Attachments

Quality Handbook

 

 

 

Programme Specification - Postgraduate

 

SECTION A: CORE INFORMATION

 

  1.  

Name  of programme:

Advanced Clinical Practitioner

 

 

  1.  

Award title:

MSc Advanced Clinical Practitioner 

MSc Advanced Clinical Practitioner Apprenticeship

Post Graduate Diploma Advanced Clinical Practice

Post Graduate Certificate Skills for Advanced Practice 

 

  1.  

Programme linkage:

 

Is this part of group of linked programmes between which students can transfer at agreed points? (e.g. a group of programmes with a common set of taught modules)

Yes

 

If yes:

This programme is one of a group of related programmes which also includes

 

Post Graduate Diploma Advanced Clinical Practice

Post Graduate Certificate Skills for Advanced Practice 

 

 

  1.  

Is the programme a top-up only?

No

 

  1.  

Level of award:

Level 7

 

  1.  

Awarding body:

University of Sunderland

 

  1.  

Department:

Faculty of Health Sciences and Wellbeing

 

  1.  

Programme Studies Board:

Postgraduate Health

 

  1.  

Programme Leader:                                 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Victoria Duffy

  1. How and where can I study the programme?

 

The programme has been developed in partnership with local NHS Trusts and Health care providers, who are committed to the recruitment of Advanced Clinical Practitioners (ACP) across their clinical workforce.

 

Advanced Clinical Practitioners are clinical leaders in their sphere of practice, often enabling innovative solutions to the care and experience of patients. Although they work as part of a wider health and social care team, they manage complete episodes of clinical care, which means they can independently provide care from the time a patient first presents through to discharge. Advanced Clinical Practitioners work across traditional professional boundaries providing care in health and social care settings, including physical and mental healthcare, in hospitals, general practice and in community care. They may also carry out their full range of duties in other settings like patients’ homes, schools, prisons and universities.

 

The ACP role delivers a high level of clinical care, often aligned to and commensurate of elements of medical practice, thus providing healthcare employers with a workable strategy to reduce the knowledge and skills gap anticipated across the medical, nursing and allied health professional workforce. The ACP role provides a highly proficient supporting role to senior medical teams by the provision of high quality and responsive healthcare for a range of patients in a variety of clinical settings. It is recognised that many professions work autonomously from first registration, however the level of autonomy exercised by ACPs would be commensurate with that expected of medical staff providing the same level of service delivery. The role requires a significantly higher level of responsibility and autonomy to make professionally accountable decisions, including differential diagnosis, prescribing medication and delivery of care, often from referral to discharge in unpredictable situations. They are empowered to use their advanced knowledge, skills and judgement for high level and complex decision making in an extended scope of practice role. Advanced Clinical Practitioners have a high level of autonomy and freedom to make decisions in complex and unpredictable situations. For example, taking a patient’s detailed history and examine all body systems to support a diagnosis, select and order a range of clinical tests to facilitate your diagnosis;  analyse the results of clinical tests and formulate a plan of care for the patient, which includes discharge.

At the end of the programme, students will be Advanced Clinical Practitioner with the ability to prescribe within legal boundaries and within the context in which you work, and/or demonstrate an enhanced knowledge of medications in the clinical area. The programme will equip students to drive service developments, educate others and provide consultancy services within a sphere of expertise. Students are developed and encouraged to undertake research activities, including audit to evaluate and further develop clinical practice and to improve patient care.

 

In recruiting to these posts, the Trust will demonstrate a commitment to this educational programme and will commit to the supervision of the trainees in the workplace by qualified medical staff/ senior advanced practitioners/nurse consultants, this commitment is vital in ensuring work-based developing competence across the curriculum.

 

The MSC programme is typically three and can be studied as a post graduate award or via the ACP apprenticeship which provides funded posts. Therefore students/apprentices are used interchangeably throughout this document.

 

The programme is presented as a series of linked awards to ensure flexibility for students and employers.

 

The structure of the programme is shown below:

 

 

 

Completion of year 1 will award the student a Post Graduate Certificate in skills for advanced practice, however, Feedback from the Trust development sites indicates that a two year programme provides the minimum period of ‘training’ necessary and therefore the programme has been developed alongside healthcare employers to develop role specific competencies which may permit the student to ‘exit’ at this point fit for an advanced practice role. Therefore

The first two years of the programme have been designed to equip experienced practitioners with advanced care competencies and capability and develop their analytical skills to a standard associated with Post Graduate Diploma. 

 

Students can progress to a Master’s degree where the 40 level 7 credit project dissertation will focus on the development of skills and knowledge associated with practice within a new advanced clinical role.

 

The 20 credit two part exam, will support transferability of the MSc ACP award, and will be undertaken as the end point assessment for those completing the apprenticeship.

 

The clinical component of the programme is delivered in practice by an educational supervisor and this is complemented by contact study on campus and structured tripartite visits in the clinical area to track progression throughout the programme.

 

 

 

At Sunderland:

x

Full-time on campus

 

Part-time on campus

x

As work-based learning full-time

 

As work-based learning part-time

x Workplace Practice based for competence and clinical learning.

As a full-time sandwich course

 

As a part-time sandwich course

 

By distance learning

 

 

At the University of Sunderland London campus: 

x

Full-time on campus

 

Part-time on campus

x

As work-based learning full-time

 

As work-based learning part-time

x

As a full-time sandwich course

 

As a part-time sandwich course

 

By distance learning

 

 

At a partner college:

 

Full-time in the UK 

 

Part-time in the UK

 

Full-time overseas

 

Part-time overseas

 

By distance learning

 

As a full-time sandwich course in the UK

 

As a part-time sandwich course in the UK

 

As a full-time sandwich course overseas

 

As a part-time sandwich course overseas

 

As work-based learning full-time in the UK 

 

As work-based learning part-time overseas

 

Other (please specify)

 

 

 

  1. How long does the programme take?

 

 

Min number of years / months

Max number of years / months

Full-time

 

 

Part-time

3 years

8 years

Distance learning

 

 

Work-based learning

 

 

 

There will be one cohort per year, subject to local need this may be increased.

 

Students who access the programme as an apprentice are working as an apprentice 100% of the time with allocated off the job learning time.

 

SECTION B:FURTHER CORE INFORMATION 

 

Market Analysis

 

Higher degree (level7) apprenticeship standard and end point assessment are finalised. (ACP ENA 2018)

 

NHS Framework for Advanced Clinical Practice published 2017 (HEE 2017)

 

Workforce development plans of NHS Trusts ensure demand. (This will not significantly increase year on year).

 

Demand Analysis

 

Key principles for planning the workforce and governance:

 

Identifying the need for such roles and their potential impact, is undertaken by employers, who have considered both regionally and nationally, where advanced clinical practice roles can best be placed within health and care pathways to maximise their impact.

 

Historically there have been many drivers for the introduction of the level of advanced clinical practice: clinical, operational, financial and professional. However, primary consideration must be given to where this level of practice is best placed for greatest impact in health and care pathways.

 

The development of the programme is in response to policy drivers, commissioners and practice leads and is as a result of prolonged changes to junior doctors working time directive. ACP’s are now recognised as important roles within non-medical professions for example Advanced Critical Care Practitioners, anaesthetic nurse practitioners, surgical practitioners, advanced primary care paramedics.

 

The apprenticeship standard will be in high demand for employers. The education of Health Care professionals is of vital importance to the future of Health and Social Care in the UK. The dynamic nature of Higher Education and health care provision provides an opportunity to reflect upon current curricula, programmes and delivery. This Apprenticeship curricula meets the Government and NHS agenda for Degree Apprenticeships and offers a quality educational experience underpinned and informed by research, practice and pedagogy.  

 

 

 

 

Competitor Identification and Analysis

 

Regionally:

 

 

All will be competing for market share in apprenticeships as the existing programmes as well as new routes similar to this proposal can be funded via the levy.

 

External (and internal) factors impacting on the market which could significantly influence ability to enter / win market share

 

The proposal addresses aims within the Universities Corporate Plan and the Faculty of Health sciences and wellbeing who have specific links with, locally Health Education North East, and nationally the National Health Service (NHS).   The programme provides the opportunity of relevance to student learning experience that fulfils the needs of employers, and associated stakeholders. As a key provider of health care education the Faculty is well placed to make a national contribution to these developing roles.

 

Course title optimisation

 

The title is the recognised HEE Framework title

 

  1. Learning and teaching strategy

 

The MSc Advanced Clinical Practitioner Apprenticeship is designed as a three year programme, with linked awards. The MSC can also be undertaken as an apprenticeship.

 

The aims for the programme adopt the following key points:

 

  • Adopting recommended theoretical components that underpin the clinical role.
  • Adopting core capabilities and competencies associated with preparation for a role in practice. 
  • Identifying key clinical skills that must be acquired to fulfil the expectations of the award.
  • Identifying core learning outcomes, a clinical supervision process for practice learning and an assessment process that addresses the requirements of the clinical role and the level of university award.
  • Developing a consultation process to identify the scope of practice for the practitioners, including limitations of the role.

 

The programme is designed to promote the development of high levels of knowledge, skills and professionalism. The role of the ACP is characterised by compassionate and caring approaches to inter-professional working in the healthcare workforce and this educational model promotes capacity building within and between professional disciplines in this context. It also places focus on compassion within the context of person-centred care across the programme.

 

This Curriculum is based on the definition of work-based learning as activ­ities that occur in workplaces (clinical practice environments) and that involve an employer assigning a worker or a ‘student/apprentice/trainee’ mean­ingful job tasks to develop his or her skills, knowl­edge, and readiness for work and to support entry or advancement in a particular career field. In this instance this is to Advanced Clinical Practitioner status.  Work-based learning (WBL) extends into the workplace through on-the-job education and training, mentoring, and other supports for a continuum of lifelong learning and skill devel­opment.

 

Students will gain experience across differing contexts of advanced clinical practice to enable you to develop both core and role specific/specialist ACP knowledge, skills and professionalism at levels corresponding with the programme award.

 

The WBL model used is the ‘CO-OP model of Work based Learning’, as this model is ideally suited to an employer/HEI partnership. The CO-OP model:

 

  • Links academic programmes with structured and assessed work experiences through which ‘students’ acquire professional and technical skills.
  • Earns academic credit for work carried out over a period of time’ under the model of supervision. 

 

Work-based learning is a critical component of many Health Professional career pathways frameworks, Career pathways models structure education, training, and career advancement in a seamless continuum across education, workforce institutions, and employers. In this curriculum they support professional registrants to build academic, technical, and professional skills; attain degrees and transferable professional credentials; and enter and advance in specific careers or fields.

 

The Key Principles of Work Based Learning in the MSc Advanced Clinical Practitioner/Apprenticeship aim to strengthen the talent pipeline into Advanced Practice by increasing the number of individuals who successfully access and complete work-based learning experiences, acquire skills and knowledge valued by employers, and enter and advance in careers.

