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Sunderland Medical School

 

 

 

 

Programme Specification

 

Undergraduate Medicine

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Programme Specification: Undergraduate Medicine

For students starting in Academic Year 2019/2021

1.      Course Summary

Names of programme(s) and award title(s)

BA or BSc (Hons)

Award Title MBChB Honours Degree

Award type

Single Honours

Mode of study

Full time

 

Framework of Higher Education Qualification (FHEQ) level of final award

Level 6

Duration

5 years

Location of study

Years 1 and 2 are predominantly based at Sunderland University City campus. The majority of clinical placements in Years 3 - 5 are based in Sunderland and South Tyneside with a significant proportion in adjoining counties.

Accreditation (if applicable)

This subject/programme is accredited by: the General Medical Council. Please note the following:

Module Selection:  Students should note that to be awarded the MBChB accreditation they must pass all modules. All modules are mandatory. NB Module = Year

Regulations:  Your programme has professional accreditation and there are specific regulations, which you have to agree to abide by, as follows:  

2.        GMC: Outcomes for graduates: http://www.gmc-uk.org/Outcomes_for_graduates_Jul_15.pdf_61408029.pdf

Study abroad:  due to GMC accreditation requirements there are no Study Abroad options available to students on this programme.

Regulator

Higher Education Funding Council for England (HEFCE)

General Medical Council

Tuition Fees

UK/EU students:

Fee for 2019/21 is £QA to add*

 

Additional Costs

For this undergraduate programme, and in common with other Medical Schools, our Medical students should be aware that there are further additional costs involved; such as the purchase of books, laboratory coats and travel to placements, which are detailed in section 17

 

* These fees are regulated by Government. We reserve the right to increase fees in subsequent years of study in response to changes in government policy and/or changes to the law. If permitted by such change in policy or law, we may increase your fees by an inflationary amount or such other measure as required by government policy or the law. Please refer to the accompanying Student Terms & Conditions. Further information on fees can be found at [insert weblink]

** We reserve the right to increase fees in subsequent years of study by an inflationary amount. Please refer to the accompanying Student Terms & Conditions for full details. Further information on fees can be found at [insert weblink]

How this information might change: Please read the important information at [insert weblink] This explains how and why we may need to make changes to the information provided in this document and to help you understand how we will communicate with you if this happens. 

2.      Overview of the Programme

Our mission: To graduate excellent clinicians

The Philosophy of the Programme

Doctors need to update and develop their skills, knowledge and behaviours throughout their working lives. The programme at Sunderland emphasises their responsibility for learning what they need to know. Learning is student–led to prepare them for their careers.

Aims of the Programme

The programme is an innovative, highly integrated, modern medical curriculum, comprising a mixture of core and student–selected components.

Integration occurs at all levels, and the three vertical themes are included in the core and selected elements in all years. The three themes taken from Outcomes for Graduates (Tomorrows Doctors) (GMC, 2015) are:

 

The doctor as a scholar and a scientist:

The graduate will be able to:

          Apply to medical practice biomedical scientific principles, method and knowledge relating to: anatomy, biochemistry, cell biology, genetics, immunology, microbiology, molecular biology, nutrition, pathology, pharmacology and physiology.

  • Apply psychological principles, method and knowledge to medical practice.
  • Apply social science principles, method and knowledge to medical practice.
  • Apply to medical practice the principles, method and knowledge of population health and the improvement of health and health care.
  • Apply scientific method and approaches to medical research

 

The doctor as a practitioner:

  • The graduate will be able to carry out a consultation with a patient.
  • Diagnose and manage clinical presentations.
  • Communicate effectively with patients and colleagues in a medical context.
  • Provide immediate care in medical emergencies.
  • Prescribe drugs safely, effectively and economically.
  • Carry out practical procedures safely and effectively
  • Use information effectively in a medical context.

 

The doctor as a professional:

  • The graduate will be able to behave according to ethical and legal principles.
  • Reflect, learn and teach others.
  • Learn and work effectively within a multi-professional team.
  • Protect patients and improve care.

 

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Sunderland Graduate attributes: Engagement with this programme will enable you to develop your intellectual, personal and professional capabilities. These attributes include independent thinking, synthesizing information, creative problem solving, communicating clearly, and appreciating the social, environmental and global implications of your studies and activities. Our educational programme and learning environment is designed to help you to become a well-rounded graduate who is capable of making a positive and valued contribution in a complex and rapidly changing world, whichever spheres of life you engage in after your studies are completed.

 

3.      Aims of the Programme

Objectives

 

The MBChB Honours Degree at Sunderland University is designed to ensure graduates meet the necessary standards in terms of knowledge, skills and professionalism that new doctors should have as they embark on further training. The curricular outcomes for undergraduate medical education are set out in Outcomes for Graduates (Tomorrow’s Doctors) (GMC, 2015), the duties of a doctor are set out in the GMC document Good Medical Practice (GMC, 2013).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Good Medical Practice (GMC, 2013). (http://www.gmc-uk.org/guidance/good_medical_practice.asp):

 

 

4.      What you will learn

Intended learning outcomes

The curricular outcomes of Tomorrow’s Doctors (GMC, 2015) form the learning outcomes of the programme thus ensuring that graduates meet the requirements the GMC. Additionally, the Intended Learning Outcomes take account of the Quality Assurance Agency (QAA, 2002) Subject Benchmark Statements Academic Standards - Medicine:

 

http://www.qaa.ac.uk/en/Publications/Documents/Subject-benchmark-statement-Medicine.pdf

 

NB Tomorrows Doctors 2009 has 124 outcomes and standards that define undergraduate medical education:

 

TD 2009 Points 1-7 outlines the different and complementary roles in medical education and therefore are indicative of responsibilities only.

 

TD 2009 Outcomes 8-23 demonstrates in which Year the student will achieve each of the learning outcomes (student learning outcomes). See below

 

TD 2009 Points 24-174 are the professional standards that the school is required to comply with, with respect to teaching, learning and assessment. The GMC require an annual self-assessment document (MSAR - Medical School Annual Return) from the school demonstrating compliance for each of the points.)

 

 

Tomorrow’s doctors 2015

Knowledge and understanding, skills and other attributes

 

TD2015 outcomes 1

The doctor as a scientist and scholar

At the end of the programme students should:

Occurs in Year:

Assessed at graduate level by completion of Year:

8

Apply to medical practice biomedical scientific principles, method and knowledge relating to: anatomy, biochemistry, cell biology, genetics, immunology, microbiology, molecular biology, nutrition, pathology, pharmacology and physiology.

8A

Explain normal human structure and functions.

1 - 4

2

8B

Explain the scientific bases for common disease presentations.

1 - 4

4

8C

Justify the selection of appropriate investigations for common clinical cases.

3 - 5

5

8D

Explain the fundamental principles underlying such investigative techniques.

1 - 5

4

8E

Select appropriate forms of management for common diseases, and ways of preventing common diseases, and explain their modes of action and their risks from first principles.

3 - 5

5

8F

Demonstrate knowledge of drug actions: therapeutics and pharmacokinetics; drug side effects and interactions, including for multiple treatments, long-term conditions and non-prescribed medication; and also including effects on the population, such as the spread of antibiotic resistance.

1 - 5

5

8G

Make accurate observations of clinical phenomena and appropriate critical analysis of clinical data.

1 - 5

5

9

Apply psychological principles, method and knowledge to medical practice.

 

 

9A

Explain normal human behaviour at an individual level.

