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Faculty of Education and Society

 

Department of Culture

 

 

 

MA in English

 

 

PROGRAMME SPECIFICATION

 

 

Date of Validation Event:

May 2007

Date Approved by QMSC:

N/A

 

Version History

 

Please complete each time a new version is drafted e.g.

 

Version

Occasion of Change

Change Author

Last Modified

1.0

Version presented for approval

Prof Richard Terry

March 2007

2.0

Amendments following institutional approval

Prof Richard Terry

September 2007

3.0

Revisions at annual review after first year of operation

Prof John Strachan

November 2008

4.0

Version presented for approval

Prof John Strachan

January 2009

5.0

LITM72 added as a option module

Peter Dempsey

January 2016

6.0

Updated

Colin Younger

October 2018

7.0

Updated

Colin Younger

May 2019

 

CORE INFORMATION

 

Programme title – MA in English Studies

 

Target award – MA in English Studies

 

Interim or exit awards:

Postgraduate Certificate in English Studies

Postgraduate Diploma in English Studies

 

Awarding body: University of Sunderland

 

Programme Assessment Board: MA English and History Programme Board

 

Collaborative partners and models of collaboration, if applicable: N/A

.

Location(s) at which programme is delivered: City Campus

 

Modes of delivery and duration:

 

Tick all that apply

Min number of years

Max number of years

Intake dates (months)

Full-time

1

2

September, February

Part-time

2

4

September, February

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2.AIMS OF THE PROGRAMME

 

Overall aims

The MA English Studies aims to equip students with an understanding of selective aspects of English literatures from 1600 to the present day. It aims to provide them with appropriate forms of historical knowledge, theoretical understanding, and analytical skill (including skill in analyzing language) in the study of these areas of literature. It aims to provide an opportunity for Creative Writing students to advance their skills above that of a first degree. It also aims to inculcate a range of research skills so as to allow students successfully to complete a dissertation to be submitted at the end of the degree.

 

The degree will provide an opportunity for students to explore English and other literatures at a level above that of a first degree and to develop themselves intellectually in the process of doing so. It is designed also to prepare candidates for advancing to the higher level of doctoral work. The degree will provide directly relevant professional development for those employed in teaching literature and/or Creative Writingin the secondary or further education sectors. The degree also lends itself to students who may want to study out of personal interest of for pleasure.

 

3                     LEARNING OUTCOMES OF THE PROGRAMME

 

Preamble

The learning outcomes of the degree as they appear here are driven by the programme’s structure. The degree is made up of three learning components: a core module (LITM51) compulsory for all awards; a dissertation module (LITM66) compulsory only for the full Masters award; and a range of optional modules that rotate over a three year cycle or so. Programme learning outcomes necessarily derive from compulsory modules. However, the optional modules will provide students with a range of learning opportunities in connection with various areas of literary study.

 

Skills and Knowledge

The learning outcomes that derive from the core module are designed to equip the students to prosecute the rest of the degree, including the dissertation. The dissertation itself provides the students with an opportunity to exercise a range of skills in relation to an area of knowledge.  It is in the optional modules that the students will be primarily involved with acquiring knowledge of distinct literary topics or fields.

 

MA in English Studies

Students receiving the award of MA English Studies must have generated 180 credits deriving from the core module (30 credits) plus the dissertation module (60 credits) plus three optional modules (30 credits each). Such students will have achieved the following learning outcomes (Please note that here and throughout, ‘K’ stands for ‘knowledge’ and ‘S’ for ‘Skills.’)