 

Work-based learning (WBL) in employment provides the reality of an authentic context for learning which produces the ability to become an ACP. It can enrich apprentice learning, thus creating a well-qualified workforce.  Advanced Clinical Practice is as yet not regulated by any health PSRB, but as this is likely to become the case, standardisation of education and training allows for confirmation of competence, public confidence and employer transferability, until that time.

 

Workplace learning here is concerned not only with immediate work competencies, but with future competencies. It is about investment in the general capabilities of employee ACP’s as well as the specific, graduate, clinical and technical.

 

Employee-students/apprentice ACP’s on work-based programmes will arrive with different needs and expectations than traditional masters level students. They are often highly experienced individuals with all sorts of qualifications and experiences of learning, many of whom have not studied formally for a number of years. The learning and teaching approaches need to recognise and value what they bring to the programme and their clinical area, and make use of the vast experience and resource in the work based learning programme. The recognising and valuing of prior learning and prior experiential learning and student -led, interactive, pragmatic contextualised learning (See Recognition of prior learning diagram) and teaching approaches need to be balanced alongside traditional lecture-based inputs.

 

Staff development will be required for both academic staff and NHS Trust mentors/tutors and clinical mentors in order to encourage effective pedagogic practice across both the workplace and academic settings.

 

Flexibility in delivery and customising modules, courses and programmes to suit the skill and knowledge requirements of the NHS employers as they are not constrained by standard HEI semester dates.

This work-based curriculum design is focused in methodologies which blend and combine information and communications technologies in the form of virtual learning environments (VLEs) with problem-based learning with the focus on solving real and concrete clinical problems, issues and concerns.

 

 

 

 

This programme and modules contain the following features.

 

  • New knowledge is introduced and applied in role-specific context to the ACP student/apprentice.
  • Existing knowledge is used as a basis on which to build new knowledge
  • New knowledge is then applied by the student/apprentice in their work context and is therefore integrated into the real world of advanced practice.
  • ACP students collaborate with peers on the modules, course or programme and with professional colleagues in the workplace.
  • Course or module activities are framed in such a way as to enable students to share knowledge with colleagues and to facilitate solution focused collaboration with peers, experts supervisors and significant others in the workplace.

 

Teaching strategies across the programme are closely aligned to the national Capabilities for advanced clinical practice (ACP) in England, which state:

 

All health and care professionals working at the level of advanced clinical practice should have developed their skills and knowledge to the standard outlined in the Multi-professional framework for advanced clinical practice in England framework (2017); the capabilities are common across this level of practice enabling standardisation’.

 

The four pillars that underpin this practice are:

 

1. Clinical Practice

2. Leadership and Management

3. Education

4. Research

 

 

Work place Supervision:

 

Throughout the programme, students will engage with Competence and Capability Portfolios that will support and develop progression across their role specific negotiated competency areas. It will engender and nurture an ethos of critical reflexivity, political awareness and higher order thinking in relation to the professional role of the ACP.

Workplace Practice supervisors, (Educational Supervisors, Practice Supervisors) are in place to make the theory practice links and to stimulate practice learning and reflection and will work closely with the academic team to negotiate and develop role specific competency areas.

 

The clinical learning experiences have been developed in collaboration with the employer providers who have agreed to provide all learners with an Educational Supervisor in Practice and Practice Supervisors (senior clinicians), this is balanced with and complemented by academic and supervisory support as an adjunct to the academic learning pathways.

 

The Educational Supervisor (ES) will confirm and ‘sign off’ competence to meet the recognised standards. (National standards e.g. Royal College of Emergency Medicine, for emergency care ACP. Or Accountable Practitioner standards in Mental health). This integration of theory and practice in the workplace is ensures that as clinical competency is established, development of professional attitudes and behaviours is commensurate with the level expected in advanced practice. Knowledge, skills and behaviours are assessed and reassessed to demonstrate progression via the tripartite process.

 

The ES will ensure that your clinical workplace based learning is supported and monitored by:

 

  • An identification and strategic focus on real clinical issues. From the clinical workplace, you will have the opportunity to reflect and develop your existing level of learning and independently benchmark where your current level of knowledge is in relation to your everyday clinical practice and professional practice skills, against a set of negotiated competency areas relevant to the role.
  • An opportunity to critically reflect on your practice within a multi-professional group context, which captures the dynamic of working in the context of ACP practice in an array of different healthcare settings.
  • Establishment of the notions of personal autonomy and individual responsibility in practice which can be used to drive the process of teaching and learning through inquiry based learning.
  • Integration of theoretical learning and the clinical application of new and developing knowledge to practice through the programme.

 

This approach to education provides a mechanism by which learning can be flexibly provided, effectively managed and continually updated. A strong physical infrastructure of professional academic, clinical and mentoring staff with a shared vision of equipping a high quality healthcare workforce will underpin all of your learning and teaching experiences.

 

The real world context afforded by work based learning in employment enables authentic patient centred interaction and care is a platform ensuring that the construction of meaning has strategic relevance, currency and tangible impact in terms of communication, care and compassion

 

Teaching and learning will be allowed to drive the assessment processes adopted through the programme and learning outcomes. Teaching methodologies and processes of assessment have been constructively aligned to reflect this.

 

The University has a state of the art Virtual Learning Environment and a Social Learning Platform via Canvas which can be used to enhance and define the learning experience. It also has the extensive supporting infrastructure to equip students in the relevant skills required for masters level study.

 

  1. Retention strategy

 

The programme reflects a unique focus on mastery of clinical (health care practice) theory and skills and unlike other post-graduate programmes it requires an assessment of clinical competence on which the award is contingentAs a result the breadth of knowledge introduced will be limited when compared to existing MSc or MA programmes within postgraduate studies and focused instead on knowledge that is imperative for clinical practice. 

 

Recruitment and Selection is via application and interview with Trusts appointing to ACP post and Sunderland University. Their manager/practice lead and training or education manager must support all applications to the Programme. The university will retain the right to interview candidates for this programme.

 

Work-based learning experiences are designed explicitly to help equip apprentices with the skills they need to obtain specific permanent jobs or advance in their careers, in this case Advanced Clinical Practitioner status. The core purpose of work-based learning is to develop and benefit both employees/ apprentices and employers. This work-based learning model is effective as it leads to the development of a fit for purpose ACP workforce that meet employer’s expectations and needs. Employers have some assurance that employees have the information and skills needed to make informed job and long-term career choices, leading to reduced turnover, greater productivity, and lower costs for employers.

 

The University has a robust and historical infrastructure specifically designed and continuously developed to support student retention in academic and clinical settings.

Key University of Sunderland policies include:

  • Work-based Learning
  • Placements Guidance
  • University Learning and Teaching Plan
  • University Academic Strategy.

 

Continually supporting students in the work place areas as an integral part of the University Academic Strategy, thus ensuring students are individually valued as a member of the programme cohort. We operationalise this by methodologically triangulating our focused identification of those students who might be lost to attrition, lacking progression or exhibiting signs of personal difficulty.

Typically:

  • Ensuring initial collaborative orientation upon commencement of the programme. This will serve as a means of defining the cohort in terms of a social identity and establish a sense of belonging to both the University and the Trusts in which they undertake practice.
  • Using the Educational Supervisor in practice and a designated University Academic Supervisor as a first point of contact, should the student experience difficulties in the programme. This system will drive intensive systems of holistic personal and professional support through the provision of one to one support if required.
  • University Student & Learning Support supporting those with disabilities or specific learning needs, e.g. mature students returning to study.
  • Providing support with learning and teaching approaches that students may not have experienced before and using this as a mechanism for driving your support in practice. There is a model of supervision tripartite which allows for students to meet with supervisors regularly for support. (See Model of apprentice supervision.
  • Formalising Work based Learning in Practice Agreements and support via the University team and Educational supervisor tripartite to ensure students gain the right experience at the right time, throughout the programme and modules.
  • Ensuring that the on-going programme delivery process ensures recognition and support, in instances where someone may struggle, through formative feedback, pastoral support to enhance their retention and progression across the programme. 
  • Responding proactively to student feedback on all aspects of programme delivery

 

  1. Any other information

 

This programme offers a framework for a new and developing series of awards in Advanced Clinical Practice.

 

  • MSc Advanced Clinical Practitioner

 

  • MSC Advanced Clinical Practitioner Apprenticeship

 

The advanced Practitioner sphere of practice and specialist competencies, will be determined in partnership with the seconding Trusts. This allows for inclusion of practice areas where national competency frameworks are in development or not fully established, thus allowing for bespoke creation of ACPs in diverse and emerging areas.

 

Non-medical prescribing is embedded as a core module in the programme thus widening the employability and applicability of the award to many clinical roles and areas. NMC approval is obtained for a level 6 non-medical prescribing award presently and HCPC approval for paramedic prescribing is presently being sought.

 

Where National Competencies are available such as the Royal College of Emergency Medicine (RCEM) ACP competencies, these will form a core competence requirements in the portfolio. (Example included in supplementary documents for the Emergency Care ACP programme).

 

ACP roles are designed to contribute to the care and management of patients and their families, as well as offering structured clinical career progression for registrant members of health care teams. This way of working for non-medical health professionals acknowledges a crossing of professional boundaries of many functions within care provision, including medicine, nursing, technical roles, physiotherapy and clinical pharmacology.

 

Public confidence in new professions relies upon the introduction of a robust regulatory framework that ensures national education and practice standards are in place, adhered to and monitored.  Thus this proposal takes note of the changing workforce in the NHS; the graduate at registration for nursing is a major change (NMC DH 2008), the Using Allied Health Professionals to transform health, care and wellbeing. (2016/17 - 2020/21), the five year forward view NHS plans (2014) for example.

