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LLM

 

Faculty of Business, Law & Tourism

 

Department of Law

 

 

PROGRAMME SPECIFICATION

 

 


SECTION A: CORE INFORMATION

 

  1.  

Name  of programme:

LLM

 

  1.  

Award title:

LLM Criminal Law & Procedure

LLM International Human Rights

LLM Commercial Law and International Trade

LLM

 

  1.  

Programme linkage:

 

Is this part of group of linked programmes between which students can transfer at agreed points? (e.g. a group of programmes with a common set of taught modules)

Yes

 

This programme is one of a group of related programmes which also includes:

LLM Criminal Law & Procedure

LLM International Human Rights

LLM Commercial Law and International Trade

LLM

 

It is possible to transfer between these programmes at certain points. This may be subject to particular requirements.

 

  1.  

Is the programme a top-up only?

Yes

 

  1.  

Level of award:

Level 7

 

  1.  

Awarding body:

University of Sunderland

 

  1.  

Department:

Law

 

  1.  

Programme Studies Board:

Law

 

  1.  

Programme Leader:

Ashley J Lowerson

 

 

  1. How and where can I study the programme?

 

At Sunderland:

 

Full-time on campus

          

Part-time on campus

 

As work-based learning full-time

 

As work-based learning part-time

 

As a full-time sandwich course

 

As a part-time sandwich course

 

By distance learning

 

 

At the University of Sunderland London campus: 

 

Full-time on campus

 

Part-time on campus

 

As work-based learning full-time

 

As work-based learning part-time

 

As a full-time sandwich course

 

As a part-time sandwich course

 

By distance learning

 

 

At a partner college:

 

Full-time in the UK 

 

Part-time in the UK

 

Full-time overseas

 

Part-time overseas

 

By distance learning

 

As a full-time sandwich course in the UK

 

As a part-time sandwich course in the UK

 

As a full-time sandwich course overseas

 

As a part-time sandwich course overseas

 

As work-based learning full-time in the UK 

 

As work-based learning part-time overseas

 

Other (please specify)

 

 

  1. How long does the programme take?

 

 

Min number of years / months

Max number of years / months

Full-time

1 year

4 years

Part-time

 

 

Distance learning

 

 

Work-based learning

 

 

 

For start-dates please see the current edition of the Prospectus or contact the relevant department at the University. For start-dates for programmes delivered in a partner college, please contact the college.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SECTION B – FURTHER CORE INFORMATION

 

  1. Learning and teaching strategy.

 

The approach across all programmes seeks to:-

 

  • facilitate the acquisition of knowledge and key transferable legal skills;
  • encourage students to develop into independent learners;
  • provide a balance between formative and summative assessment methods;
  • recognise the diversity of the student intake; and
  • prepare students for the vocational stage of their training and/or for future employment outside of the legal professions.

 

This approach is entirely consistent with the University’s Learning and Teaching Plan. There is a renewed focus on facilitating the acquisition of skills and this drives our approach to teaching and learning. Throughout all programmes a range of teaching, learning and assessment methods are adopted in order to support these objectives. The Department encourages academic freedom and innovation within both the modules and the programmes, whilst ensuring compliance with the University’s overall strategy.

 

Feedback is collected by Module Leaders, frequently using Survey Monkey, or by the Module Feedback Questionnaire via Canvas, and through the Staff Student Liaison Committee and through formal group discussions with the Programme Leader. The external examiner has been very complimentary in respect of the range of innovative teaching, learning and assessment methods employed.

 

  1. Retention strategy

 

The key to the success in considerably increasing the amount of contact time and incorporating experiential learning is in the activities which take place in these classroom sessions and the professionalism and enthusiasm with which staff engage students.

 

Student support has been, and indeed will continue to be, at the heart of our activities. The Department’s success and achievements here are based principally of three simple principles: (i) an open door policy, (ii) the responsiveness of staff to queries, whether in person or by email and (iii) the willingness of all staff to help wherever possible, rather than simply passing the student on to someone else. It is not particularly complicated or advanced, but leads to excellent working relationships between staff and students.

 

The Faculty is unique within the University in that it also provides support for the student through the Progression team and the Wellbeing and Support teams which are based at both campuses. Students can drop in to make use of this resource, or can make an appointment to gain additional support with things such as referencing, essay writing, and general academic and research skills. These have been in place now for a number of years and have proven to be very popular with students.

 

 

 

 

  1. Any other information

 

There is a greater emphasis on independent learning and of the acquisition of advanced skills of legal research; these skills are progressively developed throughout the programme. Modules are appropriate to the named routes but also reflect the research and practical specialisms of the members of staff concerned in their delivery.

 

SECTION C - TEACHING AND LEARNING

 

  1. What is the programme about?

 

The main educational aims of the LL.M programmes are to:

 

  1. Encourage a critical understanding of the relevant principles and concepts covered by the programme;

 

  1. Enable students to acquire and develop enhanced analytical, critical, communication and presentational skills appropriate to postgraduate level study in the context of their mandatory and optional modules, and to become familiar with the central problems of research in these areas;

 

  1. Enable students to develop appropriate skills in research and research design both in the context of the taught elements of the programme and through the completion of the dissertation; and

 

  1. Enhance the development of transferable skills to further advance the students’ future employment prospects.

 

In addition, and within the University context, it is intended that the Programmes will:

 

  1. Continue to develop law as a major discipline capable of delivering the University mission for quality teaching, research and outreach;

 

  1. Contribute to the University’s widening participation programme; and

 

  1. Contribute towards the internationalisation of the law programmes

 

 

  1. What will I know or be able to do at the end of the programme?

 

Learning Outcomes: Postgraduate Certificate in Higher Education – Skills

 

By the end of this part of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

 

S1. The ability to deal with complex issues both systematically and creatively, making sound judgements, and communicating conclusions clearly to specialist and non-specialist audiences

S2. The ability to produce academic writing to a high standard of scholarship, including writing effectively in the English language and presenting information and ideas in a manner that meets relevant academic conventions

S3. Expertise in a range of transferable research approaches and methodologies; along with advanced skills in self-selected legal research strategies

 

Learning Outcomes: Postgraduate Certificate in Higher Education – Knowledge

 

By the end of this part of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

 

K1. A critical appreciation of the political, social and/or economic contexts within which the substantive legal principles operate

K2. A comprehensive understanding of techniques applicable to legal research and advanced scholarship

K3. A thorough and critical appreciation of current issues in complex areas of law doctrine and theory

 

Learning Outcomes: Postgraduate Diploma in Higher Education – Skills

 

By the end of this part of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

 

S4. The ability to apply legal and related knowledge systematically to complex problems by constructing arguments, recognising potential alternative conclusions and providing supporting reasons

S5. The ability to think critically and creatively about complex legal issues, demonstrating a capacity for independent thinking

 

