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LLM Legal Practice (LPC)

 

 

 

 

Programme Specification

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sunderland Law School

 

Faculty of Business & Law

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SECTION A: CORE INFORMATION

 

  1. Name  of programme:

 

LLM Legal Practice (LPC)

 

  1. Award title:

 

LLM Legal Practice (LPC)

 

  1. Programme linkage:

 

Is this part of a group of linked programmes between which students can transfer at agreed points? (e.g. a group of programmes with a common set of taught modules)

 

 

 

 

  1. Is the programme a top-up only?

 

 

 

 

  1. Level of award:

 

Level 7

 

  1. Awarding body:

 

University of Sunderland

 

  1. Which department is it in?

 

Sunderland Law School

 

  1. Programme Studies Board:

 

Sunderland Law School

 

  1. Programme Leader:

 

Caroline Gibby

 

  1. How and where can I study the programme?

Tick all boxes that apply

 

At Sunderland:

 

Full-time on campus

          

Part-time on campus

          

As work-based learning full-time

 

As work-based learning part-time

 

As a full-time sandwich course

 

As a part-time sandwich course

 

By distance learning

 

 

At the University of Sunderland London campus: 

 

Full-time on campus

 

Part-time on campus

 

As work-based learning full-time

 

As work-based learning part-time

 

As a full-time sandwich course

 

As a part-time sandwich course

 

By distance learning

 

 

At a partner college:

 

Full-time in the UK 

 

Part-time in the UK

 

Full-time overseas

 

Part-time overseas

 

By distance learning

 

As a full-time sandwich course in the UK

 

As a part-time sandwich course in the UK

 

As a full-time sandwich course overseas

 

As a part-time sandwich course overseas

 

As work-based learning full-time in the UK 

 

As work-based learning part-time overseas

 

Other (please specify)

 

 

It is anticipated that most student will opt to study the programme full-time in one year. However students will have the option to study part-time over two years completing 90 credits in each year.

 

  1. How long does the programme take?

 

 

Min number of years / months

Max number of years / months

Full-time

1

4

Part-time

2

5

Distance learning

 

 

Work-based learning

 

 

 

 

For start-dates please see the current edition of the Prospectus or contact the relevant department at the University. For start-dates for programmes delivered in a partner college, please contact the college.

 

 

 

SECTION B – FURTHER CORE INFORMATION

 

  1. Learning and teaching strategy.

 

This programme is aimed at law graduates or graduates of other disciplines who have completed a Graduate Diploma in Law (GDL) and who wish to qualify as a solicitor in England & Wales. The teaching and learning strategy adopted throughout the programme aims to embed transferable legal and professional skills whilst providing students with practical experience in a professional legal environment.

 

The approach taken across the programme seeks to:

 

  • Facilitate the acquisition of knowledge and key transferable legal skills;
  • Enable students to develop the ability to carry out basic transactions required of them in the early part of their careers in law and to prepare them for Day 1 of their period of recognised legal training;
  • Encourage students to develop into independent, life-long learners;
  • Provide a balance between formative and summative assessment methods;
  • Recognise the diversity of the student intake;
  • Provide students with a range of assessment mediums through which they can best express their abilities;
  • Provide students with legal training in a live client environment to embed skills and experience and enhance their employability and competitiveness in the employment market; and
  • Provide students with the vocational stage of their training prescribed by the Solicitors’ Regulation Authority and required for qualification as a solicitor.

 

This programme has been developed in a way that is entirely consistent with the University’s Learning and Teaching Plan, and in a way that puts into practice the programme team’s research in the field of clinical legal education which has been carried out through the development of Sunderland Student Law Clinic and participation in the wide clinical legal education community.

 

The Legal Practice Course (LPC) element of the programme is prescribed by the Solicitors’ Regulation Authority (SRA) and required by any student who wishes to qualify as a solicitor in England & Wales, whilst also being accepted in many other jurisdictions. The qualification is also frequently an essential requirement of employers seeking to recruit to entry level positions, including paralegal roles, within the legal profession.