 

The development of this programme and apprenticeship has been via partnership working and co-production with NHS Trust Partners and is structured to comply with the NHS Framework for Advanced Clinical Practice published 2017 (HEE 2017)

 

Programme development:

 

  • Proposed curriculum model has been scoped with the employers 
  • The curriculum model is based on a CPD model of education in that the initial premise is that the Student/ Apprentice are post qualified registrants working for a health provider organisation that is able to second, support, assess and provide all learning opportunities required for ACP.
  • The teaching strategy is aligned to the 4 pillars of advanced clinical practice:  Clinical Practice, Leadership and Management, Education and Research.
  • For students accessing as apprentices: The apprentice will be a full- time employed ACP apprentice, all requirements of the ESFA in the apprenticeship standards for entry and off the job learning (OFF JOB L) time will be met. The apprenticeship route offers advantage in that it assists the widening participation agenda to those individuals who would not have the opportunity to undertake a traditional self -funded programme.  It also offers opportunity to recruit to ‘hard to recruit areas’. For example NHS Trusts have advised that care of the older persons services are hard to recruit registered nurses to from the traditional programmes. In the apprenticeship programme existing staff working in these areas can be selected for having the specific values to work in this area for a secondment opportunity to the ACP programme. The experience of such practitioners and students/apprentices will be of great value to the workforce, as they will be continuing as an ACP in this type of practice in their supporting trust.
  • The Apprenticeship has the potential through career progression to build on loyalty to a Trust and also potentially to an area of practice, and may help to reduce attrition.
  • This new Apprenticeship demands new ways of working and is dependent on partnership working to plan, design and deliver and develop the infrastructure across the organisations in a new way from the beginning.  The plan, design phases are complete to current date, and after approval the delivery and organisational change will commence. Thus building on what our partnerships have already achieved.
  • The model proposed will offer flexible entry points according to the recognition of prior learning that the apprentice can demonstrate (Academic and Practice Learning)
  • The underpinning philosophy of the ACP programme places this firmly in a career structure of apprenticeship awards. This recognises RPL and prior practice experience giving flexibility to access the programme.
  • The University has responded to Trust Stakeholders regarding the timeline for validation and implementation to meet their CWD needs.
  • In our partnership with Trusts they have indicated support for the UoS model as it incorporates innovation and successful elements of traditional and innovative teaching and learning methodologies including supervision. Planning, delivery, monitoring and evaluation of delivery will be essential to success.
  • Initial programme review and feedback from Health Education England (north) highlighted the requirement to include non-medical prescribing as a core module for all student ACP’s who are able to prescribe in their role. Therefore this addition has been made and HCPC approval sought for non-medical prescribing for paramedics. Further developments include the provision of non-medical prescribing at level 7. Students who hold a non-medical prescribing award may APEl this element of the programme or choose to undertake a level 7 contextualisation of advance prescribing module which will provide additional evidence to employers of the transferability and skills in prescribing in a new role.

 

SECTION C:  TEACHING AND LEARNING

 

  1. What is the programme about?

 

The programme aims to develop advanced clinical practitioners against the 4 pillars of advanced practice.

 

A key driver for the implementation of advanced clinical practice is to enable practitioners to practise to their full potential and to optimise their contribution to meeting population and individuals’, families and carers’ needs through different models of service delivery and multidisciplinary working.

 

The language used to describe the capabilities is deliberately mapped to level 7 taxonomy to support the expectation of advancing practice, for example, ‘to have the ability to make sound judgements in the absence of full information and to manage varying levels of risk when there is complex, competing or ambiguous information or uncertainty’.

 

The programme is compliant with the requirements of the Institute for Apprenticeships (IFA) and has been designed to deliver high quality education against the national ACP standard (2017), as detailed below.

ADVaNCED CLINICAL PRACTITIONER (DEGREE)

Overview of the role

Managing defined episodes of clinical care independently, from beginning to end, providing care and treatment

Details of standard

Occupational profile:

Advanced Clinical Practitioners are experienced clinicians who demonstrate expertise in their scope of practice. Advanced Clinical Practitioners manage defined episodes of clinical care independently, from beginning to end, providing care and treatment from the time an individual(1) first presents through to the end of the episode, which may include admission, referral or discharge or care at home. They carry out their full range of duties in relation to individuals’ physical and mental healthcare and in acute, primary, urgent and emergency settings (including hospitals, general practice, individuals’ homes, schools and prisons, and in the public, independent, private and charity sectors). They combine expert clinical skills with research, education and clinical leadership within their scope of practice. Advanced Clinical Practitioners work innovatively on a one to one basis with individuals as well as part of a wider team. They work as part of the wider health and social care team and across traditional professional boundaries in health and social care.

Responsibilities and duties:

As an Advanced Clinical Practitioner, you will:

  • Have a high level of autonomy(2) and freedom to make decisions about how people should be cared for a treated and act in complex and unpredictable situations
  • Use person-centred approaches to taking an individual’s detailed history and examine body systems to help you make a diagnosis
  • Select, undertake or request a range of appropriate clinical tests and assessments to help you make a diagnosis
  • Initiate and evaluate a range of interventions, which may include for example prescribing of medicines, therapies and care
  • Apply a skillset that may have traditionally been the remit of other disciplines so that you can enhance the care and experience of individuals
  • Analyse, interpret and act on the results of clinical tests and assessments and formulate a plan of care, which may include admission to a care setting such as a hospital, referral to settings for another opinion or discharge from services
  • Drive service improvements, educate others and provide consultancy services within your scope of practice
  • Undertake research activities to develop new knowledge and undertake audit to evaluate and further develop your area of expertise to improve care and services for the people you are treating

Qualification requirements:

Apprentices must complete a Master’s degree in Advanced Clinical Practice. Apprentices without level 2 English and maths will need to achieve this level prior to taking the end-point assessment.

Entry Requirements:

You will hold current registration with one of the statutory regulators of health and care professions.

Level:

7

Duration:

Typically 36 monthshttps://www.instituteforapprenticeships.org/apprenticeship-standards/advanced-clinical-practitioner-degree/

 

  1. What will I know or be able to do at the end of the programme?

 

On completion of the programme students will be able to:

 

Knowledge and Understanding (K)

 

  1. Articulate enhanced knowledge and critical understanding of anatomy and physiology and critical application to the competencies that need to be achieved by an Advanced Clinical Practitioner, in their area of practice.
  2. Develop specific knowledge of illness, mental disorders and therapeutics for patients in their area of practice.
  3. Extend clinical skills in the treatment of patients in their area of practice including non-medical prescribing.
  4. Demonstrate competence in the role of the Advanced Clinical Practitioner across the four advanced practice pillars. (Practice, education, leadership and research).
  5. Debate the legal, professional ethical parameters that inform ACP and related governance issues.
  6. Evaluate the clinical, educational Leadership and research role and function of the ACP in a variety of contexts

 

Intellectual skills and behaviours (I)

 

  1. Select, retrieve and evaluate relevant evidence, data and information, which can inform and improve Advanced Clinical Practice.
  2. Generate logical analytical thinking that leads to reasoned and appropriate problem solving and decision-making.
  3. Incorporate reflection to contribute towards increased self-awareness, developing capability and practice and professional development.
  4. Apply intellect in addressing potential inequities and discrimination in practice
  5. Evaluate the outcomes of research studies giving due regard to issues of reliability, validity, rigour, trustworthiness and reflexivity
  6. Judge the outcomes of studies giving due regard to applicability of the study and its potential translation to clinical practice.

 

Practical skills and behaviours (P)

 

  1. Integrate knowledge, understanding and intellectual skills derived from enhanced engagement with theory and practice, to inform advanced skills development, professional decision making, education, leadership and organisational development
  2. Appraise the uni-professional, multi-professional and inter-professional dimensions of advanced practice and relate this to leading and improving the experience of service users, clients and their families/carers/significant others
  3. Exercise judgement to facilitate change and improvement, demonstrating skills of negotiation, prudence and integrity.
  4. Within the context of the ACP roles develop methods and techniques to review, consolidate and extend their sphere of practice
  5. Demonstrate critical application of legislation, professional guidelines and ethical principles to practice

 

Transferable/key skills(T)

 

  1. Utilise effective communication skills including clear, accurate concise verbal and reporting.
  2. Demonstrate effective team working within the study group and the multi-professional work team.
  3. Develop excellent leadership and project management skills in relation to managing workload, coursework and personal study and development.
  4. Utilise IT skills to obtain relevant resources and to access the services and support available to student
  5. Incorporate academic skills in relation to analysis, synthesis and reflection associated with the development of personal and practice knowledge.
  6. Exhibit skills in providing education, presentation, negotiation, marketing and networking that are essential for professional development.

Diagram 1 Programme learning outcomes at award stage

 

Post Graduate Certificate Skills for Advanced Practice 

 

 

 

 

  • K1 Articulate enhanced knowledge and critical understanding of anatomy and physiology and critical application to the competencies that need to be achieved by an Advanced Clinical Practitioner, in their area of practice.
  • K2 Develop specific knowledge of illness, mental disorders and therapeutics for patients in their area of practice.
  • K3 Extend clinical skills in the treatment of patients in their area of practice including non-medical prescribing.
  • K4 Demonstrate competence in the role of the Advanced Clinical Practitioner across the four advanced practice pillars. (clinical practice, education, leadership and research)

 

  • I1 Select, retrieve and evaluate relevant evidence, data and information, which can inform and improve Advanced Clinical Practice.
  • I2 Generate logical analytical thinking that leads to reasoned and appropriate problem solving and decision-making.
  • I4 Apply intellect in addressing potential inequities and discrimination in practice
  • I5 Evaluate the outcomes of research studies giving due regard to issues of reliability, validity, rigour, trustworthiness and reflexivity

 

  • P1 Integrate knowledge, understanding and intellectual skills derived from enhanced engagement with theory and practice, to inform advanced skills development, professional decision making, education, leadership and organisational development
  • P5 Demonstrate critical application of legislation, professional guidelines and ethical principles to practice

 

  • T1 Utilise effective communication skills including clear, accurate concise verbal and reporting.
  • T3 Develop excellent leadership and project management skills in relation to managing workload, coursework and personal study and development.
  • T4 Utilise IT skills to obtain relevant resources and to access the services and support available to student

 

20 credits at Level 6

40 credits at Level 7

 

Post Graduate Diploma Advanced Clinical Practice

 

  • K2 Develop specific knowledge of illness, mental disorders and therapeutics for patients in their area of practice.
  • K3 Extend clinical skills in the treatment of patients in their area of practice including non-medical prescribing.
  • K4 Demonstrate competence in the role of the Advanced Clinical Practitioner across the four advanced practice pillars. (Practice, education, leadership and research).
  • K5 Debate the legal, professional ethical parameters that inform ACP and related governance issues.

 

  • P1 Integrate knowledge, understanding and intellectual skills derived from enhanced engagement with theory and practice, to inform advanced skills development, professional decision making, education, leadership and organisational development
  • P2 Appraise the uni-professional, multi-professional and inter-professional dimensions of advanced practice and relate this to leading and improving the experience of service users, clients and their families/carers/significant others
  • P4 Within the context of the ACP roles develop methods and techniques to review, consolidate and extend their sphere of practice
  • P5 Demonstrate critical application of legislation, professional guidelines and ethical principles to practice

 

  • I2 Generate logical analytical thinking that leads to reasoned and appropriate problem solving and decision-making.
  • I3 Incorporate reflection to contribute towards increased self-awareness, developing capability and practice and professional development.
  • I4 Apply intellect in addressing potential inequities and discrimination in practice
  • I6 Judge the outcomes of studies giving due regard to applicability of the study and its potential translation to clinical practice.

 

  • T2 Demonstrate effective team working within the study group and the multi-professional work team.
  • T3 Develop excellent leadership and project management skills in relation to managing workload, coursework and personal study and development.