1 - 3

2

9B

Discuss psychological concepts of health, illness and disease.

1 - 3

2

9C

Apply theoretical frameworks of psychology to explain the varied responses of individuals, groups and societies to disease.

1 - 3

3


9

Apply psychological principles, method and knowledge to medical practice.

9A

Explain normal human behaviour at an individual level.

1 - 3

2

9B

Discuss psychological concepts of health, illness and disease.

1 - 3

2

9C

Apply theoretical frameworks of psychology to explain the varied responses of individuals, groups and societies to disease.

1 - 3

3

9D

Explain psychological factors that contribute to illness, the course of the disease and the success of treatment.

1 - 5

5

9E

Discuss psychological aspects of behavioural change and treatment compliance.

1 - 5

4

9F

Discuss adaptation to major life changes, such as bereavement. Compare and contrast the abnormal adjustments that might occur in these situations.

1 - 4

4

9G

Identify appropriate strategies for managing patients with dependence issues and other demonstrations of self-harm.

1 - 5

5

10

Apply social science principles, method and knowledge to medical practice.

10A

Explain normal human behaviour at a societal level.

1 - 2

2

10B

Discuss sociological concepts of health, illness and disease.

1 - 3

3

10C

Apply theoretical frameworks of sociology to explain the varied responses of individuals, groups and societies to disease.

1 - 2

2

10D

Explain sociological factors that contribute to illness, the course of the disease and the success of treatment, including issues relating to health inequalities, the links between occupation and health and the effects of poverty and affluence.

1 - 3

3

10E

Discuss sociological aspects of behavioural change and treatment compliance.

1 - 2

3

11

Apply to medical practice the principles, method and knowledge of population health and the improvement of health and health care.

11A

Discuss basic principles of health improvement, including the wider determinants of health, health inequalities, health risks and disease surveillance.

1 - 3

3

11B

Assess how health behaviours and outcomes are affected by the diversity of the patient population.

1 - 2

2

11C

Describe measurement methods relevant to the improvement of clinical effectiveness and care.

1,3

3

11D

Discuss the principles underlying the development of health and health service policy, including issues relating to health economics and equity, and clinical guidelines.

1,3

3


11E

Explain and apply the basic principles of communicable disease control in hospital and community settings.

1 - 5

5

11F

Evaluate and apply epidemiological data in managing healthcare for the individual and the community.

1,3

3

11G

Recognise the role of environmental and occupational hazards in ill-health and discuss ways to mitigate their effects.

3

3

11H

Discuss the role of nutrition in health.

1 - 4

4

11I

Discuss the principles and application of primary, secondary and tertiary prevention of disease

1 - 5

3

11J

Discuss from a global perspective the determinants of health and disease and variations in health care delivery and medical practice.

1,3

3

12

Apply scientific method and approaches to medical research.

 

 

12A

Critically appraise the results of relevant diagnostic, prognostic and treatment trials and other qualitative and quantitative studies as reported in the medical and scientific literature.

1 - 3

3

12B

Formulate simple relevant research questions in biomedical science, psychosocial science or population science, and design appropriate studies or experiments to address the questions.

3

3

12C

Apply findings from the literature to answer questions raised by specific clinical problems.

1 - 5

3

12D

Understand the ethical and governance issues involved in medical research.

3

3

13

Carry out a consultation with a patient.

 

 

13A

Take and record a patient's medical history, including family and social history, talking to relatives or other carers where appropriate.

1 - 5

5

13B

Elicit patients’ questions, their understanding of their condition and treatment options, and their views, concerns, values and preferences.

1 - 5

5

13C

Perform a full physical examination.

1 - 5

5

13D

Perform a mental-state examination.

3 - 5

5

13E

Assess a patient’s capacity to make a particular decision in accordance with legal requirements and the GMC’s guidance (in Consent: Patients and doctors making decisions together).

2 - 5

5

13F

Determine the extent to which patients want to be involved in decision-making about their care and treatment.

3 - 5

5

13G

Provide explanation, advice, reassurance and support.

2 - 5

5

14

Diagnose and manage clinical presentations.

14A

Interpret findings from the history, physical examination and mental-state examination, appreciating the importance of clinical, psychological, spiritual, religious, social and cultural factors.

2 - 5

5

14B

Make an initial assessment of a patient's problems and a differential diagnosis.

Understand the processes by which doctors make and test a differential diagnosis.

3 - 5

5

14 C

Formulate a plan of investigation in partnership with the patient, obtaining informed consent as an essential part of this process.

3 - 5

5

14D

Interpret the results of investigations, including growth charts, x-rays and the results of the diagnostic procedures in Appendix 1.

3 - 5

5

14E

Synthesise a full assessment of the patient's problems and define the likely diagnosis or diagnoses.

3 - 5

5

14F

Make clinical judgements and decisions, based on the available evidence, in conjunction with colleagues and as appropriate for the graduate’s level of training and experience. This may include situations of uncertainty.

3 - 5

5

14G

Formulate a plan for treatment, management and discharge, according to established principles and best evidence, in partnership with the patient, their carers, and other health professionals as appropriate. Respond to patients’ concerns and preferences, obtain informed consent, and respect the rights of patients to reach decisions with their doctor about their treatment and care and to refuse or limit treatment.

4 - 5

5

14I

Identify the signs that suggest children or other vulnerable people may be suffering from abuse or neglect and know what action to take to safeguard their welfare.

3 - 4

4

14J

Contribute to the care of patients and their families at the end of life, including management of symptoms, practical issues of law and certification, and effective communication and team working.

1 - 5

5

15

Communicate effectively with patients and colleagues in a medical context.

15A

Communicate clearly, sensitively and effectively with patients, their relatives or other carers, and colleagues from the medical and other professions, by listening, sharing and responding.

1 - 5

5

15B

Communicate clearly, sensitively and effectively with individuals and groups regardless of their age, social, cultural or ethnic backgrounds or their disabilities, including when English is not the patient’s first language.

1 - 5

5

15C

Communicate by spoken, written and electronic methods (including medical records), and be aware of other methods of communication used by patients. Appreciate the significance of non-verbal communication in the medical consultation.

1 - 5

5

15D

Communicate appropriately in difficult circumstances, such as breaking bad news, and when discussing sensitive issues, such as alcohol consumption, smoking or obesity.

1 - 5

5

15E

Communicate appropriately with difficult or violent patients.

1,3,4

5

15F

Communicate appropriately with people with mental illness.

3 - 5

5

15G

Communicate appropriately with vulnerable patients

3 - 5

5

15H

Communicate effectively in various roles, for example as patient advocate, teacher, manager or improvement leader.

4 - 5

5

16

Provide immediate care in medical emergencies.

16A

Assess and recognise the severity of a clinical presentation and a need for immediate emergency care.

1 - 5

5

16B

Diagnose and manage acute medical emergencies.

1 - 5

5

16C

Provide basic first aid.

2

2

16D

Provide immediate life support.

1 - 5

5

16E

Provide cardio-pulmonary resuscitation or direct other team members to carry out resuscitation.

1 - 5

5

17

Prescribe drugs safely, effectively and economically.

17A

Establish an accurate drug history, covering both prescribed and other medication.

2 - 5

5

17B

Plan appropriate drug therapy for common indications, including pain and distress.

3 - 5

5

17C

Provide a safe and legal prescription.

4 - 5

5

17D

Calculate appropriate drug doses and record the outcome accurately.

2 - 5

5

17E

Provide patients with appropriate information about their medicines.

3 - 5

5

17F

Access reliable information about medicines.