 

Knowledge

K1 Demonstrate a sophisticated grasp of one or more methodologies informing literary study (LITM51)

K2 Demonstrate a sophisticated grasp of at least one broad concept underpinning modern notions of literature: eg ‘canon’, ‘period’, ‘identity’, ‘globalization’ (LITM51)

K3 Demonstrate a critical awareness of some current debates about the discipline of literary studies (LITM51)

K4 Demonstrate detailed acquaintance with a particular research topic (LITM66)

K5 Demonstrate advanced knowledge of three areas or topics of literary study (optional modules)

 

 

Skills

S1 Demonstrate a sophisticated grasp of contemporary research practice (LITM51)

S2 Demonstrate an ability to evaluate current research and scholarship relating to a particular research topic (LITM66)

S3  Demonstrate an ability to select and pursue an appropriate methodology of research relating to a topic (LITM66)

S4 Demonstrate self-direction and originality in executing a research project (LITM66)

S5 Demonstrate an ability to present an extensive piece of research in a way that conforms to relevant scholarly protocols (LITM66)

 

Learning Outcomes for interim stages of the award

The MA English Studies offers interim awards at the levels of Postgraduate Certificate and Postgraduate Diploma.

 

Postgraduate Certificate in English Studies

Students receiving the award of Postgraduate Certificate in English Studies must have generated 60 credits deriving from the core module (30 credits) plus one optional module (30 credits). Such students will have acquired the following learning outcomes:

 

Knowledge

K1 Demonstrate a sophisticated grasp of contemporary research practice (LITM51)

K2 Demonstrated a sophisticated grasp of at least one broad concept underpinning modern notions of literature: eg ‘canon’, ‘period’, ‘identity’, ‘globalization’ (LITM51)

K3 Demonstrate a critical awareness of some current debates about the discipline of literary studies (LITM51)

K4 Demonstrate advanced knowledge of one area or topic of literary study (optional module)

 

Skills

S1 Demonstrate a sophisticated grasp of at least one methodology informing literary study (LITM51)

 

Postgraduate Diploma in English Studies

Students receiving the award of Postgraduate Diploma in English Studies must have generated 120 credits deriving from the core module (30 credits) plus three optional module (30 credits each). Such students will have acquired the following learning outcomes:

 

Knowledge

K1 Demonstrate a sophisticated grasp of one or more methodologies informing literary study (LITM51)

K2 Demonstrate a sophisticated grasp of at least one broad concept underpinning modern notions of literature: eg ‘canon’, ‘period’, ‘identity’, ‘globalization’ (LITM51)

K3 Demonstrate a critical awareness of some current debates about the discipline of literary studies (LITM51)

K4 Demonstrated advanced knowledge of three areas or topics of literary study (optional modules)

 

Skills

S1 Demonstrate a sophisticated grasp of contemporary research practice (LITM51)

 

4 PROGRAMME DELIVERY, STRUCTURE & CURRICULUM

 

Delivery & Structure of Provision

The MA English Studies (with interim awards) will be offered exclusively on campus to both full-time and part-time applicants. Teaching sessions will take place in the early evening (6.00-8.00 pm) with lecturers being available from 5.30 pm for guidance. Two teaching sessions will be scheduled per week, of which part-time students should attend one and full-time students both. Part-time students are understood as studying on a half-time basis (i.e. 20 hours per week).

 

Full-time students will normally complete the degree in a single calendar year. In semester 1, they will take the core module plus one option (thus qualifying for the Certificate); in semester 2, they will take two further options (thus qualifying for the Diploma); in semester 3, which runs through the summer, they will research and write a dissertation to be handed in early October.

 

Part-time students will normally complete the degree in two years and one semester. In semester 1 of their first year they will take the core module, followed by an optional module in semester 2. In semester 3 (i.e. the summer semester), no teaching is offered. In semester 1 of their second year they will take an optional module, followed by another option in semester 2. In semester 3 of their second year, they will embark on the dissertation module with a deadline of the following January.

 

There is the option of semester 2 entry.[1]

 

 

 

Options

The optional modules running in any academic year will be decided before the end of the previous academic year by the MA English Studies Curriculum Steering Committee and the option modules offered each year will be a set raft which all FT students will follow.