 

The programme is vocational in nature and therefore the focus is on the acquisition and development of core transferable legal skills whilst also providing students with experience of working in a live client, professional legal environment. A core theme which pervades the programme is a working knowledge of professional conduct requirements of solicitors and law firms. In this way graduates of the programme will be competitive for entry level paralegal positions and training contracts, having acquired the knowledge and developed the many skills that will enable them to make an instant contribution to their employers’ businesses.

 

A range of assessment methods are used although many of these are unseen, supervised assessments as prescribed by the Solicitors’ Regulation Authority (SRA) in relation to which the programme team has no discretion. Nevertheless assignments are designed to further students’ development of skills and will be largely transactional in nature. Students can expect to draft documents and letters of legal advice as part of their summative assessments.  

 

The teaching and learning strategy centres on live client practical experience where possible with simulated client scenarios also used to add context in many of the modules. In each case the focus is on turning experience into learning.

 

In each of the Core Practice Areas of Litigation & Advocacy, Property Law & Practice and Business Law & Practice, along with the three Vocational Elective modules, students can expect two taught sessions each week; generally, a lecture in one week will be aimed at introducing the subject matter which will form the basis for a workshop the following week. This follow-up workshop will be a practical, immersive and interactive session centred on transactional tasks for which students will prepare in advance. Structuring teaching sessions in this way builds in time for independent study and advance preparation. In the workshop itself students will engage in simulated exercises to embed knowledge and develop skills. Each workshop will finish with an opportunity to reflect on what has been learned and how this will shape future learning and practice.

 

Reflecting the practical nature of the programme and the aims of each student to qualify as a solicitor, students will be taught by staff who are qualified practising solicitors themselves. Students will benefit from at least a 12:1 student to staff ratio which will allow staff to work with students as individuals. Moreover, students’ live client practical work will be in ‘student firms’ with no more than 6 students supervised by a qualified solicitor who will also act as those students’ personal tutor. This will allow for continuous and in-depth formative feedback and a high level of personal contact time and pastoral support. 

 

Feedback will be collected regularly by Module Leaders both formally and informally using Survey Monkey, the Staff Student Liaison Committee and through formal discussions with the Programme Leader. Students will also have regular contact with their dedicated Personal Tutor. Students will also complete the Postgraduate Taught Experience Survey.

 

Teaching staff will use a creative range of methods and software to facilitate teaching. Socrative, an app which allows students to access material live in class on their iPads, iPhones and Android devices, or online, whilst the tutor controls the flow of information to those devices such as presentations, quizzes and self-assessment exercises, will be used.

 

Lectures will use a range of methods of presenting information and will encourage debate and discussion to ensure that even the didactic element of teaching is constantly interactive and engaging.

 

  1. Retention strategy.

 

This is a demanding and challenging programme which will require significant and consistent engagement by students if they are to succeed. Successful completion of the programme will require dedication, commitment and the ability to deal with a high workload and a significant number of unseen, supervised assessments over the course of the programme. This reality is common to all Legal Practice Courses and other postgraduate programmes.

 

Students are assisted in achieving their goals by a teaching and learning strategy that is designed to be interactive and engaging and which focuses on ‘learning through doing’, and comprehensive pastoral support.

 

The low staff to student ratio, high level of contact time and focus on experiential learning through the simulated transactional activities which take place in the classroom and the live client work which takes place in Clinic are designed to facilitate student engagement. Students will benefit from the close support of, and daily contact with, staff who are themselves qualified solicitors.

 

This gives rise to exceptional pastoral support which is aimed at identifying and resolving barriers to learning quickly whilst ensuring that students are assisted in achieving their potential.

 

Each student will be allocated a dedicated personal tutor which will be the member of staff responsible for supervising that student in Sunderland Student Law Clinic. Personal tutors will no doubt encounter their tutees on other modules as well. The practical effect of this is that students can expect to have contact time with their personal tutor each day they are at university. A structured programme of formal meetings in addition aimed at reviewing attainment and progress will also take place throughout the year.

 

Classroom tutors will record observations and interactions during workshops to enable ‘follow up’ in future sessions. This will allow tutors to review students’ progress throughout the programme whilst enabling them to make targeted interventions to meet the needs of individual students.

