Attachments

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MA International Education

 

 

Faculty of Education and Society

 

Department of Education

 

 

PROGRAMME SPECIFICATION

 

2019-20

 

Date of Validation Event:

July 14th 2009

Date Approved by QMSC:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Quality Handbook

 

 

 

 

 

AQH-B2-3b Transitional Postgraduate Programme Specification Template

February 2014

 

Version

Occasion of Change

Change Author

Last Modified

1.0

Version presented for approval

Sue Cooke (Programme leader)

Created 3/7/09

2.0

Amendments following institutional approval

Sue Cooke

(Programme Leader)

10/08/09

3.0

Revisions at annual review after first year of operation

Sue Cooke (Programme Leader)

08/10/10

4.0

Review at AMR point

Sue Cooke (Programme Leader)

25/10/11

5.0

Review March 2012

Alsa Melvin

October 2012

6.0

Revision to incorrect module codes and titles and Programme Leader

Stephanie Atkinson (Programme Leader)

June 2013

7.0

Revision to Stage 1 information for those who have not studied the Overseas PGCE

Stephanie Atkinson (Programme Leader)

April 2014

8.0

Revision to IELTS regulation

Stephanie Atkinson

(Programme Leader)

May 2014

9.0

Revision to Admissions criteria for Stage 2 Diploma Level

Stephanie Atkinson

(Programme Leader)

June 2015

10.0

Inclusion of two more Optional Modules at Stage 2

Stephanie Atkinson

(Programme Leader)

November 6th 2015

11.0

Revision to entry requirements at Stage 1 of the programme

Stephanie Atkinson (Programme Leader)

May 2016

12.00

Removal of references to PGCE at Stage 1 of the programme

Stephanie Atkinson (Programme Leader)

April 2017

13.00

Change to optional module in Stage 2

Stephanie Atkinson (Programme Leader)

May 2018

14.00

Changing programme to a 2-year from a 3-year programme, restructure of core and optional modules to enable completion within 2-years

 

Stephanie Atkinson

May 2018

 

SECTION A: CORE INFORMATION

  1. Name of programme

International Education

 

  1. Award title

MA

 

  1. Programme linkage

Is this part of a group of linked programmes between which students can transfer at agreed points? (eg a group of programmes with a common set of taught modules)

 

 

 

 

  1. Is the programme a top-up only?

 

 

 

 

  1. Level of award: (Level 7 only)

Level 7

 

  1. Awarding body: University of Sunderland

 

  1. Which department is it in?

Faculty: Education and Society

School: Education

 

  1. Programme Studies Board:

Professional Development

 

  1. Programme Leader:

Professor Stephanie Atkinson

 

  1. How and where can I study the programme?

 

At Sunderland:

 

Full-time on campus

 

Part-time on campus

 

As work-based learning full-time

 

As work-based learning part-time

 

As a full-time sandwich course

 

As a part-time sandwich course

 

By distance learning

 

At the University of Sunderland London campus: 

 

Full-time on campus

 

Part-time on campus

 

As work-based learning full-time

 

As work-based learning part-time

 

As a full-time sandwich course

 

As a part-time sandwich course

 

By distance learning

 

 

At a partner college:

 

Full-time in the UK 

 

Part-time in the UK

 

Full-time overseas

 

Part-time overseas

 

By distance learning

 

As a full-time sandwich course in the UK

 

As a part-time sandwich course in the UK

 

As a full-time sandwich course overseas

 

As a part-time sandwich course overseas

 

As work-based learning full-time in the UK 

 

As work-based learning part-time overseas

 

Other (please specify)

 

 

  1. How long does the programme take?

 

 

Min number of years / months

Max number of years / months

Full-time distance learning

1

3

Part-time

Distance learning

Normally 2

6

 

For start-dates please see the current edition of the Prospectus or contact the relevant department at the University. For start-dates for programmes delivered in a partner college, please contact the college.

 

Programme Structure

All modules are 30 Credits each.

 

 

 

Semester 1

Semester 2

CREDITS

YEAR 1

Stage 1

EDPM01

EPDM97

60

YEAR 2

Stage 2 & Stage 3

EPDM09

EPDM11

Option

EPDM12

120

Total Credits

180

 


SECTION B – FURTHER CORE INFORMATION

 

Use Outline Programme Proposal Form for ADC (AQH-B2-2), for questions 12 to 22

 

  1. Learning and teaching strategy.

The Programme Team seeks to implement the objectives of the University’s Learning, Teaching and Assessment (LTA) Strategy, which is available on the University’s website and includes the University’s e-learning strategy.

The Programme’s Learning and Teaching Strategy centres around two core principles which are designed to reflect the very best research-based learning and teaching practice.  The two principles are:

  • students should be offered a wide range of learning and teaching approaches in order to demonstrate what they know and can do;
  • students should be provided opportunities to reflect critically upon the relationship between the programme’s learning and teaching strategies and their own learning styles.

 

The programme is designed to support and develop a broad spectrum of students, including teachers new to the classroom, those with extensive and established experience in schools and colleges and those already involved with management and/or curriculum development in the international context, therefore a range of teaching and learning strategies relevant to the learning outcomes of the programme. The teaching strategies used include e-lectures, workshops and tutorials.  All of the academic work will be delivered through the University’s VLE (Sunspace).   This may be further supported by on-line critical colleague seminars. Web based resources also provide opportunities for peer tutoring and formative tutor feedback. Learning is supported through guided self study materials. The aim is to provide knowledge, understanding and critical appreciation of pedagogy, key skill acquisition and to develop postgraduate intellectual skills and aptitudes throughout the programme.