Learning Outcomes: Postgraduate Diploma in Higher Education – Knowledge

 

By the end of this part of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

 

K4. A systematic understanding of a chosen area of law, and a critical awareness of current problems and/or new insights, much of which is at, or informed by, the forefront of their academic discipline, field of study, or area of professional practice

 

Learning Outcomes: Masters in Law – Skills

 

By the end of this part of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

 

S6. An ability to identify, and to proficiently research, a relevant and current legal issue by gathering information in a focused independent fashion, evaluating and synthesising this data to arrive at a reasoned and logical conclusion within an extended piece of independent work

S7. Self-direction and originality in tackling and solving problems, and act autonomously in planning and implementing tasks

 

 

 

 

Learning Outcomes: Masters in Law – Knowledge

 

By the end of this part of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

 

K5. Originality in the application of knowledge in a chosen area of law, together with a practical understanding of how established techniques of research and enquiry are used to create and interpret that knowledge

 

  1. What will the programme consist of?

 

Taught postgraduate programmes consist of a number of taught modules leading to the award of a Postgraduate Certificate (60 credits) or Postgraduate Diploma (120 credits). A Masters qualification (180 credits) usually culminates in a major piece of independent work such as a project or dissertation. All modules are at postgraduate level (level 7 in the UK’s national scheme). The summary below describes briefly what is contained in the programme. The programme structure, including a detailed list of modules, can be found in the programme regulations.

 

Term One

 

 

 

 

 

Advanced Legal Skills

Core

 

Postgraduate Certificate in Higher Education (60 credits)

Criminal Justice

Core

International Human Rights

Core

Commercial Law & International Trade

Core

 

 

 

Term Two

 

 

 

 

 

Applied Legal Methods

Core

Postgraduate Diploma in Higher Education (120 credits)

Legal Research Project

Core

 

 

 

Term Three

 

 

 

 

 

Postgraduate Dissertation

Core

Masters in Law (180 credits)

 

Term One

 

Following an induction in which students will be introduced to the subject area, Faculty and the wider University, students on all named routes will have a common Term One of 60 credits (the PG Cert exit award) studying Advanced Legal Skills and the named module suited to their programme of study. This allows the student to adapt and to gain a clear understanding and grounding in the fundamental requirements of Postgraduate study. This is congruent with the learning outcomes of the award of a Post Graduate Certificate and is fundamental to a programme such as this.

 

The Advanced Legal Skills module is designed to develop students’ skills in preparation for the research stage of the programme. One of the key observations of staff that teach on the existing programme is the wide diversity of legal writing and research skills amongst students joining the Masters programme.

 

The next 30-credit, core module for each named route is as follows:

 

LLM Criminal Law & Procedure: for this route the 30-credit core module will be Criminal Law & Justice. This new module will examine the theory and doctrine underpinning the criminal law alongside the procedure and societal pressures that operate within the Criminal Justice system of England and Wales.

 

LLM International Human Rights: for this route, the 30-credit core module will be International Human Rights. This is a pre-existing module, which examines global, regional and national legal mechanisms that guarantee basic human rights. Employing both a doctrinal and comparative approach, the module draws together theories from a number of different disciplines on societal and philosophical discourse on rights.

 

LLM Commercial Law and International Trade: for this route, the 30-credit core module will be Commercial Law and International Trade. This module will look at the creation and application of the Agency relationship, relations between the Agent and third parties, sale of goods, transfer of title, international sales and documentation, carriage of goods by sea, methods of payment and provide a comprehensive and critical understanding of the main framework of international law governing international economic relations between states.

 

Term Two

 

Having gained the necessary skills for postgraduate study at the Postgraduate Certificate stage, the Postgraduate Diploma is where the students start to fully explore the specialism inherent in the named routes. Therefore the 60 credits are broken up into two 30-credit, core modules. The modules reflect staff research interests and expertise.

 

Student will undertake the Applied Legal Methods module principle content of the module is determined by the student, in negotiation with the Module Leader. The module is designed principally to offer students the opportunity of producing, in the context of an assessed module, a piece of research work that could be suitable for submission as an academic conference paper. The student will have to demonstrate a clear understanding of the chosen area.

 

All students will undertake a 30-credit core module that is specifically aimed at enhancing their legal research skills. The Legal Research Project is designed principally to offer students the opportunity of producing, in the context of an assessed module, a piece of research work that could be suitable for submission to an academic journal and in this sense, like the dissertation, this module provides students with an opportunity to work in an autonomous fashion, on a subject of their choosing within a particular legal arena, without the constraints typically present in a taught module. The choice of subject area may be one borne solely from personal interest which motivated the initial undertaking of the programme / named route, or it may be one which has emerged through the study of a particular module, where a specific theme or question has presented itself and which students wish then to pursue further.

 

Term Three

 

Having successfully completed the first 120 taught credits, all students will finally complete a 15,000-word Dissertation (60 credits) on a subject of their choosing. Students will be required to demonstrate advanced knowledge within their subject area, together with expertise in the use of legal research and writing skills. Students will be expected to submit a dissertation proposal during the second teaching block and, subject to its approval, will then be able to commence their research dissertation for completion during the summer and submission in September.

 

  1. How will I be taught?

 

Scheduled teaching activities

          

Independent study

          

Placement

 

 

The diversity of teaching and learning approaches is designed to impart knowledge, to encourage understanding and to provide opportunity for the application of that knowledge to actual or hypothetical situations. It is also intended to foster enthusiasm within the student body. The use of the teaching and learning methods and the balance between their employment will vary within modules so as to cater appropriately for both the subject and the student. That notwithstanding all modules will employ to some extent the following features:

 

  • Teaching Strategies: although this will vary from module to module, and indeed from teacher to teacher, all modules will take advantage of the opportunity for the teacher to explain to the whole class, a concept, to take questions, to outline areas of knowledge, indicate methods of tackling a problem and demonstrate methods of analysis and synthesis of materials. Audio-visual aids will be used as appropriate, such as the use of ‘PowerPoint’ and video. Key points will often be outlined in handouts available through Canvas. Where appropriate, copies of all lecture presentations will also be available through Canvas prior to the lecture/workshop taking place or at the very least immediately following the session.
  • Interactive sessions: whether during seminars or whole group teaching sessions, students will be expected in the course of all modules to interact with each other and/or with the teacher to develop ideas, work on tasks, practice skills or explain material.
  • Legal Research: During induction, students will be introduced to various methods of legal research. The induction programme contains activities which will introduce students to the law library (including practical exercises) and to the available electronic sources of information e.g. LexisLibrary and WestLaw. All modules, throughout the Programme, require students to engage in the research of both primary and secondary sources of law.
  • Directed Private Study: This will include reading, preparation for class or for assessment, group activities, revision, and carrying out assessment work. All module guides will provide students with advice in respect of this, and as a minimum will provide details of required reading (for preparation of timetabled sessions and/or for the completion of assessments).

