Attachments

 

Quality Handbook

 

 

 

Programme Specification Template – Postgraduate 2019-20

 

SECTION A: CORE INFORMATION

 

  1.  

Name  of programme:

MSc Inequality and Society

 

  1.  

Award title:

Post Graduate Certificate Inequality and Society

Post Graduate Diploma Inequality and Society

MSc Inequality and Society

 

  1.  

Programme linkage:

 

Is this part of group of linked programmes between which students can transfer at agreed points? (e.g. a group of programmes with a common set of taught modules)

No

 

  1.  

Is the programme a top-up only?

No

 

  1.  

Level of award:

Level 7

 

  1.  

Awarding body:

University of Sunderland

 

  1.  

Department:

School of Social Sciences

 

  1.  

Programme Studies Board:

Postgraduate Social Sciences

 

  1.  

Programme Leader:

Andrew Dalton

 

 


  1. How and where can I study the programme?

 

At Sunderland:

Full-time on campus

Part-time on campus

As work-based learning full-time

 

As work-based learning part-time

 

As a full-time sandwich course

 

As a part-time sandwich course

 

By distance learning

 

 

  1. How long does the programme take?

 

 

Min number of years / months

Max number of years / months

Full-time

1

3

Part-time

2

6

Distance learning

 

 

Work-based learning

 

 

 

Start Date: September 2019

 

SECTION B:  FURTHER CORE INFORMATION

 

  1. Learning and teaching strategy.

 

The programme learning and teaching strategy is consistent with and reflects the aims of both the current University and Faculty based Learning and Teaching Plans, In support of the Faculty Learning and Teaching Plan, the Faculty aims to:

 

Improve the use of library resources across the subject disciplines to support learning.

Enhance the use of digital pedagogies.

 

The Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) (Canvas) eLearning portal will play a significant role in the students’ experience. Learning resources and material from class-based sessions will be available through the virtual classroom. Students will also be encouraged to communicate with each other and staff via the VLE.

 

Learning technologies will be utilised within and outside the classroom. For example, this has particular relevance in active learning with software packages NVivo and Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS). My Module Resources (MMR) will be used for every module on Canvas.

 

Working closely with the Liaison Librarian for Social Science will ensure that students receive an initial library welcome/induction. This will be followed up by tailored skills sessions at key points in the course to ensure that all students are aware of the full range of print and electronic library resources that are available to support their studies and know how to access and utilise the full range of resources and their associated platforms to support their learning throughout the course. In addition, the Programme handbook will emphasise the importance of having a good grasp of the University Library and attending the Library Skills sessions.

 

My Module Resources (MMR) and Skills for Learning (S4L) are both available via the Library website and also embedded into every Canvas module.

 

MMR enables seamless digital access to key reading lists and offers information about the availability of individual resources. Where possible, an electronic version of key resources (books, chapters, journal articles, scanned extracts) will be made available online to enable instant multi-user access to key module resources from anywhere with an internet connection.

 

Skills for Learning is a collection of e-learning resources, available online which enable students to independently develop their academic skills, an essential part of successful study both at university and for future employability. Academic skills include understanding academic language, questioning and thinking, finding and evaluating information, critical thinking, working with others and research skills.

 

Learning materials include guides, videos and activities developed by Skills for Learning and released under the terms of a Creative Commons licence.

 

To support and enable continuous improvement of the learning experience, including the e-learning experience, through a blended approach of learning modes.

 

The teaching and learning methodologies are designed to encourage, over the duration of the Programmes, a greater independence within students for taking responsibility for their own learning. The balance of lectures and workshops, the varying uses of the VLE (including self-assessment exercises and asynchronous debates) and the incorporation of self-directed study into the modules all contribute to the development of independent learners. In addition, extra-curricular activities such as organisational visits and guest speaker’s programmes encourage students to engage in activities which, although not assessed, contribute directly to their learning and to their career prospects.

 

Ensure the quality and consistency of feedback on assignments.

 

Students will have access via the VLE to the Programme Handbook, including the aims and outcomes, and to all the modules which contain their aims and outcomes, so that they understand what they have to achieve to successfully complete them. The assessment methods used consist of both formative and summative elements; they are linked to the learning outcomes which in turn inform the detailed feedback that students will receive.

 

The School of Social Sciences has a very good reputation with external examiners and with students for its fair and rigorous approach to assessment and constructive feedback, the latter is given through Turnitin. The same principle will be upheld in this programme.

 

Secure cohort identity, empowering students to make the most of their University experience and take responsibility for their learning.

Provide student support for progression and achievement.

Encourage student engagement at module level to respond effectively to individual concerns.

 

Cohort identity will be addressed at the very beginning of the programme during the welcome and induction period. Throughout the programme students will be provided with opportunities to be part of the community of learning and develop networks, learn together with each other and staff, sharing knowledge, solving problems and exchanging ideas and frustrations. The VLE, as an interactive tool, will play a significant role in the development of the community of learning. Moreover, students will appoint their representatives who will ensure that their views, as a cohort, are heard and acted upon. Moreover, cohort identity will be further strengthened by students dealing with an identified staff member who will be the Programme Leader and with the Programme Team who consist of academic, administrative and library staff.

 

Adult learning principles underpin the strategy aimed at empowering students to make the most of their University experience and take responsibility for their learning. During the welcome and induction period and throughout the programme, students will be informed of the range of services, curricular and extra-curricular facilities that are available at the University. Students will be advised that, consistent with adult learning principles, they will be expected to be active and independent learners, taking responsibility for their own learning. Hence, they will note that lectures are kept to a minimum; the learning and teaching approaches that will be used are aimed at empowering, enabling and facilitating students to be independent learners, having the confidence and skills to take responsibility for their learning, demonstrating self-direction, sound time management skills in completing tasks/assignments, developing transferable skills, linking theory and practice in creative and innovative ways and critically evaluating, synthesising and applying new learning to critically reflect and problem solve.

 

In addition, students will be informed that they will submit their assignments electronically through Turnitin which impacts positively on students’ learning as it provides feedback on plagiarism detection. Students will be able to check their presentation of references/citations and their similarity scores.

