, Faculty and University levels; these are outlined in sections 39 and 40 of this document.

 

Students will be informed that their active engagement in the delivery of the Programme is crucial so that through feedback and representation, their views are heard and acted upon. This strategy will ensure that their needs/aspirations (realistic and reasonable) are being met and provide the Programme Team with valuable information to monitor and continue improving the quality of the Programme. Section 42 of this document provides details of how students’ views are represented at various levels in the University.

 

Sustain, support and extend our commitment to the Research Informed Curriculum, ensuring the links between research and professional practice

 

Staff involved in the delivery of this Programme are fully supportive and committed to the Research Informed Curriculum. They are experienced practitioners and many are engaged in research activities through the Faculty’s Centre for Applied Social Science (CASS). Staff will integrate relevant and recent research into sessions in order to enable students to have a critical understanding of the relationship between theory and the realities of practice as well as exposing them to research informed teaching. Details of how research informs the Programme are provided in section 32 of this document.

 

 Assessments

The principle of Assessment for Learning (AfL) will underpin the assessment strategy. The ethos is that assessment is an educative process, designed to facilitate the student’s personal, academic and professional development. The assessments have also been designed to ensure that there is a manageable and even spread in terms of workload. 

 

The assessment strategy is designed to reflect the range of module learning outcomes and includes the full range of approaches. The strategy is also designed to enable students to demonstrate their ability to apply their knowledge and understanding of the core research competencies, outlined in the Economic and Social Research Council (2009) Post Graduate and Training Guidelines (http://www.esrc.ac.uk/_images/Postgraduate_Training_and_Development_Guidelines_tcm8-2660.pdf), to inform practice development. Students will develop knowledge and critical understanding of research methodologies, write research proposals, critique existing research studies both generally and specifically (in relation to the extent that the approaches specified have successfully engaged stakeholders and impacted on practice in their specialty), analyse quantitative and qualitative data, and develop and implement a small scale research study on practice development as the basis of their dissertation.

 

  1. Retention strategy.

These details are in addition to those contained in section 39- Student Support

 

The programme is aimed at experienced practitioners and managers, and at those who are aspiring to become involved in leadership and management, and to play a proactive role in the management, development and changing of practice/services. Hence, in terms of retention, it offers a unique opportunity for practitioners who are driven by the professional aim to be the leaders and facilitators of practice development in their areas to undertake a programme of study designed to meet their needs.

 

Moreover, the flexibility of the programme with built in ‘step on’ and ‘step off’ mechanisms at Post Graduate Certificate and Post Graduate Diploma levels will help busy practitioners to balance and meet the challenging demands of work and study, by enabling students to take time off from the Programme and then resume at a later date as appropriate, thereby contributing to retention.

 

  1. Any other relevant information

There are a number of distinctive features associated with this Programme. It is deliberatively transformative in that is it is concerned with change at an individual and organisational level. At an individual level, it offers students the opportunity to embark on a journey to make a difference and in so doing, the lived experience will involve the development and change of oneself personally, academically and professionally.

Being associated with innovation and change has added value individually. The lived experience of designing and managing change enhances significantly one’s credibility in a challenging and competitive employment market. It depicts the individual is a leader - ‘shaper’, ‘mover’ and ‘innovator’, attributes which are highly prized in the current climate.

Organisationally, practice development has a positive impact on its culture. Potentially, the implementation of innovation and change will enhance the reputation of the organisation as one which is forward thinking and keen to transform services, ensuring that they contribute towards its national, regional, and local identity and distinctiveness. Highly qualified and able individuals who share similar values and principles would be keen to work for such an organisation.

Both individuals and organisations could pride themselves by joining and being part of national and international Communities of Practice Development such as the England Centre for Practice Development, which are regarded as Beacon Sites and Centres of Excellence.

 

Depending on demands, consideration will be given by the Programme Team to secure Faculty approval to offer the modules, with the exception of the Research Project, as stand-alone ones, as short courses.

 

All modules taught on this postgraduate degree are active researchers who are involved in the understanding and development of practice in their specialist area.

 

SECTION C - TEACHING AND LEARNING

 

  1. Programme Aims

 

The programme:

a)       Is aimed at experienced practitioners and managers. It is also appropriate for those who are intending to become involved in leadership and management, and to play a proactive role in the management, development and changing of practice/services.

b)       Is designed to offer the opportunity for practitioners to focus on practices, policies and drivers in relation to their impact on their area of practice. The intention is to create the conditions in which students are able to reflect critically on issues that are relevant to their own practice speciality, and to establish the conditions and standards for rigorous critical enquiry and to extend the criteria for judging taken-for-granted assumptions underlying their practice.

c)       Will enable students to consider the implications of their learning, reading and enquiry for policy and practice in their own practice speciality.

d)      Will enable students to develop an increasing knowledge and critical understanding of evidence and discourse, and the capacity to initiate and sustain change, in their own practice.

e)       Complies with Masters level (L7) of the Framework for Higher Education Qualifications (QAA, 2008; http://www.qaa.ac.uk/en/Publications/Documents/Framework-Higher-Education-Qualifications-08.pdf) in that it provides an educational opportunity for students to build upon and further develop their abilities in dealing with complex issues, demonstrating self-direction and originality, whilst continuing to advance their knowledge and understanding of the complexity of practice.

 

  1. Programme Learning Outcomes

 

Learning Outcomes Postgraduate Certificate – Knowledge

By the end of this part of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following, in relation to their chosen pathway:

  • K1 - Have specific knowledge and critical understanding of practice development as a concept.
  • K2 -Critically evaluate a variety of information sources to develop their knowledge and critical understanding of practice development.
  • K3 -Have a critical understanding of the importance of inter and multi-collaboration in practice development.
  • K4 -Have a critical understanding of the key drivers for practice development.
  • K5 -Have a critical understanding of the ethical and legal aspects of practice development.

 

Learning Outcomes Postgraduate Certificate – Skills

By the end of this part of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following, in relation to their chosen pathway:

  • S1 - Be able to access a variety of information sources.
  • S2 - Present practice development issues critically in a manner appropriate to the target audience.
  • S3 - Critically analyse practice development issues.
  • S4 -Further develop their team working skills.
  • S5 - Further improve their time management skills.

 

     Learning Outcomes Postgraduate Diploma – Knowledge

By the end of this part of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following in relation to their chosen pathway:

  • K6- Have critical understanding of a range of philosophical and theoretical perspectives on practice development.
  • K7-Have critical understanding of a range of philosophical, theoretical and methodological perspectives on research and evidence in practice development.
  • K8-Have a critical understanding of competing approaches to practice development.
  • K9- Demonstrate knowledge and critical understanding of the range of factors which impact on practice development.

 

Learning Outcomes Postgraduate Diploma – Skills

By the end of this part of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following in relation to their chosen pathway:

  • S6 -Be able to critically review a range of philosophical and theoretical perspectives on practice development.
  • S7 -Be able to critically review a range of philosophical and theoretical perspectives on research and evidence for practice development.
  • S8 -Plan a programme for the execution of a practice development project.
  • S9 -Further improve their time management skills.
  • S10-Examine critically competing approaches for designing, executing and evaluating practice development.

 

Learning Outcomes Masters – Knowledge

By the end of this part of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following in relation to their chosen pathway:

  • K10- Demonstrate critical and comprehensive evidence based understanding of practice development in relation to the practice project.
  • K11-Be able to critically evaluate their area of practice in terms of politics, policy, ethics and governance

 

Learning Outcomes Masters – Skills

By the end of this part of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following in relation to their chosen pathway:

  • S11 -Further improve their time management skills within the context of their critical understanding of it.
  • S12 –Be able to identify worthwhile and feasible projects within the context of the workplace and apply their high level project management skills.
  • S13 -Examine critically the context of their practice development initiative.
  • S14 -Critically use and synthesise their learning to design and execute a practice development project and produce a high quality report in the format of a dissertation.