 

Curriculum

The optional modules are designed to offer students a very broad range of learning opportunities and are diverse in nature. The core module prepares students for their options by ensuring that they are conversant with a range of relevant methodological and theoretical issues. It also prepares students for their dissertation by ensuring that they have acquired a range of research skills. For this reason, the core contains sessions on research practice, including information retrieval and scholarly presentation.

 

Programme Structure Table

It should be noted that only six modules will be offered in any given year. Full-time students will need to take all the modules available to make up their credits so as to be able to graduate at the end of year. Part-time students will be able to choose between optional modules (except in semester 1 of year 2 when they will have to take the one optional module available, the other module running being the core). In the table beneath, we record the distinction between core and option but in practice all optional modules will assume compulsory status for full-time students. (Note that where an asterisk is placed (*), it denotes that a module is new but based on some previously existing one.)

 


PROGRAMME DEFINITION BY MODULE /ASSESSMENT SCHEDULE

 

Module code

Module Title

Level

Credit value*

Core/

Option

Assessment weighting

e.g. exam %

coursework %

LITM51

Approaching Literature

M

30

Core

(all awards)

25% exercise / 75% essay

LITM61

‘What Ish My Nation?’: Postcolonial Irish Literatures

M

30

Option

90 % essay / 10% presentation

LACM01

Language and Ideology in Children’s Fictions

M

30

Option

2 essays 30% and 70%

LITM62

Reading Ulysses

M

30

Option

75% essay / 25% presentation

LITM65

The Global City

M

30

Option

Essay 50% presentation 50%

LITM53

British Satire 1785-1840

M

30

Option

2 essays, each 50%

LITM63

Orientalism: Representations of the East in Western Travel Literature and Arab and Iranian Novels

M

30

Option

70% essay /

30% presentation

LITM64

Women’s Writings in a Postcolonial and Global Context

M

30

Option

2 essays, each 50%

LITM23

Early Humans in Fiction

M

30

Option

2 essays each 50%

LITM59

‘Strange Country’: Irish Literature 1790 to 1831

M

30

Option

2 essays each 50%

LITM66

Dissertation

(NB LITM51 is pre-requisite for this module)

M

60

Core (Masters award only)

100% dissertation

 

 

 

LITM67

Irish Literature and the Supernatural

M

30

Option

2 essays, each 50%

LITM25

Late Victorian Gothic

M

30

Option

2 essays, each 50%

LITM68

Creative Writing and Literary Theory

M

30

Option

2 essays, each 50%

LITM10

The 1790s

M

30

Option

2 essays, each 50%

LITM27

Reiving and Writing: Literature of the Anglo-Scottish Borders

M

30

Option

1 essay 100%

LITM70

Gothic

M

30

Option

1  essay 75%,

1 lit review 25%

LITM72

Crime Fiction: Theory & Practice

M

30

Option

1 essay 100%

 


Matrix linking Programme Learning Outcomes across Modules

 

 

 

 

  Learning outcomes – Knowledge and skills:

LITM51

LITM66

LITM30

LITM53

LITM59

LITM61

LITM62

LITM63

 

 

LITM67

LITM65

LACM01

LACM02

LITM70

LITM27

LITM25

LITM72

K5

Advanced knowledge of an area of literary study

 

 

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

K4

Detailed knowledge of a focused research topic

 

 

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

X

 

 

 

X

X

X

X

S1

Sophisticated grasp of contemporary research practice

 

 

 

 

X

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

X

X

X

 

K2

Sophisticated grasp of concepts underpinning modern notions of ‘literature’

 

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

K3

Critical awareness of current debates about literary studies

 

X

 

 

X

X

 

 

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

X

X

K1

Sophisticated grasp of one or more methodologies informing literary study

 

 

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

 

 

X

X

X

X

S4

Ability to pursue self-directed and original research

 

 

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

X

X

X

 

S2

Ability to evaluate current research and scholarship

 

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

S3

Ability to select and pursue an appropriate research methodology

 

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

S5

Ability to present a piece of research complying with relevant scholarly protocols