 

60 credits at Level 7

 

MSc Advanced Clinical Practitioner

MSc Advanced Clinical Practice Apprenticeship

  • K5 Debate the legal, professional ethical parameters that inform ACP and related governance issues.
  • K6 Evaluate the clinical, educational Leadership and research role and function of the ACP in a variety of contexts

 

  • I1Select, retrieve and evaluate relevant evidence, data and information, which can inform and improve Advanced Clinical Practice.

 

  • P2 Appraise the uni-professional, multi-professional and inter-professional dimensions of advanced practice and relate this to leading and improving the experience of service users, clients and their families/carers/significant others
  • P3 Exercise judgement to facilitate change and improvement, demonstrating skills of negotiation, prudence and integrity.
  • P4 Within the context of the ACP roles develop methods and techniques to review, consolidate and extend their sphere of practice
  • P5 Demonstrate critical application of legislation, professional guidelines and ethical principles to practice

 

  • T3 Develop excellent leadership and project management skills in relation to managing workload, coursework and personal study and development.
  • T5 Incorporate academic skills in relation to analysis, synthesis and reflection associated with the development of personal and practice knowledge.
  • T6 Exhibit skills in providing education, presentation, negotiation, marketing and networking that are essential for professional development

 

60 credits at Level 7

 

 

 


 

Diagram 2 Mapping of LO's to Awards and Modules

 

Award

Module code

 

Knowledge and Understanding (K)

Intellectual Skills/behaviours (I)

Practical Skills/behaviours (P)

Transferable Key Skills (T)

 

1

2

3

4

5

6

1

2

3

4

5

6

1

2

3

4

5

1

2

3

4

5

6

PG Cert

ACPM10

Advanced clinical management skills

 

TDA

 

TDA

 

TDA

 

TDA

 

 

 

TDA

 

DA

 

 

DA

 

TDA

 

 

TDA

 

 

 

 

TDA

 

TDA

 

 

 

DA

 

DA

 

 

ACPM09

Contextualisation of advanced prescribing

 

DA

 

DA

 

TDA

 

TDA

 

 

 

DA

 

TDA

 

 

DA

 

DA

 

 

DA

 

 

 

 

 

TDA

 

DA

 

 

DA

 

TDA

 

 

PCQ 305

Non-medical prescribing

 

TDA

 

TDA

 

TDA

 

TDA

 

 

 

TDA

 

TDA

 

 

D

 

DA

 

 

TDA

 

 

 

 

TDA

 

TDA

 

 

DA

 

DA

 

 

PG Dip

ACPM03

 

 

DA

DA

TDA

TA

 

 

TA

DA

DA

TDA

DA

 

 

TDA

 

TDA

 

DA

 

 

 

 

ACPM04

 

 

DA

DA

TDA

TA

 

 

TA

DA

DA

TDA

 

TDA

 

 

DA

DA

 

DA

 

 

 

 

ACPM05

 

 

DA

DA

TDA

TA

DA

DA

TA

DA

DA

TDA

TDA

TDA

TDA

 

TDA

DA

 

DA

TA

 

 

 

MSc

 

ACPM06

 

 

 

 

TDA

TDA

TDA

 

 

 

 

 

 

TDA

TDA

TDA

TDA

 

 

DA

 

 

DA

ACPM07 End Point Assessment

A

A

A

A

A

A

A

A

A

A

A

A

A

A

A

A

A

A

A

A

A

A

A

 

 

Key T=Taught, D =Developed, A =Assessed

 

 

 


  1. What will the programme consist of?

 

The Framework design of the programme is directed at the developmental needs of the students, due to the programme design and practice based requirements, the modules will run concurrently in each year. 

 

Students will engage theory and practice within modules that adopt an integrated approach to teaching and learning in the development of skills, professional and practice knowledge which is heavily embedded in clinical practice.

 

The programme runs over 44 weeks per academic year, to support the clinical learning element of the programme and there is a 70/30 per cent split in favour of workplace learning, the majority of which will be undertaken in clinical environments.  The practice based learning is supported with key teaching/consolidation dates which are delivered in the university setting to ensure the practice based learning is underpinned with the theoretical constructs of practice and contextualised to their specific requirements as individual learners from diverse clinical areas.

 

The clinical competence requirements of the programme will be ‘mainly’ achieved within the Post Graduate Diploma, with the professional capability elements mapped to the pillars in the HEE framework  being the focus of year 3. This is supported by the development of evidence portfolios. One which focuses on clinical competence and requires ‘sign off’ in practice, the second, an iterative and transferrable (formative) capability portfolio in which the student builds evidence against the ACP framework and role specific requirements as they move through the programme, this is intended to be a live CPD document which will form part of their ongoing professional development and revalidation (where appropriate) which may also be utilised as part of their credentialing process at the point of application to the relevant professional body.

 

A substantial part of the programme is devoted to the development of Role specific capabilities and clinical skills and the acquisition of professional and practice related knowledge base required for the role.  For this reason research and other forms of evidence are integrated within the practitioner/practice specific modules and within clinical practice.  While the effectiveness of the teaching and learning around methodology and relevance of research results will be comparable to other post-graduate programmes the form of the dissertation will steer students towards a reflective process and examination of their developing professional capacity. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The MSc fulfils the requirements of the Modular Framework in terms of level and credits.

 

Programme construct is as follows:

 

Year

Academic module studied

Academic credits

Academic level

Core/option

PGcert

Advanced clincial management skills

 

 

Non-Medical Prescribing

 

 

Contextualisation of advanced prescribing

20 credits

 

 

 

40 credits

 

 

 

40 credits

level 7

 

 

 

level 6 (moving to level 7).

 

 

level 7

Core

 

 

 

Core (or APEL)

 

 

 

Option module for students who have a prescribing award or those who require this for RCEM competencies/

PGDip

Evidence based advanced clinical practice

 

Education in advanced clincial practice

 

Clinical leadership in advanced clinical practice 

 

20 credits

 

 

 

 

20 credits

 

 

 

20 credits

level 7

 

 

 

 

level 7

 

 

 

level 7

Core

 

 

 

 

Core

 

 

 

Core

MSc

Evaluation and Professional project

 

Accreditation of advanced clincial practitioner

40 credits

 

 

20 credits

Level 7

 

 

Level 7

Core

 

 

Core (apprenticeship route only – end point assessment)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  1. How will I be taught?

 

Students will engage theory and practice within modules that adopt an integrated approach to teaching and learning in the development of capabilities skills and practice knowledge. 

 

It is proposed that there is a 70/30 per cent split in favour of workplace based learning, the majority of which will be undertaken in care clinical environments.  The clinical competence requirements of the programme will be achieved within the Post Graduate Diploma. 

 

The MSc ACP framework addresses the requirement to provide a masters award that includes new clinical skills to prepare for a role as a new type of health professional.  A substantial part of the programme is devoted to the development of specific advanced clinical skills and the remainder accommodates the acquisition of a practice related knowledge base and professional development and capability required for the ACP role.  For this reason research and other forms of evidence are integrated within the practitioner/practice specific modules and within clinical practice.  While the effectiveness of the teaching and learning around methodology and relevance of research results will be comparable to other post-graduate programmes the form of the dissertation will steer students towards a reflective process and examination of their developing professional capacity. 

 

The assessment strategy is designed to reflect and demonstrate the achievement of the range of programme and module learning outcomes.

 

The teaching, learning strategies used will be creative and varied. Students will experience lectures, debates, seminars, group work, case studies, problem-solving exercises, skills development, project related work (facilitated by tutorials), directed and independent learning.  Where appropriate visiting specialist lecturers will contribute.  The Virtual Learning platform will play a significant role in the students’ experience. Learning resources and material from class-based sessions will be available through the virtual classroom. Students will also be encouraged to communicate with each other and staff via the eLearning portal.

Simulation of clinical scenarios forms an essential component of the learning on this programme and will be developed to meet the needs of individual cohorts and specialisms to enhance the learning in practice.  Direct observation of practice by practice supervisor and educational supervisor assures competence and capability building. The tripartite model is utilised to offer continuing assessment and highlight progression through the programme and is a key requirement of the apprenticeship process.

A progress review is the regular tripartite discussion that should take place between the employer, main provider and apprentice, to review the progress of the apprentice in relation to the planned programme of learning set out in the commitment statement.

(https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/792228/OTJ_training_guidancev2_reissued_.pdf, accessed 20.6.19).
The commitment statement is a learning agreement between the apprentice, the employer and the HEI and sets out the learning requirements for the apprentice at key points. This is not a requirement for standard entry students, however, best practice in tripartite assessment will be utilised across this student group also, providing parity of experience for all learners.

 

Each student will have a designated Academic Supervisor from Sunderland University who will support him or her throughout the programme, monitoring academic and professional progress and providing pastoral support as appropriate. In addition to this the student will have an Education Supervisor, whose role will be to co-ordinate and direct the student’s clinical teaching and learning opportunities and monitor the students’ professional and clinical progressions and achievement of role competence standards. The education supervisor will be a senior clinician who will liaise closely with the clinical supervisors to ensure that the students receive appropriate clinical support and education on a day-to-day basis.

The Clinical Supervisors will be selected by the education supervisor and will be practicing within the students’ designated practice area and domain of learning.

 

The role of the clinical supervisor will be to work with the student on a daily basis to offer educational support and supervision throughout their clinical placement.

 

It is anticipated that the student will meet with their Education Supervisor for one hour per week, (not fixed and will be negotiated) and that a tripartite meeting between the student, education supervisor and the academic supervisor be arranged at the beginning and end of each module.

 

The Academic supervisor will also remain contactable to discuss and liaise should any issues occur.

 

 

Figure 1 is a schematic representation of the clinical supervision framework that will support the student learning within the first two years of the MSc Advanced Clinical Practice programme.

 

Figure 1:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The roles and responsibilities across the educational team in practice are as follows:

 

The education supervisor will play a key role in supporting the student in the practice area by:

The clinical supervisor will play a key role in supporting the student in the practice area by:

The academic supervisor will promote learning in the practice area by:

The student will develop competency across the 4 pillars of ACP by:

Arranging support for the student and linking them with the Clinical Supervisor

 

Encouraging the student to self-assess and reflect and action plan to accomplish the required clinical practice competencies. This may involve negotiating and developing role specific competencies per organisational/role requirements

 

Discussing and agreeing

the resources and strategies required for their learning and competence achievement

 

Encouraging the student to question clinical practice

 

Provide a forum for reflection on practice

 

Assisting the student in developing strategies to continually develop clinical decision making skills

 

Encourage and support autonomous practice

 

Day to day clinical supervision and teaching

 

Supervise and assess for advanced clinical practice competence

On-going assessment and report to educational supervisor

 

Report to education and academic supervisors regarding any issues or problems

 

Encouraging the student to self-assess and reflect and action plan to accomplish the required clinical competencies

 

Encouraging the student to question clinical practice

 

Providing a forum for reflection on practice

 

Ensuring all parties have a complete understanding of the programme and their role within it.

 

Completing required documentation to support the apprenticeship route and collating this within an evidence pack.