Students are given the opportunity to negotiate a learning focus with the module leader in certain modules and opportunities to develop higher order communication skills are integrated in the programme.   Reporting on experiential learning within educational contexts encourages reflective learning and generalisation of diverse experience. Through the medium of classroom based enquiry and research, students will develop into thoughtful and reflective practitioners, able to contribute critically to education research and debate and to articulate the requirements of curriculum planning & implementation and leadership & management in international settings.

 

  1. Retention strategy.

The Programme Leader/Personal Tutor has executive responsibility for the operation and development of the programme, which involves:

  • being available for trainees to discuss their experience on the programme as a whole.
  • liaising with the Module Leaders about the delivery or development of modules
  • counselling trainees with respect to their choice and progress within the programme and, where necessary, approving changes of module choice
  • collecting information relating to extenuating circumstances claimed by trainees to have affected their performance and transmitting this to module leaders.

Module Leaders have responsibility for the operation and development of the module, including:

  • responding to any particular inquiries or points that are made. Module leaders will normally identify times when trainees can expect any communication to be read and responded to.
  • communicating effectively to trainees on the module via e mail, Canvas or through the module guide.
  • communicating with other members of staff who are also teaching the module regarding all the learning and assessment procedures and schedules
  • ensuring any extenuating circumstances affecting trainee performance are reported to the Module Assessment Board
  • development of methods of teaching and learning
  • liaising with the Programme Leader about delivery or development of modules to meet the needs of programmes for which they are core/option.

 

All applicants will be advised that the programme is web-based and course literature provides a clear statement of system and user requirements. Prior to the commencement of the programme, all students will be provided with access to a set of study skills material. Further to this, students will be given specific advice on accessing Sunspace and Library support (where there is a dedicated section to the library website) and e-resources, and in modules, details are provided on how to access particular elements of the programme, information is given in the module guide on how to access e-books and on the module website, a separate A4 page of notes leads the students through a step-by-step process.

 

On-line tutorials, and email contact are opportunities to raise in confidence any other issues that may affect the life of a student. In this case the tutor will act in a ‘pastoral’ capacity and may with the student’s agreement refer them to relevant services for more specialised help.

Students are advised that if at any time they have a concern or problem about their studies or the programme, they should discuss this with one of their tutors in order that appropriate support can be given. The programme team work hard to ensure that the University has a real face to these distance learning students and every opportunity is taken to meet with them during the practical teaching elements of the PGCE, in groups or individually in order that they can be more comfortable in discussing any issues they may have during their studies.

 

The Students’ Union provides an independent service which offers advice and support across the full range of personal and academic problems which students may encounter. Students wishing to lodge a complaint or an appeal can seek advice from the Students’ Union or from Academic Services. Full details of all these services can be found on the University’s web-site. Where appropriate, academic or support staff in the Faculty will sign-post students to these specialist services.

 

Student support actually begins at the application stage.  Information about the Programme is available as on-line material. Applicants are encouraged to contact the Programme Leader to find out more and to ask any questions they may have. Once the application is processed, there are a series of “keeping warm” messages used by both the programme leader and the programme administrator to maintain contact with the students. An Introductory letter sent out as soon as an applicant has accepted their offer of a place provides access to online ”Getting Started“ material and advice.

 

  1. Any other information

None

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SECTION C - TEACHING AND LEARNING

 

  1. What is the programme about?

The programme aims to enable professionals within the field of education in an International School Setting to:

  • improve subject knowledge
  • raise standards in schools
  • improve professional practice
  • improve institutional practice
  • develop advanced research and study skills

 

  1. What will I know or be able to do at the end of the programme?

Learning Outcomes Postgraduate Certificate – Skills

By the end of this part of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

  • communicate effectively in written form, through formal presentations, in visual forms. and through the email and world-wide web (C08)
  • develop a range of study, research and organizational skills that will lay the foundation for their teaching career (C09)

Learning Outcomes Postgraduate Certificate – Knowledge

By the end of this part of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

  • have the knowledge to critically analyse, synthesise, interpret and evaluate a wide range of data, information and ideas from either primary or secondary sources C10)
  • demonstrate an understanding of a range of quantitative and qualitative research methods (C11)
  • demonstrate responsibility and accountability when working as an individual and in groups (C12)

 

Learning Outcomes Postgraduate Diploma – Skills

In addition to the skills and knowledge completed at Postgraduate Certificate Level:

By the end of this part of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

  • demonstrate the ability to use self-reflection skills in critically appraising their personal context and teaching experience and those of others (D13)

Learning Outcomes Postgraduate Diploma – Knowledge

By the end of this part of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

  • demonstrate the ability to critically analyse contemporary issues in education (D14)
  • demonstrate an understanding of the affective application, critical evaluation and synthesis of influences and drivers on international education in their own contexts (D15)

 

In addition to the skills and knowledge completed at Postgraduate Certificate and Diploma Level:

Learning Outcomes Masters – Skills

By the end of this part of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

  • critically appraise and synthesise comparative educational theory in context (M16)

 

 

Learning Outcomes Masters – Knowledge

By the end of this part of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

  • Understand and be critically aware of curriculum development & implementation, contemporary leadership and management issues in international schools (M17)
  • identify and critically evaluate educational issues requiring investigation and to design, conduct and report such research recognising ethical situations and limitations. M18)

 

  1. What will the programme consist of?

 

Taught postgraduate programmes generally consist of a number of taught modules leading to the award of a Postgraduate Certificate (60 credits) or Postgraduate Diploma (120 credits). A Masters qualification (180 credits) usually culminates in a major piece of independent work such as a project or dissertation. All modules are at postgraduate level (level 7 in the UK’s national scheme). The summary below describes briefly what is contained in the programme. The programme structure, including a detailed list of modules, can be found in the programme regulations.