 

Tutors will become aware extremely quickly in the event that students begin to disengage, allowing them to take steps to facilitate re-engagement.

 

Student support is at the heart of our activities within Sunderland Law School and the level of support offered is frequently commented on in feedback across all programmes and has been recognised through the NSS.  The School prides itself its open door policy, its responsiveness to student queries whether in person or by email and the willingness of all staff to help wherever possible, rather than simply passing the student on to someone else.

 

The Faculty is unique within the University in that it also provides three dedicated full-time ‘Student Academic Advisors’, based in the student learning space in the Reg Vardy building. Students can drop in to make use of this resource, or can make an appointment to gain additional support with things such as referencing, essay writing, and general academic and research skills.

 

  1. Any other information

 

The SRA sets down very precise requirements and prescribes each of the Learning Outcomes for a course which incorporates the LPC. To that extent the programme team is somewhat restricted in the design of the programme, especially in terms of what is to be taught and how it is to be assessed. This programme specification complies with, and in many areas exceeds, the minimum requirements of the SRA.

 

In particular it will be observed that the Learning Outcomes are numerous and specific. Each of the Learning Outcomes must be delivered and developed through the teaching and learning activities across the programme and each must remain potentially assessable in that students may not be informed what will and what will not feature in any assessment.

 

However not all of the Learning Outcomes must feature in the assessments; the SRA requires that a robust selection of the Learning Outcomes must be tested in each assessment.

 

Therefore some Learning Outcomes will not feature in summative assessments and those that do not feature need not otherwise assessed in order for students to successfully complete the programme. That said each assessment will take into account the Programme Learning Outcomes and so any student successfully completing their modular assessments will have achieved the Programme Learning Outcomes.

 

This approach to Learning Outcomes differs to that taken by the University of Sunderland on other programmes due to the need to comply with the precise requirements of the SRA and students will be carefully briefed as to the implications of this approach at the outset of the programme.

 

Notwithstanding the extent to which the course is prescribed, the SRA does encourage innovation in delivery provided the method chosen has a clear pedagogical grounding. In this way we have been innovative through the incorporation of a mandatory live client experience and the way we deliver the content more evenly across the academic year than is usual in such programmes, so as to increase students’ genuine exposure to skills and experience whilst making the workload more manageable.

 

SECTION C - TEACHING AND LEARNING

 

  1. What is the programme about?

 

The aims of the course are to:-

 

  1. Prepare students for work-based learning; and
  2. Provide a general foundation for legal practice.

 

This programme will enable students to study a professional vocational LLM whilst obtaining the Legal Practice Course qualification that they must achieve in order to qualify as a Solicitor in England & Wales and which is now a requirement for many entry level positions in the legal profession, including paralegal roles.

 

The programme is structured to allow for the formative development of skills and experience throughout Semesters 1 and 2, culminating with the completion of a 60 credit dissertation in Semester 3 in which they will reflect on their experience to critically evaluate a current issue in relation to an aspect of legal practice in which they have an interest. This will allow students to make the most of their year of study in undertaking a project that will add real value to their qualification from the perspective of employers that the student is interested in.

 

It is hoped that the project will allow students to develop and display their commercial awareness in a way that really illuminates their job applications and enables employers to differentiate between candidates.

 

Due to the pedagogical aims of the programme the LPC is not offered in isolation and a Postgraduate Diploma is not available as an exit award. A Postgraduate Certificate in Legal Practice is available upon the completion of at least 60 credits.

 

Ultimately the aim of this programme is to ensure that students leave able to compete for entry level legal positions and ready for Day 1 of their careers in legal practice and with the skills and experience necessary to succeed in their period of recognised training whilst adding real value to their employers’ businesses.

