Attachments

 

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MA Social Work

 

Faculty of Education and Society

 

Department of Social Sciences

 

 

PROGRAMME SPECIFICATION

 

2019-20

 

Date of Cluster Review

06/05/2016

Date Approved by QMSC:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Version History

 

Please complete each time a new version is drafted e.g.

 

Version

Occasion of Change

Change Author

Last Modified

1.0

Version presented for approval

Alex Summer

21/03/14

2.0

Updated onto new programme specification template for Periodic review

Alex Summer

04/03/16

3.0

Part B programme regulations updated to include approved university regulation 6.4.1c

Module list and Teaching and Learning Matrix updated to reflect changes to SWKM29 assessment

Alex Summer

14/09/16

4.0

 

Module list and Teaching and Learning Matrix updated to reflect changes to assessment in SWKM27, SWKM28 and SWKM33

Alex Summer

12/06/17

5.0

Module list and Teaching and Learning Matrix updated to reflect changes to assessment in SWKM29

Alex Summer

25/06/18

6.0

 

Part B programme regulations updated to include approved new attendance wording

 

Alex Summer

27.09.18

7.0

Module list and Teaching and Learning Matrix updated to reflect changes to assessment in SWKM28 and SWKM29

Alex Summer

11.07.19

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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AQH-B2-3b Postgraduate Programme Specification Template

February 2014

 

 

 

Postgraduate Programme Specification Template

 

SECTION A: CORE INFORMATION

 

  1. Name of programme: Social Work

 

 

  1. Award title: MA Social Work

 

 

  1. Programme linkage

Is this part of a group of linked programmes between which students can transfer at agreed points? (eg a group of programmes with a common set of taught modules)

 

 

 

 

  1. Is the programme a top-up only?

 

 

 

 

  1. Level of award: Level 7 only

 

  1. Awarding body: University of Sunderland

 

  1. Which department is it in? : Social Sciences

 

  1. Programme Studies Board: Social Work

 

  1. Programme Leader: Alex Summer

 

 

 

 

 

  1. How and where can I study the programme?

Tick all boxes that apply

 

At Sunderland:

 

Full-time on campus

x

Part-time on campus

x

As work-based learning full-time

 

As work-based learning part-time

 

As a full-time sandwich course

 

As a part-time sandwich course

 

By distance learning

 

 

 

 

  1. How long does the programme take?

 

 

Min number of years / months

Max number of years / months

Full-time

2

6

Part-time

4

6

 

For start-dates please see the current edition of the Prospectus or contact the relevant department at the University.

 

 

SECTION B – FURTHER CORE INFORMATION

 

Use Outline Programme Proposal Form for ADC (AQH-B2-2), for questions 12 to 22

 

23. Learning and teaching strategy.

The teaching, support and learning practice take full account of the University’s Academic Teaching and Learning Plan 2013-2016 in order to ensure that teaching offers:

 

  • A flexible and discursive relationship between staff and students, encouraging their active participation and valuing the experience and skills they bring to the programme
  • New ideas and ways of working which encourage and challenge students to learn actively when engaging with their subject
  • Inspirational teaching and learning methods appropriate to the subject and which address the needs of a diverse range of students
  • Assessment that is consistent with learning outcomes and embedded in the learning and teaching process, providing opportunities for learning as well as checking learning has taken place
  • The use of ongoing formative feedback opportunities to support student learning
  • Structured opportunities for supporting students in their academic, personal and professional development on the programme, based on collaborative working relationships.
  • Teaching informed by current research and evidence-based effective practice
  • Opportunities for students to develop reflexive skills and the capacity to think creatively in order to address complexity and risk.
  • An approach which engenders a culture of professional responsibility in preparation for qualification and the social work role

 

The University’s Academic Teaching and Learning Plan reflects key aspects of the ‘process curriculum’ as described by the College of Social Work (College of Social Work edref4) which is operationalised as described below.

 

The programme team has a strong commitment to adult learning principles which is evident in the careful choice of teaching and learning strategies. In particular, students are encouraged to be actively involved in managing their own learning, using and building on their own relevant experiences and that of others in the teaching/learning group. There is an emphasis on activities that support students to develop the ability to reflect on their own learning, values and skills, as a basis for professional practice.

 

The programme team has developed an interactive and flexible workshop format for University based learning as its favoured approach, although the more traditional lecture and seminar mode is also used where this is more appropriate.  Activities within any workshop are likely to include some or all of, formal lecture input, group discussion, experiential exercises, student research, analysis and presentation, analysis of video and audio material and input from expert practitioners, service users and carers to develop students’ knowledge and understanding.

 

The programme team works closely with employer partners to ensure that students are offered the opportunity to learn from practitioners about how current policy developments are being translated into practice, and about ‘cutting edge’ practice models. Similarly the programme team has developed a wide range of partnerships with service users and carers who will be involved in teaching and assessment at all levels of the programme, sharing both their experiences and training expertise in particular areas.  Teaching strategies are underpinned throughout by opportunities for students to consider issues of oppression, marginalisation, and alienation and the diverse experiences of individuals and groups with whom they might work as social workers. Similarly group work and other activities are used as opportunities for exploring these processes within the learning environment.  Over the course of the programme students will become increasingly familiar with legislation, frameworks and guidance that protect and promote human rights and social justice and the challenges to maintaining good practice within these frameworks.

 

Small group learning activities are introduced at an early stage to encourage skills in peer support and team working, which are particularly relevant to social work.  Where students bring relevant personal, voluntary work or employment experiences they are valued and utilised in the learning process. However, for all students, case studies, service users’ and carers’ experiences and a variety of interactive practice material reflecting the diversity of circumstances experienced by service users and carers are used to support learning and the development of practice skills. 

 

During the first term the involvement of service users and carers and practitioners in communication skills teaching creates opportunities for students to practise basic interviewing and assessment techniques in realistic but safe settings, and then reflect on their own recorded performance. This teaching and learning process has been recognised by a University Award for Innovation in Teaching and Learning. Service users and carers are actively involved however in teaching activities throughout the programme.

 

Students are supported to critically reflect on their own values and develop an in depth understanding of the value base of social work during workshop teaching sessions and also explore these areas in individual and group Professional and Academic tutorial sessions, using directed reading, individual and group exercises in order to analyse their experience.

 

The developmental journey towards practice and professional identity begins in induction and continues throughout the programme.  The tutorials are supported by a Practice Skills Portfolio, which is designed to develop and support students’ capacity to plan and make effective use of tutorials and keep appropriate records as preparation for the practice environment.  Students are introduced to the concept of emotional resilience within the tutorial process and the Practice Skills Portfolio evidences students’ on-going review of their own emotional wellbeing, and strategies for supporting resilience as they progress through the programme. The range of activities within the portfolio is shaped by, and provides evidence for, the appropriate stages of the Professional Capabilities Framework throughout the programme. The Practice Skills Portfolio is the student’s own individual development tool to work with throughout the programme.

 

The programme builds upon existing practice in the undergraduate provision of using the VLE (Canvas) to support learning. Module spaces are used to direct students to useful sources of information as well as additional support around assignments. Increasingly they are used more interactively to develop thinking around assignments, reflect on learning and develop materials for the practice portfolio. This is particularly relevant for Masters students with well developed skills in self-directed learning.  They are the main vehicle for communication about the modules and programme, as well as opportunities within the University or externally to attend research seminars or conferences.

 

The assignment programme, including individual written assignments, presentation work, the use of reflective diary exercises and planned professional discussion develops transferable skills such as data collection, retrieval and use of sources as well as communication and presentational skills in preparation for the working environment.

 

Whilst on placement, students experience independent mentoring from a Practice Educator who is a qualified social worker who has successfully completed or is in the process of completing either Stage 1 (for first placements) or Stage 2 (for final placements) of the Practice Educator Professional Standards (or equivalent) for further details. Opportunities for extending their knowledge and critical understanding is developed in individual practice learning sessions, shadowing and co-working with experienced practitioners, attendance at agency training events, studying agency policies, visits to a range of resources and direct work with service users and workers from a range of professional backgrounds.  Placements provide many experiences for students to learn about the ethical dilemmas inherent in social work and to develop their own value framework. Students are expected to reflect on and analyse their practice and learning with the Practice Educator and to present information both as written reports and verbal contributions to these meetings.

 

More general transferable skills are developed within practice learning opportunities through co-working, supervision, team working, direct work with service users, and the need to prioritise and manage work demands, problem solve, analyse complexity and risk.

 

 

 

  1. Retention strategy.

The programme retention strategy has three key aspects;

  • it ensures that students are fully informed about what is expected of them throughout the programme, and resources and support available to students to meet these expectations.
  • it focuses on creating supportive and collaborative relationships between staff and students so that students can fully engage with the programme.
  • the programme is robust in its requirements but works within these requirements and regulations to respond as flexibly as possible to possible obstacles to progression.