 

In the MA International Education programme Stage 1 is made up of two core modules EDPM01 and EPDM97. Stage 2 provides the student with the opportunity to study one core module EPDM01 Introduction to Criticality and one optional module selected from six.  EPDM09 and the optional modules are shared with the MA Education programme enabling a wider choice of module and maximising on the number of students available for each module. Stage 3 is not made up of a dissertation or thesis. Within the context of international education, it is essential for students to consider two complementary aspects of international education. The International School Curriculum followed by Leading & Managing in International Schools.  These aspects have therefore been addressed in two taught modules (EPDM11 and EPDM12) rather than the traditional 60 credit thesis.

 

  1. How will I be taught?

 

Scheduled teaching activities

Independent study

Placement

 

 

Across the programme, you will be exposed to critical debate, problem solving activities and private study with all learning materials accessible through Canvas.

 

You will use a range of learning strategies in the different modules, which will provide you with opportunities, to develop, explore and debate your areas of interest as well as building deep understanding and theoretical knowledge.  You will be actively encouraged to develop analytical and critical thinking skills.  The development of independent learning is an integral part of the programme.

 

The suite of modules proposed offers a broad and balanced curriculum which gives students the opportunity to develop their knowledge of current educational principles whilst extending their own personal effectiveness. There are opportunities for critical reflection on research questions at all stages of the programme and the inclusion of ‘open modules’ gives the flexibility for learners to choose modules that are compatible with their working contexts. An ‘optional module’ allows a student to negotiate their own course of study regarding subject content, whilst satisfying the learning outcomes identified for that module.

 

A list of the modules in the programme can be found in the Programme Regulations.

 

A summary of the types of teaching, learning and assessment in each module of the programme can be found in the Matrix of Modes of Teaching.

 

  1. How will I be assessed and given feedback? Modes of assessment aligned with KIS: choose one or more.

 

Written examinations

 

Coursework

Practical assessments

 

 

A summary of the types of teaching, learning and assessment in each module of the programme can be found in the Matrix of Modes of Teaching.

 

The generic assessment criteria which we use can be found here. Some programmes use subject-specific assessment criteria which are based on the generic ones.

 

This programme uses the Generic University Assessment Criteria

YES

 

This programme uses the Subject Specific Assessment Criteria

 

NO

 

The University regulations can be found here.

 

In all modules students will be required to read and critique academic papers to produce academic arguments which either address educational issues or develop and evaluate educational resources. There are no examinations. The assessment of all six modules is by written submission of assignments.  Some modules have two assignments and some have only one.  The total word count for each module is equivalent to 5000 words. These one or two assignments form the summative assessment for each module. Formative assessment and self assessment are important strands of progression in the programme and students are encouraged to submit drafts of academic work to the module leaders prior to submission. The extensive use of coursework tests a deeper understanding of issues and the ability to present evidence in a structured way as well as the ability to plan work over a period of time. Support and guidance is provided for second language speakers should they require it.

 

All written academic assignments for this programme, at all stages, are submitted through “Turnitin”.  This product, which is available within the university’s VLE, allows for online submission, marking, and plagiarism detection.  It also allows the module tutors to provide comprehensive feedback quickly to the students in any part of the world where the students are engaging with the programme.

 

  1. Teaching, learning and assessment matrix

 

 

  1. How does research influence the programme? 

Staff teaching on the existing MA modules and the new subject strands are experienced practitioners and many staff are engaged in research activity.   Staff will integrate relevant and recent research into sessions in order to enable students to have a critical understanding of how theoretical concepts underpin policy and practice. 

 

The very nature of each module means that tutors are teaching subject matter that is related to their own research interests and those of the other academics within the Centre of Pedagogy.  Students are not only lectured to about current research but in each of their modules they are expected to take an active role in their own research and present their findings based sometimes on their own school activities or in other instances based on a need that they have identified in the context of the module content.  By the end of the programme they are fully committed to being research informed and research active teachers.  We have had students presenting their research findings to their own schools, to a consortium of schools in their area and at International School conferences in another country.

 

SECTION D EMPLOYABILITY

 

  1. How will the programme prepare me for employment?

 

The programme gives you the opportunity to develop advanced skills and knowledge which you can use in the future. Some postgraduate programmes are associated with a particular career path but most skills can be applied to a range of employment situations. The skills which this programme is designed to develop are listed below.

 

The skills the programme is designed to develop are:

  • improve a student’s subject knowledge
  • enable them to raise standards in schools
  • improve their professional practice in order to become leaders within an International School
  • enable them to help improve institutional practice wherever they teach
  • develop advanced research and study skills

 

In terms of employment, all students on the programme are already in employment as teachers within International Schools.  Several have informed us that they have been promoted within their existing school or have moved school and sometimes country for promotion, because of either their Master’s qualification or because of the development of specific skills gained during the programme

 

There are also opportunities for on-campus students outside your programme of study

 

For information about other opportunities available to our students who study on campus, click here.

Additional opportunities to develop your experiences more widely will vary if you study at one of our partner colleges. For information about the extra-curricular activities available in any of our colleges please contact the college direct. 

 

  1. Particular features of the qualification. (optional)

Participants will critically engage in issues relating to current legislation and policy making and debate with other professionals in the field of education and training.