3 - 5

5

17G

Detect and report adverse drug reactions.

3 - 5

5

17H

Demonstrate awareness that many patients use complementary and alternative therapies, and awareness of the existence and range of these therapies, why patients use them, and how this might affect other types of treatment that patients are receiving.

2

2

18

Carry out practical procedures safely and effectively.

18A

(a) Be able to perform a range of diagnostic procedures, as listed in Appendix 1 and measure and record the findings.

See below

5

18B

(b) Be able to perform a range of therapeutic procedures, as listed in Appendix 1.

See below

5

18C

(c) Be able to demonstrate correct practice in general aspects of practical procedures, as listed in Appendix 1

See below

5

19

Use information effectively in a medical context.

19A

Keep accurate, legible and complete clinical records.

3 - 5

5

19B

Make effective use of computers and other information systems, including storing and retrieving information.

1 - 5

5

19C

Keep to the requirements of confidentiality and data protection legislation and codes of practice in all dealings with information.

1 - 5

5

19D

Access information sources and use the information in relation to patient care, health promotion, advice and information to patients, and research and education.

1,3 - 5

5

 

19E

Apply the principles, method and knowledge of health informatics to medical practice.

1 - 5

5

20

Behave according to ethical and legal principles.

20A

Know about and keep to the GMC’s ethical guidance and standards including Good Medical Practice, the ‘Duties of a doctor registered with the GMC’ and supplementary ethical guidance which describe what is expected of all doctors registered with the GMC.

1 - 5

All years

20B

Demonstrate awareness of the clinical responsibilities and role of the doctor, making the care of the patient the first concern. Recognise the principles of patient-centred care, including self-care, and deal with patients’ healthcare needs in consultation with them and, where appropriate, their relatives or carers.

1 - 5

All years

20C

Be polite, considerate, trustworthy and honest, act with integrity, maintain confidentiality, respect patients’ dignity and privacy, and understand the importance of appropriate consent.

1 - 5

All years

20D

Respect all patients, colleagues and others regardless of their age, colour, culture, disability, ethnic or national origin, gender, lifestyle, marital or parental status, race, religion or beliefs, sex, sexual orientation, or social or economic status. Respect patients’ right to hold religious or other beliefs, and take these into account when relevant to treatment options.

1 - 5

All years

20E

Recognise the rights and the equal value of all people and how opportunities for some people may be restricted by others’ perceptions.

1 - 5

All years

20F

Understand and accept the legal, moral and ethical responsibilities involved in protecting and promoting the health of individual patients, their dependants and the public including vulnerable groups such as children, older people, people with learning disabilities and people with mental illnesses.

1 - 5

Attributes are monitored throughout the programme

20G

Demonstrate knowledge of laws, and systems of professional regulation through the GMC and others, relevant to medical practice, including the ability to complete relevant certificates and legal documents and liaise with the coroner or procurator fiscal where appropriate.

1 - 5

5

21

Reflect, learn and teach others.

21A

Acquire, assess, apply and integrate new knowledge, learn to adapt to changing circumstances and ensure that patients receive the highest level of professional care.

1 - 5

Attributes are monitored throughout

 

21

Establish the foundations for lifelong learning and continuing professional development, including a professional development portfolio containing reflections, achievements and learning needs.

1 - 5

Attributes are monitored throughout

21C

Continually and systematically reflect on practice and, whenever necessary, translate that reflection into action, using improvement techniques and audit appropriately for example, by critically appraising the prescribing of others.

1 - 5

Attributes are monitored throughout

21D

Manage time and prioritise tasks, and work autonomously when necessary and appropriate.

1 - 5

Attributes are monitored throughout

21E

Recognise own personal and professional limits and seek help from colleagues and supervisors when necessary.

1 - 5

Attributes are monitored throughout

21F

Function effectively as a mentor and teacher including contributing to the appraisal, assessment and review of colleagues, giving effective feedback, and taking advantage of opportunities to develop these skills.

1 - 5

Attributes are monitored throughout

22

Learn and work effectively within a multi-professional team.

22A

Understand and respect the roles and expertise of health and social care professionals in the context of working and learning as a multi-professional team.

1 - 5

5

22B

Understand the contribution that effective interdisciplinary team working makes to the delivery of safe and high-quality care.

1 - 5

5

22C

Work with colleagues in ways that best serve the interests of patients, passing on information and handing over care, demonstrating flexibility, adaptability and a problem-solving approach.

3 - 5

5

22D

Demonstrate ability to build team capacity and positive working relationships and undertake various team roles including leadership and the ability to accept leadership by others.

1 - 5

5

23

Protect patients and improve care.

23A

Place patients’ needs and safety at the centre of the care process.

1 - 5

Integral to all aspects of the course

23B

Deal effectively with uncertainty and change.

3 - 5

5

23C

Understand the framework in which medicine is practised in the UK, including: the organisation, management and regulation of healthcare provision; the structures, functions and priorities of the NHS; and the roles of, and relationships between, the agencies and services involved in protecting and promoting individual and population health.

1 - 3

3

23D

Promote, monitor and maintain health and safety in the clinical setting, understanding how errors can happen in practice, applying the principles of quality assurance, clinical governance and risk management to medical practice, and understanding responsibilities within the current systems for raising concerns about safety and quality.

3 - 5

5

 

23E

Understand and have experience of the principles and methods of improvement, including audit, adverse incident reporting and quality improvement, and how to use the results of audit to improve practice.

1,3,5

5

23F

Respond constructively to the outcomes of appraisals, performance reviews and assessments.

1 - 5

Monitored throughout the programme

23G

Demonstrate awareness of the role of doctors as managers, including seeking ways to continually improve the use and prioritisation of resources.

1,3

3

23H

Understand the importance of, and the need to keep to, measures to prevent the spread of infection, and apply the principles of infection prevention and control.

1 - 2

Monitored throughout the programme

23I

Recognise own personal health needs, consult and follow the advice of a suitably qualified professional, and protect patients from any risk posed by own health.

1 - 5

Monitored throughout the programme

23J

Recognise the duty to take action if a colleague’s health, performance or conduct is putting patients at risk.

1 - 5

5


Appendix 1 procedures

Diagnostic procedures

1

Measuring body temperature

2

2

2

Measuring pulse rate and blood pressure

2

2

3

Transcutaneous monitoring of oxygen saturation

2

2

4

Venepuncture

3

3

5

Managing blood samples correctly

2

3

6

Taking blood cultures

5

5

7

Measuring blood glucose

2

2

8

Performing and interpreting a 12-lead Electrocardiograph (ECG)

3

3

9

Managing an Electrocardiograph (ECG) monitor

5

5

10

Basic respiratory function tests

2

2

11

Urinalysis using Multistix

2 - 3

3

12

Advising patient on how to collect a mid- stream urine specimen

3

3

13

Taking nose, throat and skin swabs

3

3

14

Nutritional assessment

3

3

15

Pregnancy testing

4

4

Therapeutic procedures

16

Administering oxygen

3 - 4

4

17

Establishing peripheral intravenous access and setting up an infusion; use of infusion devices

3 - 5

5

18

Making up drugs for parenteral administration

5

5

19

Dosage and administration of insulin and use of sliding scales

5

5

20

Subcutaneous and intramuscular injections

3

3

21

Blood transfusion

5

5

22

Male and female urinary catheterisation

3

3


Diagnostic procedures

23

Instructing patients in the use of devices for inhaled medication

2

2

24

Use of local anaesthetics

2,5

5

25

Skin suturing

5

5

26

Wound care and basic wound dressing

5

5

27

Correct techniques for ‘Moving and handling’, including patients

3

3

General aspects of practical procedures

28

Giving information about the procedure, obtaining and recording consent, and ensuring appropriate aftercare

1 - 5

1 - 5

29

Hand washing (including surgical ‘scrubbing up’)

1 - 5

1 - 5

30

Use of personal protective equipment (gloves, gowns, masks and so on) in relation to procedures

1 - 5

1 - 5

31

Infection control in relation to procedures

1 - 5

1 - 5

32

Safe disposal of clinical waste, needles and other ‘sharps’

1 - 5

1 - 5

 


 

5.      How is the Programme taught?

Learning medicine relies on methods that are clinically realistic. This programme achieves this by offering students many and varied learning opportunities: Problem/Case Based Learning, lectures, practicals, experiential learning and extensive clinical placements.