 

This begins at induction in the first year when activities focus on introducing students to each other, to the staff team, the programme and the University resources and facilities. It is an opportunity to establish the ethos of the programme in terms of teaching, learning, expectations and support. Students identify their learning aims for the year and make plans about how these will be achieved. Students will be issued with a comprehensive Programme Handbook at the beginning of the programme, which will be available on Canvas. Students will be advised of assessment requirements in each module at the beginning of the academic year, and the information will be repeated in module guides, on Canvas and in an academic assignment year planner.

 

The programme team recognises the complex contexts that students may need to manage and have developed a coordinated and responsive approach to meeting students’ personal and academic support needs to enable them so far as possible to maintain their studies. This includes a structured induction process in both years of the programme, to ensure that students are able to identify their learning aims for the year and plan ahead to meet these. In the first year of the programme induction activities focus on introducing students to each other, to Programme staff, to the buildings and resources, and to the Programme.  There will be opportunities for students to work together in small groups and to discuss individual queries with members of staff.  Library tours and sessions with key members of students support services e.g. Student Finance will be made available and students will be provided with an introduction to Canvas. In the second year of the programme induction activities focus on review of progress to date and planning for the next academic year and into employment. A review of academic skills, based on feedback from academic assignments in the previous year is part of this process.

 

All students will be allocated a personal tutor for both years of the Programme.   The role of the tutor will be clearly outlined within Programme Handbooks and the Personal Tutor Handbook, so that students are informed and aware of the difference between academic and personal tutoring.  These roles will also be explained at induction.  Whilst it is not possible to guarantee the same personal tutor for both years (or in the case of part-time students for the duration of the programme), if a student has a specific need to stay with the same tutor then it is generally possible to accommodate this.

 

The programme has a structured tutorial programme so students know from the beginning of the year how many times they can expect to see their tutor during planned Professional and Academic Development sessions.  This programme of tutorials is structured to ‘front load’ contact in the earlier part of the year. The tutorials include exercises focussing on students’ personal, professional and academic development which encourage students to reflect on, any barriers to their engagement with the programme from an early stage. Students are also made aware from the point of induction that they are able to contact their personal tutor to arrange additional individual tutorials to seek support with any issues impacting on their studies and tutors are experienced in catering for students’ individual needs, making good use of excellent working relationships with wider support services within the University (see section 39 p.21 for further details).

 

In addition to the tutorial system, the programme leader maintains regular contact with the student cohort during each year of the programme, ensuring there are planned opportunities for feedback (Student Staff Forum at the end of each term) as well as responding to informal feedback during teaching and tutorial sessions throughout the year.

 

All students are able to access module guides on Canvas in accordance with the University format.  These provide students with information about the content and expectations of the module, and provide a range of material/ signposts to material to support the student’s learning.

 

Module leaders and tutors can provide support with academic work and will also signpost students to additional support in academic writing available in the St. Peter’s Library where this is needed.  There is also a Faculty Disability Support Tutor and students who have other learning needs can be referred to the University’s Disability Support Services for assessment and specialist support.

 

 

  1. Any other information

The MA Social Work gives graduates an academic qualification that means they are eligible to apply for registration as a qualified social worker with the HCPC.

 

 

 

SECTION C - TEACHING AND LEARNING

 

  1. What is the programme about?

 

The overall programme aims are:

 

  • to ensure that students, on successful completion of the programme, meet the Standards of Proficiency for Social Work and are eligible for registration as Social Workers with the Health and Care Professions Council.

 

  • to ensure that students reach the standards of practice at qualifying level, as outlined in the Professional Capabilities Framework.

 

  • To ensure that students are prepared to carry out their roles to the standards expected in the Knowledge and Skills Statements for Child and Family Social Work and Adult Social Work.

 

  • to ensure that students develop as critically reflective, analytical and research minded practitioners.

 

  • to ensure that the students’ learning is informed and influenced by critical analysis of current research and practice and the experiences of service users and carers.

 

  • to ensure that students integrate a critical understanding of social work values of valuing diversity and commitment to anti-oppressive practice into all aspects of their learning and practice.

 

 

  1. What will I know or be able to do at the end of the programme?

 

Learning Outcomes Postgraduate Certificate

NB Achievement of this award does not confer eligibility to apply for registration with HCPC

By the end of this part of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

 

Knowledge

C01

Critical understanding of the values and ethical principles that underpin social work practice and their implications for professional behaviour.

C02

Critical understanding of the importance of partnership working with service users and carers and processes for ensuring service user and carer participation and influence.

C03

Critical understandings of dimensions of diversity, discrimination and oppression and their impact on individual identity and experience.

C04

Critical understanding of the legislative, policy and organisational context for meeting needs, promoting choice, safeguarding and protecting human rights.

C05

Critical understanding of  key theories and models from social work and relevant disciplines, including sociology, psychology and human growth and development,  and the way they  may shape  social work processes and practice.

C06

Critical understanding of social work processes in addressing need, choice and risk.

C07

Critical understanding of forms of harm and the concept of risk.

C08

Critical understanding of the use of professional judgement in all aspects of decision making in social work.

Skills

C09

The ability to adopt an independent proactive and critically evaluative approach to their own learning and professional development.

C10

The ability to critically analyse diverse or competing perspectives theories or values orally and in writing.

Professional Skills

C11

The ability to show high levels of skills in communicating and engaging with service users and carers, colleagues and professionals.

C12

The ability to critically reflect on own values, prejudices, personal attributes and experiences and how they impact upon the professional task.

C13

The ability to behave professionally within different settings.

 

 

Learning Outcomes Postgraduate Diploma

 

NB Achievement of this award does not confer eligibility to apply for registration with HCPC

By the end of this part of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

 

Knowledge

D01

Critical understanding of ethical and professional dilemmas and tensions and their impact on decision making.

D02

Critical understanding of the ideological and political context for social work.

D03

Critical understanding of a human rights framework for analysing the impact of poverty, exclusion and social disadvantage on people’s lives.

D04

Critical understanding of the impact of values and ethics on the research process.

Skills

D05

Creative and resourceful problem solving skills when analysing complex information to arrive at a well evidenced argument.

D06

The ability to interpret and critically evaluate research methodology, findings and the evidence base for social work and their implications for practice.

D07

The ability to critically evaluate and analyse complex information in social work decision making processes.

Professional Skills (from the Professional Capabilities Framework)

D08

Understand the role of the professional social worker and demonstrate professionalism in a range of contexts. (PCF1)

D09

Apply social work ethical principles and values to guide professional practice. (PCF2)

D10

Recognise diversity and apply anti-discriminatory and anti-oppressive principles in practice. (PCF3)

D11

Understand and, with support, apply in practice the principles of human rights, social justice, inclusion and equality. (PCF4)

D12

Apply knowledge of social sciences, law and social work theory to practice. (PCF5)

D13

Use skills of reflection and analysis to inform and provide a rationale for professional decision-making. (PCF6)

D14

Use judgement and authority to intervene with individuals, families and communities to promote independence, provide support and prevent harm, neglect and abuse. (PCF7)

D15

Understand their role within social work organisational frameworks and within multi-agency and inter-professional settings, and operate appropriately within these. (PCF8)

D16

Identify how professional leadership in social work can enhance practice and recognise the value of sharing and supporting the learning and development of others. (PCF9)

Learning Outcomes - Masters

NB The MA in Social Work is approved by the HCPC and successful completion of the full programme only leads to eligibility for the successful graduate to apply to the HCPC for registration as a qualified social worker.

 

By the end of this part of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

 

Knowledge

M01

A detailed and comprehensively evidenced understanding of an issue or area of practice relevant to social work.

Skills

M02

Ability to integrate a range of research skills to carry out a sustained critical enquiry into an area of specialist interest in social work.

M03

The capacity to think critically, logically, systematically and creatively, using a variety of problem solving techniques.

M04

The ability to synthesise theory, knowledge and research to create an original, coherent and well-argued discussion.

Professional Skills (from the Professional Capabilities Framework)

M05

Practice to the standard of proficiency required for application to register as a social worker with the Health and Care Professions Council.