 

High quality students’ support is an integral and key component of the learning and teaching strategy. Students will be informed of the full range of help and support that are available at programme, Faculty and University levels. Students will be informed that their active engagement in the delivery of the programme is crucial so that through feedback and representation, their views are heard and acted upon. This strategy will ensure that their needs/aspirations (realistic and reasonable) are being met and provide the Programme Team with valuable information to monitor and continue improving the quality of the programme.

 

Sustain, support and extend our commitment to the Research Informed Curriculum, ensuring the links between research and professional practice.

 

Staff involved in the delivery of this programme are fully supportive and committed to the Research Informed Curriculum. They are experienced practitioners and many are engaged in research activities through the Faculty’s Centre for Applied Social Science (CASS). Staff will integrate relevant and recent research into sessions in order to enable students to have a critical understanding of the relationship between theory, research and practice, as well as exposing them to research informed teaching.

 

Assessments

The principle of Assessment for Learning (AfL) will underpin the assessment strategy. The ethos is that assessment is an educative process, designed to facilitate the student’s personal, academic and professional development. The assessments have also been designed to ensure that there is a manageable and even spread in terms of workload.

 

The assessment strategy is designed to reflect the range of module learning outcomes and includes the full range of approaches. The strategy is also designed to enable students to demonstrate their ability to apply their knowledge and understanding of the core research competencies, outlined in the Economic and Social Research Council (2009) Post Graduate and Training Guidelines https://esrc.ukri.org/skills-and-careers/doctoral-training/postgraduate-training-guidelines/ to inform their research skills. Students will develop knowledge and critical understanding of research methodologies, write research proposals, critique existing research studies both generally and specifically, analyse quantitative and qualitative data, and develop and implement a small scale research study as the basis of their dissertation.

 

  1. Retention strategy

 

Students are offered tutorials and access to student support mechanisms. The University’s Academic Strategy emphasises the student experience and the postgraduate programmes team has been recognised consistently as providing excellent support to students as evidenced through the feedback obtained at Staff/Student Liaison meetings as well as staff and student feedback at both module and programme level. There are a number of elements relating to student support (both academic and personal) which have contributed to the programme team’s achievements and which continue to be at the centre of all our academic provision. All on campus students will have access to the University's central support services including Counselling, Disability service, Health and Well-being, Chaplaincy, financial support and advice, International Office and the Careers and Employability Service. The Students Union provides an independent service which offers advice and support across the full range of personal and academic issues which students may encounter. Students wishing to lodge a complaint or an appeal can seek advice from the Students Union or from University Academic Services. Full details of these services can be found on the University's website. Where appropriate, academic or support staff in the Faculty will sign post students to these specialist services. In addition, students have access to a personal tutor section on the VLE which is an information source for many of these services. The Programme Leader will continue to be available to all students should they require advice or one-to-one support on a particular issue.

 

Moreover, the flexibility of the programme with built in ‘step on’ and ‘step off’ mechanisms at Post Graduate Certificate and Post Graduate Diploma levels will help busy practitioners to balance and meet the challenging demands of work and study, by enabling students to take time off from the programme and then resume at a later date as appropriate, thereby contributing to retention.

 

  1. Any other information

 

Depending on demands, consideration will be given by the Programme Team to secure Faculty approval to offer the modules as stand-alone short courses for CPD (Continuous Professional Development) purposes.

 

All modules taught on this postgraduate degree are by active researchers who are involved in researching societal inequalities.

 

Though not a professional accreditation from a statutory or regulating body, the Programme Leader is seeking an endorsement from Equality North East (NE) to write a written endorsement of the programme as a whole which will be featured on the website.

 

SECTION C:  TEACHING AND LEARNING

 

  1. What is the programme about?

 

The MSc Inequality and Society critically examines the nature of our unequal social world and it enables students to understand, through a social science lens, how inequality embeds itself and operates from both a local to global level, including what this means for individuals, groups, communities and societies. It will enable students to critically examine and theorise what are the key drivers of inequality and to understand the nature of intersectionality as a way to understand unequal relationships. Furthermore, students will use theoretical frameworks, policy and research to examine what can be done to combat inequality, discrimination and oppression and to measure the successes of these solutions. Students will develop advanced research skills to identify a research project and use this research to propose solution-based problems to existing inequalities.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  1. What will I know or be able to do at the end of the programme?

 

Learning Outcomes Postgraduate Certificate – Skills

By the end of this part of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

 

S1: Be able to process and synthesise effectively drawing from a range of information sources       relevant to the equality and diversity agenda.

S2: Effectively present on issues and findings around equality and diversity in a manner appropriate to the target audience.

S3: Critically analyse issues of equality and diversity, including the nature of intersectionality and inequality.

S4: Demonstrate a high level of skill in working effectively as a team addressing equality and diversity topics.

 

Learning Outcomes Postgraduate Certificate – Knowledge

By the end of this part of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

 

K1: Have specific knowledge and critical understanding of equality, diversity and the nature of inequality as concepts.

K2: Demonstrate, at a high level, an understanding of information gleaned from a variety of information sources to contribute to their knowledge and critical understanding of theories and intersections of inequality.

K3: Have a critical understanding of the nature of intersectionality and the nature of how inequality manifests within society.

K4: Have a critical understanding of the key drivers of inequality.

 

Learning Outcomes Postgraduate Diploma – Skills

By the end of this part of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do all learning outcomes gained at Certificate level and the following:

 

S5: Be able to critically review a range of philosophical and theoretical perspectives on inequality, diversity and society.

S6: Be able to critically review a range of philosophical, theoretical and methodological perspectives around research methods.

S7: Critically examine the workings of different research methodologies.

S8: Construct a clear plan for a research project in order to execute a dissertation.

 

Learning Outcomes Postgraduate Diploma – Knowledge

By the end of this part of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do all learning outcomes gained at Certificate level and the following:

 

K5: Have a critical understanding of a range of drivers of inequality in more than one area, utilising social scientific theory.

K6: Have a critical understanding of a range of philosophical and theoretical perspectives around areas of inequality within society.

K7: Have a critical understanding of complimentary and competing approaches to tackling inequality.

K8: Be able to critically evaluate inequality at a local, national and/or global level and approaches to dealing with it.