 

Assessment is constructed both to facilitate learning (formative) and to allow summative judgements about knowledge, understanding and skill development. Teaching, learning and assessment are inter-related throughout.

 

Our programme is designed to assist undergraduates to achieve the requirements of the course and to maximise their career progression and leadership potential through opportunities to study a range of complementary subjects drawn from the University, including the humanities. We aim to make learning enjoyable through small class sizes, small group learning, early clinical experience and supporting individual students to develop into highly competent and self-aware professionals.

 

 

1.       The curriculum has three phases jointly delivered at the University and in primary and secondary care settings.

 

  1. Phase 1: Years 1 & 2: Overview with early clinical exposure. There is an emphasis on learning the fundamentals of biomedical, behavioural and social science with a focus on –sciences, research, study skills  and communication skills, basic clinical skills, and professionalism
  2. Phase 2: Years 3 & 4: A second run through many aspects of biomedical, behavioural and social science with an increased emphasis on complexity and pathology, combined with learning fundamental clinical skills and knowledge. Immersion in clinical placements building on the foundations of clinical knowledge and skills developed in the preceding years.
  3. Phase 3: Preparation for Professional Practice: Year 5:  Very extensive student assistantships to prepare students for practice as Foundation Year 1 doctors.

 

Educational strategies

The programme is based on a blended approach that uses many methods.

 

Key Features:

          A spiral curriculum, with vertical themes running through the 5 years.

          Scheduled learning and teaching activities

          Anatomy  teaching based in the Anatomy Lab

          Problem Based/Case based Learning

          Extensive clinical placements in hospital and community settings

          Guided Independent Study

 

Location

          Years 1 and 2 are predominantly based at Sunderland University City campus. The majority of clinical placements in Years 3 - 5 are based in Sunderland and South Tyneside with a significant proportion in adjoining counties.

 

Students on the MBChB programme at Sunderland University will achieve the graduate level learning outcomes through a range of learning, teaching and assessment opportunities.

Apart from these formal activities, students are also provided with regular opportunities to talk through particular areas of difficulty, and any special learning needs they may have, with their Personal Tutors or lecturers on a one-to-one basis.

Learning outcomes

 

 

 

Learning (to allow students to achieve intended learning outcomes) will be achieved through a blend of learning and teaching activities including:

 

Assessment of intended learning outcomes is by theme. The percentage of each assessment allotted to each theme is informed by the amount of learning time allocated to each theme.

Problem/Case-based learning

Laboratory sessions

(e.g., anatomy, biochemistry, histopathology, microbiology, pharmacology, physiology, clinical skills, information technology)

 

 

Phase 1 (Year 1 & 2):

Assessment of academic content:

Knowledge-based assessments Skills-based assessments

Student-Selected Component: Essay style written assignment

Assessment of professional competence:

Attitude-based assessments: Learning Portfolio and appraisal meeting

Communication skills sessions Experiential learning on clinical placements and other environments

Student-Selected Components (SSCs)

 

 

Phase 2 (Years 3 & 4)

Assessment of academic content:

Knowledge-based assessments Skills-based assessments

Student-Selected Components: Essay style written assignments;

Formal written reports; Scientific meeting style presentations.

Assessment of professional competence:

Attitude-based assessments: Learning Portfolio, including the Clinical Log Book and appraisal meeting

Clinical Reasoning and problem solving components

‘Question time sessions’ / lectures / seminars

Private Study – directed and self-directed

 

Phase 3 (Year 5)

Assessment of academic content:

Competency-based assessments

Assessment of professional competence:

Attitude-based assessments: Learning Portfolio, including the Clinical Log Book and appraisal meeting

 

6.      Teaching Staff

All members of the faculty have the capability and continued commitment to be effective teachers. They have knowledge of: the discipline; an understanding of pedagogy; methods of measuring student performance consistent with the learning objectives; and readiness to be subjected to internal and external evaluations.

 

The academic staff have the required academic qualification for the discipline(s) they teach; expertise in one or more subdivisions or specialties within those disciplines; appropriate research and scholarship capabilities. They contribute to the advancement of knowledge and to the intellectual growth of their students through the scholarly activity of research and continuing education. Persons appointed to the faculty demonstrate achievement within their disciplines commensurate with their faculty rank.

 

The University will attempt to minimise changes to our core teaching teams, however, delivery of the programme depends on having a sufficient number of staff with the relevant expertise to ensure that the programme is taught to the appropriate academic standard.

 

7.      What is the Structure of the Programme?

The academic year runs from September to June (year 1and 2) and September to July (Years 3), and August to July (Years 4, 5).

Our degree courses are organised into modules. Each module is a self-contained block of study and each 1 credit = 10 hours of student effort.  An outline of the structure of the programme is provided in the tables below, with an indicative example of a week.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A spiral curriculum, with vertical themes running through the 5 years. Scheduled learning and teaching activities. Problem Based/Case based Learning. Extensive clinical placements in general practice, hospital and community settings.

The doctor as a scholar and a scientist.

The doctor as a practitioner.

The doctor as a professional.

Phase 1:

Overview with early clinical exposure. There is an emphasis on the foundations of biomedical, behavioural and social science knowledge and scholarship skills, embedded in a framework of clinical placements and basic clinical skills.

Year 1 FHEQ Level 4 (120 credits)

Learning through integrated units such as Health & Disease, Immunology and infection, Emergencies, Life Course, Scholarship, Brain & Mind, Pregnancy and Lifestyle, with longitudinal GP and hospital placements

Indicative timetable

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

AM

Pbl session

Lectures

Clinical skills sessions

Experiential learning sessions

Anatomy

Pbl session

PM

Seminars

Early clinical placement

Laboratories and Lectures

End of week wrap up

Year 2 FHEQ Level 5 (120 credits)

A second run through many aspects of biomedical, behavioural and social science with an increased emphasis on complexity and pathology. Learning through integrated units such as Mechanism of Disease, Inputs & Outputs, Movement & Trauma, Circulation, Scholarship, Breath of Life, Integrated systems, longitudinal GP and hospital placements and a 3rd sector community placement

Indicative timetable

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

AM

Pbl session

Lectures

Extra-curricular – Clubs, Societies, Volunteering

 

Clinical Skills

PM

Pbl and end of week wrap up

Anatomy sessions and experiential learning sessions

Lectures and experiential learning sessions

Early clinical placement

Laboratories and Lectures

Optional Intercalated Bachelor’s Degree *

Phase 2

Comprehensive ,scientifically-based clinical learning in a phase-long spiral of primary and secondary care placements, building on the foundations of clinical knowledge and skills through immersion in clinical placements.