M06

Critically develop and use their professional identity, showing commitment to professional development and meeting the requirements of the professional regulator. (PCF1)

M07

Apply a critical understanding of social work ethical principles and values to guide professional practice. (PCF2)

M08

Demonstrate a critical understanding of diversity and apply anti-discriminatory and anti-oppressive principles in practice. (PCF3)

M09

Advance and promote human rights, social justice and economic wellbeing. (PCF4)

M10

Apply a critical understanding of social sciences, law and social work theory to practice. (PCF5)

M11

Use skills of critical reflection and analysis to inform and provide a rationale for professional decision-making and develop imaginative, creative practice(PCF 6)

M12

Use judgement and authority to intervene in complex situations with individuals, families and communities to promote independence, provide support and prevent harm, neglect and abuse. (PCF7)

M13

Operate effectively within social work organisational frameworks and multi-agency and inter-professional settings and contribute to their development. (PCF8)

M14

Recognise the importance of and begin to demonstrate professional leadership and contribute to supporting the learning and development of others. (PCF9)

 

 

 

 

  1. What will the programme consist of?

 

Taught postgraduate programmes generally consist of a number of taught modules leading to the award of a Postgraduate Certificate (60 credits) or Postgraduate Diploma (120 credits). A Masters qualification (180 credits) usually culminates in a major piece of independent work such as a project or dissertation. All modules are at postgraduate level (level 7 in the UK’s national scheme). The summary below describes briefly what is contained in the programme. The programme structure, including a detailed list of modules, can be found in the programme regulations (Appendix 2)

 

Programme Structure:

 

Post Graduate Certificate

  • The Social Work Context15 credits
  • Preparing for Practice15 credits
  • Theories and Models for Social Work Practice30 credits

 

NB  Any student  leaving  the programme having achieved 60 credits after successfully completing the modules outlined above will be awarded a Postgraduate Certificate in Social Welfare Studies. The name of the award does not contain the protected title of social work and the conferment of this award does NOT lead to eligibility to apply for registration with HCPC.

 

 

Postgraduate Diploma

  • Practice Placement One15 credits
  • Social Work Research15 credits
  • Critical Perspectives in Social Work Practice30 credits

 

NB  Any student  leaving  the programme having achieved 120 credits after successfully completing the modules outlined above will be awarded a Postgraduate Diploma in Social Welfare Studies. The name of the award does not contain the protected title of social work and the conferment of this award does NOT lead to eligibility to apply for registration with HCPC.

 

 

 

 

MA

  • Social Work Dissertation30 credits
  • Practice Placement 230 credits

 

The MA in Social Work is approved by the HCPC and successful completion of the full approved programme only (180 credits) leads to eligibility for the successful graduate to apply to the HCPC for registration as a qualified social worker.

 

 

 

Aegrotat Awards

Aegrotat awards on this programme will have the title of MA Social Welfare Studies. Students achieving this award will not be eligible to apply to the HCPC for registration as a qualified social worker
Full Time Route

 

Year 1

 

Sept

 

October

November

December

Jan.

February

March

April

May

June

SWK M26 The Social Work Context

 

 

 

 

 

 

SWKM27 Preparing for Practice

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SWK M28 Theories and Models for SW Practice

 

 

 

 

SWK M31 Practice Placement 1

 

 

 

Year 2

 

Sept

 

October

November

December

Jan.

February

March

April

May

June

SWK M29 Critical Perspectives in SW Practice

 

 

SWK M30 Social Work Research

 

 

SWK M32 Social Work Dissertation

 

 

SWKM33 Practice Placement 2

 

 

Part Time Route

 

Year 1

 

Sept

 

October

November

December

Jan.

February

March

April

May

June

SWK M26 The Social Work Context

 

 

 

 

 

 

SWKM27 Preparing for Practice

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Year 2

 

Sept

 

October

November

December

Jan.

February

March

April

May

June

SWK M28 Theories and Models for SW Practice

 

 

 

SWK M31 Practice Placement 1

 

Year 3

 

Sept

 

October

November

December

Jan.

February

March

April

May

June

SWK M29 Critical Perspectives in SW Practice

 

 

SWK M30 Social Work Research

 

 

Year 4

 

Sept

 

October

November

December

Jan.

February

March

April

May

June

SWK M32 Social Work Dissertation

 

 

SWKM33 Practice Placement 2

 

 

The programme is designed to provide students at post graduate certificate stage with a broad foundation in law and relevant social sciences with a focus on the critical application of these to social work practice, social work theories, methods and models of assessment and skills in communicating and engaging with service users and carers.  So you begin by exploring the role and value base of social work and examine what is meant by important concepts such as discrimination, oppression, social justice and equality.  You will critically explore key aspects of the law in relation to human rights, equality, adult care, mental health and child care.  Students discuss and critique relevant theory including social and psychological, explore service user and carer perspectives, and critically appraise practice in relation to some of the different service user groups and relevant law and policy.  You will be helped to understand the tensions and complexities around areas such as harm, capacity, risk assessment, professional judgement and working together with other professionals.  Teaching and learning throughout is strongly underpinned by a systemic approach that encompasses the needs of the whole family and this approach is consolidated by specific sessions focussing on a holistic perspective on family needs (‘Think Family’) at the end of the first semester, before students go out on their first practice placement of 70 days.

 

At postgraduate diploma stage you are able to explore your own interests in more depth and use your skills as an independent learner. The philosophical underpinnings of social work values are critically examined and applied to ethical practice dilemmas with individuals and families, across all age groups and within a range of contexts, and the best of new or current specialist practice explored, with a focus on decision making in complex situations.  The module content encourages students to critically evaluate the impact of issues such as discrimination, oppression and poverty and asks them to review principles of human rights and social justice in social work practice.  You will be introduced to social research methods and the crucial importance of research informed practice in social work.

 

In the Masters stage of the programme, you will use the research skills you have developed to explore a particular area of practice within the dissertation. In the final placement of 100 days students consolidate their learning and further develop their practice skills in more complex situations.  As you move towards the position of a qualified practitioner you will be helped to build on and further strengthen your understanding of professionalism and leadership, focusing in particular on the use of professional supervision.

 

In both years, service users, carers and social work practitioners are involved in the development and delivery of teaching, ensuring that students receive teaching that is reflective of the climate they will be working within and keeping the service user and carer voice at the forefront.

 

Practice Placements

There are two assessed practice placements, 70 days in year one and 100 days in year two.  In addition, there are 30 days of practice learning time to focus on skills development and integration between theory and practice. The majority of these days are based in the University and include sessions such as particular methods and models of intervention, communication and interviewing skills.  Included within these 30 days is also a period of observation in a social work/care setting in year one.

 

 

Assessment of Readiness for Practice

As part of the PSRB requirements, students must evidence that they have met the requirements of readiness for practice for the first practice placement.

 

 

 

 

Assessment of Readiness for Practice for the First Placement

 

In order to be assessed as ready for practice before the first practice placement, students will need to demonstrate the following:

 

  • Basic communication skills
  • Ability to engage with service users
  • Capacity to work as a member of an organisation
  • Willingness to learn from feedback and supervision
  • Basic social work values, knowledge, theories and skills to make effective use of the first practice placement.

Professional Capability Framework – Readiness for Practice Capabilities, BASW:

https://www.basw.co.uk/pcf/PCF09ReadinessForPracticeCapabilities.pdf

 

In order to evidence this at the appropriate level of proficiency students will need to provide a range of evidence. This will comprise:

 

  • evidence that the student has met the attendance requirements of the programme
  • confirmation from the student that there have been no changes to DBS, Health and conduct declarations which would affect suitability to practise
  • successful completion of the Practice Skills Portfolio (Assessment 003 in SWKM27).  A panel comprising of academics, practitioners, service users and carers are involved in the assessment of this.
  • successful completion of particular assessment tasks within the first term evidencing particular aspects of the Professional Capabilities Framework

 

 

Practice Learning Curriculum

As proposed by the Social Work Reform Board and advised by the College of Social Work:

 

Students are offered different practice experiences in the first and final placements. This could mean different settings, service user groups, ages or methods, although the primary focus where possible is on students having experiences in both child care and adult settings. This will strengthen the holistic approach to working with families which underpins the curriculum but also offer a foundation for developing specialist skills once qualified. (College of Social Work, 2011, edref9)

 

The curriculum for each placement and assessment documentation are carefully planned to reflect the Professional Capabilities Framework at the appropriate stage.  There are expectations at each stage that students will “act within the limits of their knowledge and skills, recognising that they are not yet autonomous practitioners but should work with the appropriate level of supervision. (College of Social Work, 2011, edref9)

 

In the final placement students undertake tasks to prepare them for statutory interventions.  They are offered opportunities to engage with:

 

  • formal assessment processes including considering risk and/or safeguarding for child protection, for practice in mental health or with vulnerable adults (PCF 7, 8)
  • opportunities to reflect on, discuss and analyse appropriate use of authority (PCF 7, 6)
  • Application and understanding of legal frameworks relevant for social work practice (PCF 5, 8)
  • organisational policies and decisions and their impact on service delivery to service users (PCF 8)
  • the demands of a high pressured environment, where time and competing interests have to be managed effectively (PCF 1)
  • multiagency working, including planning interventions with other agencies, and analysing and managing tensions (PCF 7, 8)
  • presentation of outcomes of formal assessment processes, including analysis of risk/recommendations in line with organisational policy/procedure e.g. panels/meetings/courts. (PCF 6, 7, 8)
  • use of formal agency recording for assessment/risk. (PCF 1)