 

  1. What will the programme consist of?

 

Taught postgraduate programmes generally consist of a number of taught modules leading to the award of a Postgraduate Certificate (60 credits) or Postgraduate Diploma (120 credits). A Masters qualification (180 credits) usually culminates in a major piece of independent work such as a project or dissertation. All modules are at postgraduate level (level 7 in the UK’s national scheme). The summary below describes briefly what is contained in the programme. The programme structure, including a detailed list of modules, can be found in the Programme Regulations (Appendix 4). An overview of the Programme structure is in Appendix 3.

 

The Practice Development Programme consists of a number of core and specific modules. The core modules are: Emancipatory Practice Development (30 credits), Research and Evidence (30 Credits) and a Research Project focusing on an aspect of Practice Development (Dissertation, 60 Credits); the options are: Leadership and Management for Practice Development (30 Credits), Quality Improvement Interventions for Practice Development (30 Credits), Exploring Social Entrepreneurship (30 Credits) and Risk, Austerity and Neoliberalism (30 credits).

 

Students will apply the issues explored in the delivery of the modules to their own practice speciality, for example, Childhood and Family Studies, Community and Youth Work, Criminal Justice, Education Studies, Health & Social Care and Social Work; this process will be facilitated through group and individual tutorials, presentations and the module assessment.

 

The Programme is flexible with built-in exit points at Post Graduate Certificate and Post Graduate Diploma. Students exiting at Post Graduate Certificate must successfully achieve 60 credit points at level 7 (including the core modules of Emancipatory Practice Development and Research Evidence); those exiting at Post Graduate Diploma must achieve 120 credit points (including the core modules of Emancipatory Practice Development and Research Evidence). To be awarded the MSc 180 points at Level 7 must be achieved, including the two core modules plus research project. The award title of the MSc is determined by the research project that the student completes; e.g. students would be awarded the MSc Practice Development (Childhood and Family Studies) if they complete the research study in an area related to childhood and family studies.

 

The University regulations detail the requirements for interim awards and can be found by following this link: https://my.sunderland.ac.uk/display/AQH/Academic+Regulations

 

Modules on this Programme may be used by students enrolled on other Post Graduate Programmes of Studies such as Early Years Studies and Practice Educators Course for Social Workers (both currently are offered by the School of Social Sciences) to continue their personal and professional development, cumulating and leading to a Master’s Degree in Practice Development in their respective professional field. This will also have the advantage of bringing together the Department’s existing professional development programmes.

 

Students from other Post Graduate Programmes of Studies who apply to use the MSc in Practice Development to continue their personal and professional development will be considered on a case by case basis. They may apply also for Accreditation of their Prior Learning (APL) and for their Experiential Learning (APEL) against all modules on the programme; the only exception is the Research Project module.

 

The University regulations governing the Accreditation process may be found by following this link:

https://my.sunderland.ac.uk/pages/viewpage.action?pageId=105484841

 

  1. Learning and teaching methods

 

Scheduled teaching activities

Yes

Independent study

Yes

Placement

No as students will be in their own practice areas

 

The learning and teaching methods used will be creative, varied and will include the use of blended approaches. Students will experience lectures, seminars, group work, case studies, problem-solving exercises, skills development such as critiquing skills, data analysis skills using software such as SPSS and NVivo, project related work, facilitated by guidance supervision, directed and independent learning. The number of lectures is kept to a minimum; the emphasis is on maximising the use of problem based learning and on enabling students to be independent learners. It is anticipated that modules delivery will be frontloaded and online technology will be used to keep in contact, provide help and support and advise students. The latter will be informed in advance when they will be expected to attend University.

 

This approach is exemplified in:

a)       The Research Project Module where students will use their learning gained throughout the Programme to inform and undertake an independent research study, guided by a supervisor

b)       The Emancipatory Practice Development Module (where students can negotiate with their employer/ manager where appropriate) presents an opportunity to develop and extend their critical understanding of a particular area of practice with a view to enhancing their own professional development, and knowledge and practice in this area within their own setting.  They will access a range of material provided on-line to explore key principles and theoretical ideas underpinning the implementation of practice development, and be supported within supervision sessions to interpret these in the light of the diverse natures and challenges of the their own practice specialties.  

Scheduled teaching activities such as workshops are used to set out the main themes, issues and critiques of the topic; they are normally supported with a reading list for additional course material. This provides the framework for more detailed exploration and analysis which takes place in tutorials, which offer the opportunity for small groups of students and lecturers to discuss/debate the issues, specifically with reference to the implications for practice development, to share ideas and learn from their peers.

Independent study such as private study, either in the library or on the student’s own volition, play a critical part in the student’s learning experience at university. In this way the student becomes familiar with relevant literature and develops problem solving skills which are essential in academic and practice work. Other forms of learning are likely to include essay and report writing, problem-based learning, presentations in seminars and computer-aided learning.

Where appropriate, visiting specialist lecturers will contribute to the programme. The Virtual Learning Environment (Canvas) will play a significant role in the students’ experience. Learning resources and material from class-based sessions will be available through the virtual classroom. Students will also be encouraged to communicate with each other and staff via the eLearning portal and engage in online discussion and debate to strengthen and consolidate their learning.

 

All modules are specifically designed to engage students in active learning. Class-based group problem solving approaches will require students to effectively communicate and negotiate solutions. Throughout the programme, it is a requirement that students will explore the relevance of and apply the module contents to their own practice area.

 

A list of the modules in the programme can be found in Appendix 2

 

30. Assessment methods

 

A summary of the types of teaching, learning and assessment in each module of the programme can be found in the Matrix of Modes of Teaching (Appendix 5)

 

This programme uses the Generic University Assessment Criteria

YES

 

This programme uses the Subject Specific Assessment Criteria

 

NO

 

The University Assessment regulations can be found at:

https://my.sunderland.ac.uk/display/AQH/Assessment+Policy

 

The University generic assessment criteria can be found at:

https://my.sunderland.ac.uk/download/attachments/105484817/Generic%20Assessment%20Criteria%20v5.pdf?version=2&modificationDate=1497861202000&api=v2

 

The programme uses a range of assessment methods designed to match the learning outcomes being assessed and to offer students different methods of demonstrating their learning. These include methods such as written assignments, individual and group presentations, portfolio, conference paper abstract, academic poster and a dissertation. There will be a strong emphasis on independent and problem based learning, critical analysis and the integration of theory, knowledge, and practice.

 

The aim of the assignment methods used is to enable students to become confident in their ability to be self-directed, innovative in tackling and solving problems and autonomous in designing, implementing and evaluating tasks. An example of this is the completion of the research project. To enable students to complete the project, they will complete assignments which serve as building blocks: e.g. in the module on Research and Evidence, students will undertake an in-depth critique of a peer reviewed research study and produce a detailed research proposal; both of which will inform the research project. Moreover, there is an expectation that higher degree students will not only produce knowledge but also disseminate it; hence, for example, in the module on Quality Interventions in Practice Development, students will produce a conference abstract paper and an academic poster presentation.

 

31. Teaching, learning and assessment matrix (Appendix 5)

 

32. How does research influence the programme? 

 

Staff involved in the delivery of this Programme are experienced practitioners and many are engaged in research activities through the Faculty’s Centre for Applied Social Science (CASS)

http://www.sunderland.ac.uk/research/areasofresearch/centreforappliedsocialsciences/.