Year 3 FHEQ Level 6 (120 credits)

Learning through integrated units such as Medicine, Surgery, Elderly Care, Mental Health, Paediatrics, General Practice and a Student-Selected Component.

Indicative timetable

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

AM

Case based learning session

Clinical placement

Clinical skills session

Anatomy & pathology sessions

Clinical placement

PM

Clinical placement

Clinical placement

Clinical placement

Lectures and seminars

 

Year 4 FHEQ Level 6 (120 credits)

Learning through integrated units such as Medicine, Surgery, Womens Health, Mental Health, Paediatrics, Neurology/musculoskeletal and then a General Practice and a Student-Selected Component.

Indicative timetable

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

AM

Case illustrated learning session

Clinical placement

Clinical skills session

Seminars

Clinical placement

PM

Clinical placement

Clinical placement

Clinical placement

Clinical placement

Lectures

Optional Intercalated Master’s Degree * (see below)

Phase 3

Very extensive student assistantships to prepare students for practice as Foundation Year 1 doctors in GP assistantship, Acute and Critical Care (emergency medicine, Intensive care unit & anaesthesia), Medicine student assistantship, Surgical student assistantship, Distant elective and a Preparation for Professional Practice week

Year 5 FHEQ Level 6 (120 credits)

Preparation for Professional Practice: Including some evening and weekend working

Indicative timetable

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

AM

Clinical placement

Clinical placement

Clinical placement (Cluster group learning - GP)

Clinical placement

Clinical placement

PM

Clinical placement

Clinical placement

Clinical placement

Clinical placement (Cluster group project- GP)

Clinical placement


Phase 1: Years 1 and 2

Phase 1

Foundations of biomedical, behavioural and social science knowledge and scholarship skills, embedded in a framework of clinical placements and basic clinical skills acquisition

Integrated curricular themes

Key features

Year 1

FHEQ Level 4

Credit value: 120 credits

weeks

 

The doctor as a scholar and a scientist.

The doctor as a practitioner.

The doctor as a professional

 

Cumulative, combined,  written and sequential practical assessment

 

 

Blend of learning about normal and abnormal  with a ”block and thread“ scholarship strand

 

Longitudinal GP and hospital placements

 

Year 1: students are predominantly at the Sunderland University City campus with regular exposure to a range of clinical and non- clinical community organisations throughout the area, ranging from residential homes for the elderly to gyms

 

Year 2 students spend 4 days a week at Sunderland University City campus and 1 day a week at a variety of clinical settings including GP practices and Sunderland Royal Hospital.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Unit 1 Orientation

2

Unit 2 Health and disease

3

Unit 3 Immunology and Infection

3

Unit 4 Emergencies

3

Unit 5 Life Course

3

Unit 6 Brain and Mind

3

Unit 7 Pregnancy

3

Unit 8 Lifestyle

3

Scholarship

2

Consolidation weeks

2

Assessment

3

Total

 

 

30

Year 2

FHEQ Level 5

Credit values: 120 credits per year

 

Unit 9 Mechanisms of disease

2

Unit 10 Inputs and Outputs

6

Unit 11 Movement and Trauma

4

Unit 12 Circulation

4

Unit 13 Breath of Life

3

Unit 14 Integrated systems

4

Scholarship & skills

3

Consolidation weeks

1

Assessment

3

 

 

Total

30

Optional Intercalated Bachelor’s Degree after Year 2*

 

 

 

 

Phase 2: Years 3 and 4

Phase 2

Comprehensive ,scientifically-based clinical learning in a phase-long spiral of primary and secondary care placements

 

 

The doctor as a scholar and a scientist.

The doctor as a practitioner.

The doctor as a professional

 

 

 

 

 

Spiral learning

 

Enhanced sub specialty learning

 

Progress Testing with sequential practical assessments

 

Year 3: students will spend 4 days a week at local hospital trusts with 1 day a week at Sunderland University City campus, reflecting the increasing emphasis on clinical exposure

 

Year 4: students will be dispersed across the North East in GP practices and hospital trusts.

All clinical and non-clinical experience will be held at their respective sites

 

 

Year 3

FHEQ Level 6

Credit values: 120 credits per year.

weeks

Induction

1.2

Medicine 1

4

Medicine 2

4

Surgical Care 1

4

Mental Health 1

4

Paediatrics 1

4

Elderly Care

4

General Practice 1

(Consolidation of Clinical Skills)

4

Student Selected Component 3

4

Student Selected Component 4

4

Assessment

2

Total

39.2

Year 4

FHEQ Level 6

Credit value: 120 credits

weeks

Induction

0.4

Integrated Medicine 1

6

Integrated Medicine 2

6

Surgical Care 2

6

Mental Health 2

4

Paediatrics 2

4

Women’s Health

6

General Practice 2 (Higher Consultation Skills)

4

Student Selected component 5

4

 

 

Assessment/revision

3

 

 

Total

43.4

Optional Intercalated Master’s Degree after year 3

 

 

 

Phase 3: Year 5

 

Phase 3

Preparation  for Foundation Years, with intensive assistantship experience, focus on work-readiness

 

The doctor as a scholar and a scientist.

The doctor as a practitioner.

The doctor as a professional

 

Workplace-immersed FY1 preparation

Focus on application of knowledge & to refine skills

Students will spend their time in community placements in rural communities integrating primary and secondary care. Students will be based in GP practices and hospitals across the North East.

 

 

Year 5:

FHEQ Level 6

Preparation for Professional Practice

weeks

Induction

0.2

Primary Care Assistantship (10 weeks)

10

Secondary Care Assistantship 1 (10 weeks)

Medicine

Acute Medical Unit (AMU)

Intensive Care Unit (ITU)

Teaching week

 

5

3

1

1

Secondary Care Assistantship 2 (10 weeks)

Surgery & Surgical Assessment Unit (SAU)

Anaesthesia

Emergency Medicine (EM)

Teaching week

 

4

1

4

1

Elective

6

Preparation for Professional Practice week

1

 

 

Assessment

2

 

 

Total

39.2

 

 

*Intercalated degrees

Undergraduates may suspend their medical degree for a period of 12 months to undertake either a BSc degree, normally after year 2 or year 4 or a Master’s degree after year 4.

To undertake such an intercalated degree, students must be given permission by the School of Medicine, as well as being offered a place on their chosen course following an application from the student.

 

End of year 2 Bachelor’s degrees available:
 

Biomedical Sciences

Sports, Health and Exercise Sciences

Biochemistry

Medicinal chemistry

 

End of year 2 Master’s degrees available:

 

Public Health

Drug design and development

Formulation sciences

 

 

Module lists

Compulsory modules

Compulsory modules

Credits

Optional modules

Credits

Year 1 (Level 4)

Med- 10008

120

0

0

Year 2 (Level 5)

Med- 20008

120

0

0

Year 3 (Level 6)

Med- 30001

120

0

0

Year 4 (Level 6)

Med- 30002

120

0

0

Year 5 (Level 6)

Med- 30003

120

0

0

 

 

Final and intermediate awards

Transfer routes / exit points

The end award is MBChB (Honours), however, the following Intermediate awards may be available at appropriate exit points: Certificate of Higher Education in Applied Medical Sciences; Diploma of Higher Education in Applied Medical Sciences; and a classified BSc Honours Degree in Applied Medical Sciences. These intermediate awards imply no eligibility for professional recognition or registration, or fitness to practise.