 

Case studies are extremely common throughout the Programme and are intended to enable students to develop, inter alia, the ability to;

 

  • Identify accurately the issues in need of research and to bring that information together;
  • Apply subject specific legal knowledge to a realistic and/or practical context;
  • Make critical judgments of the merits of a particular argument;
  • Present and make reasoned choices between alternative solutions;
  • Present that information in an appropriate manner according to the intended audience.

 

The case studies may take the form of real cases or legal issues in debate at any given moment in time or may be hypothetical problems which are reflective of realistic legal problems. Students are encouraged to become involved in collaborative work, particularly in the preparation of seminar and workshop sessions. This allows students to experience both the benefits and problems that can arise with collaborative activity and will further encourage students to reflect on the views of others and to deal with disagreement in a positive fashion. Self-directed study is included on a formal basis allowing students to take a greater responsibility in respect of their learning experience. Minute papers are used in a number of modules throughout the programme allowing students to identify for themselves, and for the tutors, what they have learned, any questions they have at that particular time and to identify any areas of the module curriculum which perhaps need clarification.

 

The Law Team are also of the view that the LLMs are principally academic programmes where the formal assessment of group assessments is not as fundamental as it might be on other post-graduate programmes. Self-directed study is included in all modules. Having completed a first degree, there is an expectation that students will have the ability to undertake independent study and take responsibility for their own learning. Whilst there is more of an even balance between directed and self-directed study in those modules at the certificate and diploma level, by the time the students begin their dissertation, the focus is almost entirely upon the student’s ability to direct and determine their own learning. The teaching and learning methods adopted take account of the diverse educational backgrounds of students and also consider students with special needs and specific learning difficulties, Canvas being particularly helpful in this respect. The Department recognizes the importance of appropriate support and guidance, for all students, in the overall teaching and learning strategy. The ability of students to make the most of the learning opportunities offered to them may be adversely affected by non-academic factors, and Section 7.0 outlines the provisions within the Programmes, Faculty and the wider University which are available.

 

A summary of the types of teaching, learning and assessment in each module of the programme can be found in the Matrix of Modes of Teaching.

 

A list of the modules in the programme can be found in the Programme Regulations

 

  1. How will I be assessed and given feedback?

 

Written examinations

 

Coursework

          

Practical assessments

 

 

A summary of the types of teaching, learning and assessment in each module of the programme can be found in the Matrix of Modes of Teaching.

 

The University has a generic assessment criteria which we use can be found here. Some programmes use subject-specific assessment criteria pending on the nature of the assessment.

 

This programme uses the Generic University Assessment Criteria

YES

NO

This programme uses the Subject Specific Assessment Criteria

YES

NO

 

The University regulations can be found here.

 

The assessment approaches adopted on the programmes, again formulated so as to address the provisions of the QAA Framework and the University’s Academic Strategy, is designed to:

 

  • Ensure that all graduates have achieved the learning outcomes for the Programmes. Module Learning Outcomes are directly related to Programme Learning Outcomes and all assessments indicate the Module Learning Outcome being assessed.
  • Assess achievement, both formatively and summatively over the whole of the postgraduate degree programme.
  • Distinguish between levels of achievement and reward attainment of objectives
  • Utilize a range of assessment methods and techniques which engage student interest and foster enthusiasm for the subject.
  • Avoid/limit the possibility of cheating, plagiarism and collusion, through the design of innovative assessment tasks and through the use of available plagiarism detection software.

 

Students are informed, via Module Guides, of the nature, timing and criteria for each assessment used. All assessments are internally moderated by designated members of the Law Team and are moderated by External Examiners before issue. Careful moderation processes and scrutiny of assessment ensure equivalence of standard and appropriateness of assessment for measuring outcomes. An internal and external moderation operates likewise with regard to completed student work.

 

The assessment strategy requires the use of a diverse range of methods; research assignments, case studies and analyses offering the opportunity for students to demonstrate knowledge, understanding and application of both general and specific legal principles at a post-graduate level. Such methods will also allow students to indicate both the breadth and depth of their directed and independent research. Case studies, based on real or hypothetical facts of varying degrees of complexity, are a common assessment method adopted across the programme. Whilst most are fictional, all have elements of fact within them, and thus students are well schooled and tested in the ability to identify the material details, discuss the relevant legal principles citing appropriate primary and secondary legal sources and displaying appropriate skills in legal research and legal reasoning. Further, the case study typically requires students to make reasoned judgments and to provide ‘counsel’ to one or more of the parties involved. Legal research is clearly a vitally important element in all assessments and an essential skill which students must acquire. Some assignments will focus on researching issues of policy or procedure rather than on the application of substantive law, or require the students to provide a critical analysis of the substantive law or the law making process.

 

The extra-curricular activities are also supportive of the assessment process within the LLM programme, not just as valuable additions to the student’s CV but also as supportive of the skills which students must demonstrate in successfully completing their assessment portfolio. The activities in which the students engage as part of Mooting and Debating (MaD) and Client Interviewing allow students to develop their legal and transferrable skills, and offer the opportunity to practice and hone these skills in a non-assessed environment. Furthermore, students have the opportunity to participate in “Brown Bag Seminars”. These seminars allow the students to update the researching community about ongoing research in an informal setting. This allows students to talk about their research amongst staff and students. The seminars are available to both undergraduate and postgraduate students, giving all an excellent opportunity to network and showcase their research. 

 

The University aims to return marked assessments and feedback within 4 working weeks of the assignment submission date after internal moderation process have been completed. If this is not possible, students will be notified by the Module Leaders when the feedback is available and how it can be obtained.

 

The Academic Misconduct Regulations and associated guidance can be found here. It is the responsibility of students to ensure they are familiar with their responsibilities in regards to assessment and the implications of an allegation of academic misconduct.

 

Students should refer to the University Regulations for information on degree classifications.

 

  1. Teaching, learning and assessment matrix

 

  1. How does research influence the programme? 

 

Teaching, learning and assessment within the law department is greatly influenced by the research activities of members of the group. Not only do the students learn about others’ research, they also learn to do research and in some modules learn in the research mode. Pedagogy is reflected in by the different teaching and learning strategies that are applied to reflect the nature of the module content to encourage critical contextual analysis.

 

Law is one of six research institutes that operate at the University. The legal research conducted by the department seeks to promote academic debate within the area of law as broadly conceived, although the team has particular expertise in Criminal Law, the Law of Evidence, Constitutional and Administrative Law, Human Rights Law, Counter-Terrorism Law, Family Law, Medical Law, Civil and Criminal Procedure and Sports Law. The cluster also aims to promote academic debate and engage with the wider academic community at a regional, national and international level. The Cluster draws together the research and scholarly activity of members, embracing a range of approaches to scholarship including socio-legal, critical, doctrinal and black-letter. Members of the Law department sit on academic journal editorial boards, organize and lead scholarly associations, and present at national conferences.