 

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

 


5         TEACHING & LEARNING

 

Overview of Teaching and Learning Strategies

Teaching sessions are timetabled on two evenings per week between 6 pm and 8 pm. The 2 hour block will be used fluidly in all modules: most teaching sessions will begin with a presentation of variable length by the tutor and move from there to seminar discussion or other more student-directed activities. Fundamental to the MA will be that students develop confidence and fluency in discussing intellectual topics. We will be flexible in adopting methods that galvanize and bring the best out of the students. So lecturers may revert from full seminar discussion to group work or student presentations if these seem the best way in practice to make a class work. These fluidities of approach cannot easily be captured by module proformas, which require us to specify in advance exact allocations of time for each teaching method.

Individual or small group tutorials will be offered (by appointment) between 8-9pm on the evenings teaching takes place.

 

Teaching Schedule for LITM66 Dissertation (core for MA Award)

Session 1:  Dissertation Day including proposal presentation session (6 hours): Engaging in research for dissertation, working on dissertation writing skills, writing dissertation, receiving supervisory / tutorial support

Session 2:  Library research session (2 hours).

Each student is required to submit a dissertation proposal (one side of A4) by an agreed date after which a dissertation supervisor will be allocated.

Supervisory / Tutorial support by appointment. It is the student’s responsibility to make contact with the supervisor allocated and arrange mutually convenient times to meet.

It is expected that there will be 2/3 meetings between supervisor and student with one of these to be arranged in early September prior to the deadline hand in of 1st October for FT students.

 

Teaching and learning strategies reflect our sense that at MA level responsibility for learning lies as much with the student as with the lecturer. While most teaching sessions will begin with a presentation by the lecturer, students will be expected to equip themselves in their own time with knowledge of basic facts and contexts. Seminars / workshops will mostly be made up of discussion, with the students being expected to contribute their own ideas for the benefit of the group. Students will be encouraged to be self-reflective, in not just voicing opinions about texts and issues but also in being conscious of the methodological underpinnings of such opinions. The teaching and learning strategies prioritize critical reflection over the bare assimilation of facts.   

 

Self-directed study

Full-time students will receive 6 hours of scheduled contact per week plus some shared guidance time plus opportunities to see staff by arrangement. We are aware that students’ success on the degree will depend largely on how they spend their self-directed study time. The core module is designed to help them use this time as productively as possible.                 

 

Matrix mapping Teaching & Learning Methods across modules

 

Module

L

S

T

GW

IR

DR

LITM51

X

X

X

X

 

X

LITM66

X

X

X

X

X

X

LITM25

X

X

X

X

X

X

LITM27

X

X

X

X

X

X

LITM30

X

X

X

X

 

X

LITM53

X

X

X

X

 

X

LITM59

X

X

X

X

 

X

LITM61

X

X

X

X

 

X

LITM62

X

X

X

X

 

X

LITM63

X

X

X

X

 

X

LITM64

X

X

X

X

 

X

LITM65

X

X

X

 

 

X

LACM01

X

X

X

X

 

X

LACM02

X

X

X

X

 

X

LITM70

X

X

X

X

X

X

LITM72

X

X

X

 

X

X

Figure 3: Map of Learning and Teaching Strategies Across The Programme

Key:

L – Lecture

S – Seminar

T– Tutorial

GW-Group Work

IR-Independent research

DR–Directed/Independent Reading /self study

 

 

6.ASSESSMENT

General Description of Assessment Strategies

The academic qualities we most want to instil in our students are (i) the ability to compose a sophisticated written response to a question; and (ii) the ability to discuss academic topics fluently in a group setting. Our assessment strategies derive directly from the need to develop these abilities. Each module requires the students to submit assignments deemed to be equivalent to a 5,000 word essay. On some modules, these assignments may simply consist of two 2,500 word essays; on other modules, they may consist of major written assignment accompanied by a minor writing task; on several modules, they consist of a substantial written assignment accompanied by an oral presentation. The dissertation module is supported mainly through one-to-one tutorials.