 

(College of Social Work, 2011, edref9)

 

 

 

The placement criteria and processes are consistent with University guidance on Work Based Learning (https://my.sunderland.ac.uk/display/AQH/Work+Based+Learning

 

 

  1. How will I be taught?

 

Scheduled teaching activities

x

Independent study

x

Placement

x

 

You will be taught through a mixture of lectures, seminars and workshops, with a strong emphasis on individual participation and discussion.  Across the programme you will be exposed to critical debate and discussion. In teaching sessions students are encouraged to participate and discuss and debate issues and share their own views, values and ideas to enrich the teaching and learning process. Teaching sessions may be led by academic staff, practitioners, people who use services, carers or combinations of these. They include a range of learning strategies to encourage deeper understanding and the development of skills in critical thinking and analysis. You will be expected to prepare for teaching sessions by engaging with material (journal articles, extracts from books, audio- visual material etc.) provided in module guides and on Canvas, as well as wider reading around the subject.  In addition, in some modules your learning will be guided by online exercises, tasks and workbooks and formative feedback on these. In order to develop practice skills, you will engage in role play exercises with your peers, staff, practitioners and service users and carers. Some of these will be recorded to help you reflect on your practice and for assessment purposes. There is an expectation that you will build on your graduate skills and engage, at a high level, in independent study.

 

When you are undertaking your practice placements your Practice Educator will be your mentor and will organise different opportunities for you to learn about practice. This will include some direct teaching within individual supervisions sessions, opportunities to observe the practice of others, attendance at setting-specific training sessions, reflection on your practice within supervision using your own records of your practice, direct observation of and feedback on your practice by the Practice Educator, joint work with other practitioners/other professionals and direct work with people who use services and their carers.

 

  • A list of the modules in the programme can be found in the Programme Regulations (Appendix 2).

 

  • A summary of the types of teaching, learning and assessment in each module of the programme can be found in the Teaching Learning and Assessment Matrix (Appendix 4)

 

  1. How will I be assessed and given feedback?

 

Written examinations

 

Coursework

x

Practical assessments

x

 

  • A summary of the types of teaching, learning and assessment in each module of the programme can be found in the Teaching Learning and Assessment Matrix (Appendix 4)

 

  • The generic assessment criteria which we use can be found here. Some programmes use subject-specific assessment criteria which are based on the generic ones.

 

This programme uses the Generic University Assessment Criteria

YES

 

This programme uses the Subject Specific Assessment Criteria

 

NO

 

The University regulations can be found here.

 

The aim of the assessment strategy for the programme is to “both support high quality learning and provide a robust threshold for entry to professional practice.” (College of Social Work, 2011, edfer5) There is a strong focus on integrating academic and practice learning throughout the course and the Professional Capabilities Framework informs both learning outcomes and assessment of student performance at each stage.  The strategy is designed to ensure that students who successfully complete the programme meet the HCPC Standards of Proficiency for social workers.

 

The programme uses a wide range of assessment methods designed to carefully match the learning outcomes being assessed and to offer students different methods of demonstrating their learning. These include methods such as workbooks, individual and group presentations, critically reflective accounts of practice, role play, a professional discussion exercise, a comparative study, written assignments, practice portfolio and a dissertation. There will be a strong emphasis on critical analysis and the integration of theory, knowledge, values and practice. You will be informed of the assignment task in the module guide at the beginning of the module, and time will be made available within each module programme to discuss what is required for each task and ensure that you are clear about what is expected of you. This will include an examination of the feedback/mark sheet. The Module Leader will also offer either small group or individual tutorials to discuss your ideas.

 

 

Your academic work and practice will be variously assessed by academic staff, practitioners, service users and carers working in partnership.  You will be given detailed written feedback in each piece of summative assessment which will be supplemented by class feedback on common issues arising from the assessment of a particular piece of work, and the opportunity for an individual tutorial if necessary. In addition, there will be opportunities for formative feedback on your understanding and development in classroom exercises and individual tutorials. You will be encouraged to engage with the assessment process as a developmental tool for learning, with opportunities for reflection on your progress built into Professional and Academic Tutorial sessions. As you progress through the programme the assessment tasks in both academic study and in practice will look for increasingly detailed research, more advanced skills in critical analysis and evaluation and a more complex understanding of the tensions and dilemmas in social work. Throughout you will be able to see that the assessments you undertake are closely related to the College of Social Work Professional Capabilities Framework and the HCPC Standards of Proficiency.

 

Practice Assessment Panel

Assessment of practice is considered by the Practice Assessment Panel which is made up of academic staff and employer representatives.  This panel makes a recommendation to the Social Work Module Assessment Board about whether students have achieved the standard required by the appropriate level of the Professional Capabilities Framework

 

  1. Teaching, learning and assessment matrix- see Appendix 4

 

  1. How does research influence the programme? 

The Social Work team has a strong commitment to research and evidence based teaching and staff members are engaged in a wide variety of research activities.  Examples of research on-going or carried out include:

  • social services responses to children who display sexually harmful behaviour – plotting trajectories through the system from referral to outcome and understanding how this is experienced by parents, carers and social work practitioners,
  • evaluation of Family Intervention Projects,
  • evaluation of assertive outreach mental health services,
  • research into how caring may impact on identity,
  • an on-going research study into experiences of institutional care of adults with learning disabilities,
  • evaluation of a Customer Access Strategy for Children’s Services in a partner Local authority,
  • evaluation of a project to engage men in the early stages of dementia to engage in activities to prevent social isolation,
  • evaluation of a ‘relaxed theatre’ event for children and young people experiencing autism.

 

Academic staff who also contribute to the programme include those who are research-active in the areas of for example domestic violence, disability and racism in youth work 

 

Clearly these activities are directly relevant to teaching on the social work programme and are used both to inform exploration of particular areas of knowledge and practice. For example, children who display sexually harmful behaviour could be one of the emerging issues examined in SWKM29 Critical Perspectives in Social Work Practice, Family Intervention Projects and the needs of carers will be examined in SWKM26 The Social Work Context. In addition, staff use their own research to examine research methodologies, methods and data analysis with students. This supports the process throughout the programme for students show ‘a developed capacity for the critical evaluation of knowledge and evidence from a range of sources.’ (QAA 2016 p23)


The Social Work Team are committed to staying up-to-date with the most recent issues in social work practice and contributing to current practice; recent initiatives include the development of training materials on Personalisation in collaboration with the Sunderland Carers Centre funded by the Department of Health, the provision of training at a regional level with Local Authority employers to promote a ‘Think Family’ approach across mental health and child care services, and training to Local Authority social workers on the policy and theory behind personalisation. In addition, staff use their role as Placement Tutors, and individually negotiated practice experiences for themselves, or discussions with key practitioners to ensure that their understanding of the practice context remains current.

The programme also draws on a wide range of researchers and practitioners from the field to provide specialist input into a number of modules at all levels.

The social work team are active members of the Centre for Applied Social Science, (CASS click here) which combines original academic research with practice-based collaborations and reach-out activities. There are regular Faculty and Departmental research seminar sessions for staff and students and the social work team both present and participate in these sessions. We are also in the process of becoming a North East hub for the national organisation Making Research Count (click here)

 

SECTION D EMPLOYABILITY

 

  1. How will the programme prepare me for employment?

 

The programme gives you the opportunity to develop advanced skills and knowledge which you can use in the future. Some postgraduate programmes are associated with a particular career path but most skills can be applied to a range of employment situations. The skills which this programme is designed to develop are listed below.

 

Clearly in applying to come on this programme you have expressed a commitment to a career in social work. The programme will prepare students to become competent social work practitioners through the provision of up-to-date, research informed teaching and strong partnerships with service user and carer organisations, private, voluntary and statutory sector agencies and individuals, which ensures the teaching is very reflective of current practice and has a strong focus on experiences of service users and carers. There are additional opportunities to learn new skills to promote your personal development and resilience, e.g. to learn mindfulness skills with carers, to work with service users on assertiveness skills.

 

If you decide to move into a different field of employment, you will take with you valuable and transferable skills in working as a member of team, problem solving in complex situations, managing risk and stress and excellent communications skills in verbal and written form. You will have developed your skills in critical analysis and decision making, and will have demonstrated you are resourceful and creative in problem solving.