 

Working with employers and education supervisors to negotiate competency areas as per specific role requirements.

 

Structuring tripartite meetings to determine and track progression.

 

Identifying areas of deficit in progression and developing, in line with education supervisors, remedial action to be taken to improve performance.

 

The provision of direct teaching in the programme as required.

 

Promoting appropriate learning opportunities and environments for the relevant academic level of the programme.

 

Encouraging mastery in critical reflection, which is role specific and developmental in function.

 

Promoting and engaging in critical discourse in relation to pertinent issues in the clinical practice area.

Supporting the education supervisors and clinical supervisors in their supervision of trainee ACPs.

Working closely with ES/CS/AS to develop realistic role competency areas in practice.

 

Highlighting areas of development across the competency areas and engaging in autonomous learning to support their developments.

 

Engaging with tripartite support by arranging time away from practice and being fully prepared for a review.

 

Engages in self reflection and team reflection to determine developing competency or areas of deficit across the competency areas.

 

Utilises the VLE to support the work based learning approach

 

Meets the requirements of the programme and apprenticeship regulations as stipulated in the commitment statement.

 

 

Clinical competence portfolios span each year of the programme and forms the central teaching and learning strategy. Competency areas are negotiated in practice and will be aligned to national best practice (where available), or locally developed in line with an Advanced Clinical Practitioner role profile.

An example is provided from the Royal College of Emergency Medicine:

https://www.rcem.ac.uk/docs/Training/EM%20ACP%20curriculum%20V2%20Final.pdf

 

Where specific competency areas are not available, these will be developed under the supervision and direction of the identified clinical lead within the employing organisation and the programme lead and will form the basis of the programme in the absence of a national competency framework.

 

The generic nature of the programme allows all registered healthcare professionals to develop as ACPs with their employers support.

Each individual practitioner will take professional responsibility for their autonomous practice, including acknowledgment of their personal and professional limitations, including when to seek assistance and when to refer to additional clinicians or services. This is a key feature of any advancing scope of practice in healthcare and is intrinsically linked to their employers specified professional remit and the regulations stipulated by their professional statutory and regulatory body.

One key feature of the portfolio assessment is that it allows for an individual tailored approach to continual professional development, acknowledging that all students will have a different starting point and that there will be common competencies to be met across each year. For example, the employer may decide to break the RCEM portfolio into three sections, one to be achieved each year showing development across the portfolio.

 

Tripartite Process:

Progress across the programme is tracked and supported by a the academic supervisor, working in partnership with the student and the educational supervisor in practice to provide a ‘tripartite’ review of progress. This is a key requirement of the apprenticeship process and will be utilised across the programme irrespective of the method of entry.
Tripartite meetings are formally minuted and shared with the student for retention within their portfolio. Students knowledge, skills and behaviours are mapped against the 4 pillars of advanced clinical practice.

The tripartite meetings will be held at 12 weekly intervals to determine progress and competency development in the relevant areas and to identify any areas of deficit in practice which may need remedial support. If cause for concern, fitness to practice, or fitness to study issues are identified, the academic supervisor will notify the student and mentor (where appropriate) that onward referral to the  relevant university processes will be made, and will be notified to the supporting organisation.

 

Schedule of meetings in practice (minimum, may be extended if required):

 

Meeting

Purpose

Documentation to complete

Initial meeting with student and educational supervisor

Introduction to the programme and processes within.

Establish mentor contact details and support requirements.

Identify competency areas to be studies in practice.

Formalise off the job learning time (OJL) plan for apprentices.

Educational supervisor form

Initial skills assessment form.

(if not completed at induction)

 

12 weekly progress review/tripartite 1

Review the competency areas for area of practice to be studied in year 1.

Review of knowledge, skills and behaviours against the 4 pillars (as appropriate).

Review of progress/planned progress against the competency areas.

Review the OJP plan for apprentices.

Review the mentorship arrangements.

Identify areas of concern/deficit and develop an improvement plan.

Tripartite documentation

Ensure year 1 time sheet is being completed for all apprentices.

 

Midpoint tripartite

As above.

Highlight midpoint developmental areas and progress against the competency areas and 4 pillars.

As above.

Final tripartite

As above.

Highlight development throughout the year in relation to the competency areas and 4 pillars.

Obtain final sign off prior to portfolio submission.
Discuss forward planning to following year/autonomous practice (as appropriate).

As above

Final sign off from clinical mentor.

 

 

 

Alongside the formal competency areas, students are encouraged to formally construct a ‘capability’ portfolio which they build throughout the programme. The Capability portfolio is aligned to the 4 pillars of advanced practice and will be key part in the students’ continuing professional development as an advanced practitioner and will also form a useful resource for students who wish to undertake the apprenticeship route and end point assessment. The descriptors below articulate how ACPs can be expected to develop capability as they gain experience and confidence within their role. They describe the expectation of ACPs as they develop from ‘Competent’ practitioners to ‘Proficient’ practitioners to ‘Expert’ practitioners.

 

NHS Framework for Advanced Clinical Practice published 2017 (HEE 2017)-, Apprentice standard 4 pillars mapped to Capability building document.

 

 

 

 


Capability 1 Clinical practice/clinical skills 

Pillar Domains

Competent

Proficient

Expert

1.1      Autonomous practice

 

 

Demonstrates a professional understanding of autonomy within this framework and respective professional codes of conduct.

 

Versed in organisational processes, ethical insight to enable freedom and confidence to act with authority when making decisions.

 

Demonstrates confidence and high level communication skills when working within the boundaries of the organisations policy.

Demonstrates the application of autonomous critical appraisal and evaluation skills in the context of working practice.

 

Acts within the organisational processes confidently, demonstrating their freedom to act and authority when making decisions.

 

Has the confidence and ability to communicate and influence the local policy in terms of the political context of the role and its future potential to deliver services.

Has the confidence and ability to communicate and influence the local policy in terms of the political context of the role and its future potential to deliver services.

 

Leading and setting direction in relation to the clinical governance and organisational liabilities where non-medical professionals are working independently. 

 

Able to articulate effectively from board to ward. Setting direction and local policy, engaging in national and strategic thinking relating to the role. Leads within the political context of the role and develops future services.

1.2 Critical Thinking

Demonstrates critical thinking and analytical skills in their practice and attainment of knowledge.

 

Incorporates analysis, critical thinking and reflection to inform their clinical assessments.

Able to synthesize experience evidence and knowledge to apply within unfamiliar situations.

 

Courage to challenge and question others in complex situations.

Has developed advanced psychomotor skills with creative ability to make the decisions required of them in their nursing practice.

 

Challenging existing thinking with new ideas and debating practice issues across professional boundaries.

1.3 High levels of decision making and problem solving:

Demonstrates decision making skills in assessment, diagnosis referral and discharge.

 

Confident to seek second opinion, relevant information and the answers to key questions from several sources. 

 

Confident to seek second opinion, relevant information and the answers to key questions from several sources. 

Decisions combine logical analysis, experience, wisdom and advanced methods to make sound, timely decisions.

 

Demonstrates persistence and skill in gathering information.

 

Is confident in utilising gathered opinions to act and creatively find solutions at times of crisis.

 

Articulates solutions and decisions that impact the whole organisation.

 

Understands levels of inclusion necessary for ownership and effective action.

Is well respected and sought out often by others for input, support, and direct decision making.

 

Demonstrates deep resolve and resilience throughout the decision making process.

 

Delivers solutions and decisions that have a positive, far-reaching, and comprehensive organisational impact.

 

Demonstrates advanced skill and keen insight in gathering, sorting, and applying key information.

 

Demonstrates the ability to make decisions and solve complex, difficult, and intractable problems.

1.4 Values based care

Demonstrates and lives the NHS organisational, personal and professional values.

 

Develops therapeutic interventions to improve service user outcomes by demonstrating personal ability to understand an individual’s health and social needs.

 

Communicates effectively to promote good workplace with benefits for those in their care and staff alike.

Works to improve the values of others in the health of the individual and the whole community.

 

Leads teams and builds relationships based on compassion, empathy, respect and dignity.

 

Shows good communication and listening skills and demonstrates courage to ensure effective multi-professional team working.

 

Influences and leads integration to ensure improved pathways through shared values and behaviours. 

 

Is exemplar at ensuring engagement and ‘no decision about me without me

 

Demonstrates strong leadership at a strategic level and able to engage in and influence local regional and national policy.

Programme LO’s mapped particularly to this pillar K1, K2, K3. I2, I3, I4, I5, I6. P1, P2, P4, P5. T1, T2, T4, T5, ( as this is a capability live document this is individual to practitioner)

 

Capability 2 Education 

Pillar 2  Domains

Competent

Proficient

Expert

2.1 Role model:

Understands and demonstrates the characteristics of a role model to members in the team/and or service.

 

 

Demonstrates the characteristics of an effective role model at a higher level.

Is able to develop effective role model behaviour in others.

2.2 Mentorship and coaching:

Demonstrates understanding of mentorship and coaching principles and processes, and applies these appropriately with team members.

Demonstrates ability to support others within the team to effectively mentor and/or coach.

Demonstrates ability to effectively mentor and/or coach within the wider environment.

2.3 Leading and shaping education and training:

Demonstrates an understanding of current teaching and learning principles relevant to current areas of practice.

 

Participates in the delivery of formal and informal education programmes within the team.

Demonstrates an ability to design and implement a local approach to workforce education planning and development.

Leads on and participates in education and training delivery out with the team.

Contributes to and shapes the approach to workforce education planning and development within the wider environment. Shapes, contributes or is accountable for the creation or development of accredited education.

2.4 Promotion creation of learning environment:

Demonstrates an understanding of East Midlands Quality Standards for local Training and Education providers and undertakes appropriate role in meeting the standards.

Shapes how East Midlands Quality

Standards for local Training and Education providers are implemented and outcomes improved on within the local area.

Contributes and shapes how East

Midlands Quality Standards for local Training and Education providers are implemented and outcomes improved on within the wider environment.

2.5 Maintain and improve fitness to practice in self and others:

Demonstrates individual fitness for practice through continuing to develop skills, knowledge and behaviours that underpin the agreed requirements of the role.

Demonstrates own fitness for practice, supports and ensures others within the team continue to develop and demonstrate their fitness for practice.

Takes a lead role in ensuring the development of staff groups within the wider environment demonstrate their fitness for practice.

2.6 Educating and supporting patients, service user and carers:

Demonstrates an active contribution to the education and awareness raising for patients, service users and carers.

Demonstrates an ability to engage with patients, service users and carers to improve the provision of education and awareness raising.

Contributes and shapes the provision of education and awareness raising for patients, service users and carers within the wider environment.