Credits required for each level of academic award are as follows:

MBChB

600 credits

You will require 120 credits from each taught year of the programme:

Med:10008 : 120 credits at level 4

Med:20008:  120 credits at level 5

Med: 30001: 120 credits at level 6

Med: 30002: 120 credits at level 6

Med: 30003: 120 credits at level 6

BSc Honours Degree in Applied Medical Sciences

360 credits

You will require 120 credits at levels 4, 5 and 6

Diploma of Higher Education in Applied Medical Sciences

240 credits

You will require at least 120 credits at level 4 or higher and at

least 120 credits at level 5 or higher

 

Certificate of Higher Education in Applied Medical Sciences

120 credits

You will require at least 120 credits at level 4 or higher

 

8.      How is the Programme assessed?

The wide variety of assessment methods used within Medicine at Sunderland University reflects the broad range of knowledge and skills that are developed as you progress through the degree programme. Teaching staff pay particular attention to specifying clear assessment criteria and providing timely, regular and constructive feedback that helps to clarify things you did not understand and helps you to improve your performance. The following list is representative of the variety of assessment methods used within Medicine:

The School of Medicine has a comprehensive assessment programme.

Overall, assessment is designed to:

  • Assist students to achieve the learning objectives of the medical programme.
  • Facilitate the development in students of the learning skills necessary to maintain currency in later professional practice.
  • Provide evidence of the extent to which students have achieved the learning objectives of the course.
  • Employ assessment practices that reflect current, evidence-based, best practice.
  • Align with the curriculum in both content and process and will assess knowledge, skills and attitudes in an integrated manner.
  • Provide feedback to all students after summative assessments
  • Follow a process of blueprinting to ensure appropriate sampling of material reflecting common international assessment practices.

 

9.      Assessment Formats

The School uses a variety of assessment formats throughout the programme. These include written and practical assessments. Examples of written assessments include Single Best Answer questions (SBAs), Extended Matching questions (EMQs), short answer questions known as Key Feature Problems (KFPs). Examples of practical assessments include the Objective Structured Clinical Assessments (OSCEs). This list is not exhaustive; other formats may be used to support specific years of the course.

 

Some assessments will be ‘low stakes’ as their primary purpose is to provide feedback to students on their learning progress. Other assessments will be ‘high stakes’ or summative as their primary purpose is to inform decision-making about a student’s capacity to proceed to the next year of the course or to graduate. Feedback will still be offered after high stakes assessments in order to encourage students to continually improve their performance. Feedback is provided in a variety of ways, including via an online portal, small and large group sessions, and individual meetings with tutors for students whose performance is unsatisfactory.

 

Assessment methods

 

The medical school has a range of assessment modes appropriate to assess each of the ILOs, categorized across three domains; Doctor as a Professional, Doctor as a Practitioner, Doctor as a Scholar and Scientist

 

In every year all domains will be summatively assessed using appropriate assessment methods.

 

Doctor as a Professional

Doctor as a Practitioner

Doctor as a Scholar and Scientist

Information Management Skills

Clinical and Practical Skills

Learning portfolio

 

MSF (multi source feedback)

Reflective summaries Appraisal

Written Communication skills

Practical assessment of skills

Knowledge assessment

 

The modes of assessment include:

 

In-Year written work

 

Written work/assignments test the quality and application of the subject knowledge. In addition they allow students to demonstrate their ability in communicating effectively for a range of audiences and purposes.

 

Written information management skills assessments.

 

Students are required to demonstrate competence in a range of skills in defined conditions e.g. publication based paper, data interpretation paper, critical appraisal paper.

 

Written knowledge examination.

 

Knowledge is examined in a range of formats that test students’ knowledge and their ability to apply this knowledge to professional practice. Examinations may consist of single best answer questions, extended multiple choice question and key feature problems.

 

Reflective assignments.

 

Reflective assignments enable students to develop the skills of reflective learning and practice; these are fundamental skills used by the medical profession as part of their continuing professional development.

 

Practical examinations. These examinations enable students to demonstrate a safe and effective application of practical clinical and laboratory skills.

 

Marks are awarded for summative assessments designed to assess your achievement of learning outcomes. You will also be assessed formatively to enable you to monitor your own progress and to assist staff in identifying and addressing any specific learning needs.  Feedback, including guidance on how you can improve the quality of your work, is also provided on all summative assessments as soon as possible after assessments.

10.  Contact Time and Expected Workload

This contact time measure is intended to provide you with an indication of the type of activity you are likely to undertake during this programme. The data is compiled based on module choices and learning patterns of students on similar programmes in previous years. Every effort is made to ensure this data is a realistic representation of what you are likely to experience, but changes to programmes, teaching methods and assessment methods mean this data is representative and not specific.

Undergraduate courses at Sunderland contain an element of module choice; therefore, individual students will experience a different mix of contact time and assessment types dependent upon their own individual choice of modules. The figures below are an example of activities that a student may expect on your chosen course by year/stage of study. Contact time includes scheduled activities such as: lecture, seminar, tutorial, project supervision, demonstration, practical classes and labs, supervised time in labs/workshop, fieldwork and external visits. The figures are based on 1,200 hours of student effort each year for full-time students.

 

Activity

Year 1 (Level 4)

Year 2 (Level 5)

Year 3 (Level 6)

Year 4 (Level 6)

Year 5 (Level 6)

Scheduled learning and

teaching activities

43%

43%

29%

27%

11%

Guided independent

Study

54%

50%

15%

8%

13%

Placements

3%

7%

56%

65%

76%

 

11.  Accreditation

This programme is accredited by the General Medical Council and the University of Sunderland. (September 2018).

 

12.  Regulations

The University Regulations form the framework for learning, teaching and assessment and other aspects of the student experience. Further information about the University Regulations can be found at: [weblink]

13.  What are the typical admission requirements for the programme?

Subject

A-level

Subjects not

included

International

Baccalaureate

BTEC

GCSE

requirements

Medicine MBChB

 A levels in three subjects at grades of AAA are required, including Biology or Chemistry plus another designated science subject (Biology, Chemistry, Physics, Maths/Further Maths/Statistics) and a third academic subject.

Any science A level (Biology, Chemistry, Physics) completed in England from 2017 must include a pass in the practical endorsement: without this endorsement the qualification will be judged to have been failed, regardless of the headline grade.

 The following subjects are not accepted at A level for A100: Citizenship Studies; Critical Thinking; General Studies; any AQA Applied A level (Applied Art & Design; Applied Business; Applied ICT; Applied Leisure Studies; Applied Science; Applied Travel & Tourism; Science in Society; Use of Mathematics); any Edexcel Applied A Level (Applied Art & Design; Applied Business; Applied ICT; Engineering; Health & Social Care; Leisure Studies; Media; Performing Arts; Travel & Tourism); any OCR Applied A level (Applied Art & Design; Applied Business; Applied Health & Social Care; Applied ICT; Applied Leisure Studies; Applied Performing Arts; Applied Science; Applied Travel & Tourism); any WJEC Applied A level (Applied Business; Applied ICT; Applied Science). Key skills qualifications will not be taken into account in assessing academic ability.

 35 points including three grade 6 passes at IB Higher Level and grades of 6, 6, 5 at Standard Level are required. Higher Level subjects should include Chemistry or Biology, plus one from Chemistry, Biology, Physics or Maths and a third rigorous subject. Any science not taken at the Higher Level must be offered at Standard Level grade 5 or GCSE grade B (or equivalent). Points awarded for the Extended Essay or Theory of Knowledge are not taken into account but these components must have been completed.