 

Learning Outcomes Masters – Skills

By the end of this part of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do all learning outcomes gained at Diploma level and the following:

 

S9: Be able to identify and realise a high level and feasible project for individual study and effectively and critically apply their own social research skills to constructing that project.

S10: Effectively demonstrate their critical writing skills.

 

Learning Outcomes Masters – Knowledge

By the end of this part of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do all learning outcomes gained at Diploma level and the following:

 

K9: Demonstrate critical and comprehensive evidence based understanding of equality and diversity issues within a research dissertation.

K10: Be able to critically evaluate case studies of inequality.

K11: To demonstrate critical understanding of appropriate theoretical frameworks and their applications to an area(s) of inequality.

 

  1. What will the programme consist of?

 

Semester 1:

Semester 2:

Semester 3:

PG Certificate

PG Diploma

Masters

Core

SSCM25: Inequalities, Diversity and Intersectionality: Theory and Practice

 

Core

SSCM32: Research and Evidence

 

Two options taken from the following modules:

 

SSCM24: Gender-based Violence and Society

 

SSCM27: Mind, Body and Health Inequalities

 

SSCM28: Fear of a Queer Planet? Sexuality and Inequality

 

SSCM17: Risk, Austerity and Neoliberalism

 

SSCM29: Global Childhoods

 

SSCM30: Rethinking the Clinical Gaze: Medicine, Disability and Society

 

Core

SSCM26: Inequality and Society Dissertation

 

 

The layout of the programme will ensure that core taught modules are in semester one, and both semesters follow the typical master’s level semester format. All students in semester one complete a core module in SSCM25 Inequalities, Diversity and Intersectionality: Theory and Practice, as well as a core module in SSCM32 Research and Evidence to prepare them for dissertation research in SSCM26: Inequality and Society Dissertation. This will give students the necessary theory, concepts and research methods training required to write the dissertation and to take part in either library based or empirical research, at the end of the programme.

 

In semester two, students will then take two additional option module choices to further their specialisation areas. It is planned that over time, with programme development, further optional modules will be added.

 

The semester three dissertation module is a year-long module which will be addressed over the course of the academic year, particularly after the research methods module is completed. Key information about the module will be given to students via development ‘days’ that will condense dissertation information into specific days as opposed to weekly teaching. Tutor support will be offered to guide students through their dissertation.

 

  1. How will I be taught?

 

Scheduled teaching activities

Yes

Independent study

Yes

Placement

No (though optional internships will be promoted)

 

Didactic exposition: although this will vary from module to module, and indeed from teacher to teacher, all modules will take advantage of the opportunity for the tutor to explain to the whole class, a concept, to take questions, to outline areas of knowledge, indicate methods of tackling a problem and demonstrate methods of analysis and synthesis of materials. Audio-visual aids will be used as appropriate, such as the use of overhead slides, ‘PowerPoint’ and video. Key points will normally be outlined in handouts.

 

Interactive sessions: whether during seminars or whole group teaching sessions, students will be expected in the course of all modules to interact with each other and/or with the tutor to develop ideas, work on tasks, practice skills or explain material.

 

Research: During induction and the programme, students will be introduced to research techniques. The induction programme contains activities which introduce students to the library (including practical exercises) and to the available electronic sources of information, for example, Discover. All modules, throughout the programme, require students to engage in the research of both primary and secondary sources of information. The level and depth of research required for the completion of modules will then increase as the student progresses throughout their programme culminating in the final dissertation module.

 

Directed Private Study: This will include reading, preparation for class or for assessment, group activity, revision, and carrying out assessment work. All module guides will provide students with advice in respect of this, and as a minimum will provide details of required reading (for preparation of timetabled sessions and/or for the completion of assessments). Whilst these methods will form the backbone of much of the teaching and learning strategy, the programme may utilise a much wider, more eclectic combination of approaches.

 

As is evident throughout this specification, the VLE (Canvas) has become an important element of the teaching and learning strategy with its specific usage varying from module to module. For distance learning modules our strategic partners may use other Virtual Learning Environment systems to support student learning.  In some instances, the VLE is used mainly as a repository for module documents, such as lecture materials and overhead slides, whilst others involve direct web links, discussion boards and self-assessment exercises. The VLE is part of the programme team’s aim to offer a blended approach to teaching and learning by using a range of tools in the delivery of the modules.

 

Case studies may be used across the programme and are intended to enable students to develop the ability to;

  • identify the issues in need of research;
  • apply subject specific knowledge to a realistic and/or practical context;
  • make critical judgments of the merits of a particular argument; and;
  • present and make reasoned choices between alternative solutions.

 

The case studies may take the form of real cases or issues in debate at any given moment in time or may be hypothetical problems which are reflective of realistic problems.

 

Self-directed study is included in all modules as a way of encouraging students to take a greater responsibility in respect of their learning experience.

 

A list of the modules in the programme can be found in the Programme Regulations.

 

A summary of the types of teaching, learning and assessment in each module of the programme can be found in the Matrix of Modes of Teaching.

 

  1. How will I be assessed and given feedback?

 

Written examinations

Yes

Coursework

Yes

Practical assessments

No

 

A summary of the types of teaching, learning and assessment in each module of the programme can be found in the Matrix of Modes of Teaching.

 

The generic assessment criteria which we use can be found here. Some programmes use subject-specific assessment criteria which are based on the generic ones.

 

This programme uses the Generic University Assessment Criteria

YES

 

This programme uses the Subject Specific Assessment Criteria

 

NO

 

The University regulations can be found here.

 

Students are informed, via Module Guides, of the nature, timing and criteria for each assessment used.  The programme leaders work with staff to ensure that the deadlines for assessed work are spread across the assessment period.  All assessments are internally moderated by designated members of the team and by the relevant External Examiners before issue.  Careful moderation processes and scrutiny of assessment ensure equivalence of standard and appropriateness of assessment for measuring outcomes. An internal and external moderation operates likewise with regard to completed student work.

 

The programme utilises a range of methods to assess the learning outcomes of the programme and the modules. 