 

 

  1. Professional statutory or regulatory body (PSRB) accreditation. Choose one of the following.

 

PSRB accreditation is not relevant to this programme 

PSRB accreditation is currently being sought for this programme

 

This programme currently has PSRB accreditation

 

SECTION E PROGRAMME STRUCTURE AND REGULATIONS

 

Use Programme Regulations Form, for questions 36 and 37

 

 

SECTION F ADMISSIONS, LEARNING ENVIRONMENT AND  SUPPORT

 

  1. What are the admissions requirements?

 

At Stage 1

The current entry requirement for this programme is as specified in the “Fees and Entry Requirements” section on the programme page on the University’s website.  An applicant with 30 Level 7 credits from programmes at comparable institutions may be considered for APL and will be required to study one of the two core Level 7 modules in order to complete the Certificate Stage of the programme.

At Stage 2: Diploma

Entry to the programme at Diploma Level requires a Post-Graduate Certificate in Education (PGCE) either from the University of Sunderland which by definition contains 60 Level 7 credits, or from a PGCE studied at a comparable UK institution which includes 60-credits from named Level 7 Education Studies Modules.  Applicants with Level 7 credits from programmes at comparable institutions other than from a Post-Graduate Certificate in Education programme may be considered for APL and transfer the equivalent of up to 90 credits towards the full Master’s award as there are three modules EPDM09, EPDM11 and EPDM12 (90 credits) which are core modules.

At Stage 3: M.A. International Education

Entry to the programme at Stage 3 level is not allowed. 

 

Applications for the programme come via the university website, where full details of the programme are posted with a link to the on-line application form.  Each application is assessed by the programme leader against a set of established criteria which were drawn up in consultation with the programme team and stakeholders.

 

The criteria include:

 

  • appropriate qualifications, specifically a first degree or equivalent in an appropriate subject
  • appropriate experience including working in schools (eg learning mentors, unqualified teachers) and with young people
  • well-articulated personal statement referenced to reasons for wanting to pursue masters’ level work.

 

The University’s standard admissions requirements can be found in the university regulations.

Programme-specific requirements which are in addition to those regulations are given below. 

 

Can students enter with advanced standing?

Yes

 

 

If yes, to which Stages?

Stage 1

Stage 2

Stage 3

 

 

If yes, with what qualifications?

 

Stage 1 30 Level 7 credits

Stage 2 60 or 90 Level 7 credits

See details in Section 38 above.

 

The University has a process by which applicants whose experience to date already covers one or more modules of the programme they are applying for may seek Accreditation of Prior Learning (APL). Full details can be found here but if you think that this may be relevant to you, please contact the department which offers the programme you are interested in.

 

  1. What kind of support and help will there be?
    1. in the department:

The Programme Leader who is also the personal tutor has executive responsibility for the operation and development of the programme, which involves:

  • being available for trainees discuss their experience on the programme as a whole.
  • liaising with the Module Leaders about the delivery or development of modules
  • counselling trainees with respect to their choice and progress within the programme and, where necessary, approving changes of module choice
  • collecting information relating to extenuating circumstances claimed by trainees to have affected their performance and transmitting this to module leaders.

 

Module Leaders have responsibility for the operation and development of the module, including:

  • responding to any particular inquiries or points that are made. Module leaders will normally identify times when trainees can expect any communication to be read and responded to.
  • communicating effectively to trainees on the module via e mail, WebCT or through the module guide.
  • communicating with other members of staff who are also teaching the module regarding all the learning and assessment procedures and schedules
  • ensuring any extenuating circumstances affecting trainee performance are reported to the Module Assessment Board
  • development of methods of teaching and learning
  • liaising with the Programme Leader about delivery or development of modules to meet the needs of programmes for which they are core/option.

 

All applicants will be advised that the programme is web-based and course literature provides a clear statement of system and user requirements. Prior to the commencement of the programme, all students will be given Sunspace access and the ‘Getting Started’ material includes a link to an e-learning package designed to develop the necessary on-line study skills. Further to this, students will be given specific advice on accessing Canvas and Library support and e-resources, and in modules, details are provided on how to access particular elements of the programme, information is given in the module guide on how to access e-books  and on the module website, a separate A4 page of notes leads the students through a step-by-step process.

 

On-line tutorials, and email contact are opportunities to raise in confidence any other issues that may affect the life of a student. In this case the tutor will act in a ‘pastoral’ capacity and may with the student’s agreement refer them to relevant services for more specialised help.

Students are advised that if at any time they have a concern or problem about their studies or the programme, they should discuss this with one of their tutors in order that appropriate support can be given. The programme team work hard to ensure that the University has a real face to these distance learning students and every opportunity is taken to meet with them during the practical teaching elements of the PGCE, in groups or individually in order that they can be more comfortable in discussing any issues they may have during their studies.

 

The Students’ Union provides an independent service which offers advice and support across the full range of personal and academic problems which students may encounter. Students wishing to lodge a complaint or an appeal can seek advice from the Students’ Union or from Academic Services. Full details of all these services can be found on the University’s web-site. Where appropriate, academic or support staff in the Faculty will sign-post students to these specialist services.

 

Student support actually begins at the application stage.  Information about the Programme is available as on-line material. Applicants are encouraged to contact the Programme Leader to find out more and to ask any questions they may have. Once the application is processed, there are a series of “keeping warm” messages used by both the programme leader and the programme administrator to maintain contact with the students. During the few weeks immediately preceding the commencement of the programme, ”Getting Started“ material is made available on Sunspace.

  1. in the university as a whole:

The University provides a range of professional support services including health and well-being, counselling, disability support, and a Chaplaincy. Click on the links for further information.