 

Matrix mapping assessment methods across modules

 

Module

Es

TCT

P

E

D

LITM51

X

 

 

X

 

LITM66

 

 

 

 

X

LITM72

X

 

 

 

 

LITM25

X

 

 

X

 

LITM27

X

 

 

 

 

LITM70

X

 

 

X

 

LITM30

X

 

 

 

 

LITM53

X

 

 

 

 

LITM59

X

 

 

 

 

LITM61

X

 

X

 

 

LITM62

X

 

X

 

 

LITM63

X

 

X

 

 

LITM64

X

 

 

 

 

LITM65

X

 

 

 

 

LITM67

X

 

 

X

 

LITM72

X

 

 

 

 

LACM01

X

 

 

 

 

LACMO2

X

 

X

 

 

Figure 4: Map of Assessment Methods Across The Programme

 

Key:

Es - Essay

TCT - Time  Constrained Test

P - Presentation

E - Exercise

D - Dissertation

 

 


7SUPPORT, GUIDANCE AND PROGRESSION

 

Mechanisms for Provision of Student Support and Guidance

Academic and pastoral support begins with an Induction event organized by the programme leader in the week before the start of formal teaching. Students will be introduced to the degree and equipped with a Programme Guide advising them on staff contacts, learning resources available to them, and the structure of, and regulatory issues relating to, the degree. They will also have an opportunity at this early point to get to know each other as well as the staff who will be delivering the programme.

 

A proportion of students are expected to be part-time, amongst whom many will be working during the day. Accordingly, lecturers will be available for a half-hour prior to each teaching session to provide academic guidance relating to their modules. Pastoral support on the degree will be provided to all students by the programme leader, unless there exists a reason for a student to be guided by another member of staff. Our experience is that part-time students, attending only in the evening, can become slightly detached from the institution (sometimes even forgetting who their tutor is). Making the programme leader the tutor for all students brings clarity to the situation. The programme will also be very aware of the need to assist overseas students during their settling-in period and afterwards.  

 

Personal and Career Planning

The University has a Career Education Information and Guidance Policy (CEIG) and a commitment to supporting students in their progression from education to work. Recently the careers service (the ‘Opportunities Centre’) has moved into the Gateway, an impressive, newly-renovated facility in the centre of the City Campus.  The effect is to bring careers guidance as a service much closer to the students.

 

Our experience of MA teaching over many years is that career planning for the kind of students we recruit at MA level remains somewhat problematic. Some of our students are retired, some are self-employed, some are at an early stage in a chosen career, some have many years of professional experience behind them, and many others, while not necessarily occupying a job that corresponds to their desired career path, are still working substantial numbers of hours. Other students will be from overseas, and these students will return to pursue future careers about which it is difficult for English lecturers at Sunderland to advise them. Accordingly, we see our role as encouraging students, where relevant, to reflect on their career development and to take advantage of the careers guidance offered by the University.

 

Guidance for Further Study

The skills acquired on the MA should constitute a preparation for PhD study for those who wish to explore that path. The core module LITM51 is designed to inculcate a range of research skills necessary, in a general way, for PhD study. The module has been designated, outside the confines of the programme, as our English subject-specific research training vehicle. Teaching staff, as a matter of course, will advise students on opportunities for postgraduate research at this University and elsewhere. 

 

8.RECRUITMENT AND ADMISSIONS

Admissions requirements

The entry requirement for the degree will be a good Honours degree in English. We will, however, consider candidates who have graduated in a cognate discipline and who can demonstrate some literary background and / or literary interests. For overseas candidates, we will request an English Language proficiency measured as at least IELTS 6.5 or equivalent.