Formative assessment is utilised throughout the programme and will take place through the  adoption of a range of approaches which are detailed in the module descriptors, indicatively these approaches may include: group work, observations, individual or group presentations, student conferences, round table debates, blog/journal activities, discussion board questions and feedback, peer review, question and answer sessions, debriefing exercises, Socratic seminars, role play, progression tests, assignment discussion, case study activity and theory/practice related discussions. 

Summative assessment will be conducted for each module.  The marking criteria will be followed throughout assessments.  All assignments are designed to test students’ understanding of theory and applied perspectives and their ability to use this appropriately to critically analyse and evaluate current practice and research.

 

Students are required to demonstrate self-reflection and reflective practice where appropriate and to demonstrate reflexivity in relation to rigorous exploration of their beliefs and behaviours as individuals who critically analyse situations and theory.  It is recognised that not all subjects lend themselves to this approach, but the programme as a whole will present many opportunities for students to demonstrate these skills. The programme uses a range of assessment methods designed to match the learning outcomes being assessed and to offer students different methods of demonstrating their learning. These include methods such as written assignments, individual presentations, reports, a conference and a dissertation. There will be a strong emphasis on independent and problem based learning, critical analysis and the integration of theory, knowledge and research. Students will be provided with feedback on their assignments to help them prepare later assessments. The aim of the assignment methods used is to enable students to become confident in their ability to be self-directed, innovative in tackling and solving problems and autonomous in designing, implementing and evaluating tasks.

 

The University aims to return marked assessments and feedback within four working weeks of the assignment submission date after internal moderation process have been completed. If this is not possible, students will be notified by the Module Leaders when the feedback is available and how it can be obtained.

 

The Academic Misconduct Regulations and associated guidance can be found here. It is the responsibility of students to ensure they are familiar with their responsibilities in regards to assessment and the implications of an allegation of academic misconduct.

 

Students should refer to the University Regulations for information on degree classifications.


  1. Teaching, learning and assessment matrix

 

Matrix of modes of teaching, learning and assessment

 

NB. Not all option modules may be offered in any one academic year and will depend on the availability of staff and the priorities of the school. In addition, modules will usually need to be selected by a minimum number of students. Option modules may be available on more than one programme and the Programme Leaders will liaise with the Faculty Management Team to ensure there is a reasonable amount of choice in any given year.

 

Module

Code

Core / optional

Modes of T&L

Modes of Assessment

LO S1

LO K1

LO S2

LO K2

LO K3

LO K4

LO S3

LO K5

LO S4

LO K6

LO S5

LOK7

LO S6

LO K8

LO S7

LOK9

LO S8

LO K

10

LO S9

LO K

11

LO S

10

Inequalities, Diversity and Intersectionality: Theory and Practice*

 

SSCM25

Core

Lecture, seminar, private study

Essay

 

Group Project

T

D

A

T

D

A

 

T

D

A

T

D

A

T

D

A

T

D

A

T

D

A

T

D

A

T

D

A

T

D

A

 

 

T

D

A

 

 

 

T

D

A

 

T

D

A

T

D

A

Research and Evidence*

 

SSCM32

Core

Computer workshops, seminar, canvas

Comparative Research Study

 

Practical Skills Assessment

 

Research Proposal

T

D

A

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

T

D

A

 

T

D

A

 

T

D

A

 

 

 

T

D

A

T

D

A

T

D

A

Inequality and Society Dissertation*

 

SSCM26

Core

Workshops, dissertation days, private study

 

 

Dissertation

 

Presentation

T

D

A

T

D

A

T

D

A

 

 

T

D

A

 

T

D

A

 

T

D

A

T

D

A

T

D

A

T

D

A

T

D

A

T

D

A

T

D

A

T

D

A

 

T

D

A

T

D

A

T

D

A

Risk, Austerity and Neoliberalism

 

 

SSCM17

Option

Group work, seminar, private study

 

Essay

T

D

A

T

D

A

 

 

T

D

A

T

D

A

 

T

D

A

 

T

D

A

T

D

A

T

D

A

 

T

D

A

 

 

 

T

D

A

 

T

D

A

T

D

A

Gender-based Violence and Society

 

SSCM24

Option

Lecture, seminar, optional court visit, private study

Evaluation of a contemporary source

 

Investigative writing designing an intervention

T

D

A

T

D

A

 

 

 

T

D

A

 

T

D

A

 

T

D

A

T

D

A

T

D

A

 

 

 

 

 

T

D

A

 

T

D

A

T

D

A

Mind, Body and Health Inequalities

 

SSCM27

Option

Lecture, seminar, private study

Essay

 

Essay

T

D

A

T

D

A

 

 

 

T

D

A

 

T

D

A

 

T

D

A

T

D

A

T

D

A

 

 

 

 

 

T

D

A

 

T

D

A

T

D

A

Fear of a Queer Planet? Sexuality and Inequality

 

SSCM28

Option

Group work, lectures, workshops, online learning tasks, private study

Essay

 

Report

T

D

A

T

D

A

 

T

D

A

T

D

A

T

D

A

T

D

A

T

D

A

 

T

D

A

T

D

A

T

D

A

 

T

D

A

 

 

 

T

D

A

 

T

D

A

T

D

A

Global Childhoods

 

SSCM29

Option

Lecture, seminar, private study

Essay

T

D

A

T

D

A

 

 

 

T

D

A

 

T

D

A

 

T

D

A

T

D

A

T

D

A

 

T

D

A

 

 

 

 

 

T

D

A

T

D

A

Rethinking the Clinical Gaze: Medicine, Disability and Society

 

 

SSCM30

Option

Lecture, seminar, private study

Essay

 

Essay

 

 

 

T

D

A

 

 

 

T

D

A

 

T

D

A

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

T

D

A

 

T

D

A

T

D

A

 

*Indicates a compulsory module which must be successfully passed for progression to further modules or to the next academic year of study


 

  1. How does research influence the programme? 

 

Staff involved in the delivery of this Programme are experienced practitioners and many are engaged in research activities through the Faculty’s Centre for Applied Social Science (CASS) https://www.sunderland.ac.uk/more/research/institutes/institute-education-society/centre-education-social-science-pedagogy/cass-centre-for-applied-social-sciences/

 

The work of CASS is guided by three key objectives:

 

  • to facilitate knowledge exchange between academics, frontline practitioners and policymakers to support high quality workforce development based around Families and Communities;

 

  • to produce excellent original research to increase society’s understanding of how inequality and social exclusion occurs and to use this to improve the life chances of the most vulnerable (this includes providing a supportive research environment for early career and postgraduate research);

 

  • to develop a research-active curriculum that engages undergraduates and graduates in policy and practice challenges in their chosen field.