 

The work of CASS is guided by three key objectives:

 

  • to facilitate knowledge exchange between academics, frontline practitioners and policymakers to support high quality workforce development  based around Families and Communities;
  • to produce excellent original research to increase society’s understanding of how inequality and social exclusion occurs and to use this to improve the life chances of the most vulnerable (this includes providing a supportive research environment for early career and postgraduate research);
  • to develop a research-active curriculum that engages undergraduates and graduates in policy and practice challenges in their chosen field.

 

The range of work the Centre engages in requires a multi-disciplinary approach. The centre draws    together expertise from across the University’s faculties.  It combines original academic research with practice-based collaborations and reach-out activities, often working directly with practitioners, policymakers and front-line delivery staff.

 

CASS is engaged in three core activities:

 

  • Practice Based Collaborations: to improve and address issues related to the development of a highly skilled workforce.

 

  • Research: the work of CASS has achieved recognition regionally, nationally and internationally.

 

  • Knowledge Exchange: CASS hosts several seminar series which bring together researchers, practitioners and policymakers to discuss and debate key issues across a range of social care and social justice topics.

 

Staff will integrate relevant and recent research into sessions in order to enable students to have a critical understanding of the relationship between theory and the realities of practice as well as exposing them to research informed teaching. Students are required to undertake research as part of their studies and to disseminate their findings in a variety of ways: e.g. to organisations where they work and in peer reviewed journals, present their work to their peers, at conferences and contribute to book chapters. These mechanisms will develop the community of learning with academics, peers and students.

 

Modules where students learn specifically about research techniques or engage in research include:

 

a)                 Research and Evidence

 

This module aims to provide students with knowledge and critical understanding of the philosophical, theoretical and methodological foundations of enquiry and knowledge/evidence production, research/evidence governance, the politics of knowledge/evidence, the research process, research design, methods, and data analysis techniques. The nature of knowledge/evidence, different types of knowledge/evidence and the ways of approaching the generation of knowledge/evidence are addressed. The assessment consists of an in-depth, comparative critique of two research studies, worksheets on research skills from practical workshops, and a written research proposal.

 

b)                 Research Project (Dissertation)

 

The focus of this module is on the student as a researcher to undertake, under guidance supervision, a research study relevant to practice development in their area of specialism and produce a high quality report in the format of a dissertation. As such it provides an opportunity for the collection and analysis of primary data, quantitative and/or qualitative, for the purpose of answering a specific research question regarding practice development; a work-based focused study; or a systematic appraisal. A range of methodologies and methods may be appropriate. The research project should aim to develop new, or verify existing, practice development knowledge in a particular area. The relevance and potential application of that knowledge to the student's practice area/knowledge and/or body of professional knowledge should be made explicit.

 

SECTION D - EMPLOYABILITY

 

33. How will the programme prepare me for employment?

 

  • Enhancement of employability skills and career progression

 

It is anticipated that practitioners employed in practice based organisations will be largely engaging with this programme. As such students will be in their practice areas already.

 

The programme will enhance students’ professional knowledge and understanding about key issues involved in practice development, and will offer them opportunities for career progression as leaders and facilitators of service modernisation within their practice areas and those in other agencies. In terms of progression and succession planning in organisations offering series in childhood and family, community and youth work, criminal justice, education studies, health and social care and social work, having a Master’s qualification is increasingly highly desirable (and in most cases a core requisite for promotion), and critical for implementing the government agenda of enhancing the quality of service provision and modernisation. 

 

  • Opportunities to meet and work with active professionals in the field

 

Dissemination is actively encouraged, particularly for students undertaking Post Graduate studies. Hence, it is expected that students will discuss their research with colleagues in their own organisations and through collaborative research relationships.  In addition, discussing practice development ideas and issues in class and on-line with other students on the course will play a major part of their professional development. Ethical considerations will be at the forefront of the work in University based sessions. All students will be required to adhere to the appropriate ethical guidelines.

 

  • Opportunities for students to showcase their work to employers.

 

Dissemination is encouraged between organisations through on-line discussion and in seminars. Moreover, students will be supported and helped to publish their research in peer-reviewed journals, as chapters in books and to present them at conferences as research papers.

 

For information about opportunities available to students who study on campus, click on this link:

http://sls.sunderland.ac.uk/ces/

 

34. Particular features of the qualification. (optional)

 

Same as emphasised in Section 33 above

 

35. Professional statutory or regulatory body (PSRB) accreditation.

 

PSRB accreditation is not relevant to this programme 

Not Applicable

PSRB accreditation is currently being sought for this programme

Not Applicable

This programme currently has PSRB accreditation

Not Applicable

There are programme-specific regulations relating to the following. Details are given in the programme regulations:

 

The modules to be studied

All

Pass-marks for some or all modules and/or parts

(elements) of modules 

40%

Placement requirements

N/A

Attendance requirements

The equivalent of one day per week during academic year

Professional practice requirements

Not Applicable

Final or overall mark for the award  

40%

Other 

 

 

Interim or exit awards are not accredited. 

 

 

 

SECTION E - PROGRAMME STRUCTURE AND REGULATIONS

 

Use Programme Regulations Form, for questions 36 and 37

 

 

 

 

 

 

SECTION F - ADMISSIONS, LEARNING ENVIRONMENT AND SUPPORT

 

  1. Admissions requirements

 

The University has standard admission requirements for post-graduate programmes which can be found in the University regulations at:

https://my.sunderland.ac.uk/display/AQH/Programme+Regulations+and+Assessment

 

The Programme-specific requirements are outlined below.

 

Students must demonstrate that they are in employment relevant to their chosen pathway and undertake an interview, conducted by the Programme Leader, to assess their suitability for the Programme. The interview will enable the student to gain further knowledge and understanding of the Programme to help them make an informed decision.

 

The entry requirement for the programme is normally a second class honours degree or better in a subject relevant to the student’s intended pathway of study. Candidates with ordinary degrees or non degree level professional qualifications will be considered on the basis of equivalence to the normal requirement. Experience may be counted towards entry.

 

For candidates whose English is not their first language, they must demonstrate a sufficient level of competence in English (Minimum of International English Language Testing System, IELTS 6.0).

 

Advanced standing entry, consistent with University Accreditation Regulations, into the programme will be considered for individuals with relevant Postgraduate credits (L7), Postgraduate Certificate (60 L7) or Postgraduate Diploma (120 L7) undertaken within the previous 5 years. APL / APEL will be used to ensure that the appropriate learning outcomes have been met. Accreditation will not be considered for the dissertation module.

 

The University regulations governing the Accreditation process may be found at:

https://my.sunderland.ac.uk/pages/viewpage.action?pageId=105484841

 

Students must successfully complete each stage (i.e. Post Graduate Certificate, Post Graduate Diploma, and Masters) of the programme to progress to the next one and be awarded the MSc

 

Can students enter with advanced standing?

Yes

 

 

If yes, to which Stages can students enter with advanced standing?

Stage 1 – PG Cert

Yes

Stage 2 – PG Dip

Yes

Stage 3 - MSc

NO Advanced Standing for Dissertation

 

 

If yes, with what qualifications?

 

Postgraduate Certificate in subjects relevant to the student’s chosen pathway for entry to the Postgraduate Diploma

 

Postgraduate Diploma in subjects relevant to the student’s chosen pathway for entry to the Masters phase

 

Students must complete the dissertation for which there will be no prior accreditation.