 

The Law team is committed to the progressive deployment of a research active curriculum. This acknowledges a national/international concern at an institutional level with the co-terminus relationship between teaching and research. This serves both to enhance the student experience through teaching informed by current research and also to empower individual members of staff to enhance their research profile.

 

  • Dr Caroline Gibby's is Team Leader for the Law School. Caroline’s research interests focus on three areas, firstly the impact of diplomatic rules and consular activities within the UK , the development of effective training and support for practitioners who work with vulnerable clients and finally, the development of community based pro bono legal support and  education such as Sunderland Law Clinic . She has published in areas surrounding developments within legal education and wellbeing research networks which focus on enhancing the understanding of mental health and wellbeing within the legal services sector.

 

  • Ashley Lowerson is a Lecturer at Sunderland Law School and LLM Programme Leader. Ashley’s research area is Sports Law and Public Order Law. Ashley is currently a PhD candidate at Manchester Metropolitan University and is looking at whether Football Banning Orders are fit for purpose in their current form. Ashley has published in areas surrounding the context and use of the Public Order offences in England and Wales.

 

  • Amy Purvis’s research is primarily socio-legal in nature and is focused around family law and children’s rights. She has published in these areas and is currently studying for her PhD, which explores the position of children within the criminal justice system.

 

  • Chris Baldwin is a Senior Lecturer at Sunderland Law School and has been in post since 2010. His research area is criminal records. This multi-disciplinary area encompasses, among others, elements of criminal law, criminal procedure, data protection, human rights and employment law. He has published a number of peer-reviewed articles in this area, including research analysing the judicial framework which allows for the disclosure of non-conviction material on certificates used for employment screening purposes. His most recent publication (The Vetting Epidemic in England and Wales [2017] Journal of Criminal Law 81(6) 478 – 496) traced the development of criminal vetting to a series of high-profile child abduction cases and provided a critical examination of the effectiveness of the legislative response to these. His next scheduled publication, entitled The Demise of the Criminal Records Bureau, aims to offer an explanation for the abrupt closure of the Criminal Records Bureau in 2012, and ask what lessons can be learned by its replacement, the Disclosure and Barring Service. This research will be published in the Journal of Criminal Law in December 2018. His current research includes a collaborative piece with his colleague Amy Purvis, entitled The Innocence of Youth? which examines the problem of consensual child-sexting, and the potential criminalisation of young people under the existing laws which deal with this. He also hopes to defend his PhD thesis, entitled Modern criminal records: protection from harm or more harm than good?, in early 2019.

 

  • Amy Laws’ research interests are counter-terrorism, and predominantly whether there are sufficient constitutional safeguards in place to avoid unnecessary human rights breaches. This research also considers whether conventional criminal law is capable of combatting terrorism in the modern age. Amy is published in the Journal of Criminal Law and is hoping to further this research by enrolling onto a PhD.

 

  • Zach Leggett joined the University of Sunderland in 2013 as a lecturer in criminal law.  Zach's research interests are in Criminal law and Criminology and he is currently working towards a PhD through published work conducting socio-legal research into the legal responses to prostitution and trafficking in the UK. He is also a case-note writer for the Journal of Criminal law where he is regularly published.  Zach’s research directly underpins his teaching and module leadership on Criminal Law and Justice (LAWM41).

 

Research Seminars:

As stated above, University research is centred around 6 research institutes. The Faculty of Business, Law and Tourism links across a range of public and private sector organisations nationally and internationally.

The Institute can provide research and business support to help organisations develop their growth strategies. The cross cutting themes of innovation, sustainability and entrepreneurship underpin the research and enterprise activities of the clusters. The clusters have a range of members both internal and external from industry, business and the public sector.

The University works collaboratively to help improve the economic competitiveness of business partners and increase the effectiveness of public services and policy. The University Research and Innovation Strategy provides a focus for developing the relationship between policy and practice with the work of members influencing thinking in business, government and the public sector at a local, national and international level. The work of the institutions supports the university mission of being innovative, accessible, inspirational and outward looking; with international reach; and with remarkable local impact.

As part of the University Strategy, a number of seminars are held on a regular basis. These seminars are open to all staff, students and general public. They are a very good opportunity for postgraduate students to attend and network with academics and other students.

 

SECTION D EMPLOYABILITY

 

  1. How will the programme prepare me for employment?

 

The programme gives students the opportunity to develop advanced skills and knowledge which you can use in the future. Some postgraduate programmes are associated with a particular career path but most skills can be applied to a range of employment situations. The skills which this programme is designed to develop are listed below.

 

The LLM is designed to ensure that graduates are imbued with a wide variety of skills relevant to their subsequent employment, including written and verbal communication, proficiency with legal research and analysis, independent and autonomous working, working as part of a team, time management, personal responsibility, ethical conduct and professionalism. Guest lectures are arranged, in common with the LLB students, which include talks by employers and legal professionals including key members of the judiciary.

 

The Careers and Employability service are invited into the programme induction to give advice to new students. Throughout the academic year the Programme Leader liaise with the service and a number of talks are provided to the students to prepare for employment.

 

There are also opportunities for on-campus students outside your programme of study

 

  • Opportunities for students to undertake work placements/internships;
  • Opportunities to meet and work with active professionals in the field
  • Opportunities for students to showcase their work to employers

 

For information about other opportunities available to our students who study on campus, click here.

 

  1. Professional statutory or regulatory body (PSRB) accreditation.

 

PSRB accreditation is not relevant to this programme 

          

PSRB accreditation is currently being sought for this programme

 

This programme currently has PSRB accreditation

 

 

There are programme-specific regulations relating to the following. Details are given in the programme regulations:

 

The modules to be studied

 

Pass-marks for some or all modules and/or parts

(elements) of modules 

 

Placement requirements

 

Attendance requirements

 

Professional practice requirements

 

Final or overall mark for the award  

 

 

Interim or exit awards are not accredited. 