 

Throughout the programme there will be opportunities to enhance your opportunities for employment through the Sunderland Futures programme (see link below) and support in the process of gaining employment from the Careers and Employment Service who provide bespoke sessions for the programme and individual coaching opportunities for students.

 

For information about other opportunities available to our students who study on campus, click here.

 

 

  1. Particular features of the qualification.

 

Successful completion of the course provides students with a Masters degree and a professional qualification in social work which means that they can apply to register with the Health and Care Professions Council as a qualified social worker.  The programme includes two practice placements to develop students’ proficiency in line with the Professional Capabilities Framework.  Service users, carers and social work practitioners are substantially involved in the development and delivery of teaching, ensuring that students receive teaching that is reflective of the climate they will be working within and keeping the service user and carer voice at the forefront.

 

 

  1. Professional statutory or regulatory body (PSRB) accreditation.

 

 

PSRB accreditation is not relevant to this programme 

 

PSRB accreditation is currently being sought for this programme

 

This programme currently has PSRB accreditation

x

The approval (accreditation) of the programme is open-ended subject to satisfactory annual monitoring.

The relevant PSRB is the Health and Care Professions Council

 

Accreditation gives graduates eligibility for the successful graduate to apply to the HCPC for registration as a qualified social worker. This depends upon successful completion of the whole programme.

 

There are programme-specific regulations relating to the following. Details are given in the programme regulations:

 

The modules to be studied

x

Pass-marks for some or all modules and/or parts

(elements) of modules 

x

Placement requirements

x

Attendance requirements

x

Professional practice requirements

x

Final or overall mark for the award  

 

Other 

 

 

 

 

Interim or exit awards are not accredited and do not confer eligibility to apply for registration with HCPC as a qualified social worker.


SECTION E PROGRAMME STRUCTURE AND REGULATIONS

See Programme Regulations Form Appendix 2

 

SECTION F ADMISSIONS, LEARNING ENVIRONMENT AND SUPPORT

 

  1. What are the admissions requirements?

 

The University’s standard admissions requirements can be found in the university regulations.

 

Programme-specific requirements which are in addition to those regulations are given below.

 

The admissions process is governed by the minimum standards set by the Health Care Professionals Council (HCPC) and applicants for social work programmes are assessed against the relevant elements of the Professional Capability Framework (PCF) at the point of admission to social work training.  The programme looks for a combination of the personal qualities and intellectual ability needed to be effective in the complex and challenging social work role. Throughout the selection process we look to select applicants who are most likely to become effective and safe practitioners.

 

The entry requirements for this course are that successful applicants:

 

  • Hold at least a 2.1 honours degree or equivalent, or a 2.2 plus a relevant postgraduate award.
  • Have Maths and English GCSE at Grade C or above (or equivalent).
  • Have the International English Language Testing System (IELTS) at a score of 7.0 in all elements, or equivalent, for applicants whose first language is not English.
  • All applicants must confirm at interview that they are able to use a range of IT software, including email, internet, word and powerpoint.
  • Successful applicants must have sustained experience (voluntary or paid) in a social care or related setting, and be able to reflect on this and relate it to a career in social work.

 

All offers of places are subject to two satisfactory references (academic and work-related or equivalent), a satisfactory health declaration, receipt of a suitable Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) enhanced certificate, and meeting suitability and character requirements of the regulatory body that approves the social work programme (the Health and Care Professions Council).

 

Applicants who are shortlisted on the basis of their written application will be invited to take part in a selection process which includes a:

  • timed written task;
  • group exercise; and an
  • individual interview.

 

Observation and interview panels comprise practitioners, service users, carers and members of the social work team.

 

Can students enter with advanced standing?

 

No

 

 

The University has a process by which applicants whose experience to date already covers one or more modules of the programme they are applying for may seek Accreditation of Prior Learning (APL). Full details can be found here but if you think that this may be relevant to you, please contact the department which offers the programme you are interested in.

 

  1. What kind of support and help will there be?

 

On this programme you will be provided with an excellent level of support, recognising the demands of an academic degree and professional qualification.  You will be assigned a personal tutor, who will meet with you formally in a group and individually at set points throughout the first semester of each year.  On placement you will have a practice educator, sometimes a link worker, and a tutor who will together with the student form a ‘Training Team’ responsible for monitoring your progress and dealing with any concerns.  Tutorials are supported by a Practice Skills Portfolio, which is designed to support students in the development of essential skills for practice such as recording, making use of supervision and reflection.

 

You will have access to a wide range of resources to both support your learning (e.g. links to lecture notes, online discussions, access to the library’s full range of material) and to support your progress through the programme (e.g. information about support services available, supporting material for the use of progress files, careers information.).  The module spaces are also used for communicating module information, and for discussions to support teaching in the classroom and assignment preparation.  Students have access to email, Canvas and other IT including our social work blog and other social media communications.  You will be using the communication skills labs which include recording devices in sessions developing their communication skills.

 

You will be given a comprehensive programme handbook at the beginning of the programme, which will also be available on Canvas.  The handbook includes frequently asked questions, information about office availability and contact details of the staff team as well as support staff.  It also includes essential contact information for faculty and central University services and links to University on line resources. 

 

All module leaders and tutors will provide academic support with individual assessments at the request of the student.  The University offers Skills for Learning services to all students who feel they may need further support in this area. Support is offered via workshops within St. Peter’s Library or with an individual support tutor to help students organise and plan study tasks, listen and read for understanding, take useful notes, plan and write essays or reports, use citations and references: avoid plagiarism, prepare and give presentations, revise and sit examinations.  Students who have other learning needs which may have been identified prior to the start of the programme, or in some cases are only identified during the programme, are referred for assessment and specialist support to the Disability Support Service which is able to offer individual tutorial support, guidance and specialist equipment where necessary. This team also helps programme staff to support students appropriately by making recommendations concerning how their needs should be met in the academic setting. This process is supported by the Faculty Disability Support Tutor where necessary.

 

The University provides a range of professional support services including health and well-being, counselling, disability support, and a Chaplaincy. Click on the links for further information.

 

 

  1. What resources will I have access to?

 

On campus

x

In a partner college

 

By distance learning

 

 

 

 

 

On campus

General Teaching and Learning Space

x

IT

x

Library

x

VLE

x

Laboratory

 

Studio

 

Performance space

 

Communication skills rooms

x

Technical resources 

 

 

Most of your teaching and learning will take place at St. Peter’s Campus, which offers rooms to accommodate large lectures, seminars and small group work. There are also rooms set up with soft furnishings and cameras to support communication skills training. There are a number of informal meeting spaces and small rooms for individual tutorials. Teaching rooms are equipped with AV equipment and Smartboards and there are two computer labs available for students’ use when teaching is not taking place. St Peter’s Library is a few minutes’ walk away from the buildings where teaching takes place and provides an excellent range of resources and study support services which are detailed via the link below.

 

Information about the University’s facilities can be found here.

 

 

  1. Are there any additional costs on top of the fees?

 

No, but all students buy some study materials such as books and provide their own basic study materials.

 

Yes (optional) All students buy some study materials such as books and provide their own basic study materials. In addition, there are some are additional costs for optional activities associated with the programme (see below)

X

Yes (essential) All students buy some study materials such as books and provide their own basic study materials. In addition, there are some are essential additional costs associated with the programme (see below)

 

 

There will be travel costs associated with placement. Currently students receive a bursary payment to contribute towards these, but this is under review by the Department of Health.

 

 

 

 

  1. How are student views represented?

 

All taught programmes in the University have student representatives for each programme who meet in a Student-Staff Liaison Committee (SSLC) where they can raise students’ views and concerns. The Students’ Union and the faculties together provide training for student representatives. SSLCs and focus groups are also used to obtain student feedback on plans for developing existing programmes and designing new ones. Feedback on your programme is obtained every year through module questionnaires and informs the annual review of your programme. Student representatives are also invited to attend Programme and Module Studies Boards which manage the delivery and development of programmes and modules.  Various Faculty committees, particularly Faculty Academic Experience Committee, Academic Development Committee and Quality Management Sub-Committee also have student representation. This allows students to be involved in higher-level plans for teaching and learning. There is a parallel structure at university level on which students are represented by sabbatical officers who are the elected leaders of the Students’ Union.

The University’s student representation and feedback policy can be found here.

 

Every two years we participate in the national Postgraduate Taught Experience Survey (PTES) which is run by the Higher Education Academy.

 

To evaluate the programme and involve students, students’ views are sought through group work and class discussions and module questionnaires.  The feedback informs module leaders’ annual review of their modules.  Students are represented on the Programme and Module Studies Boards; in the former they are involved in discussion of external examiners’ reports.