 

  1. What will I know or be able to do at the end of the programme?

 

Learning Outcomes Postgraduate Certificate – Skills

 

By the end of this part of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

 

S1. The ability to deal with complex issues both systematically and creatively, making sound judgements, and communicating conclusions clearly to specialist and non-specialist audiences

S2. The ability to produce academic writing to a high standard of scholarship, including writing effectively in the English language and presenting information and ideas in a manner that meets relevant academic conventions

S3. Expertise in a range of transferable research approaches and methodologies; along with advanced skills in self-selected legal research strategies

 

Learning Outcomes Postgraduate Certificate – Knowledge

 

By the end of this part of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

 

K1. A critical appreciation of the political, social and/or economic contexts within which the substantive legal principles operate

K2. A comprehensive understanding of techniques applicable to legal research and advanced scholarship

K3. A thorough and critical appreciation of current issues in complex areas of law doctrine and theory

 

Learning Outcomes Masters in Law Legal Practice (LPC) – Skills

 

By the end of this part of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

 

S4. The ability to apply legal and related knowledge systematically to complex problems by constructing arguments, recognising potential alternative conclusions and providing supporting reasons

S5. The ability to think critically and creatively about complex legal issues, demonstrating a capacity for independent thinking

S6. An ability to identify, and to proficiently research, a relevant and current legal issue by gathering information in a focused independent fashion, evaluating and synthesising this data to arrive at a reasoned and logical conclusion within an extended piece of independent work

S7. Self-direction and originality in tackling and solving problems, and act autonomously in planning and implementing tasks

S8.  Research and apply knowledge of law and legal practice accurately and effectively

S9.  Identify the client’s objectives and different means of achieving those objectives and be aware of a) the financial, commercial and personal priorities and constraints to be taken into account and b) the costs, benefits and risks involved in transactions or courses of action taken

S10. Perform the tasks required to advance transactions or matters

S11. Demonstrate skills in:

  • Professional Conduct and Regulation
  • The core practice areas of Business Law and Practice, Property Law and Practice, Litigation and the areas of Wills & Administration of Estates and Taxation
  • The course skills of Practical Legal Research, Writing, Drafting, Interviewing and Advising, and Advocacy.

S12.  Be able to transfer the skills learnt in one context to another

S13.  Demonstrate their skills in the three areas covered by their choice of electives

S14.  Reflect on their learning and their learning needs

 

 

 

Learning Outcomes Masters in Law Legal Practice (LPC) – Knowledge

By the end of this part of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

 

K4. A systematic understanding of a chosen area of law, and a critical awareness of current problems and/or new insights, much of which is at, or informed by, the forefront of their academic discipline, field of study, or area of professional practice

K5. Originality in the application of knowledge in a chosen area of law, together with a practical understanding of how established techniques of research and enquiry are used to create and interpret that knowledge

K6.  Understand the key ethical requirements contained in the SRA Principles of Regulation and Code of Conduct, understand where these may impact and be able to apply them in context

K7.   Demonstrate their knowledge and understanding of:

  • Professional Conduct and Regulation
  • The core practice areas of Business Law and Practice, Property Law and Practice, Litigation and the areas of Wills & Administration of Estates and Taxation
  • The course skills of Practical Legal Research, Writing, Drafting, Interviewing and Advising, and Advocacy.

 

  1. What will the programme consist of?

 

This programme will lead to a Masters qualification (200 credits). Students may leave with a Postgraduate Certificate on successful completion of 60 credits as an interim award. Students will complete 140 credits in Semesters 1 and 2 in which they will satisfy the requirements of the SRA in respect of the LPC element of the programme. The programme culminates in a major piece of independent work in the Legal Practice Project which accounts for the final 60 credits which make up the full LLM. All modules are at postgraduate level (level 7 in the UK’s national scheme). The summary below describes briefly what is contained in the programme. The programme structure, including a detailed list of modules, can be found in the programme regulations.

 

The content and structure of the LPC is closely regulated by the SRA and, accordingly, there is very little variation in the content or structure of the courses offered by the other 26 providers of the qualification nationwide. The following sets out what such programmes usually include and how this programme will differ.

 

Customarily, students undergo an extremely intensive course of study. The Core Practice Areas of Litigation (Civil & Criminal), Property Law & Practice and Business Law & Practice (including Business Accounts & Taxation), along with Professional Conduct & Regulation (PCR), Solicitors’ Accounts and Wills & Administration of Estates are all typically assessed within Stage 1 of the programme (September-January). The Core Practice Areas must be assessed by way of 3 hour unseen, supervised assessments and PCR and Solicitors’ Accounts are assessed by way of 2 hour unseen, supervised assessments.