 

  1. in a partner college:

Please see the relevant college prospectus or website for details of student support if you are planning to study in one of our partner colleges.

 

  1. What resources will I have access to?

As a distance learning student you will have access to support in the following areas

VLE

Library

IT

 

VLE Access and Support:

Much of the research and communication you undertake on this programme will be within a ‘Virtual Learning Environment’ or VLE. The University of Sunderland uses a VLE called Canvas which is accessed through the my.sunderland dashboard where access is granted (once an applicant has accepted their place on the programme) to ‘Skills for Learning’ materials.  Access to the programme space and each module space that you will be studying is granted on registration to become a ‘current student’ approximately one month before the official start of the programme.  Within each module your module reading list is a live interactive resource list available from within your online module space and the University’s library website.

What do you get?

          Real time library information, both availability and location of print books, plus being able to place reservations on books that are already on loan

          Direct access/links to electronic resources

          Allows you to set up RSS alerts for changes and additions to your Module Resource list

          Smartphone and tablet friendly – providing QR capture, touch screen functionality and e-resource access

Access problems concerning my.sunderland are provided by a dedicated support team via email

 

Library Access and Support:

Students can access library resources off campus via the web. Students will have access to all of our e- resources including journals and e-books and you can also request books in our collections through the Postal Loan Service. If there's an article or chapter of a book that you can't find electronically we will try and obtain it for you through our Document Delivery Service.

 

Tailored resources and support are available from specific subject areas of the ULS web site. Single sign-on using university userID and password is used to allow student access to electronic resources regardless of location.  A dedicated librarian is provided for distance learning students and a Sunderland Library Services Off Campus Newsletter is provided for all distance learning students on a regular basis.

 

IT Support:  There is dedicated help both via telephone and via email to assist all students with any problems concerning access to their University IT based systems. Contact details are in the link below

 

Information about the University’s facilities can be found here.

 

Please see the relevant college prospectus or website for details of college learning resources if you are planning to study in one of our partner colleges.

 

  1. Are there any additional costs on top of the fees?

 

No, but all students buy some study materials such as books and provide their own basic study materials.

Yes (optional) All students buy some study materials such as books and provide their own basic study materials. In addition there are some are additional costs for optional activities associated with the programme (see below)

 

Yes (essential) All students buy some study materials such as books and provide their own basic study materials. In addition there are some are essential additional costs associated with the programme (see below)

 

 

All students are expected to have their own personal computer and good internet access.  All students will also be required to buy some study materials such as books and provide their own basic study materials.

 

 

  1. How are student views represented?

All taught programmes in the University have student representatives for each programme who meet in a Student-Staff Liaison Committee (SSLC) where they can raise students’ views and concerns. The Students’ Union and the faculties together provide training for student representatives. SSLCs and focus groups are also used to obtain student feedback on plans for developing existing programmes and designing new ones. Feedback on your programme is obtained every year through module questionnaires and informs the annual review of your programme. Student representatives are also invited to attend Programme and Module Studies Boards which manage the delivery and development of programmes and modules.  Various Faculty committees, particularly Faculty Academic Experience Committee, Academic Development Committee and Quality Management Sub-Committee also have student representation. This allows students to be involved in higher-level plans for teaching and learning. There is a parallel structure at university level on which students are represented by sabbatical officers who are the elected leaders of the Students’ Union.

 

The University’s student representation and feedback policy can be found here.

 

Every two years we participate in the national Postgraduate Taught Experience Survey (PTES) which is run by the Higher Education Academy.

 

Programmes offered in partner colleges: If you are studying in one of our partner colleges the college will have its own mechanisms for obtaining student feedback. Some of these may be the same as those on-campus at the University but others may be different. You should ask your college for further information.

 

For distance learning operated from Sunderland: if you are studying by distance learning you will have slightly different arrangements from those used on campus. In particular you  are likely to have virtual rather than physical meetings and discussions. However these arrangements  should provide comparable opportunities for you to give feedback. Details are given below.  

 

Feedback from the students is collected in each of the individual modules using an electronic feedback form and in terms of programme issues it is collected through emails both during and at the end of each Stage of the programme.

 

 

SECTION G QUALITY MANAGEMENT 

 

  1. National subject benchmarks

 

The Quality Assurance Agency for Higher Education publishes benchmark statements which give guidance as to the skills and knowledge which graduates in various subjects and in certain types of degree are expected to have. They do not cover all subjects at postgraduate  level but those which exist can be found at here.

 

Are there any benchmark statements for this programme?

 

NO

 

The subject benchmark(s) for this programme is/are:

 

 

The QAA also publishes a Framework for Higher Education Qualifications (FHEQ) which defines the generic skills and abilities expected of students who have achieved awards at a given level and with which our programmes align. The FHEQ can be found here.

 

  1. How are the quality and standards of the programme assured?

 

The programme is managed and quality assured through the University’s standard processes. Programmes are overseen by Module and Programme Studies Boards which include student representatives. Each year each module leader provides a brief report on the delivery of the module, identifying strengths and areas for development, and the programme team reviews the programme as a whole.  The purpose of this is to ensure that the programme is coherent and up-to-date, with suitable progression through the programme, and a good fit (alignment)  between what is taught and how students learn and are assessed - the learning outcomes, content and types of teaching, learning and assessment. Student achievement, including progress through the programme and the way in which the final award is made, is kept under review. The programme review report is sent to the Faculty Quality Management Sub-Committee which in turn reports issues to the University’s Quality Management Sub-Committee (QMSC) and Academic Experience Committee (AEC).