SECTION E PROGRAMME STRUCTURE AND REGULATIONS

 

Programme  Regulation/s

 

Name of programme:

LLM

 

Title of final award:

LLM Commercial Law and International Trade

 

Interim awards

Postgraduate Certificate in Higher Education

Postgraduate Diploma in Higher Education

 

Accreditation: None

 

University Regulation: Postgraduate Regulations 2014-15

 

Regulations apply to students commencing their studies from: October 2015

 

Regulations apply to students

Date the regulations apply

Intakes affected

All students

Commencement of Programme (October)

1

 

Term One

 

Core modules:

Code

Title

Credits

LAWM39

Advanced Legal Skills

30

LAWM52

Commercial Law and International Trade

30

 

Term Two

 

Core modules

Code

Title

Credits

LAWM83

Applied Legal Methods

30

LAWM50

Legal Research Project (in an area of Commercial Law)

30

 

Term Three

 

Core modules

Code

Title

Credits

LAWM49

Dissertation (in an area of Commercial Law)

60

 

Compensation between modules is not permitted in Postgraduate Certificate or Diploma or Master’s programmes

 

The final mark awarded to receive a LLM is based on the average of all Level 7 modules as per the University of Sunderland Postgraduate Regulations

 

Programme  Regulation/s

 

Name of programme:

LLM

 

Title of final award:

LLM Criminal Law & Procedure

 

Interim awards

Postgraduate Certificate in Higher Education

Postgraduate Diploma in Higher Education

 

Accreditation: None

 

University Regulation: Postgraduate Regulations 2014-15

 

Regulations apply to students commencing their studies from: October 2015

 

Regulations apply to students

Date the regulations apply

Intakes affected

All students

Commencement of Programme (October)

1

 

Term One

 

Core modules:

Code

Title

Credits

LAWM39

Advanced Legal Skills

30

LAWM41

Criminal Law & Justice

30

 

Term Two

 

Core modules

Code

Title

Credits

LAWM83

Applied Legal Methods

30

LAWM50

Legal Research Project (in area of Criminal Law & Procedure)

30

 

Term Three

 

Core modules

Code

Title

Credits

LAWM49

Dissertation (in an area of Criminal Law & Procedure)

60

 

Compensation between modules is not permitted in Postgraduate Certificate or Diploma or Master’s programmes

 

The final mark awarded to receive a LLM is based on the average of all Level 7 modules as per the University of Sunderland Postgraduate Regulations.

 

 

Programme  Regulation/s

 

Name of programme:

LLM

 

Title of final award:

LLM International Human Rights

 

Interim awards

Postgraduate Certificate in Higher Education

Postgraduate Diploma in Higher Education

 

Accreditation: None

 

University Regulation: Postgraduate Regulations 2014-15

 

Regulations apply to students commencing their studies from: October 2015

 

Regulations apply to students

Date the regulations apply

Intakes affected

All students 

Commencement of Programme (October)

1

 

Term One

 

Core modules:

Code

Title

Credits

LAWM39

Advanced Legal Skills

30

LAWM42

International Human Rights

30

 

Term Two

 

Core modules

Code

Title

Credits

LAWM83

Applied Legal Methods

30

LAWM50

Legal Research Project (in an area of Human Rights Law)

30

 

Term Three

 

Core modules

Code

Title

Credits

LAWM49

Dissertation (in an area of Human Rights Law)

60

 

Compensation between modules is not permitted in Postgraduate Certificate or Diploma or Master’s programmes

 

The final mark awarded to receive a LLM is based on the average of all Level 7 modules as per the University of Sunderland Postgraduate Regulations.

 

 

Programme  Regulation/s

 

Name of programme:

LLM

 

Title of final award:

LLM 

 

Interim awards

Postgraduate Certificate in Higher Education

Postgraduate Diploma in Higher Education

 

Accreditation: None

 

University Regulation: Postgraduate Regulations 2014-15

 

Regulations apply to students commencing their studies from: October 2015

 

Regulations apply to students

Date the regulations apply

Intakes affected

All students

Commencement of Programme (October)

1

 

Term One

 

Core modules:

Code

Title

Credits

LAWM39

Advanced Legal Skills

30

LAWM41

Criminal Law & Justice

30

LAWM52

Commercial Law & International Trade

30

LAWM42

International Human Rights

30

 

Term Two

 

Core modules

Students must pick the Legal Research Project Module and study one of the other core modules; 

Code

Title

Credits

LAWM83

Applied Legal Methods

30

LAWM50

Legal Research Project (in any area of law)

30

 

Term Three

 

Core modules

Code

Title

Credits

LAWM49

Dissertation (in an appropriate area of law)

60

 

 

Compensation between modules is not permitted in Postgraduate Certificate or Diploma or Master’s programmes

 

The final mark awarded to receive a LLM is based on the average of all Level 7 modules per the University of Sunderland Postgraduate Regulations.

Students who do not choose a specific named route can graduate with a LLM provided they have met the learning outcomes of the programme, have completed all core modules and accumulated the correct number of credits.

 

SECTION F: ADMISSIONS, LEARNING ENVIRONMENT AND SUPPORT

 

  1. What are the admissions requirements?

 

It will be usual for applicants to possess a LLB with at least a 2ii classification. Applicants who possess a professional qualification (or combination of qualifications) recognised as being the equivalent of an honours degree will also be accepted. Students who have undertaken a degree which contains an adequate amount of legal study to give them sufficient understanding of legal knowledge e.g. a Joint Honours degree where law is at least a ‘dual’ component or will have work experience within a legal field. Applicants in this position will be assessed at first instance via the application form, and where appropriate interviewed, by the Programme Leader to determine the suitability of their qualifications and to ensure that they are adequately aware of the expectations which will be placed upon them.

 

Where an applicant’s first language is not English, and where an applicant possesses qualifications other than those indicated, they will be required to demonstrate evidence of achievement of Level 6 overall in the International English Language Testing Scheme (IELTS), with all element scores at 6.0. Alternatively, a Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) score of at least 550 and/or a pass in the University’s own English Language Proficiency Test is required.

 

The University’s standard admissions requirements can be found in the university regulations.

Programme-specific requirements which are in addition to those regulations are given below. 

 

Can students enter with advanced standing?

Yes

No

 

If yes, to which Stages?

 

Stage 1

          

 

If yes, with what qualifications?

Postgraduate Certificate in Higher Education

Postgraduate Diploma in Higher Education

 

Up to two-thirds of the credits for an award may be given by advanced standing. Marks obtained for credits imported by advanced standing are not used in making an award, including the award of a Merit or Distinction or of a Postgraduate Certificate or Diploma. The award is calculated on the basis of the marks obtained from modules taught and assessed at Sunderland.

 

Credits gained by advanced standing are not given a mark or grade, and may not be used in any summative grade such as a Merit or Distinction.

 

The University has a process by which applicants whose experience to date already covers one or more modules of the programme they are applying for may seek Accreditation of Prior Learning (APL). Full details can be found here but if you think that this may be relevant to you, please contact the department which offers the programme you are interested in.

  1. What kind of support and help will there be?

 

In the department: All students are allocated with a personal tutor by the end of their induction week. The personal tutor will provide a point of contact and information, and whilst many of the student support functions will be carried out by University-wide services, the personal tutor will direct students to the relevant support services. The Department has an open-door policy, allowing students to drop in whenever necessary. Basic study skills are included in the induction programme and on Canvas. Departmental staff provide information and guidance on the possible careers available to students, through a variety of mechanisms.

 

In the university as a whole: The University provides a range of professional support services including health and well-being, counselling, disability support, and a Chaplaincy. Click on the links for further information.