 

The range of work in CASS engages in requires a multi-disciplinary approach. The centre draws together expertise from across the University’s faculties. It combines original academic research with practice-based collaborations and reach-out activities, often working directly with practitioners, policymakers and front-line delivery staff.

 

CASS is engaged in three core activities:

 

  • Practice Based Collaborations: to improve and address issues related to the development of a highly skilled workforce.

 

  • Research: the work of CASS has achieved recognition regionally, nationally and internationally.

 

  • Knowledge Exchange: CASS hosts several seminar series which bring together researchers, practitioners and policymakers to discuss and debate key issues across a range of social care and social justice topics.

 

Staff will integrate relevant and recent research into sessions in order to enable students to have a critical understanding of the relationship between theory and the realities of practice as well as exposing them to research informed teaching. Students are required to undertake research as part of their studies and to disseminate their findings in a variety of ways: e.g. to organisations where they work and in peer reviewed journals, present their work to their peers, at conferences and contribute to book chapters. These mechanisms will develop the community of learning with academics, peers and students.

 

SECTION D EMPLOYABILITY

 

  1. How will the programme prepare me for employment?

 

The programme gives you the opportunity to develop advanced skills and knowledge which you can use in the future. Some postgraduate programmes are associated with a particular career path but most skills can be applied to a range of employment situations. The skills which this programme is designed to develop are listed below.

 

The programme will enhance students’ professional knowledge and understanding about key issues involved in understanding inequality, as well as equality and diversity issues, and will offer them opportunities for career progression as leaders and facilitators of equal opportunities within the private, public and Third Sectors. It is anticipated that any practitioners employed in organisations will be largely engaging with this programme. Through utilising Sunderland Futures, students will take part in ‘employability days’ which will emphasise employment opportunities which can be gained through studying this MSc (for example, using employers to discuss the value of this MSc), as well as opportunities for PhD information which may lead them onto further study. Students can access voluntary opportunities to take part in internships with organisations to work on equality and diversity projects, as well as potential opportunities for volunteering abroad to put their knowledge of equality issues into practice. A structured programme of employability have been designed with Sunderland Futures to engage with employability from induction week to right throughout the programme itself. Through gaining the opportunity to plan and speak at the MSc Inequality and Society Conference, at the end of the programme, students will gain further skills to use toward employment.

 

Students will be able to access opportunities such as Leading Lights training, volunteering and internships, employability days and CV support as part of a wider package of employability built into the programme.

 

Employment opportunities for students who complete this MSc are varied and they fit into the following broad areas:

  • Further PhD study and social/health/policy/charity research;
  • Areas such as the third/voluntary sector, equality and diversity champions within public, private and educational sectors, human rights work, international development, work with marginalised young people and adults, human resources, community development, campaign and advocacy roles, public health and health policy, the criminal justice system and global NGOs and INGOs.
  • ‘Upskilling’ a current job role to progress onto another position or to specialise within a particular area in their current employment.

 

For information about other opportunities available to our students who study on campus, click here.

 

  1. Professional statutory or regulatory body (PSRB) accreditation.

 

PSRB accreditation is not relevant to this programme 

Not Applicable

PSRB accreditation is currently being sought for this programme

Not Applicable

This programme currently has PSRB accreditation

Not Applicable

The modules to be studied

All

Pass-marks for some or all modules and/or parts

(elements) of modules 

40%

Placement requirements

N/A

Attendance requirements

The equivalent of one day per week during the academic year

Professional practice requirements

N/A

Final or overall mark for the award  

40%

Other 

N/A

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SECTION E:  PROGRAMME STRUCTURE AND REGULATIONS

 

Name of programme: MSc Inequality and Society

Title of final award: MSc Inequality and Society

Interim awards[1]:

Postgraduate Certificate

Postgraduate Diploma

Masters

 

Accreditation: N/A

 

University Regulation (please state the relevant University Regulation): 4.2.1. The overall pass mark for each

module is 40%. To pass a module a student must also have submitted work for each element of assessment.

 

Stage 1

 

Core modules:

 

Code

Title

Credits

SSCM25

Inequalities, Diversity and Intersectionality: Theory and Practice

 

30

SSCM32

Research and Evidence

 

 

30

SSCM26

Inequality and Society Dissertation

 

60

 

Optional Modules

Choose modules to the value of 60 credits from the following list

 

Code

Title

Credits

SSCM29

Global Childhoods

 

30

SSCM28

Fear of a Queer Planet? Sexuality and Inequality

 

30

SSCM27

Mind, Body and Health Inequalities

 

30

SSCM24

Gender-based Violence and Society

 

30

SSCM17

Risk, Austerity and Neoliberalism

 

30

SSCM30

 

 

Rethinking the Clinical Gaze: Medicine, Disability and Society

 

30

 

SECTION F:  ADMISSIONS, LEARNING ENVIRONMENT AND SUPPORT

 

  1. What are the admissions requirements?

 

The University’s standard admissions requirements can be found in the university regulations.

Programme-specific requirements which are in addition to those regulations are given below. 

 

Can students enter with advanced standing?

 

NO

 

The University has a process by which applicants whose experience to date already covers one or more modules of the programme they are applying for may seek Accreditation of Prior Learning (APL). Full details can be found here but if you think that this may be relevant to you, please contact the department which offers the programme you are interested in.

 

  1. What kind of support and help will there be?

 

The University’s Academic Strategy emphasises the student experience and the postgraduate programmes team has been recognised consistently as providing excellent support to students as evidenced through the feedback obtained at Staff/Student Liaison meetings as well as staff and student feedback at both module and programme level.  There are a number of elements relating to student support (both academic and personal) which have contributed to the programme team’s achievements and which continue to be at the centre of all our academic provision.