 

External examiners are appointed to oversee and advise on the assessment of the programme. They ensure that the standards of the programme are comparable with those of similar programmes elsewhere in the UK and are also involved in the assessment process to make sure that it is fair. They are invited to comment on proposed developments to the programme. Their reports are sent to the Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Academic) as well as to the Faculty so that issues of concern can be addressed.

 

All programmes are reviewed by the University on a six-yearly cycle to identify good practice and areas for enhancement. Programmes are revalidated through this review process. These reviews include at least one academic specialist in the subject area concerned from another UK university. The University is subject to external review by the Quality Assurance Agency for Higher Education on a six-year cycle. Their review reports for Sunderland can be found at here.

 

Further information about our quality processes can be found here.

 

 

 


Appendix 1

PART B   -  Programme  Regulation/s

 

Name of programme: M.A. International Education

Award Title: M.A. International Education

Regulation: 2.2

Level of Award: 7

Interim awards or Exit Awards: Postgraduate Certificate of Education

 Postgraduate Diploma of Education

PSRB accreditation: No

 

Admissions

Applicants whose first language is not English must achieve a minimum IELTS band score of 6.5, with 6.5 in writing, with no sub section below 6.

 

Stage 1

 

Core modules: Two Level 7 modules

 

Code

Title

Credits

EDPM 01

Development of Learning: A Case Study

30 Level 7

EPDM 97

Negotiated Individual Study in Education

30 Level 7

 

Optional Modules

There is no provision for optional modules at Stage 1

 

Elective Modules

There is no provision for elective modules at Stage 1

 

Progression Regulations

There are no programme-specific progression regulations[1]

 

Stage 2

 

Core modules

There is one core module at Stage 2

Code

Title

Credits

EPDM 09

Introduction to Criticality

30 Level 7

 

Optional Modules

Students choose one module to the value of 60 credits from the following list

 

Code

Title

Credits

EPDM01

Mentoring and Coaching

30 Level 7

ESSM14

Advanced pedagogical practice in subject related disciplines

30 Level 7

EPDM15

Leading organisational effectiveness in education & training

30 Level 7

EPDM16

Assessment theory into pedagogical practice

30 Level 7

EPDM83

The nature of teaching and learning

30 Level 7

Elective Modules

There is no provision for elective modules at Stage 2

 

Progression Regulations: A fail in any module at Stage 2 cannot be compensated, each module must be passed with an overall mark of 40%

 

Stage 3

 

Core modules

 

Code

Title

Credits

EPDM 11

The International school curriculum

30 Level 7

 

EPDM 12

Leading & managing in international schools

30 Level 7

 

 

Optional modules 

There is no provision for optional modules at Stage 3

 

Elective modules

 

There is no provision for an elective module at Stage 3.

 

Progression Regulations

A fail in either module cannot be compensated both modules must be passed with an overall mark of 40%

 

 


Appendix 2

 

Matrix of modes of teaching, learning and assessment

Stage 1

Module

Code

Core / optional

Modes of T&L

Modes of Assessment

LO C08

LO C09

LO C10

LO C11

LO C12

LO D13

LO

D14

LO

D15

LO

M16

LO

M17

LO

M18

Development of Learning: A Case Study

EDPM 01

Core

Online lectures and tutorials, workbook, discussion forums, independent study

work based learning, self selected reading, literature searching

Case study

 

 

 

 

 

 

Negotiated Individual Study in Education

EPDM 97

Core

Online lectures and tutorials, workbook, discussion forums, independent study

work based learning self selected reading, literature searching

Research paper on negotiated  individual research

 

 

 

 

 

Stage 2

Module

Code

Core / optional

Modes of T&L

Modes of Assessment

LO C08

LO C09

LO C10

LO C11

LO C12

LO D13

LO

D14

LO

D15

LO

M16

LO

M17

LO

M18

Introduction to Criticality

EPDM09

Option

Online lectures and tutorials, workbook, discussion forums, independent study

work based learning self selected reading, literature searching

Written report on criticality

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mentoring and Coaching

EPDM01

Option

Online lectures and tutorials, workbook, discussion forums, independent study

work based learning self selected reading, literature searching

Written assignment on an aspect of mentoring and coaching

 

 

 

 

Advanced pedagogical practice into subject related disciplines

ESSM14

Option

Online lectures and tutorials, workbook, discussion forums, independent study

work based learning self selected reading, literature searching

Written report of individual , subject specific research

 

 

Leading organisational effectiveness in education & training

EPDM15

Option

Online lectures and tutorials, workbook, discussion forums, independent study

work based learning self selected reading, literature searching

Written report on management of organisations

 

 

 

 

Assessment theory into pedagogical practice

EPDM16

Option

Online lectures and tutorials, workbook, discussion forums, independent study

work based learning self selected reading, literature searching

Written report of individual research related to assessment practices in educational contexts

 

 

 

The Nature of Teaching and Learning

EPDM83

Option

Online lectures and tutorials, workbook, discussion forums, independent study

work based learning self selected reading, literature searching

Written report on an aspect of Teaching and Learning

 

 

 

 

 

Stage 3

Module

Code

Core / optional

Modes of T&L

Modes of Assessment

LO C08

LO C09

LO C10

LO C11

LO C12

LO D13

LO

D14

LO

D15

LO

M16

LO

M17

LO

M18

The international school curriculum

EPDM11

Core

Online lectures and tutorials, workbook, discussion forums, independent study

work based learning self selected reading, literature searching

Written report of individual research related to curriculum development and implementation in the international sector