English Language (Language A) at Grade 6 is acceptable in lieu of GCSE English Language. Please see English Language Requirements under General Requirements if you do not have either of these.

 Not accepted for A100

 5 subjects at grade A (7) with a minimum of grade B (6) in Maths, English Language, Biology, Chemistry and Physics

 

Overseas applicants not offering GCSE or Level 1/2 Certificate (first language) English Language at the required grade must have one of the following:

 

  • Grade B or above in the Certificate of Proficiency or Advanced Certificate in English offered by the University of Cambridge under the English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) programme
  • International English Language Testing Service (IELTS, academic) with a minimum score of 7.0 in each component taken at the same sitting
  • Grade B in International GCSE (IGCSE) First Language English, with a minimum of grade 2 in Paper 5 (optional speaking & listening component).
  • Students with other English language qualifications may be required to undertake IELTS to fulfil the requirements of both the School of Medicine and UK Visas & Immigration (UKVI).

 

We do not normally accept Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) qualification.

For full details of our entry criteria please see [insert weblink]

The UK Clinical Aptitude Test (UKCAT), the UCAS application, the roles and responsibilities (R+R) form, and the multiple mini-interview (MMI) will be used to assess the majority of applicants’ academic and non-academic attributes. Applicants may be selected for interview on the basis of any one of the following criteria:

  • evidence of excellent motivation, commitment, responsibility, resilience and interpersonal skills including team-working and communication
  • overcoming significant educational and/or socio-economic disadvantage to acquire appropriate qualifications and experience
  • demonstration of strong academic and language abilities

 

14.  How are students supported on the programme?

Pastoral Support will be organised and managed by the Clinical Lead of Professional Development and Welfare for the School of Medicine. A team of pastoral tutors are available to see all students about any problems on a confidential basis. Workshops on study skills and managing health are provided by the team. The students are also encouraged to use University and external sources of support.

Particular support is arranged for disabled students, those with chronic health issues and those who are called to Progress and/or Health and Conduct committees. Our tutors are able to advise and counsel students about the professional demands of a career in medicine as well as career paths.

Academic and pastoral support is normally provided by:

  • Professional Development Tutors (PDTs) who act as personal tutors and  oversee students through the course of the programme and are responsible for appraisal of their professional development   
  • PBL tutors:  academic and personal support in the early course
  • Clinical tutors: will support students in clinical practice
  • Year leads: will provide support for academic issues related to their year   
  • Peer mentors: students in later years will have mentoring roles for students in earlier years

 

Additional support is available from:

Sunderland University provides support, guidance and advice for all its students available through the Student Support team. This includes Occupational health, counselling, mental health support and a crisis intervention team.

 

15.  Learning Resources

The non-clinical components are based in the Sciences Complex, City Campus, Sunderland University. This is a very spacious, light and airy building, and includes the Living Lab, part of a £15M investment in health facilities at the University in past few years. The Living Lab at the University of Sunderland was opened by Professor Lisa Bayliss-Pratt, Chief Nurse of Health Education England in 2016, following significant investment and major redevelopment of the ground floor of Fleming Building in the Sciences Complex. Our aim is to provide a state-of-the-art venue for all forms of healthcare related simulation based education. The Living Lab boasts the region’s only immersive simulation room allowing participants to experience events in simulated environments. An adjacent task trainer room which can be used flexibly can aid with the development of clinical and non-technical skills. Integral cameras enable participants to view live or recorded footage in our dedicated debrief room. The Lab also has a 7 bedded ward and Point of Care Testing (POCT) facility along with an OSCE suite and seminar rooms. The facility currently has 2 SimMan 3Gs, a SimNewB, a SimMom birthing simulator and 2 TraumaFX simbodies. A range of other clinical equipment and part task trainers as well as a pop-up ambulance are available to compliment the facilities.

 

The Sciences Complex includes seminar rooms, open plan IT learning resource, student social gathering spaces and refreshment areas. Groups of networked PCs are available throughout the University. Our anatomy provision will be delivered in September 2019 following Exeter’s provision of surface anatomy, models and use of state-of-the-art virtual learning environment (VLE). Models, bones, microscopes with histology slides, pathology pots, posters and CAL (computer aided learning) material are available in this brand new facility. Cadaveric dissection will become an integral part of the course with a target delivery date of September 2021. There are three Multi User Laboratories with industry specified equipment and resources that are used for the study of human physiology, pharmacology, biochemistry, histopathology and related biosciences. The resources range from microscopes for histology work, to biochemical equipment and facilities for biological investigations to computerised spirometry and ECG recording. Our large 300 seat lecture theatre is located in the Murray library where there is an additional cluster of networked open-access PCs (over 200 in total. The computing facilities are fully networked, have full access to the Internet and colour printing. In addition, there is a computer in each of the seminar rooms in the building, and computers in the Living Lab and the Multi-user labs. All students have individual e-mail accounts and a small amount of private file space on the University fileserver.

 

The Sunderland Royal Hospital Education Centre, contains a lecture theatre, seminar rooms, computers and a University of Sunderland School of Medicine student resource room.  In addition to the teaching areas, the education centre includes Teaching Support offices and offices for key clinical academic clinical staff.

There are a range of seminar/meeting rooms strategically placed around the hospital adjacent to wards and other clinical areas to assist in teaching close to or in contact with patients and other professional colleagues.

 

The Medical School Clinical Academic Campus will follow a 3 phase growth plan. Our phase 1 and 2 partners have detailed descriptions of their facilities below.

 

 

Sunderland Royal Hospital

 

City Hospitals Sunderland has a proven track record for undergraduate medical education. Clinical teachers include nurse lecturers and clinical teaching fellows along with a faculty of senior consultant educators. All those with undergraduate teaching responsibility have annual educational appraisal and attend regular train the trainer events at CHS. The trust participates in GMC trainee and trainer surveys.

The hospital provides a wide range of clinical opportunity with neurology, rheumatology, urology, renal medicine and bariatric surgery in addition to the main medical and surgical specialities and a nationally renowned ophthalmology teaching and research facility.

The Education Centre provides classroom and mock ward teaching accommodation, with 6 mock wards which are flexibly used for classroom and patient based sessions. There is a 150 seat lecture theatre. A refectory and student common room with fully equipped kitchen are available to all students.

There are a further 10 flexible classrooms as well as 2 small seminar rooms and an MDT meeting room equipped with video and tele conferencing facilities.

There is a large library providing access to all NHS HEE funded resources as well as local and regional collections. There is a group study area enabling students to work together to produce presentations. An IT suite of 39 networked PCs is supported by free Wi-Fi access.

South Tyneside NHS Foundation Trust

South Tyneside comprises the close knit communities of South Shields, Jarrow, Hebburn, The Boldons, Cleadon and Whitburn – with a total population of nearly 200,000. South Tyneside NHS Foundation Trust has been consistently recognised as one of the best performing FTs in the country, and has been ranked in the top 40 hospitals nationally over the past 7 years by the independent benchmarking company CHKS. There are approximately 400 beds on the main hospital site (South Tyneside District Hospital) accommodating all acute services, which include Medicine, Surgery, Paediatrics, Orthopaedics, Gynaecology and Maternity.

The Trust receives excellent feedback for postgraduate and undergraduate medical training from national, regional and local surveys – particularly relating to quality of supervision provided for trainees and students. The education centre is based on site, with facilities including a 120 seat lecture theatre, seminar rooms, and assembly room for informal meetings. There is a fully equipped kitchen available to all students. The Trust also has a dedicated Clinical Simulation Suite, with an active undergraduate simulation training programme.