 

39. Support and help for students

 

Staff involved in the delivery of this Programme have extensive experience and expertise in dealing with and supporting students undertaking Programmes of study in the Faculty of Education and Society. Support and help are available to students within the Programme Team and in the University.

 

Personal Tutor

 

Each student will have a personal tutor, who will see them formally as a group and individually at set points throughout the Programme to monitor their progress and provide help and support as appropriate. Although not a requisite, it is highly desirable that students have a mentor in their practice areas to help and support them. Students may contact their personal tutor via e-mail, VLE and phone to make appointments.

Programme Leader

The Programme Leader has overall responsibility of the Programme, therefore, responsible for ensuring that students receive the support to which they are entitled, and for ensuring that the Programme of study has coherence and is informed by the University quality assurance mechanisms. The Programme Leader will produce the Programme Handbook which details the requirements of the Programme and it will be available on the VLE. Any issue with support and help which the student is unable to resolve with the module leader should be referred to the Programme Leader.

Module Leader

Module leaders are responsible for the academic quality of their modules and they produce the Module Handbook which details the requirements of the modules which are available on the VLE. They provide students with guidance and support regarding the module and assignment requirements. Students are advised to access this support.

Skills for Learning

Study skills services are available through the Library and learning services. Students can use the study skills facilities independently and/or with guidance from the support team. The study skills staff will not proof read students work but they can offer advice and hand-outs on how students can develop their own proof reading skills. Study skills services offer a range of support to students: e.g. academic writing, note taking, time management, good referencing, dissertation planning and presentation skills. If it is sometime since students engaged in formal study they may benefit from some or all of these services.

Students with Specific Learning Needs

The Programme adheres to the  Inclusive Programme Design- Disabled Students

Students who have other learning needs which may have been identified prior to the start of the programme, or in some cases are only identified during the programme, are referred for assessment and specialist support to the Disability Support Service  which is  able to offer individual tutorial support, guidance and specialist equipment where necessary. This team also helps programme staff to support students appropriately by making recommendations concerning how their needs should be met in the academic setting. This process is supported by the Faculty Disability Support Tutor where necessary.

Personal Development Planning

Students will be encouraged to maintain personal progress records. They should keep a written record of tutorial and supervision meetings, records of their academic achievements and feedback. This information will provide a useful resource that they may choose to share with employers when discussing the challenges and benefits they have derived from undertaking this Programme of study.

 

Dissertation/Project Supervisor

 

Each student will be allocated a supervisor for the research project. The following points outline the role of the supervisor, who will:

 

  • Ensure that the project undertaken by the student is appropriate and feasible.
  • Ensure that the requirements of research governance are met at all times.
  • Agree with each student a schedule of supervision meetings.
  • Keep joint supervision/student records of all sessions.
  • Help the student to set realistic and achievable objectives for the project.
  • Provide the student with timely, critical and constructive comment on the content and draft elements of the work.
  • Refer students to subject expertise, as appropriate.
  • Recognise the individual needs of students and refer students to university support services, where appropriate.
  • Encourage students to publicise their research.

 

All students have access to the University’s central support services and where appropriate, staff in the Faculty will sign-post students to these specialist services, which include:

 

Counselling (http://www.sunderland.ac.uk/studentlife/support/counselling) - The University offers a free and confidential counselling service for students. All counsellors are professionally qualified and can offer support and advice on a range of issues including: anxiety, depression, bereavement, relationship difficulties, exam worries, problems with courses, feelings of isolation, and problems with making friends.  As well as offering a counselling service, staff can also advise on practical support offered by the University for students with family commitments or those experiencing a bereavement or long-term illness.

 

Disability Support (http://www.sunderland.ac.uk/studentlife/support/disability/) - The University offers a support service for students with disabilities and students who have a specific learning difficulty, such as dyslexia.  The Disability Support team can also offer advice and guidance to students who think they might have a specific learning difficulty but who have not yet had a formal diagnosis.  The service is confidential, and can offer practical support on accessing financial support and learning aids.

 

Health and Well-being (http://sls.sunderland.ac.uk/health-and-wellbeing) – This service offers support to students by encouraging a healthy lifestyle in order to maintain good health and wellbeing.  The service has qualified/registered nurses who are available to offer help and advice on a range of issues such as: Health promotion; Support for those with ongoing or newly diagnosed physical and mental health problems; Claiming for help with NHS costs; many other general health issues (all aspects can be dealt with).  All aspects of the service are confidential. Information is protected and accessed only by Health & Wellbeing staff.  The service’s nursing staff adhere to the code of professional conduct laid down by the Nursing and Midwifery Council.  No information can be obtained or given out without consent.

 

Chaplaincy (http://sls.sunderland.ac.uk/chaplaincy/) - The Chaplaincy is involved in the life of the University at all levels and across all parts of the institution, offering: Friendship, Support, Pastoral care, Advice on religious matters to both students and staff, regardless of any particular religious affiliation or none.  The Chaplaincy Service is for students to use in the way that is most beneficial and appropriate to their needs.  The service regularly organises events in and around Sunderland.

 

Financial Support and Advice (http://sls.sunderland.ac.uk/studentfinancialadvice/) - The Student Financial Advice team is the University's provision of information, advice, representation and on-going support for students on any aspect of student finance. The Service is for all prospective or current students on University of Sunderland courses, full-time or part-time, undergraduate or postgraduate; free, confidential, impartial, and non-judgemental; available to all students by individual appointment or on a 'drop-in' basis, as well as by telephone and email.  Advice can be given on all aspects of student finance including: problems with applying for grants and loans; contact with national Student Finance agencies, such as Student Finance England or the Student Loans Company; information on the student finance system and other sources of financial support; assistance with claims for state benefits for those students who remain eligible; if appropriate, help with identifying educational charities and trusts, and with applications for funding.  Also advice around basic budgeting, which may prove to be a problem (especially for first year students) as a result of restricted income resources or the timing of student support payments.

 

Careers and Employability Services (http://sls.sunderland.ac.uk/ces/) – This service is for current students and graduates who have completed their studies within the last 3 years.  They offer: Careers advice to help students decide what to do next; Student and graduate jobs advertised on-line; Paid projects and volunteering opportunities; Career skills workshops; CV and application coaching; Interview coaching; Free online practice aptitude tests; Career information resources.

 

The Students’ Union (http://www.sunderlandsu.co.uk/) provides an independent service which offers advice and support across the full range of personal and academic problems which students may encounter.  Students wishing to lodge a complaint or an appeal can seek advice from the Students Union or from Academic Services.

 

Further information about the University’s facilities can be found on the University’s web-sites.

 

40. What resources will I have access to?

 

On campus

Tick all that apply

General Teaching and Learning Space

IT

Library

VLE

Laboratory

Not Applicable

Studio

Performance space

Not Applicable

Other specialist

Not Applicable

Technical resources 

Not Applicable

 

 

General Teaching and Learning Space

 

The University has modern and state of the art facilities to ensure students receive the highest quality education. There are rooms for seminars, workshops and lecture rooms; the latter are equipped with a range of modern teaching facilities and high-spec IT equipment. Rooms are designed to accommodate wheelchairs.

 

The teaching spaces include computer laboratories for students to learn about computer skills and the use of a range of software packages, including SPSS and NVivo.

 

Everyone learns in different ways and depending upon their mood or the task in hand, an individual may needs different study and social environments at different times. The University has listened to what students have said, watched how students study and spend a lot of time looking for solutions as to how to provide students with the best learning spaces possible. It offers a range of learning spaces: e.g. computer spaces, quiet spaces, social spaces, group study spaces and silent spaces. Further details are available by clicking on the link below.

http://library.sunderland.ac.uk/learning-spaces/

 

The University Timetabling Team co-ordinates and provides the University’s overall teaching timetable.