Leading & managing in international schools

EPDM 12

Core

Online lectures and tutorials, workbook, discussion forums, independent study

work based learning self selected reading, literature searching

Written report of individual research related to management and leadership n in the international sector

 


Assessment Criteria at the level of the target award

 

For Stage 1, Stage 2 and Stage 3 – postgraduate assessment criteria

Generic Assessment Criteria – Postgraduate

These should be interpreted according to the level at which you are working

 

Categories

 

Grade

Relevance

Knowledge

Analysis

Argument and Structure

Critical Evaluation

Presentation

Reference to Literature

Pass

86 – 100%

The work examined is exemplary and provides clear evidence of a complete grasp of the knowledge, understanding and skills appropriate to the Level of the qualification.  There is also ample excellent evidence showing that all the learning outcomes and responsibilities appropriate to that Level are fully satisfied. At this level it is expected that the work will be exemplary in all the categories cited above. It will demonstrate a particularly compelling evaluation, originality, and elegance of argument, interpretation or discourse.

76-85%

The work examined is outstanding and demonstrates comprehensive knowledge, understanding and skills appropriate to the Level of the qualification.  There is also excellent evidence showing that all the learning outcomes and responsibilities appropriate to that level are fully satisfied. At this level it is expected that the work will be outstanding in the majority of the categories cited above or by demonstrating particularly compelling evaluation and elegance of argument, interpretation or discourse.

 

70 – 75%

The work examined is excellent and is evidence of comprehensive knowledge, understanding and skills appropriate to the Level of the qualification.  There is also excellent evidence showing that all the learning outcomes and responsibilities appropriate to that level are satisfied  At this level it is expected that the work will be excellent in the majority of the categories cited above or by demonstrating  particularly compelling evaluation and elegance of argument, interpretation or discourse.

 

60 – 69%

Directly relevant to the requirements of the assessment

A substantial knowledge of relevant material, showing a clear grasp of themes, questions and issues therein

Comprehensive analysis - clear and orderly presentation

Well supported, focussed  argument which is clear and logically structured.

Contains  distinctive or independent thinking; and begins to formulate an independent position in relation to theory and/or practice. 

Well written, with standard spelling and grammar, in a readable style with acceptable format

Critical appraisal of up-to-date and/or appropriate literature.  Recognition of different perspectives.  Very good use of a wide range of sophisticated source material. 

 

50 – 59%

Some attempt to address the requirements of the assessment: may drift away from this in less focused passages

Adequate knowledge of a fair range of relevant material, with intermittent evidence of an appreciation of its significance

Significant analytical treatment which has a clear purpose

Generally coherent and logically structured, using an appropriate mode of argument and/or theoretical mode(s)

May contain some distinctive or independent thinking; may begin to formulate an independent position in relation to theory and/or practice. 

Competently written, with only minor lapses from standard grammar, with acceptable format

Uses a good variety of literature which includes recent texts and/or appropriate literature,  including a substantive amount beyond library texts.  Competent use of source material.

40 – 49%

Some correlation with the requirements of the assessment but there is a significant degree of irrelevance

Basic understanding of the subject but addressing a limited range of material

Some analytical treatment, but may be prone to description, or to narrative, which lacks clear analytical purpose

Some attempt to construct a coherent argument, but may suffer loss of focus and consistency, with issues at stake stated only vaguely, or theoretical mode(s) couched in simplistic terms

Sound work which expresses a coherent position only in broad terms and in uncritical conformity to one or more standard views of the topic

A simple basic style but with significant deficiencies in expression or format that may pose obstacles for the reader

Evidence of use of appropriate literature which goes beyond that referred to by the  tutor.  Frequently only uses a single source to support a point. Weak use of quotation

Fail

35 – 39%

Relevance to the requirements of the assessment may be very intermittent, and may be reduced to its vaguest and least challenging terms

A limited understanding of a narrow range of material

Largely descriptive or narrative, with little evidence of analysis

A basic argument is evident, but mainly supported by assertion and there may be a  lack of clarity and coherence

Some evidence of a view starting to be formed but mainly derivative.

Numerous deficiencies in expression and presentation; the writer may achieve clarity (if at all) only by using a simplistic or repetitious style

Barely adequate use of literature.  Over reliance on

material provided by the tutor. 

The evidence provided shows that the majority of the learning outcomes and responsibilities appropriate to that Level are satisfied – for compensation consideration. 

30 – 34%

 

The work examined provides insufficient evidence of the knowledge, understanding and skills appropriate to the Level of the qualification.  The evidence provided shows that some of the learning outcomes and responsibilities appropriate to that Level are satisfied.  The work will be weak in some of the indicators.

15-29%

The work examined is unacceptable and provides little evidence of the knowledge, understanding and skills appropriate to the Level of the qualification.  The evidence shows that few of the learning outcomes and responsibilities appropriate to that Level are satisfied. The work will be weak in several of the indicators.

0-14%

The work examined is unacceptable and provides almost no evidence of the knowledge, understanding and skills appropriate to the Level of the qualification.  The evidence fails to show that any of the learning outcomes and responsibilities appropriate to that Level are satisfied. The work will be weak in the majority or all of the indicators.