 

The University provides a range of professional support services including health and well-being, counselling, disability support, and a Chaplaincy.

 

  1. What resources will I have access to?

 

On campus

          

In a partner college

 

By distance learning

 

 

On campus

General Teaching and Learning Space

          

IT

          

Library

          

VLE

          

Laboratory

 

Studio

 

Performance space

 

Other specialist

 

Technical resources 

 

 

University Library Services (ULS) supports both staff and students with the provision of a high-quality learning environment, comprehensive print collections, extensive e–resources,  1,400 study places, 300+ PCs and Macs, skills training facilities and study skills support.  There are wireless access zones at Murray and St Peter’s libraries; and both libraries loan laptops for student use. The principal holdings and services which support Law programmes are housed in St Peter’s Library which is adjacent to the Faculty for Law.

 

There around 100 PCs and Macs at St Peter’s Library, and all computers provide access to a range of software including MS Office, as well as access to library e-resources, email, Canvas  and the internet.  Each computer cluster has printing facilities.  Scanning, photocopying and printing services are also available via scanners and multi-function devices (MFDs), supported by our trained staff.  St Peter’s Library has over 400 study spaces for individuals and groups, and laptops may be used within these study spaces.  There is also an award-winning silent reading room.

 

All students have the full use of the University’s two libraries. The libraries are open extensive hours and are staffed for 59 hours a week, including weekends and evenings.  During core teaching weeks, Murray Library is open 24 hours and St Peter’s Library is open until midnight.  St Peter’s Library is open 24 hours during peak examination periods.

 

Bookstock

Selection of appropriate library materials is carried out largely by academic staff.  ULS has the responsibility to ensure that at least one copy of an item recommended in a module guide is in the stock of the library.  In practice, this also extends to other items in reading lists. 

 

The book fund has been used in recent years to extend the range of the book stock, to improve undergraduate provision by purchasing multiple copies of key texts, and increase provision of new up-to-date materials.

 

Academic Liaison Librarians ensure materials on module reading lists are available in the library in appropriate.numbers.

The availability of books for teaching and learning is enhanced in a variety of ways:

  • The library will purchase an ebook version of titles on recommended reading lists if available, otherwise a hard copy will be available in the Library.
  • Production of online reading lists which may include digitised book chapters and journal articles (copyright permitting)
  • Short Loan: a collection of books and other materials in heavy demand that are available for overnight loan, making them more accessible for students
  • The provision of 1-week loan items, particularly duplicate copies of key texts, to improve availability for part-time students
  • All students have access to the Inter-Library Loans service, whose purpose is to obtain books and documents that ULS does not hold, usually within ten days of request

 

Periodicals
ULS subscribes to tens of thousands of journal titles, in both print and electronic format.  Usage is monitored and the portfolio of titles is continually reviewed.

Search and retrieval tools include an online resource discovery tool (Discover) to access a range of e-resources including journal articles and a range of subject-specific databases, including:

  • English Law Reports (via HeinOnline)
  • JustisOne
  • LexisLibrary
  • Westlaw

 

Online.Information
Staff and students can access library resources either on-campus or off-campus via the web.  ULS maintains a website www.library.sunderland.ac.uk which provides a gateway to information resources and services for students both on- and off-campus.  Tailored resources and support are available from specific subject areas of the ULS website.

 

Single Sign-On (SSO) authentication using university userID and password is used to allow staff and students access to extensive subscription e-resources regardless of their location.


Liaison
Excellent communication has been achieved with University Faculties, key examples of which are:

  • The Director or Assistant Director of SLS sit on the following university boards:

-          Academic Board

-          Academic Development

-          Academic Experience

-          Academic Futures

  • Library management staff have explicit responsibility for liaison with the Faculties and for managing the library to meet the needs of users
  • Library management staff sit on the following Faculty Boards:

-          Faculty Experience

-          Faculty Futures

-          Quality Management sub-committee

-          Research sub-committee

  • Academic Liaison Librarians at each site have direct liaison responsibility with Faculty staff and students.

 

Evaluation and feedback

Evaluation and feedback are provided by the University's systems for course evaluation and monitoring.  Evaluation and monitoring reports are considered by Faculty Quality and Assessment Boards, which are attended by the appropriate Library management staff.

 

Communication with students
This is achieved in various ways:

  • A professional member of staff is available in all libraries during open hours
  • Online customer feedback service where comments and questions can be submitted and responses received
  • ULS Facebook page and Twitter account enable a two-way conversation between students and ULS
  • Subject-specific and off-campus blogs keeping students up-to-date with current library issues and useful new resources
  • Livechat - real-time online enquiry service
  • News area on library web site for current issues and events
  • Students' fora held once a term where students have the opportunity to raise problems and discuss the service development with library staff
  • Customer notice board in each site library, and in faculty buildings
  • Questions about library services are included in the University's student questionnaire
  • Library staff attend staff/student consultative committees as appropriate

 

Evaluation and feedback

Evaluation and feedback are provided by the University's systems for course evaluation and monitoring.  Evaluation and monitoring reports are considered by Faculty Quality and Assessment Boards, which are attended by the appropriate library management staff.

 

Assignment Services

ULS manages two campus Assignment Services, one in the Murray Library and the other in St Peter’s Library.  Both provide facilities for the submission and collection of student work.

 

Skills for Learning and Skillability

All new students are offered an induction to Library Services at the start of their first term.  In addition, Academic Liaison Librarians work with academic staff to provide both group and individual skills sessions to develop students’ knowledge of electronic resources appropriate to their subject area.  Sessions include skills training in using online journals, searching for quality academic information on the internet, and understanding plagiarism, citation and referencing.

Online tutorials are also available from the library web site and customised real-time support sessions using various online conferencing/meeting tools which have been developed for off-campus students.  These are complemented by the Skillability programme of workshops across a range of Skills for Learning topics, and these are open to all students.

 

Help and support

The library provides support to users in a number of ways:

  • Face to face in the libraries via staffed helpdesks, roving support from library staff and group or one to one skills sessions
  • Named librarians are available for specific subject support
  • Online skills tutorials available from the library website
  • A dedicated email service where users may contact the library with any queries and will receive a reply with 24 hours
  • “Live Chat”- real-time online help available at various periods throughout the day, enabling users to chat with library staff and receive instant support
  • Out of hours IT telephone support service

 

Distance Learners

University of Sunderland distance learners are offered where possible a parity of service equal to the on-campus students.  They have an online support service delivered via the library website and e-mail, which is provided by the Distance Learning Co-ordinator and support staff.

 

Researcher Support

Support is also provided via the Academic Liaison Librarians for all PhD researchers.  This is done through a ‘Buddy’ system in conjunction with the Graduate Research School. Support is also provided through the Supporting your Research area on the library website. The library also maintains the repository, SURE, for academic research material.