Programme LO’s mapped particularly to this pillar K4, K5, K6. I2, I3, I5. P1, P2, P4, P5. T1, T2, T4, T5,T6 ( as this is a capability live document this is individual to practitioner)

 

Capability 3 Management and Leadership

Pillar 3 Domains      

Competent                                                     

Proficient                                                 

Expert

3.1 Developing case for   change: 

 

Contributes to the development of a case for change. Taking into account workforce vision and business strategy. Demonstrates an ability to think 4-12 months ahead within a defined area and contribute to the planned service improvement work programme.

Creates vision of future change and translates this into clear direction for others. Demonstrates the ability to think over a year ahead within a defined area and can generate formal arguments and evidence to support change.

Convinces others within the wider environment to share the vision for change at a more strategic level.

Demonstrates the ability to think over a longer term and across the wider environment, contributing to the management of organisational politics and changes in the external  environment

3.2 Identifying need for change, leading innovation and  managing change, including service development 

Contributes to improving quality through effectively undertaking agreed change management and project

managing roles

 

Identifies where innovation could support improvements to service delivery and can articulate changes required to implement.

 

 

 

Develops clear understanding of priorities and formulates practical short-term plans in line with workplace strategy.

 

Recognises and implements service improvements and innovation through successfully managing the process of change with a team.

Takes a lead to ensure innovation produces demonstrable improvements in service provision, which is embedded into working practices in the short, medium and longer term.

 

Takes the lead in service innovation and improvement, facilitating adoption and spread in accordance with best practice

3.3 Negotiation and influencing skills:

Demonstrates an understanding of organisational behaviours and cultural climate within the team and how this can be utilised to effectively deliver service priorities.

Demonstrates an understanding and ability to influence behaviours and the cultural climate at service level.

 

Demonstrates how to obtain cooperation of relevant stakeholders, both within and outwith service level, to deliver improved patient services.

Demonstrates leadership and ability to influence at a strategic level the behaviour and cultural climate in light of public and media perceptions.

 

Understands the role of health and social care organisational boundaries to promote and build integrated service for the future.

 

Demonstrates the ability to develop and support increased levels of cooperation across potentially diverse groups when faced with potentially contentious issues and decisions

3.4 Networking

Promotes the sharing of information and resources.

 

Actively seeks the views of others.

Creates opportunities to bring individuals and groups together to achieve goals.

Identifies opportunities where working in collaboration with others within and across networks can bring added benefits.

3.5 Team development:

 

 

Can recognise the role they play in supporting more strategic motivational activities with both individuals and teams within a wider environment.

 

Adopts a team approach within the wider environment, acknowledging and appreciating efforts, contributions and compromises.

Programme LO’s mapped particularly to this pillar K4, K5, K6. I2, I3, I4 I5. P1, P2, P3 P4, P5. T1, T2, T4, T5,T6 ( as this is a capability live document this is individual to practitioner)

 

 

Capability 4 Research

Pillar 4 Domains

Competent

Proficient

Expert

4.1 Ability to access research/use information systems:

Demonstrates ability to access research/use appropriate information systems.

Demonstrates ability to access research and show teams use of appropriate information system

Demonstrates ability to lead teams and services to access/use appropriate information systems.  

4.2 Critical appraisal/evaluation skills:

Demonstrates ability to critically evaluate and review literature.

Demonstrates application of critical appraisal and evaluation skills in the context of working practice.

Is recognised as undertaking peer review activities within working practice.

4.3 Identifies gaps in evidence base:

Demonstrates ability to identify where there is a gap in evidence base to support practice

Demonstrates an ability to formulate appropriate and rigorous research questions to bridge the gaps.

Is recognised as undertaking peer review activities within working practice.

4.4 Implement research evidence into working practice:

Demonstrates ability to apply research evidence base into working practice.

Demonstrates ability to apply research and evidenced based practice within team and or service.

Is able to use research evidence to shape policy/procedure at an organisational level.

4.5 Develops and evaluate research protocols / guidelines and working practices

Demonstrates ability to describe core features of research protocols/guidelines.

 

Demonstrates their application into working practice.

Demonstrates ability to design a rigorous protocol/guideline to address previously formulated research questions.

 

Demonstrates ability to apply protocols/guidelines with team -

Demonstrates active involvement in the

Critical review of research protocols/guidelines.

 

Demonstrates ability to lead protocol/guidelines at an organisational level.

4.6 Supervision of others undertaking research:

Demonstrates the understanding of research governance.

Is able to contribute to research supervision in collaboration with others.

Is a research supervisor for postgraduate students

4.7 Establishes research partnerships:

Demonstrates the ability to work as a member of the research team.

Demonstrates ability to establish new multidisciplinary links to conduct research projects.

Demonstrates ability to show leadership within research teams concerning the conduct of specialist research.

Programme LO’s mapped particularly to this pillar K4, K6. I1 I4 I5, I6. P1, P5. T5,T6 ( as this is a capability live document this is individual to practitioner)

 

 


 

  1. How will I be assessed and given feedback? Modes of assessment aligned with KIS: choose one or more.

 

Written examinations

X

Coursework

X

Practical assessments

X

 

The generic assessment criteria that we use can be found here. Some programmes use subject-specific assessment criteria, which are based on the generic ones.

 

This programme uses the Generic University Assessment Criteria

YES

 

This programme uses the Subject Specific Assessment Criteria

YES

 

 

 

Subject specific assessment criteria will be utilised against the competency areas negotiated and assessed in practice. Students will be ‘signed off’ as competent by their education supervisor against individual competency areas negotiated at the tripartite meetings.

Although many students will use a generic approach (for example the Royal College of Emergency Medicine ACP competencies for adult/child, for students working in emergency care), it is acknowledged that students may also enter the programme from clinical areas in which the ACP competency areas are not as well defined. These will therefore be locally negotiated and broken down into competency areas, which are feasible across the programme and reviewed at the tripartite meetings to ensure progression is made at the required level and against the 4 pillars of advanced practice.

The University aims to return marked assessments and feedback within 4 working weeks of the assignment submission date after internal moderation process has been completed. If this is not possible, students will be notified by the Module Leaders when the feedback is available and how it can be obtained.

 

The Academic Misconduct Regulations and associated guidance can be found here. It is the responsibility of students to ensure they are familiar with their responsibilities in regards to assessment and the implications of an allegation of academic misconduct.

 

Students should refer to the University Regulations for information on degree classifications.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Programme structure

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


The programme is divided into modular ‘phases’ as shown below: This meets the requirements of the apprenticeship.

 

Year 1 ( 1 Week)

Modules ACPM01

                 ACPM02

                ACP300

 

 

Phase 2 (20 weeks)

 

 

Phase 3 (4 weeks)

 

 

Phase 4  (10 weeks)

 

 

Phase 5 (7 week)

 

 

Phase 6 (2 weeks

 

 

Off the job learning (OFF JOB L)

This will be taken as individual days throughout the year.

5 days x 7.5 hrs. Taught 

4 days p/w as ‘normal Work’ as

In working role

Working in role

2 days p/w supervised practice consolidating new clinical competencies and completing sign off

Development of year 1 evidence in Clinical competence portfolio

Supervision tripartite. Academic tutorial

Working in role

 

5 days x 7.5 hrs. Taught consolidation/ reflection/ assignment submission/ I day Simulation

5 days reading

Personal development

Self-directed visits

Capability building

University Block of theory and practice based simulation

I day p/w Integrated teaching Practice

Working with PS and ES and capability building (portfolio)

Working towards sign off of new clinical competencies

Supervision tripartite.

Academic tutorial

1 hour

ES and As tripartite

1 hour

3 days p/w working in role

Academic tutorial

1 hour

ES and As tripartite

1 hour

University Block of theory and practice based simulation/exam

Assignment hand in for 3 x yearlong modules and portfolio

 

5 days OFF JOB L

20 days OFF JOB L

 

20 days OFF JOB L

 

10 days OFF JOB L

10 days OFF JOB L

Off the job learning is 65 days per year

Annual leave will be taken according to work and service demands

 

 

Year 2 ( 1 Week)

Modules ACPM03

                 ACPM04

                ACPM05

 

 

Phase 2 (20 weeks)

 

 

 

Phase 3 (4 weeks)

 

Phase 4  (10 weeks)

 

Phase 5 (7 week) s

 

Phase 6 (2 weeks

 

Off the job learning

This will be taken as individual days throughout the year.

5 days x 7.5 hrs. Taught 

4 days p/w as ‘normal Work’ as

In working role

Working in role

2 days p/w supervised practice consolidating new clinical competencies and completing sign off

Development of year 2 evidence in Clinical competence portfolio

Supervision tripartite. Academic tutorial

Working in role

 

5 days x 7.5 hrs. Taught consolidation/ reflection/ assignment submission/ I day Simulation

5 days reading

Personal development

Self-directed visits

Capability building

University Block of theory and practice based simulation

I day p/w Integrated teaching Practice

Working with PS and ES and capability building portfolio

Working towards sign off of new clinical competencies

Supervision tripartite.

Academic tutorial

1 hour

ES and As tripartite

1 hour

3 days p/w working in role

Academic tutorial

1 hour

ES and As tripartite

1 hour

University Block of theory and practice based simulation/exam

Assignment hand in for 3 x yearlong modules and clinical competence portfolio

 

5 days OFF JOB L

20 days OFF JOB L

 

20 days OFF JOB L

 

10 days OFF JOB L

10 days OFF JOB L

Off the job learning is 65 days per year

Annual leave will be taken according to work and service demands

 

 

 

Year 3  ( 1 Week)

Modules ACPM06             

 

 

Phase 2 (20 weeks)

 

 

 

Phase 3 (4 weeks)

 

Phase 4  (10 weeks)

 

Exam

Board and Gateway to EPA assessment

 

Final Phase (2 week)

 

Final exam end point assessment and administration of exam

 

Off the job learning

This will be taken as individual days throughout the year.

5 days x 7.5 hrs. Taught 

4 days p/w as ‘normal Work’ as

In working role

Working in role

2 days p/w supervised practice consolidating and finalising clinical competencies and completing sign off

Completing full evidence of clinical competence portfolio

Supervision tripartite. Academic tutorial

Working in role

Preparing for end point assessment

10 days reading

 

1 day

Personal development

 

University Block of theory and practice based simulation

I day p/w Integrated teaching Practice

Working with PS and ES  towards final sign off of clinical  competencies

Begin drafting of final capability building portfolio

Supervision tripartite.

Academic tutorial

1 hour

ES and As tripartite

1 hour

2          days p/w working in role

Assignment hand in for dissertation module and final complete 3 year clinical and capability portfolio

Academic tutorial

1 hour

ES and As tripartite

1 hour

 

 

5 days OFF JOB L

20 days OFF JOB L

 

20 days OFF JOB L

10 days of the job learning

 

10 days OFF JOB L

 

Off the job learning is 60  days

Annual leave will be taken according to work and service demands


  1. How does research influence the programme? 

 

The MSc ACP programme framework addresses the requirement to provide a masters award that includes new clinical skills to prepare for a role as a new type of health professional.  A substantial part of the programme is devoted to the development of specific skills and the remainder accommodates the acquisition of a bio-medical and practice related knowledge base, and professional development required for the role.  For this reason research and other forms of evidence are integrated within the modules and within clinical practice.  While the effectiveness of the teaching and learning around methodology and relevance of research results will be comparable to other post-graduate programmes the form of the dissertation will steer students towards a reflective process and examination of their developing professional capacity. 