 

In addition to these standard processes, Student Staff Forums are held at least twice per year, supplemented by regular meetings between students and their tutors.  Any issues raised at these meetings are explored and minutes from these meetings and evidence of action taken to address issues raised are discussed within the programme team and the Programme Studies Board.  The minutes and action taken to resolve issues are made available to students on Canvas.  Feedback from the National Student Survey is also considered at the staff student forums and by the Programme Studies Board.  Key changes in response to student feedback are also displayed as “you said/we did” items on the plasma screens throughout the building where most of the teaching takes place.

 

At the end of their placement, students also complete an evaluation of the placement setting and learning experience, which they include in their placement portfolio.  These are summarised and considered by the Practice Learning Group before being fed back to placement providers

 

 

 

SECTION G QUALITY MANAGEMENT 

 

  1. National subject benchmarks

 

  1. National subject benchmarks

 

The Quality Assurance Agency for Higher Education publishes benchmark statements which give guidance as to the skills and knowledge which graduates in various subjects and in certain types of degree are expected to have. They do not cover all subjects at postgraduate level but the most recent undergraduate benchmark statement for social work explains that this documents also provides a guide for all qualifying programmes in this subject.

Are there any benchmark statements for this programme?

YES

 

 

The subject bench mark statement for this programme is The Subject Benchmark Statement for Social Work (2016). This can be found at:

https://www.qaa.ac.uk/docs/qaa/subject-benchmark-statements/sbs-social-work-16.pdf?sfvrsn=1d95f781_6

The QAA also publishes a Framework for Higher Education Qualifications (FHEQ) which defines the generic skills and abilities expected of students who have achieved awards at a given level and with which our programmes align. The FHEQ can be found here.

In addition there are particular professional body requirements for this programme:

 

 

  1. Professional Body Requirements

In addition, there are particular professional body requirements for this programme:

 

The Health and Care Professions Council Standards of Proficiency for Social Work

https://www.hcpc-uk.org/assets/documents/10003B08Standardsofproficiency-SocialworkersinEngland.pdf

The Health and Care Professions Council Standards of Education and Training.

https://www.hcpc-uk.org/assets/documents/10000BCF46345Educ-Train-SOPA5_v2.pdf

The Professional Capabilities Framework, currently held by the British Association of Social Workers.

https://www.basw.co.uk/pcf/

Knowledge and Skills statement for Approved Child and Family Practitioners

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/512790/Knowledge_and_skills_statement_for_approved_child_and_family_practitioners.pdf

Knowledge and Skills Statement for Social Workers in Adult Services

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/411957/KSS.pdf

 

 

  1. How are the quality and standards of the programme assured?

 

The programme is managed and quality assured through the University’s standard processes. Programmes are overseen by Module and Programme Studies Boards which include student representatives. Each year each module leader provides a brief report on the delivery of the module, identifying strengths and areas for development, and the programme team reviews the programme as a whole.  The purpose of this is to ensure that the programme is coherent and up-to-date, with suitable progression through the programme, and a good fit (alignment) between what is taught and how students learn and are assessed - the learning outcomes, content and types of teaching, learning and assessment. Student achievement, including progress through the programme and the way in which the final award is made, is kept under review. The programme review report is sent to the Faculty Quality Management Sub-Committee which in turn reports issues to the University’s Quality Management Sub-Committee (QMSC) and Academic Development Committee (ADC).

 

The Programme Studies Board is supported in its work by two sub-groups: the Practice Learning Group, and the Recruitment and Admissions Group.  They consider issues particular to their area of expertise and if necessary bring recommendations for change to the Programme Studies Board.

 

When students are out on their assessed practice placements they are under the supervision of a Practice Educator who is evidenced to be meeting or have met the required standards for practice education in social work through being in the process of or have successfully completed the requirements for Stage 1 (for first placements) or Stage 2 (for final placements) of the Practice Educator Professional Standards, or equivalent.  Whilst on placement students also continue to receive support from a tutor who acts as a point of contact between the placement and the University and will intervene in the case of any difficulties or disputes as well as monitoring the student’s progress. 

 

The University is also part of a wider strategic partnership which includes regional employers and another social work programme provider.  All members have signed up to a Memorandum of Co-operation which is designed to promote excellence in social work training in order to meet employer requirements.

 

At the end of each academic year, the programme team meets with employer and service user and carer representatives to review the programme, consider any adjustments or developments and plan for the following year, to ensure the influence of current policy and practice on curriculum content and design.

 

External examiners are appointed to oversee and advise on the assessment of the programme There is a requirement from the HCPC for at least one of the external examiners to be from the relevant part of the Register. They ensure that the standards of the programme are comparable with those of similar programmes elsewhere in the UK and are also involved in the assessment process to make sure that it is fair. They are invited to comment on proposed developments to the programme. Their reports are sent to the Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Academic) as well as to the Faculty so that issues of concern can be addressed.

 

All programmes are reviewed by the University on a six-yearly cycle to identify good practice and areas for enhancement. Programmes are revalidated through this review process. These reviews include at least one academic specialist in the subject area concerned from another UK university. The University is subject to external review by the Quality Assurance Agency for Higher Education on a six-year cycle. Their review reports for Sunderland can be found at here.

 

Further information about our quality processes can be found here.

 

 


 

Quality Handbook

 

SITS SUMMARY PROGRAMME/SHORT COURSE DETAILS

(Form to be completed electronically by the Faculty and forwarded to the Quality Support Officer supporting the Approval event, or sent to Planning & MI for faculty devolved processes before sending to Quality Support (with the exception of Short Courses and GRS))

This form is to be completed when a new programme has been validated and approved so that the programme codes and progression and awards rules can be set up in SITS.  This also needs to be completed at periodic course review when there have been significant modifications to the course.

 

Please note that all details entered onto this form will go onto every student’s record that is attached to this programme and it is therefore imperative that the information is correct. 

 

1 Programme Details

New/ Modification/Review:

Please ensure the minor modification document is included

Modification

Full Programme Title (including award):

MA Social Work

If replacement for existing course, specify title and course code:

 

Qualification Aim:

e.g. Foundation degree of Science, Bachelor of Arts (Honours)

MA

Qualification Level (NQF level):

7

HECoS Code

See HESA Website https://www.hesa.ac.uk/innovation/hecos

100503

Is the programme Open or Closed:

A course is defined as closed when specifically designed for a certain group of people and not also available to other suitably qualified candidates. It may be designed for a particular company however if the same course is also run for other suitably qualified candidates, not employed by the company, then the course is not closed. If the programme is closed please specify who it is for.

Open

Faculty and School:

Faculty of Education and Society

Social Sciences

Location of study:

e.g. Sunderland in London, Sunderland

Sunderland

Last Date Registration (PBI) Number of days:

The number of days after the start date of the course that it is possible for students to register onto it. It is also referred to as the migration date. This is normally 18 days.  Please indicate if more or less than this number.

As standard

Programme Leader:

Alex Summer

Academic Team for the programme:

Social Work

Date of Approval/Modification/Review:

Modification: 26th July 2019

Date of next review (QS to complete):

2021/22

Accrediting Body or PSRB
If yes please attach a completed PSRB form

Yes

Health and Care Professions Council

Programme Specific Regulations

If yes, please attach a completed Programme Specific Regulations form

Yes

 

Does this programme come under the Unistats return?

The following are excluded from the Unistats return:

  • Programmes of 120 credits or less (including top ups)
  • ‘Closed’ Courses
  • Programmes of one year’s full-time duration even if they have more than 120 credits
  • Programmes which will be delivered only to overseas students
  • Postgraduate programmes
  • A course that is run as part of an apprenticeship

No

Is this an undergraduate programme whose primary (but not necessarily only) purpose is to improve the effectiveness of practitioners registered with a professional body? If yes, please specify which body:

https://www.hesa.ac.uk/collection/c16061/accreditation_list/

e.g. a short course aimed at registered nurses

No


Professional Body:

 

 

Interim Awards

If a student does not achieve their qualification aim, what lower awards might they be entitled to, assuming they have the credits?  The subject title for any lower level award should be given where this is different from the subject of the qualification aim. This should be the same title as the main award unless an alternative is approved via a Programme Specific Regulation.

 

Interim Award Title

Credits Required

Interim Structure

Please show mandatory requirements if applicable e.g. core module codes

1

Postgraduate Certificate in Social Welfare Studies

NB Successful completion of this award does not lead to eligibility to apply for registration with HCPC.

60

Please see attached programme specific regulations.

2

Postgraduate Diploma in Social Welfare Studies

NB Successful completion of this award does not lead to eligibility to apply for registration with HCPC.

120

Please see attached programme specific regulations.