 

Induction process

Applicants (except those from overseas) will be invited for interview, even in cases when they are clearly qualified to join the programme. This is viewed as useful in terms of familiarizing potential students with how the programme operates and with the identity of the important contact staff. It also ensures that all enrolling students are fully aware of the demands of the programme. An induction night will be organized in the week prior to the first week’s teaching in semester 1. Students will be inducted by the programme leader and issued with a Programme Guide containing details of the degree structure, the modules on offer, and support structures available to students.

 

9.REGULATORY ISSUES

Regulations – Programme Specific Regulations

 

The MA English Studies complies fully with the University’s regulations governing Masters Degrees.

 

10. PROGRAMME MANAGEMENT AND QUALITY ASSURANCE

 

Management of the Programme

The day-to-day running of the MA English Studies will be the responsibility of the Programme Leader. This will be a senior figure within the English Department with extensive research and teaching experience. The MA English Studies will be managed within the organizational framework of the Department of Culture within the Faculty of Education and Science.

 

Programme Standards and Monitoring

The quality of the Faculty’s academic provision is monitored by the Faculty Quality Assurance Board. The MA in English Studies is reviewed annually and a an annual monitoring report by the Programme Leader is sent to the Faculty  Quality Management Sub-Committee which in turn reports issues to Academic Board via the University’s Quality Management Sub-Committee (QMSC) and Academic Experience Committee (AEC).

 

The MA English Studies is be managed through the MA English and History Programme Board of Studies, meeting twice a year, which will oversee all aspects of the delivery and performance of the programme as a whole and its portfolio of modules. Student performance on individual modules and on the programme will be overseen by a Module/Programme Board of Assessment, which will also meet twice a year.

 

External Examiners

A single external examiner will be appointed to the programme on a four-year term. The role of the examiner will be to monitor and report on the performance of students, on the appropriateness of assessment strategies, on the consistency of grading, and on the comparability of academic standards on the programme with those elsewhere in the sector. He/she will receive internally moderated samples of student work from all modules delivered. The external will also be asked to advice on the appropriateness of students’ dissertation topics. The external will attend the main award conferring board in October of each year. 

 

Student Representation and Feedback

Feedback from students relating to particular modules is taken every time a module runs; there are also organizing feedback meetings twice a year. These will be scheduled for the hour immediately before the start of an evening teaching session (i.e. from 5 pm) so as to give part-timers who work during the day a chance to attend. Feedback collected in this way will be presented and discussed at a subsequent Board of Studies. Student reps will able to attend Boards of Studies and give voice to any student concerns. Actions taken in light of student suggestions or concerns will be reported back to the students through the feedback session and through the reps.

 

11.RESOURCE ENVIRONMENT

 

Learning Resources

Resources within the School are allocated by the Dean, who is advised by the Faculty Management Group, Faculty Quality Assurance Board, and other groups within the Faculty.

 

Teaching Accommodation

 

The English Department is currently housed in the Reg Vardy Building of the University’s St Peter’s Campus. All the teaching on the degree will take place in this building, which contains, as well as seminar rooms and offices, a student computer/IT suite and a coffee shop serving sandwiches and pastries.  All of the teaching rooms are equipped with white boards, data projectors, video/DVD/PowerPoint facilities, and internet ports.  Slide projectors and televisions are available for booking. 

 

Information Services and the University Library

The library collections most relevant to our students are housed at the Murray Library on Chester Road and at St. Peter’s Library on the St. Peter’s Campus.  There are approximately 10,500 titles in literature and literary criticism, and 1,600 titles in English language and linguistics. As well as print and audio-visual material, the University’s library holdings provide on-line facilities such as Literature Online (LION), the Modern Language Association International Bibliography, the World Shakespeare Bibliography, and the British Humanities Index. In addition, there exists an excellent, free inter-library loan system. Both libraries have 24-hour access study areas, and more than 200 computer places with worldwide web and internet access. The libraries are spacious and comfortable, and include areas for both individual and group work.  The Murray Library houses the City Campus Learning Resource Centre, where students will hand in and receive back their assignments.