 

The integration of research methodologies/evidence based practice within the MSC Advanced Clinical Practitioner/ MSc Advanced Clinical Practice Apprenticeship Programme and linked awards is shown below:

This programme design is underpinned by guidelines provided by the QAA (2008). 

Each bullet point has a bracketed module code and descriptor title indicating where each criterion is addressed in the Programme. 

 

The QAA state that Master’s level degrees are awarded to students who have demonstrated the following:

 

  • A systematic understanding and critical awareness of current problems and/or new insights in their academic discipline, field of study or area of professional practice
    1. Professional Portfolio 3 Consolidation of Domains evidence for Advanced Clinical Practitioner comprising Module 7 Evaluation/ professional Project L7 40 credits
    2. Module 8, 2 part final assessment-20 credits)
  • Originality in the application of knowledge, together with a practical understanding of how established techniques of research and enquiry are used to create and interpret knowledge in the discipline.
  1. Professional Portfolio 1 Competencies/competence framework for Advanced Clinical Management skills
  2. Non-medical prescribing and contextualisation of advanced prescribing
  3. Professional Portfolio 2 Developing Professional Capability and competencies for Advanced Practice (Evidence gathering) within evidence based advanced clinical practice, education and leadership modules in year 2.
  • A comprehensive understanding of techniques applicable to their own research or advanced scholarship:
  1. Professional Portfolio 3 Consolidation of Domains evidence for Advanced Clinical Practitioner comprising Module 7 Evaluation/ professional Project L7 40 credits, and Module 8, 2 part final assessment-20 credits) and evidence based advanced clinical practice.
  • Conceptual understanding that enables the student to critically evaluate current research and advanced scholarship within the discipline and to evaluate methodologies and develop critiques of them and, where appropriate, to propose new hypotheses.
  1. Professional Portfolio 1 Competencies/competence framework for Advanced Clinical management skills, non-medical prescribing and/or contextualisation of advanced prescribing.

 

The QAA also recommend that holders of the qualification will be able to:

 

  • Deal with complex issues both systematically and creatively, make sound judgements in the absence of complete data, and communicate their conclusions clearly to specialist and non-specialist audiences- (Mirrors role of ACP and the programme enables professionalism and develops capability)
  • Demonstrate self-direction and originality in tackling and solving problems, and act autonomously in planning and implementing tasks at a professional or equivalent level. (Mirrors role of ACP and the programme enables professionalism and develops capability)
  • Continue to advance their knowledge and understanding and to develop new skills at a high level (Mirrors role of ACP and the programme enables professionalism and develops capability)

 

Finally, holders of a Master’s degree will also have the qualities and transferable skills necessary for employment requiring:

 

  • The exercise of initiative and personal responsibility
  • Decision making in complex and unpredictable situations
  • The independent learning ability required for continuing professional development

QAA (2008)

 

The mapping exercise below demonstrates how the above recommendations will be met during the three year MSC Advanced Clinical Practice by utilising a scaffolding approach whereby evidence for practice as a theme is built on as each module is delivered over the three year Programme.

 

 

 


Mapping of research content to ACP curriculum

 

 

Established module type (stand-alone)

 

 

Corresponding ACP module

Research skills: Approaches to ……

Module outcomes:

 

Demonstrate competence in the location, retrieval and management of literature from a variety of sources

 

Critically appraise the range of approaches, e.g. positivist, realist, constructionist to enquiry

 

Critically appraise research literature in a specific area of health, community or education

 

 

 

 

 

 

Module: 4 ACPM03 Evidence base for advanced Clinical Practice

  • Module learning outcome:  To analyse the scientific research paradigm and demonstrate an understanding of its significance in evidence based medicine.

 

Content: Introduction to hierarchies of evidence, philosophies underpinning evidence, focusing on the reductionist paradigm and positivist research methodologies, systematic reviews, randomised controlled trials.  Introduction to critical analysis of quantitative research i.e. Identifying terminology (3 hours of seminars).

Journal Club presentation 1: Presentation of differing types of quantitative research (1 hour)

(Total of 4 hours)

 

Module:  1 ACPM01 ‘Advanced Clinical Examination or Consultation skills’

Module learning outcome: Differentiate between reductionism and holism in relation to clinical   assessment and history taking.

 

 

 

Content: Revisit research philosophies focusing on the interpretive paradigm. Introduction to critical analysis of qualitative methods.  Links to history taking will be made by comparing an holistic versus a reductionist approach (3 hours of seminars)

Journal club presentation 2: Presentation and analysis of a qualitative piece of research linked to clinical history taking/examination (1 hour)

(Total of 4 hours)

 

Module summative assessment (Module 2): Presentation of a case study and critical appraisal of the sources of evidence in relation to an aspect of on-going management within the case study

Research skills: Design and methods

 

Identify a research problem and locate it within the relevant literature

 

Demonstrate a critical understanding of a variety of research designs

 

Identify and manage the ethical issues arising within their research area

 

Select and defend the choice of research methods to apply to a specific research problem

 

 

 

 

 

Demonstrate a critical understanding of the strategies/methods of qualitative and quantitative data analysis

 

Module: 2 ACPM02 Clinical investigation, Formulation and Diagnostic skills

Module learning outcome: Evaluate quantitative research relating to altered physiology in (e.g. ED, MH paediatrics) sphere of ACP practice

 

Content will include exploring how descriptive and inferential statistics are interpreted in relation to biomedical sciences, public Health and other relevant disciplines (3 hours)

Journal club presentation 3:  Discussion on research which focuses on establishing parameters of normality, illustrating ranges, outliers and means (1 hour)

(Total of 4 hours)

Module: 2 ACPM02 Clinical investigation, Formulation and Diagnostic skills

Module: 3 ACP300 Evidencing Prescribing in ACP 

  • Module learning outcome: Critically appraise contemporary sources of evidence and critically reflect on practice in light of this evidence

Content will include comparing and contrasting differing approaches to research in the critical care area and evaluating the strengths and weaknesses of differing methods (3 hours)

Journal club presentation 4:  Students will present a critical analysis of research relevant to Critical Care.  Both quantitative and qualitative methods will be presented and examined.

(Total of 4 hours)

Module 4 ACPM03 Evidence base for advanced Clinical Practice

Module 6 ACPM05 Clinical Leadership in Advanced Clinical Practice

  • Module learning outcome: Critically appraise contemporary sources of evidence e.g. research, local, national and international guidelines, and legal, ethical and professional frameworks and demonstrate utilisation of this information in clinical decision making and clinical education
  • Module learning outcome: Explore ethical issues in relation to research with vulnerable groups 

Content will include building on the content to include the value of guidelines (national and local) and audit in leadership in advanced clinical practice (2 hours). 

Seminar on ethical issues relating to research in ACP practice and leadership (1 hour)

Journal club presentation 5: Presentation and evaluation of a national audit or set of guidelines relevant to the student’s sphere of Advanced practice (1 hour)

(Total of 4 hours)

Summative assessment:………… Deconstruction of a set of clinical guidelines requiring the student to critically review the evidence base of the local guideline

 

 

 

SECTION D EMPLOYABILITY

  1. How will the programme prepare me for employment?

 

There is a demand for education programmes that are iterative, flexible and respond to ever changing health and workforce needs. The Five Year Forward View signals how the health service needs to change, arguing for a more engaged relationship with citizens and communities to promote well-being and prevent ill health.

This requires workforce transformation and a consistent approach to the development of new roles and new ways of working including advanced clinical practice as one of the many solutions. A recent joint professions statement by the royal colleges and professional bodies representing the health workforce coordinated by the Academy of Medical Royal Colleges has supported and recognised this need and the professions have committed to work together to help create the environment to support effective team working and new ways of working and workforce development that impact on the quality of life of individuals, families and carers. This paves the way for different ways of working, using new models of care to achieve workforce transformation.

 

  1. Particular features of the qualification.

 

Evidence the development of Advanced Clinical Practice to Advanced clinical Practitioner Advanced Clinical Practice Apprenticeship. This evidence can be used to transfer between clinical environments or employers. The portfolio can be used to demonstrate against re-validation of first level registration and/or PSRB approval (if ACP becomes regulated)

 

  1. Professional statutory or regulatory body (PSRB) accreditation.

 

PSRB accreditation is not relevant to this programme

X

PSRB accreditation is currently being sought for this programme

 

This programme currently has PSRB accreditation

For the non-medical prescribing module only.

SECTION E:  PROGRAMME STRUCTURE AND REGULATIONS

 

25.PART B - PROGRAMME  REGULATION/S

 

Name of programme: MSc Advanced Clinical Practitioner 

MSc Advanced Clinical Practitioner Apprenticeship

Title of final award: MSc

Interim awards[1]: Post Graduate Diploma Advanced Clinical Practice

Post Graduate Certificate Skills for Advanced Practice 

 

Accreditation:    Module PQC305, Non-Medical Prescribing is Accredited by the Nursing Midwifery Council

 

University Regulation (please state the relevant University Regulation):

 

1.       International English Language Testing System (IELTS) – regulation 1.1.1b

 

Applicants whose first language is not English must achieve a minimum IELTS score of 7.0, with no individual element below 7.0

 

2.       Title of Exit Qualification – regulation 6.1.3

 

A variation from the university regulations has been given to allow the interim award titles to be different from the main award.

 

3.       Level 6 Modules and Number of Credits – regulation 2.2.4

 

20 credits at degree level 6 can be studied as part of the PG cert award (ACP300 Evidencing Prescribing in Advanced Clinical Practice). This is applicable to the initial cohort only and will be removed for subsequent cohorts.

 

An additional 40 credits at degree level 6 can be studied alongside the PG cert award (PQC305 Non-Medical Prescribing). This is applicable to the intial cohort only and will be a core module in the programme from October 2019.

 

4.       Progression Regulations – regulation 4.2.2

 

You must achieve a minimum mark of 40% in order to pass each element of assessment. In Advanced Clinical Practice, some elements of assessment will be assessed on a pass/fail basis on a judgment of ‘competent / not yet competent’. All elements of assessment must be passed in order to pass the module overall.

 

5.       Maximum duration on the Programme – regulation 2.3.2

 

The maximum period of registration on the programme is eight years.