3

 

 

 

 

2 Mode of Attendance

 

Tick all that apply

Min number of years

Max number of years

Overall length of programme in years/months/weeks

Intake dates (months)

Max and min cohort sizes

01 Full-time*

2

6

2

September

 

31 Part-time*

4

6

4

September

 

Sandwich*

 

 

 

 

 

 

Off-campus

 

 

 

 

 

 

On-campus

 

 

 

 

 

Distance learning

 

 

 

 

 

 

Work-based learning

(placement)

 

 

 

 

 

Collaborative

 

 

 

 

 

 

Proposed start-date (month/year)

September

Full-time (031)

Full-time students are those expected to study for more than 24 weeks per year, for a minimum of 21 hours per week and are paying the full-time fee. (Note – this includes any work based learning).

Part-time (031)

Students who are expected to study for less than 21 hours per week.

Sandwich

Please ensure you include the title of the sandwich programme in Section 3

 

 

 

3 Admissions

An admissions or MCR code will be created to allow student applications.

Tick appropriate

UUCAS

Universities and Colleges Admission Services

Required for full-time undergraduate programmes only.

 

DDirect Entry

Required for FT, PT, PG and PGR, only where students will be admitted through the admissions teams or where the programme needs to be advertised on the web.

GGTTR

Graduate Teacher Training Registry
Education only, where applicable

 

 

4 Collaborative Provision

UK

N/A

Overseas

N/A

Institution

Collaborative Model

Funding Arrangements

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Does this course offer a sandwich placement?

If yes, please indicate which programme year this placement is to take place.

No

 

Is this sandwich placement compulsory or optional?

 

Does this course offer a study abroad year out? If yes, please indicate which programme year this placement is to take place.

No

 

Is this study abroad year out compulsory or optional?

 

 

5 Major Source of Funding

Please note this relates to funding for the programme and not individual students

Office for Students (previously known as HEFCE)

Student fees/HEFCE

Education & Skills Funding Agency (includes Degree Apprenticeships)

 

DfE   https://www.gov.uk/government/organisations/national-college-for-teaching-and-leadership

 

Wholly NHS Funded

Partially NHS Funded

Departments of Health/NHS/Social Care. For all Health funded programmes please indicate whether the programme is eligible for an NHS Bursary

-  Eligible for NHS BursaryY/N

 

 

 

Other Funding:

 

– If Other, please specify:

 

 

 

6 Education Programmes Only

This section must be completed for any programmes marked above as ‘NCTL’ funded

Teacher Training Identifier:

 

Teacher Training Scope:

 

Qualification Aim:

QTS and academic award, QTS only, QTS by assessment only

 

 

7 Fees

Where non-standard fees are proposed this will need approval by Fees and Bursaries Group before the programme can be advertised.

Undergraduate:

(Please select option)

Standard

Other (please state):

 

Postgraduate:

(Please select option)

Fees stated are for full time programmes

All part-time programmes should be Band 2

Band 1 (classroom) £6000 (Sunderland) £6500 (UoSiL)

Band 2 (mixed) £6500 (Sunderland) £6800 (UoSiL)

Band 3 (laboratory) £7000 (Sunderland) £7200 (UoSiL)

MBA: £11500 (Sunderland) £11500 (UoSiL)

Other: (please state)

 

 

 

   DETAILS SUPPLIED BY:Alex Summer        DATE:11.09.19

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

appendix two

PART B   -  Programme  Regulation/s

Name of programmeSocial Work

Title of final award: MA Social Work

Interim awards:Postgraduate Certificate in Social Welfare Studies

Postgraduate Diploma in Social Welfare Studies

 

Accreditation: MA Social Work will be accredited/approved by the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) from September 2014. The interim awards are not accredited, and do not confer eligibility to apply to the HCPC register, nor does any Aegrotat award which will also use the title ‘Social Welfare Studies’.

 

 

Regulations apply to students commencing their studies from

 

Regulations apply to students

Date the regulations apply

Intakes affected

Stage 1

2015/16

All

Stage 2

2015/16

All

 

 

 

University Regulations: 1.1, 2.3.2, 4.2.1, 4.3.1, 6.1.3, 6.4.1 (c)

 

  1. Admissions

Applicants whose first language is not English must achieve a minimum IELTS score of 7 in all four areas.

For admission to the programme there must be:

  • A satisfactory health check
  • A satisfactory Disclosure and Barring Service check at enhanced level
    • A satisfactory outcome of any declaration of involvement with Local Authority Adults or Children’s Services
    • A satisfactory outcome of any declaration of disciplinary issues.

 

 

  1. Duration of programme

The MA programme will be delivered as a full time programme over two academic years. 

The maximum time allowed for a student to complete will therefore be six years from the date of first registration.

 

  1. External Examiners

At least one external examiner must be appropriately experienced and qualified and, unless other arrangements are agreed, be from the relevant part of the HCPC Register.

 

 

Programme Structure

 

Year 1 comprises modules SWKM26, SWKM27, SWKM28 and SWKM31

Year 2 comprises modules SWKM29, SWKM30, SWKM32 and SWKM33

 

Postgraduate Certificate

 

Students take the following core modules:

Module Code

Module Title

Credits

SWKM26

The Social Work Context

15

SWKM27

Preparing for Practice

15

SWKM28

Theories and Models for Social Work Practice

30

 

Progression Regulations

To meet the recommendations of the College of Social Work (the professional endorsing body), the following restrictions have been approved by Academic Board as a variation from the University regulations.

 

You must achieve a pass of 40% in each of the elements of assessment in all modules.

 

You will be eligible to achieve a Postgraduate Certificate in Social Welfare Studies upon achievement of 60 credits from SWKM26, SWKM27, SWKM28 and SWKM31.

 

Postgraduate Diploma

Students take the following modules:

Module Code

Module Title

Credits

SWKM31

Practice Placement 1

15

SWKM29

Critical Perspectives in Social Work Practice

30

SWKM30

Social Work Research

15

 

Progression Regulations

To meet the recommendations of the College of Social Work (the professional endorsing body), the following restrictions have been approved by Academic Board as a variation from the University regulations.

 

You must achieve a pass of 40% in each of the elements of assessment in all modules.

 

You must have passed modules SWKM26, SWKM27, SWKM28 and SWKM31 before being able to progress to the following modules SWKM29, SWKM30, SWKM32 and SWKM33.

 

You will be eligible to achieve a Postgraduate Diploma in Social Welfare Studies upon achievement of 120 credits.

Masters

 

Students take the following core modules:

Module Code

Module Title

Credits

SWKM32

Social Work Dissertation

30

SWKM33

Practice Placement 2

30

 

 

 

 

Progression Regulations

To meet the recommendations of the College of Social Work (the professional endorsing body), the following restrictions have been approved by Academic Board as a variation from the University regulations.

 

You must achieve a pass of 40% in each of the elements of assessment in all modules.

 

5. Attendance

The MA Social Work programme leads to a professional qualification; therefore 100% attendance in class is expected. Any student whose attendance falls below 80% in any module without extenuating circumstances during one semester will not normally be permitted to undertake assessment and will be referred in the relevant module/s and/or may be required to withdraw from the programme. Students with extenuating circumstances will be deferred in the relevant module(s). The Programme Academic team will make a recommendation on how the minimum attendance requirement can be met.

 

6. Placement Referral and Resubmission

A student who fails a placement module at the first attempt may be allowed by the Assessment Board, as appropriate to:

  • re-submit relevant written work as a referral; and / or
  • repeat the placement (as a repeat with attendance) at the end of which one further referral of the written element will be permitted if needed, but the student may not repeat the placement for a third time.

 

7. Withdrawal from Placement

A student who has failed to submit for and / or has failed the assessments in all the modules of the given Stage to date, without extenuating circumstances, will be required by the MAB (Module Assessment Board) to withdraw from the placement until satisfactory performance has been achieved.  This may result in the student having to take an extra year in which to complete the placement.

 

8. Extensions to Placements

Under exceptional circumstances, the placement can be extended for up to two weeks.

 

9. Classification

 

A 2% borderline will apply to the classification boundaries (i.e. if the student achieves 58-59.99%or 68-69.99% in the final credit-weighted average). Where a result is borderline, the award will be moved up to the higher classification if the student's dissertation or project mark is at the higher level (i.e. 70% or higher for a Distinction, 60% or higher for a Merit). As the dissertation module (SWKM32) is fewer than 60 credits, the 30 credit core module 'Practice Placement 2’ (SWKM33) will be taken into consideration when determining borderline classifications.


 

 

Module List                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     Appendix 3

Award, Route (if applicable) and Level

New/

Existing/ Modified  Module (N/E/MM)

Module Title

Module Code

Module Credit Value

Whether core or option

Sem

Assessment weighting –

Pre-/co-requisites

Module leader

Other comment (if required)

Date of Entry on SITS.