 

All on campus students will have access to the University's central support services including Counselling, Disability service, Health and Well-being, Chaplaincy, financial support and advice, International Office and the Careers and Employability Service. The Students Union provides an independent service which offers advice and support across the full range of personal and academic issues which students may encounter. Students wishing to lodge a complaint or an appeal can seek advice from the Students Union or from University Academic Services. Full details of these services can be found on the University's website. Where appropriate, academic or support staff in the Faculty will sign post students to these specialist services. In addition, students have access to a Personal Tutor section on the VLE which is an information source for many of these services. The Programme Leader will continue to be available to all students should they require advice or one-to-one support on a particular issue. In addition, guest speakers and organisational visits will provide support to the students learning experience. Part time students have access to all facilities and efforts are made to accommodate work commitments through alternative communications systems and times.

 

The Induction Programme is intended to introduce students to all aspects of their time at Sunderland – to the staff associated with their programme; to the School; to the wider University and indeed to the study of their programme. The Induction Week is an important aspect of the Programme. All students will;

  • be provided with a Programme Handbook;
  • be introduced to the programme curriculum and to some of the skills involved in the study of their programme;
  • be provided with information on academic referencing including information on the University Regulations on Cheating, Plagiarism and Collusion; 
  • be provided with information in respect of central University support facilities i.e. student counselling, the Chaplaincy, the Student Office, financial guidance and assistance;
  • be provided with specific guidance of disability support facilities within the University, how these may be accessed and the benefits of so doing;
  • be introduced to the VLE and the support facilities available in relation to the Programme, to modules and to careers services;
  • be given an opportunity to interact with the staff of the School of Social Sciences and each other.

 

An allocated member of the programme team is to be the Personal Tutor for all students. Students are to be provided with contact details and office availability times in the Induction session but also via the programme handbook and on the VLE site. Typically, the Personal Tutoring system is ‘driven’ by the students and their support needs as well the University of Sunderland’s Personal Tuition Policy. It is usual for the Personal Tutor to email or telephone all tutees before and after a taught block to check for progress and understanding and allow discussion of any issues. The use of Engage will be utilised to document student meetings and to set targets to ensure that retention of students is a key priority.

 

In most instances, and with regard to specific modules, the first point of contact for studies advice will be the tutors, all of whom are willing to provide advice at the end of formal class contact time, in module surgery sessions (where these form a part of the teaching and learning strategy for the module) and in staff surgery time.  Basic study skills are included in the induction programme, in the Student Handbook and on the VLE. Students are introduced to the use of the VLE as part of the Induction Programme. Various web links are provided to ensure that students have the most up to date information available.

 

Some master’s students will want to continue their studies after they graduate, which will be promoted heavily to continue their studies. This may be further academic study at Ph.D. level or Professional Doctorate. The Graduate Research School and the Careers and Employability Service has a wide range of information available to students should they choose to continue with their studies. Workshops will be offered to students to inform them about their options.

 

The University provides a range of professional support services including wellbeing, counselling, disability support, and a Chaplaincy. Click on the links for further information.

 

  1. What resources will I have access to?

 

On campus

/

In a partner college

 

By distance learning

 

 

On campus

Tick all that apply

General Teaching and Learning Space

IT

Library

VLE

Laboratory

 

Studio

 

Performance space

 

Other specialist

 

Technical resources 

 

 

University Library & Study Skills Services, (ULSSS), supports students with the provision of a high quality learning environment, comprehensive print and online resource collections, 1400 study places, 300+ PCs, My Module Resources and study skills support.

 

All students have the full use of the University’s two libraries. The libraries are open extensive hours and are staffed for 59 hours a week, including weekends and evenings.  During core teaching weeks, The Murray library is open 24x7 and St Peter’s library is open until 12 midnight.

 

The ULSSS web site www.library.sunderland.ac.uk provides a gateway to information resources and services for students both on and off campus. Tailored resources and support are available from specific subject areas of the ULSSS web site and a ‘Live Chat’ function enables student to access library support and help 24/7.

 

My Module Resources https://moduleresources.sunderland.ac.uk/

Module reading lists are live interactive resource lists available from within online module spaces on the VLE and the University’s library website.

 

What do you get?

          Real time library information, both availability and location of print books, plus being able to place reservations on books that are already on loan

          Allows you to set up RSS alerts for changes and additions to your Module Resource list

          Smartphone and tablet friendly – providing QR capture, touch screen functionality and e-resource access

 

How does this help you?

          Getting the right resources easily from flexible access points

          Receive guidance from your tutor on what to read at a point of need by using search filters

          Access to a wider range of resources to support learning.

 

Study Skills Support

University Library Services includes a robust study skills support offer, available to all our students across the University both on and off campus, contributing to students’ attainment and the quality of their experience.

 

Skills delivery options include:

  • Online Skills Support including:  videos, webinars and Skype sessions and online tutorials. Online assignment drop-ins using Live Chat will be held weekly to engage those students not on campus and provide additional support at the point of contact.
  • On campus assignment skills drop-in events throughout key teaching weeks when students are encouraged to attend with any assignment queries.
  • Embedded skills sessions - Throughout teaching periods embedded skills sessions are a key element to support academic learning. Study skills support team and Liaison Librarians continue to cultivate relationships and provide the support necessary in their subject areas.
  • Dissertation workshops - Dissertation skills support will be provided in early June to ‘Kickstart your Dissertation’. Bookable workshops will be held demonstrating how to begin a dissertation, using University library resources to support your work, and managing references for a substantial project. Sessions will be cross-subject focusing on the skills and resources required for completing a dissertation.
  • One to One - Study Skills Advisers will be on hand to advise and support students in a range of study skills including: effective reading, reporting writing, academic writing and referencing, note taking, critical thinking, analysis and evaluation, reflective writing, group work and presentation skills. Sessions will be booked centrally, catering for embedded academic sessions, study groups and 1 to 1 advice. For those studying independently away from the university campus, 1 to 1 support is available via Skype.

 

If an embedded skills session best suits student learning outcomes, academic staff will be asked to complete an online request form so that a session can be arranged.