 

Regulations apply to students commencing their studies from (please state the date / intake that these regulations will apply to students for each Stage):

 

Regulations apply to students

Date the regulations apply

Intakes affected

Stage 1

2018-19

 

Stage 2

2018-19

 

Stage 3

2018-19

 

 

Stage 1

 

Core modules:

 

Code

Title

Credits

ACPM10

Advanced Clinical Management Skills

20

PCQ 305

Non-medical prescribing (level 6)

40

 

Elective Modules

 

Code

Title

Credits

ACPM09

Contextualisation of advanced prescribing 

40

 

 

Stage 2

 

Core modules

 

Code

Title

Credits

ACPM03

Evidence based Advanced Clinical Practice

20

ACPM04

Education in Advanced Clinical Practice

 

20

ACPM05

Clinical Leadership in Advanced Clinical Practice

20

 

Stage 3

 

Core modules

 

Code

Title

Credits

ACPM06

Evaluation and Professional Project

 

40

ACPM07

 

Accreditation of Advanced Clinical Practitioner

20

 

 

SECTION F:  ADMISSIONS, LEARNING ENVIRONMENT AND SUPPORT

 

  1. What are the admissions requirements?

 

Students will be selected upon the following criteria:

1)       Registered health professional, appointed to ACP role by seconding Trust/employer.

2)       2:2 or above in first degree (Normal)

3)       English language score of at least IELTS 7 where English is not the student’s first language.

4)       Students who do not hold a prescribing award will also need to meet the entry requirements for the non-medical prescribing programme, which are as follows:

 

Applicants must provide evidence that they have met the NMC’s criteria for eligibility to undertake a nurse independent/supplementary prescribing programme.

 

The criteria are:

  • You must be a registered first level nurse, midwife and/or specialist community public health nurse (NMC)
  • OR
    • You must be either a registered chiropodist, podiatrist, physiotherapist, therapeutic radiographer (independent prescribing), diagnostic radiographer or dietitian (supplementary prescribing). (HCPC)
  • You must have at least three years’ experience as a practising nurse, midwife or specialist community public health nurse or in your current role for AHPs and be deemed competent by your employer to undertake the programme. (Employers will be required to provide a signature on application to the module to agree this.)
  • Of these three years, the year immediately preceding application to the programme must have been in the clinical field in which you intend to prescribe, e.g. Neonates, mental health. Part-time workers must have practised for a sufficient period to be deemed competent by their employer
  • Successfully pass a 20-question drug calculations entry test with a mark of 80% or above
  • You must provide evidence via the Accreditation of Prior and Experiential Learning (APEL) process of your ability to study at minimum academic level six.

In addition, students will need to have written confirmation from:

 

  • Their employer of their support for them to undertake the preparation programme.
  • The short course lead about their selection on to the preparation of prescribers education programme.
  • A designated medical practitioner who meets eligibility criteria for medical supervision of nurse prescribers and who has agreed to provide the required term of supervised practice.

 

 

 

 

Non-standard entry to the course will be considered. However, in such cases criteria 1, 3 and 4 will continue to apply.

 

Additional application processes to usual PGS requirements are necessary to fulfil the employment or placement expectations of the Trust. Joint interviews with Trust employers and programme manager of the programme will determine approval to access the programme of study.

 

Recruitment and Selection is via application and interview with Trusts appointing to ACP post and Sunderland University. The applicants’ manager/practice training and education manager must support all applications to the Programme. The university will retain the right to interview candidates for this programme.

 

Can students enter with advanced standing?

Yes

 

 

If yes, to which Stages?

 

Stage 1

NMC and/or HCPC prescribing mapped to PG cert stage

Stage 2

Completion of PG cert Skills for Advanced Practice can then map to PG diploma Advanced Clinical Practice and MSc Advanced Clinical Practitioner if break in linked award study is less than 3 years. (Not apprenticeship see RPL diagram)

Stage 3

Completion of PG diploma Advanced Clinical Practice can then map to MSc Advanced Clinical Practitioner if break in linked award study is less than 3 years. (Not apprenticeship see RPL diagram)

Stage 4

Future development assessment only route

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Post-Qualified Career Structure Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL) Mapping to Advanced Clinical Practitioner/Practice   

 

Year

 

 

Post qualified registrant with no PG cert in Advanced Clinical Skills

Post Qualified registrant with PG Cert Advanced Clinical Skills

Post Qualified registrant with PG Diploma in Advanced Practice

Post Qualified registrant Advanced Clinical Practitioner with no M level Advanced Practitioner Qualification

 

NB – not in current approval of programme

 

Post Qualified registrant new to advanced skills/practitioner role

Post Qualified registrant with competent foundation level advanced skills and 1 year experience in practitioner role

Post Qualified registrant working in practitioner or advanced practitioner role for total minimum of 2 years and evidence of advanced competence

 

 

Working in role as Advanced Practitioner for minimum of 3 years

 

 

NB – not in current approval of programme

Academic credit mapping as RPL

 

Supervised Clinical Practice mapping as RPL

 

 

1

 

RPL

RPL

 

NO RPL

RPL

RPL

 

Assessment only programme route

2

 

 

RPL

 

 

RPL

3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Both RPL domains need to follow University and Professional boundaries to ensure currency.
  • All RPL Decisions will be made in collaboration with seconding employers and the University of Sunderland Admissions Tutor/Programme Leader
  • Maths and English GCSE or Equivalent is an expectation by end of apprenticeship
  • Academic credit mapping must adhere to the University of Sunderland and Quality Assurance Agency Standards for such mapping against awards.
  • In order to gain Recognition of Supervised Clinical Practice the Apprentice must account for the said practice (Supervised Clinical Practice) by using a log or credential from seconding employer.
  • Any RPL for academic credit must demonstrate relevance in subject.

NB. Assessment only route is recommended as RPL Career development only. At this stage and route not part of first (this) approval, and will be developed at a later date.


  1. What kind of support and help will there be?

 

Student Information

Induction

Students are provided with an induction programme which introduces them to the practical/theoretical elements as well as essential information regarding University ‘Rules and Regulations’ and Assessment Regulations for Sunderland Awards. 

 

Student support

Guidance tutors

Students have a designated academic guidance tutor from Sunderland University who supports them throughout the programme, monitoring academic and professional progress and providing pastoral support as appropriate. Further to this they will provide students with an academic link during the programme.

An educational supervisor (medical specialist or Advanced Practitioner) is essential to teach and assess clinical learning, working in the clinical area. Support and preparation for those undertaking this role is developed at Sunderland alongside this programme development. Tripartite meetings with the student, educational and academic supervisor will be required to monitor programme learning outcomes are being acquired.  The educational supervisor will delegate student supervision to a clinical supervisor as appropriate. See Section Fig 1 and 2 below.

 

Other members of academic team

In addition, other academic staff provides support for the students including the Programme Leader who is the contact person regarding the programme structure, placements, demands on students, student needs and expectations for that year.  The Module Tutor manages the day-to-day operation of a module, working with the Programme Manager and the staff team to ensure appropriate timetabling and staffing as well as effective and efficient management of assessment process.

 

Student Services including Library Services

Students also have access to specialised services provided by the University.  Students are introduced to the library during the induction period and a resource pack helps them develop the skills needed to take full advantage of the information and services available.  The Library offers open access computer facilities and library staff.  A further learning resource is provided by the Living laboratory and other specialised facilities which enable students to practice clinical skills in a safe and supported environment.

  1. In the university as a whole:

The University provides a range of professional support services including wellbeing, counselling, disability support, and a Chaplaincy.


 

  1. What resources will I have access to?

 

On campus

x

In a partner college

 

By distance learning

X

 

On campus

General Teaching and Learning Space

x

IT

x

Library

x

VLE

x

Laboratory

x

Studio

 

Performance space

 

Other specialist

 

Technical resources 

 

 

Information about the University’s facilities can be found here.

 

  1. Are there any additional costs on top of the fees?

 

Yes, The appropriate National standard of practice clinical portfolio will incur a cost per student. For example in Emergency care the Royal College of Emergency medicine portfolio for ED ACP’s.

yes

 

 

  1. How are student views represented?

All taught programmes in the University have student representatives for each programme who meet in a Student-Staff Liaison Committee (SSLC) where they can raise students’ views and concerns. The Students’ Union and the faculties together provide training for student representatives. SSLCs and focus groups are also used to obtain student feedback on plans for developing existing programmes and designing new ones. Feedback on your programme is obtained every year through module questionnaires and informs the annual review of your programme. Student representatives are also invited to attend Programme and Module Studies Boards, which manage the delivery and development of programmes, and modules.  Faculty Academic Committee also has student representation. This allows students to be involved in higher-level plans for teaching and learning. At university level on Students are represented on University level Committed by sabbatical officers who are the elected leaders of the Students’ Union.

 

The University’s student representation and feedback policy can be found here.

 

Every two years we participate in the national Postgraduate Taught Experience Survey (PTES), which is run by the Higher Education Academy.


SECTION G: QUALITY MANAGEMENT 

 

  1.  National subject benchmarks

The Quality Assurance Agency for Higher Education publishes benchmark statements, which give guidance as to the skills, and knowledge that graduates in various subjects and in certain types of degree are expected to have. They do not cover all subjects at postgraduate level but those, which exist, can be found at here.

Are there any benchmark statements for this programme?

 

NO

 

The subject benchmark(s) for this programme is/are:

The QAA also publishes a Framework for Higher Education Qualifications (FHEQ), which defines the generic skills, and abilities expected of students who have achieved awards at a given level and with which our programmes align. The FHEQ can be found here.

 

  1. How are the quality and standards of the programme assured?

The programme is managed and quality assured through the University’s standard processes. Programmes are overseen by Module and Programme Studies Boards, which include student representatives. Each year each module leader provides a brief report on the delivery of the module, identifying strengths and areas for development, and the programme team reviews the programme as a whole. The purpose of this is to ensure that the programme is coherent and up-to-date, with suitable progression through the programme, and a good fit (alignment) between what is taught and how students learn and are assessed - the learning outcomes, content and types of teaching, learning and assessment. Student achievement, including progress through the programme and the way in which the final award is made, is kept under review. The programme review report is sent to the Programme Studies Board and the Faculty in turn reports issues to the University’s Quality Management Sub-Committee (QMSC).

 

As this is a work based learning programme that includes appointed practice supervisors and educational supervisors, standards of clinical practice and competence assessment will be monitored through a course steering group with Lead academic and practice professional staff.

 

External examiners are appointed to oversee and advise on the assessment of the programme. They ensure that the standards of the programme are comparable with those of similar programmes elsewhere in the UK and are also involved in the assessment process to make sure that it is fair. They are invited to comment on proposed developments to the programme. Their reports are sent to the Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Academic) as well as to the Faculty so that issues of concern can be addressed.

 

The University reviews all programmes on a six-yearly cycle to identify good practice and areas for enhancement. Programmes are revalidated through this review process. These reviews include at least one academic specialist in the subject area concerned from another UK university. Quality Assurance Agency (QAA) review reports for Sunderland can be found here.

 

Further information about our quality processes can be found here.

Please also complete and insert the SITS form.

 


[1] Same as main award unless agreed otherwise at validation – eg to meet PSRB requirements