 

Disability Support

A dedicated disability support co-ordinator is based at Murray Library offering help and advice on library services.  Extra services are also available, such as the use of assistive technology, extended loan periods, postal loans, photocopying and retrieving items.

 

Access to other Libraries

Academic staff, researchers, part-time students, distance learners, postgraduates on taught courses and students on placement may also use other University libraries participating in the SCONUL Access scheme.

There are well-developed regional networks which provide staff and students with access to a range of other libraries. The Libraries Access Sunderland Scheme (LASh) gives students access to the college and public libraries in the City of Sunderland, and through Tyne & Wear Information Resources for Learning (TWIRL), to all the further education college libraries in Tyne and Wear.

 

Laura Wilkinson – Academic Liaison Librarian (Law)

January 2015

 

Information about the University’s facilities can be found here.

 

  1. Are there any additional costs on top of the fees?

 

No, but all students buy some study materials such as books and provide their own basic study materials.

          

Yes (optional) All students buy some study materials such as books and provide their own basic study materials. In addition there are some are additional costs for optional activities associated with the programme (see below)

 

Yes (essential) All students buy some study materials such as books and provide their own basic study materials. In addition there are some are essential additional costs associated with the programme (see below)

 

 

  1. How are student views represented?

 

All taught programmes in the University have student representatives for each programme who meet in a Student-Staff Liaison Committee (SSLC) where they can raise students’ views and concerns. The Students’ Union and the faculties together provide training for student representatives. SSLCs and focus groups are also used to obtain student feedback on plans for developing existing programmes and designing new ones. Feedback on your programme is obtained every year through module questionnaires and informs the annual review of your programme. Student representatives are also invited to attend Programme and Module Studies Boards which manage the delivery and development of programmes and modules.  Various Faculty committees, particularly Faculty Academic Experience Committee, Academic Development Committee and Quality Management Sub-Committee also have student representation. This allows students to be involved in higher-level plans for teaching and learning. There is a parallel structure at university level on which students are represented by sabbatical officers who are the elected leaders of the Students’ Union.

 

The University’s student representation and feedback policy can be found here.

 

SECTION G QUALITY MANAGEMENT 

 

  1. National subject benchmarks

 

The Quality Assurance Agency for Higher Education publishes benchmark statements which give guidance as to the skills and knowledge which graduates in various subjects and in certain types of degree are expected to have. They do not cover all subjects at postgraduate level but those which exist can be found at here.

 

Are there any benchmark statements for this programme?

YES

NO

 

https://www.qaa.ac.uk/docs/qaa/subject-benchmark-statements/sbs-law-15.pdf?sfvrsn=ff99f781_10

 

The benchmarks are also based on the QAA’s publication on the Framework for Higher Education Qualifications (FHEQ) which defines the generic skills and abilities expected of students who have achieved awards at a given level and with which our programmes align. The FHEQ can be found here.

 

  1. How are the quality and standards of the programme assured?

 

The programme is managed and quality assured through the University’s standard processes. Programmes are overseen by Module and Programme Studies Boards which include student representatives. Each year each module leader provides a brief report on the delivery of the module, identifying strengths and areas for development, and the programme team reviews the programme as a whole. The purpose of this is to ensure that the programme is coherent and up-to-date, with suitable progression through the programme, and a good fit (alignment) between what is taught and how students learn and are assessed - the learning outcomes, content and types of teaching, learning and assessment. Student achievement, including progress through the programme and the way in which the final award is made, is kept under review. The programme review report is sent to the Programme Studies Board and the Faculty in turn reports issues to the University’s Quality Management Sub-Committee (QMSC).

 

External examiners are appointed to oversee and advise on the assessment of the programme. They ensure that the standards of the programme are comparable with those of similar programmes elsewhere in the UK and are also involved in the assessment process to make sure that it is fair. They are invited to comment on proposed developments to the programme. Their reports are sent to the Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Academic) as well as to the Faculty so that issues of concern can be addressed.

 

All programmes are reviewed by the University on a six-yearly cycle to identify good practice and areas for enhancement. Programmes are revalidated through this review process. These reviews include at least one academic specialist in the subject area concerned from another UK university. Quality Assurance Agency (QAA) review reports for Sunderland can be found here.

 

Further information about our quality processes can be found here.

 


 

Quality Handbook

 

SITS SUMMARY PROGRAMME/SHORT COURSE DETAILS

(Form to be completed electronically by the Faculty and forwarded to the Quality Support Officer supporting the Approval event, or sent to Planning & MI for faculty devolved processes before sending to Quality Support (with the exception of Short Courses and GRS))

This form is to be completed when a new programme has been validated and approved so that the programme codes and progression and awards rules can be set up in SITS.  This also needs to be completed at periodic course review when there have been significant modifications to the course.

 

Please note that all details entered onto this form will go onto every student’s record that is attached to this programme and it is therefore imperative that the information is correct. 

 

1 Programme Details

New/ Modification/Review:

Please ensure the minor modification document is included

Modification

Full Programme Title (including award):

LLM

On completion of a specific route, students can be awarded;

LLM Criminal Law & Procedure

LLM International Human Rights

LLM Commercial Law and International Trade

If replacement for existing course, specify title and course code:

 

Qualification Aim:

e.g. Foundation degree of Science, Bachelor of Arts (Honours)

Masters

Qualification Level (NQF level):

7

HECoS Code

See HESA Website https://www.hesa.ac.uk/innovation/hecos

 

Is the programme Open or Closed:

A course is defined as closed when specifically designed for a certain group of people and not also available to other suitably qualified candidates. It may be designed for a particular company however if the same course is also run for other suitably qualified candidates, not employed by the company, then the course is not closed. If the programme is closed please specify who it is for.

Open

Faculty and School:

Business, Law and Tourism

Sunderland Law School

Location of study:

e.g. Sunderland in London, Sunderland

Sunderland

Last Date Registration (PBI) Number of days:

The number of days after the start date of the course that it is possible for students to register onto it. It is also referred to as the migration date. This is normally 18 days.  Please indicate if more or less than this number.

 

Programme Leader:

Ashley Lowerson

Academic Team for the programme:

Law

Date of Approval/Modification/Review:

April 2019 (Modification)

Date of next review (QS to complete):

2021/22

Accrediting Body or PSRB
If yes please attach a completed PSRB form

No

 

Programme Specific Regulations

If yes, please attach a completed Programme Specific Regulations form

No

 

Does this programme come under the Unistats return?