N/MM only

JACS Code

PG Cert

E

The Social Work Context

SWKM26

15

C

 

1

Presentation 40%

Essay 60%

None

Alex Summer

 

 

L500

 

E

Preparing for Practice

SWKM27

15

C

1

Essay 40%

Observed interview 30%

Portfolio 30%

None

Alex Summer

 

 

L500

 

E

Theories and Models for Social Work Practice

SWKM28

30

C

3

Essay 20%

Essay 20%

Professional Discussion 60%

None

Eileen Dunn

 

 

L500

PG Diploma

E

Practice Placement 1

SWKM31

15

C

2

Professional Discussion 100%

Placement P/R

SWKM27

Stephen Mordue

The placement is assessed as Pass or Refer. The grading is derived from the Professional Discussion

 

L500

 

E

Critical Perspectives in Social Work Practice

SWKM29

30

C

1

Group presentation

50%

Assignment

50%

SWKM26

SWKM27

SWKM28

 

 

Carrie Phillips

 

 

L500

 

E

Social Work Research

SWKM30

15

C

1

Comparative research study 100%

SWKM26

SWKM27

SWKM28

 

 

Lesley Deacon

 

 

L500

MA

E

Social Work Dissertation

SWKM32

30

C

3

Dissertation

100%

SWKM26

SWKM27

SWKM28

SWKM29

SWKM30

 

Lesley Deacon

 

 

L500

 

E

Practice Placement 2

SWKM33

30

C

2

Professional Discussion 100%

Placement P/R

SWKM26

SWKM27

SWKM28

SWKM30

SWKM31

 

Stephen Mordue

The placement is assessed as Pass or Refer. The grading is derived from the Professional Discussion

 

L500

 

Module

Title

Module

Code

C/O

Modes of T&L

Modes of Assessment

 

LO

C01

 

LO

C02

 

LO C03

 

LO C04

 

LO

C05

 

LO C06

 

LO C07

 

LO C08

 

LO C09

 

LO C10

 

LO C11

 

LO C12

 

LO C13

 

 

 

 

The Social Work Context

SWK

M26

C

Lectures,

seminars,

workshops

Policy Presentation

Essay

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

 

T

 

 

 

T

A

 

T

 

 

 

T

A

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Preparing for Practice

SWK

M27

C

Lectures,

seminars, workshops

Written assignment

 

Observed interview

 

Skills

Practice Portfolio

 

 

 

 

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

 

 

 

 

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

 

 

Theories and Models for Social Work Practice

SWK

M28

C

Lectures,

seminars,

workshops

Sociological Theory essay

Psychological Theory essay

Professional Discussion

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

 

 

 

T

A

 

 

 

 

 

 

Module

Title

Module

Code

C/

O

Modes of T&L

Modes of Assessment

LO

D01

LO

D02

LO D03

LO D04

LO

D05

LO D06

LO D07

LO D08

LO D09

LO D10

LO D11

LO D12

LO D13

LO D14

LO D15

LO D16

Practice Placement 1

SWK

M31

C

Placement

Professional Discussion

Practice Portfolio

 

T

 

 

 

T

 

 

 

 

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

T

A

T

A

T

A

T

A

 

Critical  Perspectives in Social Work Practice

SWK

M29

C

Lectures,

seminars, workshops

Group presentation

Written assignment

 

 

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Social Work Research

SWK

M30

C

Lectures,

seminars, workshops,

 

Comparative

research study

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

 

 

 

 

 

Module

Title

Module

Code

C/

0

Modes of T&L

Modes of Assessment

LO

M01

LO

M02

LO M03

LO M04

LOM05

LO M06

LO M07

LO M08

 

LO M09

LO M10

LO M11

LO M12

LO M13

LO

M14

Social Work Dissertation

SWK

M32

C

Lectures,

seminars, workshops

one to one

supervision

 

Dissertation

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Practice Placement 2

SWK

M33

C

Placement

Professional Discussion

Practice Portfolio

 

 

 

 

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

T

A

 


Generic Assessment Criteria – Postgraduate                                                                                                                                                                                       APPENDIX 5

These should be interpreted according to the level at which you are working

 

Categories

 

Grade

Relevance

Knowledge

Analysis

Argument and Structure

Critical Evaluation

Presentation

Reference to Literature

Pass

86 – 100%

The work examined is exemplary and provides clear evidence of a complete grasp of the knowledge, understanding and skills appropriate to the Level of the qualification.  There is also ample excellent evidence showing that all the learning outcomes and responsibilities appropriate to that Level are fully satisfied. At this level it is expected that the work will be exemplary in all the categories cited above. It will demonstrate a particularly compelling evaluation, originality, and elegance of argument, interpretation or discourse.

76-85%

The work examined is outstanding and demonstrates comprehensive knowledge, understanding and skills appropriate to the Level of the qualification.  There is also excellent evidence showing that all the learning outcomes and responsibilities appropriate to that level are fully satisfied. At this level it is expected that the work will be outstanding in the majority of the categories cited above or by demonstrating particularly compelling evaluation and elegance of argument, interpretation or discourse.

 

70 – 75%

The work examined is excellent and is evidence of comprehensive knowledge, understanding and skills appropriate to the Level of the qualification.  There is also excellent evidence showing that all the learning outcomes and responsibilities appropriate to that level are satisfied  At this level it is expected that the work will be excellent in the majority of the categories cited above or by demonstrating  particularly compelling evaluation and elegance of argument, interpretation or discourse.

 

60 – 69%

Directly relevant to the requirements of the assessment

A substantial knowledge of relevant material, showing a clear grasp of themes, questions and issues therein

Comprehensive analysis - clear and orderly presentation

Well supported, focussed  argument which is clear and logically structured.

Contains  distinctive or independent thinking; and begins to formulate an independent position in relation to theory and/or practice. 

Well written, with standard spelling and grammar, in a readable style with acceptable format

Critical appraisal of up-to-date and/or appropriate literature.  Recognition of different perspectives.  Very good use of a wide range of sophisticated source material. 

 

50 – 59%

Some attempt to address the requirements of the assessment: may drift away from this in less focused passages

Adequate knowledge of a fair range of relevant material, with intermittent evidence of an appreciation of its significance

Significant analytical treatment which has a clear purpose

Generally coherent and logically structured, using an appropriate mode of argument and/or theoretical mode(s)

May contain some distinctive or independent thinking; may begin to formulate an independent position in relation to theory and/or practice. 

Competently written, with only minor lapses from standard grammar, with acceptable format

Uses a good variety of literature which includes recent texts and/or appropriate literature,  including a substantive amount beyond library texts.  Competent use of source material.

40 – 49%

Some correlation with the requirements of the assessment but there are instances of irrelevance

Basic understanding of the subject but addressing a limited range of material

Some analytical treatment, but may be prone to description, or to narrative, which lacks clear analytical purpose

Some attempt to construct a coherent argument, but may suffer loss of focus and consistency, with issues at stake stated only vaguely, or theoretical mode(s) couched in simplistic terms

Sound work which expresses a coherent position only in broad terms and in uncritical conformity to one or more standard views of the topic

A simple basic style but with significant deficiencies in expression or format that may pose obstacles for the reader

Evidence of use of appropriate literature which goes beyond that referred to by the  tutor.  Frequently only uses a single source to support a point.

Fail

35 – 39%

Relevance to the requirements of the assessment may be very intermittent, and may be reduced to its vaguest and least challenging terms

A limited understanding of a narrow range of material

Largely descriptive or narrative, with little evidence of analysis

A basic argument is evident, but mainly supported by assertion and there may be a  lack of clarity and coherence

Some evidence of a view starting to be formed but mainly derivative.

Numerous deficiencies in expression and presentation; the writer may achieve clarity (if at all) only by using a simplistic or repetitious style

Barely adequate use of literature.  Over reliance on

material provided by the tutor. 

The evidence provided shows that the majority of the learning outcomes and responsibilities appropriate to that Level are satisfied – for compensation consideration. 

30 – 34%

 

The work examined provides insufficient evidence of the knowledge, understanding and skills appropriate to the Level of the qualification.  The evidence provided shows that some of the learning outcomes and responsibilities appropriate to that Level are satisfied.  The work will be weak in some of the indicators.

15-29%

The work examined is unacceptable and provides little evidence of the knowledge, understanding and skills appropriate to the Level of the qualification.  The evidence shows that few of the learning outcomes and responsibilities appropriate to that Level are satisfied. The work will be weak in several of the indicators.

0-14%

The work examined is unacceptable and provides almost no evidence of the knowledge, understanding and skills appropriate to the Level of the qualification.  The evidence fails to show that any of the learning outcomes and responsibilities appropriate to that Level are satisfied. The work will be weak in the majority or all of the indicators.