 

The request form is available from:                                                                 library.sunderland.ac.uk/services-and-support/services-for-staff/

 

Access to other libraries

There may be occasions when students studying postgraduate programmes would find it useful to use other university libraries for their studies, in addition to the resources available at the University of Sunderland. Postgraduate students may be able to borrow items or to access collections on a reference basis at a number of institutions throughout the UK by joining the Sconul Access Scheme. www.access.sconul.ac.uk

 

Please see the relevant college prospectus or website for details of college learning resources if you are planning to study in one of our partner colleges

 

Information about the University’s facilities can be found here.

 

  1. Are there any additional costs on top of the fees?

 

No, but all students buy some study materials such as books and provide their own basic study materials.

 

Yes (optional) All students buy some study materials such as books and provide their own basic study materials. In addition there are some are additional costs for optional activities associated with the programme (see below)

Yes

Yes (essential) All students buy some study materials such as books and provide their own basic study materials. In addition there are some are essential additional costs associated with the programme (see below)

 

 

Where possible, there may be opportunities to take part in national and international field trips. These costs will be at a student’s own expense for costs of travel, food, visas, accommodation, vaccinations and additional expenses, where necessary.

 

  1. How are student views represented?

 

All taught programmes in the University have student representatives for each programme who meet in a Student-Staff Liaison Committee (SSLC) where they can raise students’ views and concerns. The Students’ Union and the faculties together provide training for student representatives. SSLCs and focus groups are also used to obtain student feedback on plans for developing existing programmes and designing new ones. Feedback on your programme is obtained every year through module questionnaires and informs the annual review of your programme. Student representatives are also invited to attend Programme and Module Studies Boards which manage the delivery and development of programmes and modules.  Faculty Academic Committee, also has student representation. This allows students to be involved in higher-level plans for teaching and learning. At university level on Students are represented on University level Committed by sabbatical officers who are the elected leaders of the Students’ Union.

 

The University’s student representation and feedback policy can be found here.

 

Every two years we participate in the national Postgraduate Taught Experience Survey (PTES) which is run by the Higher Education Academy.

 

SECTION G: QUALITY MANAGEMENT 

 

  1. National subject benchmarks

 

The Quality Assurance Agency for Higher Education publishes benchmark statements which give guidance as to the skills and knowledge which graduates in various subjects and in certain types of degree are expected to have. They do not cover all subjects at postgraduate level but those which exist can be found at here.

 

Are there any benchmark statements for this programme?

 

NO

 

This master’s programme complies with Masters level (L7) of the Framework for Higher Education Qualifications (QAA, 2008; http://www.qaa.ac.uk/en/Publications/Documents/Framework-Higher-Education-Qualifications-08.pdf) in that it provides an educational opportunity for students to build upon and further develop their abilities in dealing with complex issues, demonstrating self-direction and originality, whilst continuing to advance their knowledge and understanding of the complexity of equality, diversity and the causes of inequality.

 

The QAA also publishes a Framework for Higher Education Qualifications (FHEQ) which defines the generic skills and abilities expected of students who have achieved awards at a given level and with which our programmes align. The FHEQ can be found here.

 

  1. How are the quality and standards of the programme assured?

 

The programme is managed and quality assured through the University’s standard processes. Programmes are overseen by Module and Programme Studies Boards which include student representatives. Each year each module leader provides a brief report on the delivery of the module, identifying strengths and areas for development, and the programme team reviews the programme as a whole. The purpose of this is to ensure that the programme is coherent and up-to-date, with suitable progression through the programme, and a good fit (alignment)  between what is taught and how students learn and are assessed - the learning outcomes, content and types of teaching, learning and assessment. Student achievement, including progress through the programme and the way in which the final award is made, is kept under review. The programme review report is sent to the Programme Studies Board and the Faculty in turn reports issues to the University’s Quality Management Sub-Committee (QMSC).

 

External examiners are appointed to oversee and advise on the assessment of the programme. They ensure that the standards of the programme are comparable with those of similar programmes elsewhere in the UK and are also involved in the assessment process to make sure that it is fair. They are invited to comment on proposed developments to the programme. Their reports are sent to the Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Academic) as well as to the Faculty so that issues of concern can be addressed.

 

All programmes are reviewed by the University on a six-yearly cycle to identify good practice and areas for enhancement. Programmes are revalidated through this review process. These reviews include at least one academic specialist in the subject area concerned from another UK university. Quality Assurance Agency (QAA) review reports for Sunderland can be found here.

 

Further information about our quality processes can be found here.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Quality Handbook

 

 

 

SITS SUMMARY PROGRAMME/SHORT COURSE DETAILS

(Form to be completed electronically by the Faculty and forwarded to the Quality Support Officer supporting the Approval event, or sent to Planning & MI for faculty devolved processes before sending to Quality Support (with the exception of Short Courses and GRS))

This form is to be completed when a new programme has been validated and approved so that the programme codes and progression and awards rules can be set up in SITS.  This also needs to be completed at periodic course review when there have been significant modifications to the course.

 

Please note that all details entered onto this form will go onto every student’s record that is attached to this programme and it is therefore imperative that the information is correct. 

 

1 Programme Details

New/ Modification/Review:

Please ensure the minor modification document is included

NEW

Full Programme Title:

MSc Inequality and Society

If replacement for existing course, specify title and course code:

N/A

Qualification Aim:

e.g. Foundation degree of Science, Bachelor of Arts (Honours)

MSc Masters of Science

Qualification Level (NQF level):

7

JACS 3.0 code

JACS code = e.g. (V100) History, (I100) Computing Science, etc. See HESA Website https://www.hesa.ac.uk/jacs3

HECoS Code 100505

 

Is the programme Open or Closed:

A course is defined as closed when specifically designed for a certain group of people and not also available to other suitably qualified candidates. It may be designed for a particular company however if the same course is also run for other suitably qualified candidates, not employed by the company, then the course is not closed.

Open

Faculty and School:

Education and Society

School of Social Sciences

Location of study:

e.g. SAGE, Sunderland in London, Sunderland

Sunderland

Last Date Registration (PBI) Number of days:

The number of days after the start date of the course that it is possible for students to register onto it. It is also referred to as the migration date.