The following are excluded from the Unistats return:

  • Programmes of 120 credits or less (including top ups)
  • ‘Closed’ Courses
  • Programmes of one year’s full-time duration even if they have more than 120 credits
  • Programmes which will be delivered only to overseas students
  • Postgraduate programmes
  • A course that is run as part of an apprenticeship

No

Is this an undergraduate programme whose primary (but not necessarily only) purpose is to improve the effectiveness of practitioners registered with a professional body? If yes, please specify which body:

https://www.hesa.ac.uk/collection/c16061/accreditation_list/

e.g. a short course aimed at registered nurses

No


Professional Body:

 

 

Interim  Awards

If a student does not achieve their qualification aim, what lower awards might they be entitled to, assuming they have the credits?  The subject title for any lower level award should be given where this is different from the subject of the qualification aim. This should be the same title as the main award unless an alternative is approved via a Programme Specific Regulation.

 

Interim Award Title

Credits Required

Interim Structure

Please show mandatory requirements if applicable e.g. core module codes

1

Postgraduate Certificate in Higher Education

60

N/A

2

Postgraduate Diploma in Higher Education

120

N/A

 

2 Mode of Attendance

 

Tick all that apply

Min number of years

Max number of years

Overall length of programme in years/months/weeks

Intake dates (months)

Max and min cohort sizes

01 Full-time*

1

4

12 months

October

 

31 Part-time*

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sandwich*

 

 

 

 

 

 

Off-campus

 

 

 

 

 

 

On-campus

 

 

 

 

 

Distance learning

 

 

 

 

 

 

Work-based learning

 

 

 

 

 

 

Collaborative

 

 

 

 

 

 

Proposed start-date (month/year)

 

Full-time (031)

Full-time students are those expected to study for more than 24 weeks per year, for a minimum of 21 hours per week and are paying the full-time fee. (Note – this includes any work based learning).

Part-time (031)

Students who are expected to study for less than 21 hours per week.

Sandwich

Please ensure you include the title of the sandwich programme in Section 3

 

 

3 Admissions

An admissions or MCR code will be created to allow student applications.

Tick appropriate

UUCAS

Universities and Colleges Admission Services

Required for full-time undergraduate programmes only.

 

DDirect Entry

Required for FT, PT, PG and PGR, only where students will be admitted through the admissions teams or where the programme needs to be advertised on the web.

GGTTR

Graduate Teacher Training Registry
Education only, where applicable

 

 

4 Collaborative Provision

UK

 

Overseas

 

Institution

Collaborative Model

Funding Arrangements

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Does this course offer a sandwich placement?

If yes, please indicate which programme year this placement is to take place.

No

 

Is this sandwich placement compulsory or optional?

N/A

Does this course offer a study abroad year out? If yes, please indicate which programme year this placement is to take place.

No

Is this study abroad year out compulsory or optional?

N/A

 

5  Major Source of Funding

Please note this relates to funding for the programme and not individual students

Office for Students (previously known as HEFCE)

Education & Skills Funding Agency (includes Degree Apprenticeships)

 

DfE   https://www.gov.uk/government/organisations/national-college-for-teaching-and-leadership

 

Wholly NHS Funded

Partially NHS Funded

Departments of Health/NHS/Social Care. For all Health funded programmes please indicate whether the programme is eligible for an NHS Bursary

-  Eligible for NHS BursaryY/N

 

 

 

Other Funding:

 

– If Other, please specify:

 

 

 

6 Education Programmes Only

This section must be completed for any programmes marked above as ‘NCTL’ funded

Teacher Training Identifier:

 

Teacher Training Scope:

 

Qualification Aim:

QTS and academic award, QTS only, QTS by assessment only

 

 

7 Fees

Where non-standard fees are proposed this will need approval by Fees and Bursaries Group before the programme can be advertised.

Undergraduate:

(Please select option)

Standard

Other (please state):

 

Postgraduate:

(Please select option)

Fees stated are for full time programmes

All part-time programmes should be Band 2

Band 1 (classroom) £6000 (Sunderland) £6500 (UoSiL)

Band 2 (mixed) £6500 (Sunderland) £6800 (UoSiL)

Band 3 (laboratory) £7000 (Sunderland) £7200 (UoSiL)

MBA: £11500 (Sunderland) £11500 (UoSiL)

Other: (please state)

 

 

 

 

   DETAILS SUPPLIED BY:………………………………………        DATE:………………………..

 


Module List

Award, Route (if applicable) and Level

New/Existing/ Modified  Module (N/E/MM)

Module Title

Module Code

Module Credit Value

Criminal Law  Core/Option

International Human Rights Core/Option

Commercial and Law Core/Option

International Trade Law Core/Option

Law Core/Option

Assessment weighting – give % weight for each assessment item

Pre-/co-requisites

Module leader

Other comment (if required)

Date of Entry on SITS.

N/MM only (After event)

JACS Code

HECoS Code

Academic Team

PG Cert

E

Advanced Legal Skills

LAWM39

30

C

C

C

C

C

A1 – 40

A2 - 60

NONE

Ashley Lowerson

 

 

M100

 

 

E

Criminal Law & Justice

LAWM41

30

C

O

O

O

O

A1 – 100

Zach Leggett

 

 

M100

 

 

E

International Human Rights

LAWM42

30

O

C

O

O

O

A1 – 100

James Ibinson

 

 

M100

 

 

E

Commercial Law and International Trade

LAWM52

30

O

O

C

O

O

A1 – 100

Gavin Jackson

 

 

M100

 

 

PG Dip

E

Applied Legal Methods

LAWM83

30

C

C

C

C

C

A1 – 30

A2 – 70

Ashley Lowerson

 

 

M100

100485

 

E

Legal Research Project

LAWM50

30

C

C

C

C

C

A1 - 100

Zach Leggett

 

 

M100

 

 

LLM

E

Dissertation

LAWM49

60

C

C

C

C

C

A1 – 100

Caroline Gibby

 

 

M100

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Appendix One:Matrix of modes of teaching, learning and assessment

 

Module

Code

Core / optional

Modes of T&L

Modes of Assessment

LO
S1

LO
S2

LO
S3

LO
S4

LO
S5

LO
S6

LO
S7

LO
K1

LO
K2

LO
K3

LO K4

LO

K5

Advanced Legal Skills

LAWM39

Core

Workshops

Book Review & Dissertation Plan

          

          

 

          

 

 

 

 

          

          

          

 

 

Applied Legal Methods

LAWM83

Core

Workshops

Written coursework & Presentation

          

          

          

 

 

 

 

          

          

          

 

 

Criminal Law & Justice

LAWM41

Core

Workshops

5000 word piece of written coursework

 

 

 

          

          

 

 

 

 

 

          

 

International Human Rights Law

LAWM42

Core

Workshops

5000 word piece of written coursework

 

 

 

          

          

 

 

 

 

 

          

 

Commercial Law and International Trade

LAWM52

Core

Workshops

5000 word piece of written coursework

 

 

 

          

          

 

 

 

 

 

          

 

Legal Research Project

LAWM50

Core

Workshops

Written coursework & Viva

 

 

 

          

          

 

 

 

 

 

          

 


Dissertation

LAWM49

Core

Workshops

15,000 word legal research dissertation