 

Information Technology

 

Students have access to an extensive range of IT facilities and support to ensure that they maximise the benefits for their learning and to make the most of studying at University for their personal and professional development. More details on IT are available by clicking on the link below.

https://my.sunderland.ac.uk/display/uniitsupport/My+IT+Support

 

Library Services

 

University Library Services (ULS) support students and staff with the provision of a high quality learning environment, comprehensive print collections, extensive E–resources, 1400 study places, 300+ PCs and skills training facilities and study skills support.  All students have the full use of the University’s two libraries. The libraries are open extensive hours and are staffed for 59 hours a week, including weekends and evenings.  During core teaching weeks, The Murray library is open 24x7 and St Peters library is open until 12 midnight.  Staff and students can access library resources either on campus or off campus via the web.  ULS maintains a web site www.library.sunderland.ac.uk which provides a gateway to information resources and services for students both on and off campus. 

 

Virtual Learning Environment (Canvas)

 

Students have access to a range of University wide resources on Canvas including referencing and study guides.  At programme level Canvas is used for the dissemination of programme and module information. Lecture notes, additional material to support these and links to other relevant material are posted up in advance of teaching. Module spaces are also used for group conversations and targeted discussion threads about assignment preparation and the module content in which they are engaged.  Turnitin, which allows students to check their work for plagiarism prior to submission, will be used throughout the programme.  More details on IT are available by clicking on the link below.

 

Studio

 

Two rooms are equipped with recording equipment to support teaching and learning of skills such as communication, leadership and management skills. This allows students to review and reflect on their skills with staff and peers.

 

Information about the University’s facilities can be found by clicking on the link below.

http://services.sunderland.ac.uk/academic-services/qae/furtherinformationaboutstudyingatsunderland/

 

41. Are there any additional costs on top of the fees?

 

No, but all students buy some study materials such as books and provide their own basic study materials.

 

Yes (optional) All students buy some study materials such as books and provide their own basic study materials. In addition there are some are additional costs for optional activities associated with the programme (see below)

Yes (essential) All students buy some study materials such as books and provide their own basic study materials. In addition there are some are essential additional costs associated with the programme (see below)

 

Where, and as appropriate, determined by the learning needs of students, they may incur additional costs for visits to: e .g. Beacon Sites and Centres of Excellence.

42. How are students’ views represented?

 

All taught programmes in the University have student representatives for each programme who meet in a Student-Staff Liaison Committee (SSLC) where they can raise students’ views and concerns. The Students’ Union and the faculties together provide training for student representatives. SSLCs and focus groups are also used to obtain student feedback on plans for developing existing programmes and designing new ones.

 

Feedback on the programme is obtained every year through module questionnaires and informs the annual review of the programme. Student representatives are also invited to attend Programme and Module Studies Boards which manage the delivery and development of programmes and modules.  In the former, students are involved in discussions of external examiners’ reports. Various Faculty committees, particularly Faculty Academic Experience Committee, Academic Development Committee and Quality Management Sub-Committee also have student representation. This allows students to be involved in higher-level plans for teaching and learning. There is a parallel structure at University level on which students are represented by sabbatical officers who are the elected leaders of the Students’ Union.

 

The University’s student representation and feedback policy can be found at:

https://my.sunderland.ac.uk/download/attachments/105484853/Student%20Representation%20and%20Feedback%20Policy%20v8.docx?version=1&modificationDate=1503410473000&api=v2

 

Every two years the University participates in the national Postgraduate Taught Experience Survey (PTES) which is run by the Higher Education Academy.  Feedback from the Survey is considered at the Programme Studies Board. Changes actioned in response to student feedback are displayed as ‘You said and We did’ on the plasma screens in the building where teaching takes place.

 

Students will have access to the module leaders and the Programme Leader to express their views individually and as a group whether in person, by phone, email and/or via the VLE. Issues raised will be explored and communicated back to the student (s) concerned. Regular Student Staff Liaison Meetings are held at key points during the year which provide a forum for listening to, discussing and addressing issues relevant to the students’ experience.

 

SECTION G - QUALITY MANAGEMENT 

 

43. National subject benchmarks

 

Are there any benchmark statements for this programme?

 

NO

 

The QAA Framework for Higher Education Qualifications (FHEQ) (2008) outlines the generic skills and abilities expected of students who have successfully completed a taught master’s programme. The FHEQ can be found here.

 

This programme complies with Masters level (L7) of the Framework for Higher Education Qualifications (FHEQ) by providing an educational opportunity for students to develop their abilities in dealing with complex issues, demonstrating self-direction and originality whilst continuing to advance their knowledge and understanding.

 

44. How are the quality and standards of the programme assured?

 

The programme is managed and quality assured through the University’s standard processes. Programmes are overseen by Module and Programme Studies Boards which include student representatives. Each year each module leader provides a brief report on the delivery of the module, identifying strengths and areas for development, and the programme team reviews the programme as a whole. The purpose of this is to ensure that the programme is coherent and up-to-date, with suitable progression through the programme, and a good fit (alignment) between what is taught and how students learn and are assessed - the learning outcomes, content and types of teaching, learning and assessment. Student achievement, including progress through the programme and the way in which the final award is made, is kept under review. The programme review report is sent to the Programme Studies Board and the Faculty in turn reports issues to the University’s Quality Management Sub-Committee (QMSC).

 

External examiners are appointed to oversee and advise on the assessment of the programme. They ensure that the standards of the programme are comparable with those of similar programmes elsewhere in the UK and are also involved in the assessment process to make sure that it is fair. They are invited to comment on proposed developments to the programme. Their reports are sent to the Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Academic) as well as to the Faculty so that issues of concern can be addressed.

 

All programmes are reviewed by the University on a six-yearly cycle to identify good practice and areas for enhancement. Programmes are revalidated through this review process. These reviews include at least one academic specialist in the subject area concerned from another UK university. Quality Assurance Agency (QAA) review reports for Sunderland can be found here.

 

Further information about our quality processes can be found here.


Appendix 1

 

 

 

SITS SUMMARY PROGRAMME/SHORT COURSE DETAILS

(Form to be completed electronically by the Faculty and forwarded to the Quality Assurance and Enhancement (QAE) Quality Officer supporting the Approval event, or sent to Management Information and Systems Development (MISD) for faculty devolved processes before sending to QAE)

PROGRAMME/SUBJECT/SHORT COURSE DETAILS

 

Exit Award: Title of programme/award

PG Cert, PG Dip, MSc Practice Development

If replacement for existing, specify title of old

 

Faculty(ies):

Education and Society

School:

Social Sciences

SITS Programme/Short Course code[1]

 

Programme Studies Board[2]

Health and Social Care

UCAS code[3] (if applicable).  If other please state method.

 

JACS code[4]

L300

Qualification Level / Qualification Aim

Masters (Level7)

 

Modes of delivery and duration:

 

(delete yes/no as necessary)

Full time       yes  (1-2 years)

Sandwich     no  

Part time      yes  (2-6 years)

Work Based Learning : no

On-campus  yes

Off-campus  no 

CSP Only. Other subject combinations not allowed with this subject:

Not Applicable

Programme/Subject/Short Course Leader:

Matt Deacon

Date of Approval /Modification/Review

07.11.2014

Date of next review (QAE to complete)

 

Start date of programme/Short Course

October 2017

Number of intakes per annum and likely month(s) intake(s) starts.