7 days

Programme Leader:

Andrew Dalton

Academic Team for the programme:

Social Sciences

Date of Approval/Modification/Review:

 

Date of next review (QS to complete):

 

Accrediting Body or PSRB
If yes please attach a completed PSRB form

No

 

Programme Specific Regulations

If yes, please attach a completed Programme Specific Regulations form

No

 

Does this programme come under the Unistats return?

If yes, please attach a completed Unistats form

Yes/No

Is this an undergraduate programme whose primary (but not necessarily only) purpose is to improve the effectiveness of practitioners registered with a professional body? If yes, please specify which body:

http://www.hefce.ac.uk/media/HEFCE,2014/Content/Pubs/2016/201622/HEFCE2016_22.pdf  (Page 88, paragraph f)

e.g. a short course aimed at registered nurses

No


 

 

 

Interim  Awards

If a student does not achieve their qualification aim, what lower awards might they be entitled to, assuming they have the credits?  The subject title for any lower level award should be given where this is different from the subject of the qualification aim.

 

Interim Award Title

Credits Required

Interim Structure

Please show mandatory requirements if applicable e.g. core module codes

1

Post Graduate Certificate Inequality and Society

60

SSCM25, SSCM32

2

Post Graduate Diploma Inequality and Society

120

SSCM25, SSCM32 + One Option

3

MSc Inequality and Society

180

SSCM25, SSCM32, SSCM26 + Two Options

 

Combined Subjects Programmes only

Will the subject run as Major/Minor/Dual:

 

Any subject(s) not permitted to be combined with this subject:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2 Mode Of Attendance

01                          Full-time

Full-time students are those expected to study for more than 24 weeks per year, for a minimum of 21 hours per week and are paying the full-time fee.

Full time

02                          Other Full-time

Students who attend full-time for a period less than 24 weeks per year

 

31Part-time

Students who are expected to study for less than 21 hours per week.

Part time

31Part-time at Full-time Rate

Students who are studying full-time credits over part-time attendance

 

 

 

3 Admissions

An admissions or MCR code will be created to allow student applications.

Tick appropriate

UUCAS

Universities and Colleges Admission Services

Required for full-time undergraduate programmes only.

 

DDirect Entry

Required for FT, PT, PG and PGR, only where students will be admitted though the admissions teams or where the programme needs to be advertised on the web

Direct entry

GGTTR

Graduate Teacher Training Registry

Education only, where applicable

 

 

 

4Collaborative Provision

UK

 

Overseas

 

Institution

Collaborative Model

Funding Arrangements

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

5aCourse Block

Full-time - Overall length of the programme in months:

12 months

Part-time - Overall length of the programme in months:

24 months

Does this course offer a sandwich placement?

If yes, please indicate which programme year this placement is to take place.

No

 

Is this compulsory or optional?

N/A

Does this course offer a study abroad year out? If yes, please indicate which programme year this placement is to take place.

No

 

Is this compulsory or optional?

N/A

 

6   Major Source of Funding

Please note this relates to funding for the programme and not individual students

HEFCE

Higher Education Funding Council for England

HEFCE

Skills Funding Agency/EFA/Degree Apprenticeship

 

NCTL

National College for Teaching and Leadership

 

Wholly NHS Funded

Partially NHS Funded

Departments of Health/NHS/Social Care. For all Health funded programmes please indicate whether the programme is eligible for an NHS Bursary

-  Eligible for NHS BursaryY/N

 

 

 

Standard Fee

If no then the Learning Resources Form should be attached

Yes

Other Funding:

 

– Please Specify:

 

7   Education Programmes Only

This section must be completed for any programmes marked above as ‘NCTL’ funded

Teacher Training Identifier:

 

Teacher Training Scope:

 

Qualification Aim:

QTS and academic award, QTS only, QTS by assessment only

 

 

 

   DETAILS SUPPLIED BY:Andrew Dalton      DATE:28/11/18


Module List

 

 

Award, Route (if applicable) and Level

New/Existing/ Modified  Module (N/E/MM)

Module Title

Module Code

Module Credit Value

Whether core or option

Must choose (i.e. designated option):

Assessment weighting – give % weight for each assessment item

Pre-/co-requisites

Module leader

Other comment (if required)

Date of Entry on SITS.

N/MM only

( After event)

JACS Code

 

(HECOS CODE)

Academic Team

7

N

Inequalities, Diversity and Intersectionality: Theory and Practice

 

SSCM25

30

C

 

Essay (50%)

Group Project (50%)

N/A

Sheila Quaid

 

 

100505

Social Studies

7

N

Research and Evidence

 

SSCM32

30

C

 

Comparative Research Study (40%)

Practical Skills Assessment (20%)

Research Proposal (40%)

N/A

Matthew Durey

 

 

100505

Social Studies

7

N

Inequality and Society Dissertation

 

SSCM26

60

C

 

Dissertation (80%)

Presentation (20%)

N/A

Andrew Dalton

 

 

100505

Social Studies

7

N

Fear of a Queer Planet? Sexuality and Inequality

 

SSCM28

30

O

 

Essay (50%)

Report (50%)

N/A

Andrew Dalton

 

 

100505

Social Studies

7

N

Mind, Body and Health Inequalities

 

SSCM27

30

O

 

Essay (50%)

Essay (50%)

N/A

Ian Spencer

 

 

100505

Social Studies

7

N

Gender-based Violence and Society

 

SSCM24

30

O

 

Evaluation of Contemporary Source (40%)

Intervention (60%)

N/A

Nicola Roberts

 

 

100505

Social Studies

7

N

Risk, Austerity and Neoliberalism

 

SSCM17

30

O

 

Essay (100%)

N/A

Sheila Quaid

 

 

100505

Social Studies

7

N

Global Childhoods

 

SSCM29

30

O

 

Essay (100%)

N/A

Bruce Marjoribanks

 

 

100505

Social Studies

7

N

Rethinking the Clinical Gaze: Medicine, Disability and Society

SSCM30

30

O

 

Essay (50%)

Essay (50%)

N/A

Stephen Macdonald

 

 

100505

Social Studies

 

 

 


[1] Same as main award unless agreed otherwise at validation – e.g. to meet PSRB requirements