The educational faculty, overseeing both undergraduate and postgraduate training within the Trust, comprises of clinical staff from across all specialities. A number of educators and trainers within the Trust hold lead educational roles within the region, and the Trust’s research team has received national recognition for the quality of its work.

North Tees and Hartlepool NHS Foundation Trust

North Tees and Hartlepool NHS Trust holds Investor in People status and was formed in 1999 from the amalgamation of the North Tees Health Trust, and Hartlepool and East Durham Trust. This new Trust provides high quality local health care to the urban and rural communities in and around Stockton on Tees, Sedgefield, Hartlepool and East Durham with a total catchment area of over 400,000.  Within the North Tees and Hartlepool NHS Trust there are two hospital sites, with the University of North Tees being the acute site.

The Trust has an excellent reputation for innovation in education and ranks highly in national and local trainee surveys for the quality of undergraduate and postgraduate training (GMC, Your School Your Say), QA visits from HENE. There are first class educational facilities with 3 simulation facilities including a community flat; a modern library with electronic access; teaching rooms, clinical skills lab, common room facilities and an active interprofessional education ethos and teaching programmes.  Medical education research and innovation is actively supported with joint programmes with local universities. An active faculty development programme for educators has enabled over 30% of permanent medical staff in gaining certificate/diploma/masters in clinical education. Quality assurance and educational governance processes developed in the trust have been adopted regionally. The Trust’s education department was praised by the President of the Royal College and the GMC.

 

 

Northumbria Health Care NHS Foundation Trust

Northumbria Healthcare is one of the country’s top performing NHS foundation trusts, looking after the wellbeing of around half a million people across Northumberland and North Tyneside – one of the largest geographical areas of any NHS trust in England. In May 2016, it became only the fourth trust nationally to be rated 'outstanding' by the Care Quality Commission. The Trust provides hospital and community health services in North Tyneside and hospital, community health and adult social care services in Northumberland.  It also provides care from three general hospitals – Hexham, Wansbeck and North Tyneside, community hospitals in Alnwick, Berwick, Rothbury and Blyth, an integrated health and social care facility at Haltwhistle, an elderly care unit in Morpeth and outpatients and diagnostic centres at Sir GB Hunter in Wallsend and Morpeth NHS Centre. In addition the trust is responsible for adult social care services in Northumberland to support people who need help to live independently at home

In June 2015 The Northumbria Specialist Emergency Care Hospital (The Northumbria) was opened in Cramlington. This is the first purpose-built hospital of its kind in the country, with emergency care consultants working 24 hours a day, seven days a week and specialists in a broad range of conditions on site seven days a week. The Trust is one of the largest employers in the North East with around 9,500 dedicated members of staff.

The Trust provides a working environment that encourages development and values staff input, with lots of opportunities for training and progression. The Trust is highly related by our students and provide educational facilities on all our hospital sites to match their needs. The Trust is currently developing more library and teaching space at the Northumbria Hospital which will complement the libraries and spaces at Hexham, North Tyneside and Wansbeck. Of particular importance is the new state of the art Simulation Faculty at Wansbeck Hospital. DASH (Dinwoodie Assessment and Simulation Hub) www.dash.northumbria.nhs.uk/ which was opened in 2015 and provides the most beautifully designed training experience possible.

Northumberland Tyne and Wear NHS Mental Health Foundation Trusts

Northumberland Tyne and Wear NHS Mental Health Foundation Trust is one of only two mental health trusts in the country that has been rated ‘outstanding’ by the Care Quality Commission. The trust provides comprehensive mental health care across a large geographical area from Sunderland and Wearside in the south up to the Scottish border. We provide both inpatient and community mental health services, including delivery of primary, secondary and tertiary services, with a number of nationally recognised centres of excellence.

As well as being a national leader in the delivery of high quality mental health services the trust also has a strong reputation for high quality academic activity including both research and education. We rate as the mental health trust that is the third most research active nationally with academic teams across the different specialities of psychiatry and national leaders in a number of areas. We also have a strong reputation for both undergraduate and postgraduate medical education. We rate within the top 10% of trusts nationally within the GMC trainee survey and additionally provide consistently high quality undergraduate medical education. We have a large and growing medical education faculty with dedicated educational facilities across all our main sites. Recent developments with additional resource in medical education include the growth of simulation based learning and expanding collaborative work with colleagues in acute trusts to help students take a more holistic approach to patient care. We have an established faculty development programme to support clinical trainers who all have both dedicated time for teaching and are appraised in their educational roles.

Tees, Esk and Wear Valley NHS Mental Health Foundation Trust

Tees, Esk and Wear Valleys Mental Health Foundation NHS Trust was created in 2006. The trust provides a full range of mental health services across Adult Mental Health and Substance Misuse, Older Persons Services, Child and Adolescent Services, Intellectual Disability and also Forensic Services. The trust employs some 6,000 staff working across around 170 community and inpatient sites and has just under 1000 inpatient beds. The sites are spread over a wide and diverse geographical area of around 3,600 square miles serving the 1.6 million people living in County Durham, the Tees Valley, North and East Yorkshire, York City and Selby.

The trust has an excellent and growing reputation for the delivery of training both at undergraduate and all stages of postgraduate training. In the annual GMC National trainee survey it has been the number 1 ranked trust in the North east for each of the last 5 years and over the same time has progressively risen from 13th to 6th ranked out of more than 200 training trusts in the UK.  The trust has excellent top level board support and commitment to education. It has a well organised faculty structure which includes designated undergraduate tutors, undergraduate administrators and specialised nurse trainers for each locality. It has very good teaching resources with lecture theatres and allocated learning spaces on most sites.

General Practice and Community Medicine

One of the major changes to modern medical school curricula is the amount of teaching that now takes place in general practice and community settings. Medical students now must understand that patients receive most of their health care in or close to their own homes from their general practitioners and community services. As a result, relatively little healthcare is delivered in hospitals. This is reflected in students spending more time learning in general practices and with community services than in the past.

Throughout your time as a medical student at Sunderland University you will be encouraged to think of community and social dimensions of illness and health. You will have placements with community services and general practices in all three phases of the course. Examples of other community services we use are schools, chemists/pharmacies, the workplace, residential homes, gyms and drop-in centres all places which contribute to the health and care of people.

Library Resources & Services

 

The University Library & Study Skills Service supports students at all campuses.  There are 2 purpose built Libraries in Sunderland with the Murray Library on the City Campus being the main facility for the School of Medicine students.  You will find copies of texts on your reading lists either online as “e-books” or printed and available for loan for four weeks or seven days; a limited number of copies of some high demand key resources may also be found in the Short Loan collection (these are available for 24-hour loan).   CDs and DVDs are also available to use in the library or borrow for up to 3 days.  As undergraduate student you will be able to borrow a total of 15 items at a time.

  • 1:1 and group academic/numeracy skills development
  • Delivery of key services face to face, online via Library Talk and via Skype
  • Laptops loans for up to 3 days
  • Enquiries service including 24/7 Library Talk service
  • Interactive, transactional and informational website  (http://library.sunderland.ac.uk/)
  • Printed and online guides to resources and services
  • Self-service photocopiers/printers
  • A variety of bookable and walk-up spaces and technologies to suit your study needs across the academic year including silent study, study lounges, syndicate rooms, group study areas, creative and resource discovery zones
  • Online, interactive floor guides
  • IT facilities which can be located using the live “Find a PC” web service