1 (Depending on demand)

October

 

FUNDING DETAILS

 

Confirm funding arrangements for programme e.g. HEFCE/TDA/NHS/Other[5]

Self funding

If it is TDA, is it primary/secondary/F.E./Other (please state)

Not applicable

Is the programme Open or Closed[6]:

Open

 

ACCREDITING BODY

No

 

 

PROGRAMME SPECIFIC REGULATIONS

Are there to be programme specific regulations? No

If yes, please attach completed form AQH-B3 Appendix 2 or AQH-B8.

 

COLLABORATIVE:

Please complete details

UK                     no

 

Overseas           no

Institution                                      Collaborative model[7]         Funding arrangements[8]

 

…………………………………………..            ………………………………         ….……………………..

 

…………………………………………..            ………………………………         ………………………..

 

…………………………………………..            ………………………………         …………………………

 

 

  INTERIM AWARD SCHEDULE

Interim award title

Credits required

Interim structure

Please show mandatory requirements if applicable e.g. core module codes

Post Graduate Certificate Practice Development (Childhood and Family Studies)

Post Graduate Certificate Practice Development (Criminal Justice)

Post Graduate Certificate  Practice Development (Community and Youth Work)

Post Graduate Certificate Practice Development (Education Studies)

Post Graduate Certificate Practice Development (Health and Social Care)

Post Graduate Certificate Practice Development (Social Work)

 

 

60

Successful completion of core modules (SSCM31 and SSCM32) 60 credits on the programme

 

 

Post Graduate Diploma Practice Development (Childhood and Family Studies)

Post Graduate Diploma Practice Development (Community and Youth Work)

Post Graduate Diploma Practice Development (Criminal Justice)

Post Graduate Diploma Practice Development (Education Studies)

Post Graduate Diploma Practice Development (Health and Social Care)

Post Graduate Diploma Practice Development (Social Work)

 

 

 

120

Successful completion of 120 credits on the programme – this includes core modules (SSCM31 and SSCM32) plus two option modules.

MSc Practice Development (Childhood and Family Studies)

MSc Practice Development (Community and Youth Work)

MSc Practice Development (Criminal Justice)

MSc Practice Development (Education Studies)

MSc Practice Development (Health and Social Care)

MSc Practice Development (Social Work)

 

 

180

Core Module: Research Project (SSCM18/19/21/22/23)

 

To be awarded the MSc, students must complete successfully all taught components  and the Research Project (SSCM18/19/21/22/23), depending on the students’ chosen pathway

 

 

 

 

DETAILS SUPPLIED BY:Lesley Deacon      DATE: 25.04.18

 

For QAE  use only:  Circulation list: Quality Assurance & Enhancement (files), MISD (J Ruffell, L Warner), Admissions  (E Wilson), Recruitment (Les  Brown, Catryn Davies), Student Office (L Dixon), Planning (Laura Anderson), Learning Development Services (Scott Miller, Canvas@sunderland.ac.uk) Central Timetabling (Alison McMahon) International Admissions (Annie Doyle)  + for collaborative programmes: Partnership Office Carole Green, Marketing and Recruitment (Judith Green)


Appendix 2

Module List

Award, Route (if applicable) and Level

New/ Existing/ Modified  Module (N/E/MM)

Module Title

Module Code

Module Credit Value

Whether core or option

Must choose (MC) (i.e. designated option) (DO):

 

Assessment weighting – give % weight for each assessment item

Pre-/co-requisites

Module leader

Other comment (if required)

JACS Code

PG Cert

MM

Emancipatory Practice Development

SSCM31

30

Core

MC

Practice Development Plan 50%

Tool Development for engaging Service Users 50%

None

Dr Lesley Deacon

 

L300

MM

Research and Evidence

SSCM32

30

Core

MC

Comparative Research Study (40%)

Practical workshop worksheets (20%)

Research Proposal 40%

 

None

Matt Durey

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

PG Diploma

MM

Emancipatory Practice Development

SSCM31

30

Core

MC

Practice Development Plan 50%

Tool Development for engaging Service Users 50%

PG Cert

Dr Lesley Deacon

 

 

MM

Research and Evidence

SSCM32

30

Core

MC

Comparative Research Study (40%)

Practical workshop worksheets (20%)

Research Proposal 40%

 

None

Matt Durey

 

 

M

Quality Interventions in Practice Development

SSCM11

30

Option

DO

Conference Paper   60%

Academic Poster  40%

None

Dr Bruce

Marjoribanks

 

 

N

Leadership and Management in Practice Development

SSCM10

30

Option

DO

Essay 70%

Presentation 30%

None

Michael Elsy

 

 

MM

Exploring Social Entrepreneurship

SSCM04

30

Option

DO

Presentation 20%

Business Plan 80%

 

None

Dan Connolly

 

 

N

Risk, Austerity and Neoliberalism

SSCM17

30

Option

DO

Essay 100%

None

Dr Sheila Quaid

 

 

Masters

N

Research Project

SSCM18/19/21/22/23 depending on the pathway chosen by the student

60

Core

MC

Dissertation 100%

PG Dip

Matt Durey

Award of MSc (180 Credits)

Successful completion of 120 credits and Research Project Module ( SSCM18/19/21/22/23)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Appendix 3

 

 

PG Cert/PG Dip/MSc Structure

 

For students who access the Programme without advanced standing

 

Progression & Exit Stages

  • Post Graduate Certificate - 60 credits.

Successful completion of 60 credits – core modules SSCM31 and SSCM32.

  • Post Graduate Diploma -    120 credits.

Successful completion of 120 credits – core modules SSCM31 and SSCM32 plus two option modules from SSCM10, SSCM11, SSCM04 or SSCM17.

  • Masters  - 180 credits

All taught components & Research Project (SSCM18/19/21/22/23) depending on the students’ chosen pathway

 

Students who access the Programme with advanced standing

 

They will be considered on a case by case basis to ensure that they:

 

  • meet the requirements of the Post Graduate Certificate Level if they are applying to join the Post Graduate Diploma.

 

  • meet the requirements of the Post Graduate Diploma Level if they are applying to join the MSc.

 

There will no advanced standing for the dissertation module.

 

The options of full-time and part-time routes will be available to them and the minimum and maximum time for completing the Programme will be the same.

 

One Year Full-time Option

 

 

Term 1 (12wks)

 

Term  2 ( 12wks)

Choose two option modules

Term 3 (12wks)

Emancipatory Practice Development (30 credits) (SSCM31)

 

Exploring Social Entrepreneurship (30 credits)

SSCM04)

Research Project (120 credits)

 

Research and Evidence (30 credits) (SSCM32)

Leadership and Management in Practice Development (30 credits)

(SSCM10)

 

 

 

Quality Interventions for PD (30 credits) (SSCM11)

 

 

 

Risk, Austerity and Neoliberalism (30 credits) (SSCM17)

 

 

Two Years Part-time Option

 

Year 1

 

Term 1 (12wks)

 

Term 2 ( 12wks)

Choose two option modules

Term 3 (12wks)

Emancipatory Practice Development  (30 credits) (SSCM31)

 

Exploring Social Entrepreneurship (30 credits)

SSCM04)

Research Project (120 credits)

 

OR

Leadership and Management in Practice Development (30 credits)

(SSCM10)

 

 

Research and Evidence (30 credits) (SSCM32)

Quality Interventions for PD (30 credits) (SSCM11)

 

 

 

Risk, Austerity and Neoliberalism (30 credits) (SSCM17)

 

 

Year 2

 

Term 1 (12wks)

 

Term 2 ( 12wks)

Choose two option modules

Term  3 (12wks)

Emancipatory Practice Development  (30 credits) (SSCM31)

 

Exploring Social Entrepreneurship (30 credits)