Ver 1.3 13/02/2008 SJS

 

 

 

 


 

Appendix 3

 

 

 

SITS SUMMARY PROGRAMME/SHORT COURSE DETAILS

(Form to be completed electronically by the Faculty and forwarded to the Quality Assurance and Enhancement (QAE) Quality Officer supporting the Approval event, or sent to Management Information and Systems Development (MISD) for faculty devolved processes before sending to QAE)

PROGRAMME/SUBJECT/SHORT COURSE DETAILS

 

Exit Award: Title of programme/award

M.A. International Education

If replacement for existing, specify title of old

 

Faculty(ies):

Faculty of Education and Society

Department:

Education

SITS Programme/Short Course code[2]

PEDUINTFT, PEDUINTPT

Programme Studies Board[3]

Masters Programme Studies Board

UCAS code[4] (if applicable).  If other please state method.

 

JACS code[5]

 

Qualification Level / Qualification Aim

 

Level 7 (M)

Modes of delivery and duration:

 

(delete yes/no as necessary)

Full time       no

Sandwich     no  

Part time      yes    2 years

Work Based Learning  yes

On-campus no

Off-campus  yes

CSP Only. Other subject combinations not allowed with this subject:

 

Programme/Subject/Short Course Leader:

Professor Stephanie Atkinson

Date of Approval /Modification/Review

14th July 2009

Date of next review (QAE to complete)

 

Start date of programme/Short Course

September 2009

Number of intakes per annum and likely month(s) intake(s) starts.

One intake annually: September start only

 

FUNDING DETAILS

 

Confirm funding arrangements for programme e.g. HEFCE/TDA/NHS/Other[6]

Full cost course

If it is TDA, is it primary/secondary/F.E./Other (please state)

Not TDA Funded

Is the programme Open or Closed[7]:

Open

 

ACCREDITING BODY

No

 

 

PROGRAMME SPECIFIC REGULATIONS

Are there to be programme specific regulations?

No

If yes, please attach completed form AQH-B3 Appendix 2 or AQH-B8.

 

COLLABORATIVE:

Please complete details

UK                      no

 

Overseas           no

Institution                                      Collaborative model[8]         Funding arrangements[9]

 

 

 INTERIM AWARD SCHEDULE

Interim award title

Credits required

Interim structure

Please show mandatory requirements if applicable e.g. core module codes

Stage 1 – Postgraduate Certificate of Education

60

EDPM 01

EPDM 97

Postgraduate Diploma of Education

60

Core module EPDM09

Option Modules 1 from 5

EDPM 04

EPDM 15

EPDM 16

EPDM 83

ESSM 14

DETAILS SUPPLIED BY:Stephanie Atkinson        DATE:May 14th 2019

For QAE  use only:  Circulation list: Quality Assurance & Enhancement (files), MISD (J Ruffell, L Warner), Admissions  (E Wilson), Recruitment (Les  Brown, Catryn Davies), Student Office (L Dixon), Planning (Laura Anderson), Learning Development Services (Scott Miller, sunspace@sunderland.ac.uk) Central Timetabling (Alison McMahon) International Admissions (Annie Doyle)  + for collaborative programmes: Partnership Office Carole Green, Marketing and Recruitment (Judith Green)


Module List

Award, Route (if applicable) and Level

New/ Existing/ Modified  Module (N/E/MM)

Module Title

Module Code

Module Credit Value

Core or option

Assessment weighting – give % weight for each assessment item

Module leader

Date of Entry on SITS.

N/MM only

JACS Code

Stage 1

Certificate

E

Development of Learning: A Case Study

EDPM 01

30 level 7

C

Proposal 10%

Case study 90%

Ian Elliot

 

 

 

E

Negotiated Individual Study in Education

EPDM 97

30 level 7

C

Proposal 10%

Final Report 90%

Ian Elliot

 

 

Stage 2

Diploma

E

Introduction to Criticality

EPDM09

30 level 7

C

5 pieces of Critical Thinking (approx. 1000 words each) 100%

Kim Gilligan

 

 

 

E

The Nature of Teaching and Learning

EPDM83

30 level 7

O

Critical Study 100%

Kim Gilligan

 

 

 

E

Mentoring and Coaching

EPDM01

30 Level 7

O

Critical Reflection 20%

Critical Analysis 80%

 

Kim Gilligan

 

 

 

E

Advanced Pedagogical Practice in Subject Related Disciplines

ESSM14

30 level 7

O

Proposal 10%

Critical Study 90%

Dianne Fleetham

 

 

 

E

Leading organisational effectiveness in education & training

EPDM15

30 level 7

O

Development Plan 20%

Report 80%

Susan Beetlestone

 

 

 

E

Assessment Theory into Pedagogical Practice

EPDM 16

30 level 7

O

Proposal Pass/Fail 0%

Critical Evaluation 100%

Dianne Fleetham

 

 

Stage 3 Master’s award

E

The International School Curriculum

EPDM 11

30 level 7

C

Needs Assessment 20%

Situational Analysis 80%

Barbara Justham

 

 

 

E

Leading & Managing in International Schools

EPDM 12

30 level 7

C

Action Plan 20%

Situational Report 80%

Barbara Justham

 

 

 

 

 


[1] This will be the norm – university regulations apply

[2] To be allocated in consultation with MISD team in Planning and Finance

[3] Programme Studies/Assessment Board that will have management responsibilities for the programme.

[4] Please contact Admissions Manager for code

[5] JACS code = e.g. (V1) History, (G5) Computing Science, etc. for information contact relevant Faculty Associate Dean (See QAA Website http://www.qaa.ac.uk/WorkWithUs/Documents/jacs_codes.pdf)

[6] Please confer with Amanda Watson for funding status for programme

[7] An Open programme constitutes an open admissions policy.  A Closed programme is normally specific to one client only.  If in doubt please consult Academic Services or Planning and Finance.

 

[8] As per QAE guidelines

[9] Please contact Amanda Watson for confirmation of funding details