 

Research Activity Underpinning Programme

The English team which is comprised of 9 permanent members of staff is solidly committed to excellence in research, as clearly indicated by its rating of 4* in the RAE 2001 10% 4* in RAE2009 and a strong REF in 2014.  The majority of the teaching staff on the programme hold PhDs and contribute knowledge to their fields.  Our expertise is sought by the local, national, and international media.  In the last four years alone, the team has produced 13 books, 19 book chapters and numerous journal articles.  Our work has been translated into 14 languages and members of the team have been recipients of prestigious AHRC, British Academy and Leverhulme awards.  We are also supported by a number of very experienced and highly qualified \academic Tutors, most of whom have PhDs (or high-quality publications if they are Creative Writing practitioners).

 

 

Relation of Research to Teaching

The English Department is a strong research grouping.  The strengths of the department are in Gothic Literature, Renaissance Literature, Medieval Literature, Anglo-Scottish Borders Literature, Mythopoetic, postmodern and post-colonial theory, Creative Writing and literary linguistics. The philosophy of the degree is that allows staff to offer modules in areas in which they hold particular expertise. Students benefit from this in terms of the enthusiasm and the authority of the teaching that they receive.  


 

Appendix 1

 

 

 

SITS SUMMARY PROGRAMME DETAILS

 

(Form to be completed electronically by the Faculty and

forwarded to the Academic Services Quality Officer supporting the  review panel)

PROGRAMME DETAILS

 

Exit Award: Title of programme/award

MA in English Studies

If replacement for existing, specify title of old

N/A

University Academic subject area

Culture

Academic SITS (subject) area

 

Academic (SITS) code[2] (Course Code)

 

Programme Studies Board[3]

English

UCAS code[4] (if applicable).  If other please state method.

Direct Application to MA route

JACS code[5]

 

Qualification Level / Qualification Aim

(M) HE Level 4

 

Interim awards (please state)

(Please complete structure details in full below)

Certificate of Higher Education

Diploma in Higher Education

 

Modes of delivery and duration:

 

Full time       yes   1 year

Sandwich     no   ……..

Part time      yes   2 years

Work Based Learning  no

On-campus  yes

Off-campus  no 

Faculty(ies):

Education & Society

Programme Leader:

Dr Alison Younger and Colin Younger

Date of Approval Event

May 2007

Date of next review (QAE to complete)

 

Start date of programme (QAE to complete)

 

Number of intakes per annum.

(if more than one per year please state how many and likely month(s) intake starts)

2 available – S1 and S2 entry(but invariably S1 is chosen)

 

FUNDING DETAILS

 

Confirm funding arrangements for programme e.g. HEFCE/TDA/NHS/Other[6]

HEFCE

If it is TDA, is it primary/secondary/F.E./Other (please state)

 

Is the programme Open or Closed[7]:

Open

 

ACCREDITING BODY

 

N/A

Detail of Accreditation:

 

 

 

 

PROGRAMME SPECIFIC REGULATIONS

Are there to be programme specific regulations?

No

If yes will they affect assessment?  NA

Note Programme Specific Regulation:

 

 

 

COLLABORATIVE:

Please complete details

UK                     no

 

Overseas          no

Institution                                      Collaborative model[8]         Funding arrangements[9]

 

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DETAILS SUPPLIED BY: Colin Younger DATE - 8th May 2019.

 

 


[1] No student at the time of writing has ever applied for S2 entry.

[2] To be allocated by SITS team in SRBP

[3] Programme Studies/Assessment Board that will have management responsibilities for the programme.

[4] Please contact Admissions Manager for code

[5] JACS code = e.g. (V1) History, (G5) Computing Science, etc.

[6] Please confer with David Balme for funding status for programme

[7] An Open programme constitutes an open admissions policy.  A Closed programme is normally specific to one client only.  If in doubt please consult Academic Services or Planning and Finance.

 

[8] As per QAE guidelines

[9] Please contact David Balme for confirmation of funding details