SSCM04)

Research Project (120 credits)

 

OR

Leadership and Management in PD (30 credits)

(SSCM10)

 

 

Research and Evidence (30 credits) (SSCM32)

Quality Interventions for PD (30 credits) (SSCM11)

 

 

 

Risk, Austerity and Neoliberalism (30 credits) (SSCM17)

 

 


Appendix 4

Programme  Regulation/s

 

Name of programme: Practice Development

Title of final award: MSc Practice Development

Interim awards[9]:

 

PG Certificate Practice Development (Childhood and Family Studies)

 

PG Certificate Practice Development (Community and Youth Work)

 

PG Certificate Practice Development (Criminal Justice)

 

PG Certificate Practice Development (Education Studies)

 

PG Certificate Practice Development (Health and Social Care)

 

PG Certificate Practice Development (Social Work)

 

 

 

 

PG Diploma Practice Development (Childhood and Family Studies)

 

PG Diploma Practice Development (Community and Youth Work)

 

PG Diploma Practice Development (Criminal Justice)

 

PG Diploma Practice Development (Education Studies)

 

PG Diploma Practice Development (Health and Social Care)

 

PG Diploma Practice Development (Social Work)

 

 

 

 

MSc Practice Development (Childhood and Family Studies)

 

MSc Practice Development (Community and Youth Work)

 

MSc Practice Development (Criminal Justice)

 

MSc Practice Development (Education Studies)

 

MSc Practice Development (Health and Social Care)

 

MSc Practice Development (Social Work)

 

 

 

Accreditation: The awards are not externally accredited.

 

University Regulations:

 

  1. Admissions

For admission to the programme, applicants must be working, attend an interview and for those whose first language is not English must achieve a minimum IELTS score of 6.5 in all four areas.

 

  1. Duration of programme

The MSc programme will be delivered as part-time and full time modes; the fulltime is over one academic year and the part-time one is over two academic years.

 

  1. Time Limits

The maximum time allowed for a student to complete will be three years for the fulltime mode and six years for the part-time mode, from the date of first registration. In exceptional extenuating circumstances, as adjudicated by the Programme Assessment Board, a maximum of one academic year additional registration may be granted.

 

  1. Interim Awards

 

Stage 1- Post Graduate Certificate

To be awarded the PG Certificate, students must successfully complete the core modules Emancipatory Practice Development (SSCM31) and Research and Evidence (SSCM32)

 

Stage 2- Post Graduate Diploma

To be awarded the Post Graduate Diploma, students must successfully complete the PG Certificate, plus two option modules from Leadership and Management in Practice Development (SSCM10), Exploring Social Entrepreneurship (SSCM04), Quality Intervention for Practice Development (SSCM11) or Risk, Austerity and Neoliberalism (SSCM17)

Stage 3- Masters

To progress to masters’ level, students must successfully complete the PG Dip. To complete the masters, students must successfully gain 180 level 7 credits to include the core module on Research Project (SSCM18/19/21/22/23), depending on their chosen pathway.

 

Pass mark

The pass mark for each module is 40%. 

Core modules:

Code

Title

Credits

SSCM31

Emancipatory Practice Development

30

SSCM32

Research and Evidence

30

SSCM18/19/21/22/23

Research Project

60

 

Optional modules

Code

Title

Credits

SSCM11

Quality Interventions in Practice Development

30

SSCM10

Leadership and Management in Practice Development

30

SSCM04

Exploring Social Entrepreneurship

30

SSCM17

Risk, Austerity and Neoliberalism

30

 

Progression Regulations

There are no programme-specific progression regulations


Generic Assessment Criteria – Postgraduate

These should be interpreted according to the level at which you are working

 

Categories

 

Grade

Relevance

Knowledge

Analysis

Argument and Structure

Critical Evaluation

Presentation

Reference to Literature

Pass

86 – 100%

The work examined is exemplary and provides clear evidence of a complete grasp of the knowledge, understanding and skills appropriate to the Level of the qualification.  There is also unequivocal evidence showing that all the learning outcomes and responsibilities appropriate to that Level are fully satisfied. At this level it is expected that the work will be exemplary in all the categories cited above. It will demonstrate a particularly compelling evaluation, originality, and elegance of argument, interpretation or discourse.

76-85%

The work examined is excellent  and demonstrates comprehensive knowledge, understanding and skills appropriate to the Level of the qualification.  There is also excellent evidence showing that all the learning outcomes and responsibilities appropriate to that level are fully satisfied. At this level it is expected that the work will be excellent in the majority of the categories cited above or by demonstrating particularly compelling evaluation and elegance of argument, interpretation or discourse and some evidence of originality.

 

70 – 75%

The work examined is of a high standard  and there  is evidence of comprehensive knowledge, understanding and skills appropriate to the Level of the qualification.  There is clearly articulated evidence demonstrating  that all the learning outcomes and responsibilities appropriate to that level are satisfied  At this level it is expected that the standard of the work will be high in the majority of the categories cited above or by demonstrating  particularly compelling evaluation and elegance of argument, interpretation or discourse.

 

60 – 69%

Directly relevant to the requirements of the assessment

A substantial knowledge of relevant material, showing a clear grasp of themes, questions and issues therein

Comprehensive analysis - clear and orderly presentation

Well supported, focussed  argument which is clear and logically structured.

Contains  distinctive or independent thinking; and begins to formulate an independent position in relation to theory and/or practice. 

Well written, with standard spelling and grammar, in a readable style with acceptable format

Critical appraisal of up-to-date and/or appropriate literature.  Recognition of different perspectives.  Very good use of a wide range of sophisticated source material. 

 

50 – 59%

Some attempt to address the requirements of the assessment: may drift away from this in less focused passages

Adequate knowledge of a fair range of relevant material, with intermittent evidence of an appreciation of its significance

Significant analytical treatment which has a clear purpose

Generally coherent and logically structured, using an appropriate mode of argument and/or theoretical mode(s)

May contain some distinctive or independent thinking; may begin to formulate an independent position in relation to theory and/or practice. 

Competently written, with only minor lapses from standard grammar, with acceptable format

Uses a good variety of literature which includes recent texts and/or appropriate literature,  including a substantive amount beyond library texts.  Competent use of source material.

40 – 49%

Some correlation with the requirements of the assessment but there are instances of irrelevance

Basic understanding of the subject but addressing a limited range of material

Some analytical treatment, but may be prone to description, or to narrative, which lacks clear analytical purpose

Some attempt to construct a coherent argument, but may suffer loss of focus and consistency, with issues at stake stated only vaguely, or theoretical mode(s) couched in simplistic terms

Sound work which expresses a coherent position only in broad terms and in uncritical conformity to one or more standard views of the topic

A simple basic style but with significant deficiencies in expression or format that may pose obstacles for the reader

Evidence of use of appropriate literature which goes beyond that referred to by the  tutor.  Frequently only uses a single source to support a point.

Fail

35 – 39%

Relevance to the requirements of the assessment may be very intermittent, and may be reduced to its vaguest and least challenging terms

A limited understanding of a narrow range of material

Largely descriptive or narrative, with little evidence of analysis

A basic argument is evident, but mainly supported by assertion and there may be a  lack of clarity and coherence

Some evidence of a view starting to be formed but mainly derivative.

Numerous deficiencies in expression and presentation; the writer may achieve clarity (if at all) only by using a simplistic or repetitious style

Barely adequate use of literature.  Over reliance on

material provided by the tutor. 

The evidence provided shows that the majority of the learning outcomes and responsibilities appropriate to that Level are satisfied – for compensation consideration. 

30 – 34%

 

The work examined provides insufficient evidence of the knowledge, understanding and skills appropriate to the Level of the qualification.  The evidence provided shows that some of the learning outcomes and responsibilities appropriate to that Level are satisfied.  The work will be weak in some of the indicators.

15-29%

The work examined is unacceptable and provides little evidence of the knowledge, understanding and skills appropriate to the Level of the qualification.  The evidence shows that few of the learning outcomes and responsibilities appropriate to that Level are satisfied. The work will be weak in several of the indicators.

0-14%

The work examined is unacceptable and provides almost no evidence of the knowledge, understanding and skills appropriate to the Level of the qualification.  The evidence fails to show that any of the learning outcomes and responsibilities appropriate to that Level are satisfied. The work will be weak in the majority or all of the indicators.

 


Post Graduate Certificate (Core Modules)

Module

Title

Module Code

C/O

Modes of T&L

Modes of Assessment

 

LO

K1

 

LO

K2

 

LO

K3

 

LO

K4

 

LO

K5

 

LO

K6

 

LO

K7

 

LO

K8

 

LO

K9

 

 

LO

 

K10

 

 

LO

 

K11

LO

S1

LO

S2

LO

S3

LO

S4

LO

S5

LO

S6

LO

S7

LO

S8

LO

S9

LO

S

10

LO

S

11

LO

S

12

 

LOS

13

LO

S

14

Emancipatory Practice Development

SSCM

31

C

Lectures, seminars, workshops on-line tasks

Plan

Tool

T

A

T

A

T

A

T

A

T

A

T

A

T

A

T

A

T

A

 

A

 

T

A

T

A

T

A

T

A

T

A

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Research and Evidence

SSCM

32

C

Lectures, seminars,  workshops

Essay

Worksheets

Proposal

 

T

A

 

 

 

T

A

T

A

T

A

T

A

 

 

 

T

A

 

 

 

 

 

T

A

T

A

T

A

T

A

 

 

 

 


 

Post Graduate Diploma (Core Modules)

Emancipatory Practice Development

SSCM

31

C

Lectures, seminars, workshops on-line tasks

Plan

Tool

T

A

T

A

T

A

T

A

T

A

T

A

T

A

T

A

T

A

 

A

 

T

A

T

A

T

A

T

A

T

A

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Research and Evidence

SSCM

32

C

Lectures, seminars,  workshops

Essay

Worksheets

Proposal

 

T

A

 

 

 

T

A

T

A

T

A

T

A

 

 

 

T

A

 

 

 

 

 

T

A

T

A

T

A

T

A

 

 

 

 

Option Modules

Titles

Module Code

C/O

Modes of T&L

Modes of Assessment

 

LO

K1

 

LO

K2

 

LO

K3

 

LO

K4

 

LO

K5

 

LO

K6

 

LO

K7

 

LO

K8

 

LO

K9

 

 

LO

 

K10

 

 

LO

 

K11

LO

S1

LO

S2

LO

S3

LO

S4

LO

S5

LO

S6

LO

S7

LO

S8

LO

S9

LO

S

10

LO

S

11

LO

S

12

 

LOS

13

LO

S

14

Leadership and Management In  Practice Development

 

SSCM

10

O

Lectures, seminars, workshops

Presentation

Essay

 

 

T

A

A

A

T

A

T

A

T

A

T

A

T

A

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

T

A

T

A

T

A

 

A

T

A

 

 

 

 

Quality Interventions In Practice Development

SSCM

11

O

Lectures, seminars, workshops

Conference Paper Abstract and Electronic Academic Poster

T

A

T

A

T

A

T

A

T

A

T

A

T

A

T

A

 

A

 

A

 

 

 

 

 

 

T

A

T

A

T

A

 

A

T

A

 

 

 

 

Exploring Social Entrepreneurship

SSCM

04

O

Lectures,

seminars,

workshops

Portfolio

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

T

A

T

A

T

A

 

A

T

A

 

 

 

 

Risk, Austerity and Neo-liberalism

SSCM17

O

Lectures,

seminars,

workshops

Essay

 

 

 

 

 

T

A

T

A

T

A

T

A

T

A

 

T

A

T

A

T

A

T

A

 

T

A

T

A

 

 

T

A

 

 

 

 

 


Masters (Core Modules)

Emancipatory Practice Development

SSCM

31

C

Lectures, seminars, workshops on-line tasks

Plan

Tool

T

A

T

A

T

A

T

A

T

A

T

A

T

A

T

A

T

A

 

A

 

T

A

T

A

T

A

T

A

T

A

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Research and Evidence

SSCM

32

C

Lectures, seminars,  workshops

Essay

Worksheets

Proposal

 

T

A

 

 

 

T

A

T

A

T

A

T

A

 

 

 

T

A

 

 

 

 

 

T

A

T

A

T

A

T

A

 

 

 

 

Research Project in Practice Development

 

 

SSCM

18/19/20/21/22/23

 

C

Lectures, seminars,  workshops, on-line tasks

Dissertation

T

A

T

A

T

A

T

A

T

A

T

A

T

A

T

A

T

A

T

A

 

T

A

T

A

T

A

T

A

T

A

T

A

T

A

T

A

T

A

T

A

T

A

T

A

T

A

T

A

T

A

Option Modules

Titles

Module Code

C/O

Modes of T&L

Modes of Assessment

 

LO

K1

 

LO

K2

 

LO

K3

 

LO

K4

 

LO

K5

 

LO

K6

 

LO

K7

 

LO

K8

 

LO

K9

 

 

LO

 

K10

 

 

LO

 

K11

LO

S1

LO

S2

LO

S3

LO

S4

LO

S5

LO

S6

LO

S7

LO

S8

LO

S9

LO

S

10

LO

S

11

LO

S

12

 

LOS

13

LO

S

14

Leadership and Management In  Practice Development

 

SSCM

10

O

Lectures, seminars, workshops

Presentation

Essay

 

 

T

A

A

A

T

A

T

A

T

A

T

A

T

A

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

T

A

T

A

T

A

 

A

T

A

 

 

 

 

Quality Interventions In Practice Development

SSCM

11

O

Lectures, seminars, workshops

Conference Paper Abstract and Electronic Academic Poster

T

A

T

A

T

A

T

A

T

A

T

A

T

A

T

A

 

A

 

A

 

 

 

 

 

 

T

A

T

A

T

A

 

A

T

A

 

 

 

 

Exploring Social Entrepreneurship

SSCM

04

O

Lectures,

seminars,

workshops

Portfolio

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

T

A

T

A

T

A

 

A

T

A

 

 

 

 

Risk, Austerity and Neo-liberalism

SSCM17

O

Lectures,

seminars,

workshops

Essay

 

 

 

 

 

T

A

T

A

T

A

T

A

T

A

 

T

A

T

A

T

A

T

A

 

T

A

T

A

 

 

T

A

 

 

 

 


[1] To be allocated in consultation with MISD team in Planning and Finance

[2] Programme Studies/Assessment Board that will have management responsibilities for the programme.

[3] Please contact Admissions Manager for code

[4] JACS code = e.g. (V1) History, (G5) Computing Science, etc. for information contact relevant Faculty Associate Dean (See QAA Website http://www.qaa.ac.uk/WorkWithUs/Documents/jacs_codes.pdf)

[5] Please confer with Amanda Watson for funding status for programme

[6] An Open programme constitutes an open admissions policy.  A Closed programme is normally specific to one client only.  If in doubt please consult Academic Services or Planning and Finance.

 

[7] As per QAE guidelines

[8] Please contact Amanda Watson for confirmation of funding details

[9]