 

Students must also be assessed in the Course Skills of Advocacy, Drafting, Legal Writing, Practical Legal Research and Interviewing & Advising on a Competent/Not Yet Competent basis. All Course Skills are also traditionally assessed in Stage 1 of the programme, frequently integrated into other modules.

 

Typically, in Stage 2 (February-May) students study 3 Vocational Elective modules each examined by way of 3 hour unseen, supervised assessments.

 

There is a mandatory pass mark of 50% across the programme. The LPC Course Skills are assessed on a Competent/Not Yet Competent basis.

 

Nevertheless, the SRA does permit, and indeed welcome, flexibility and innovation in course design-where supported by learning theory- provided the Learning Outcomes are maintained.

 

It is for this reason that this programme ‘blends’ stages 1 and 2 in order to deliver a more balanced workload across the programme to facilitate the acquisition of genuine skills and experience through more prolonged exposure.

 

The programme is innovative in that it incorporates a mandatory live-client module in which students will develop and be assessed in three of the five Course Skills required by the SRA through participation in Sunderland Student Law Clinic. Students will advise real clients under the supervision of qualified solicitors, working on cases that complement their Vocational Elective choices so far as possible.

 

This makes the programme more relevant to the needs of students and employers in our region. Law graduates are increasingly required to have practical experience even for entry level jobs in the legal industry and the integration of Sunderland Student Law Clinic into the programme provides students with such experience in a genuine professional legal environment. Students will produce their assessed work in the Course Skills of Interviewing and Advising, Legal Writing and Practical Legal Research in the context of their live client work, which will in turn compliment and be related to the three Vocational Elective modules they have chosen to study. Wills & Administration of Estates will be delivered separately, incorporating the Course Skill of Drafting.

 

Students will choose three optional Vocational Elective modules from a choice of six. Students will study one such module in Semester 1 and two in Semester 2. The six optional electives have been broadly grouped into two themes aimed at enabling students to tailor the programme towards the area of legal practice they are most interested in should they wish to do so.

 

Students keen on pursuing a career in a regional, national or international law firm may select the Commercial Route comprising Commercial Property, Commercial Contracts and Employment Law & Practice.

 

Students who aim to practice in a small to medium sized local or regional firm may opt for the High Street Route comprising Family Law & Practice, Housing Law & Practice and Advanced Personal Injury Law & Practice.

 

Students are free to select any three options from the six available if they do not wish to follow one of the specified routes. For example, many students may opt to select Advanced Personal Injury Law & Practice as there is a high volume of jobs in this industry in our region with both claimant firms and insurers, and the module will explore personal injury litigation from both a claimant and a defendant perspective. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The following sets out the structure for the programme across the year: -

 

Title

Credits

Pass Mark

Assessment Method

Semester 1 – September to January

Business Law & Practice (inc. Taxation & Business Accounts)

25

50%

4 hr unseen open- book supervised assessment

Property Law & Practice

20

50%

3 hr unseen open- book  supervised assessment

1 Elective

10

 

50%

3 hr unseen open- book  supervised assessment

Semester 2 – January to May

Litigation & Advocacy

20

50% (Course Skill: Advocacy is C/NYC)

3 hr unseen open- book  supervised assessment

Wills & Administration of Estates

15

50%

Assessed through Course Skill of Drafting - C/NYC

Unsupervised Coursework

Solicitors’ Accounts

5

50%

2 hr unseen open- book  supervised assessment

1 Elective

10

50%

3 hr unseen open- book  supervised assessment

1 Elective

10

50%

3 hr unseen open- book  supervised assessment

Across Semesters 1 & 2 – September to May

Advanced Legal Practice

-Live client module incorporating   Professional Conduct & Regulation and the Course Skills of:-

  • Interviewing & Advising;
  • Legal Writing;
  • Practical Legal Research

Students will work on cases that complement their elective choices.

25

PCR – 50%

 

 

Course Skills

C/NYC

Professional Conduct & Regulation assessed by way of discrete 2 hour unseen open-book supervised assessment in Semester 1

 

Course Skills assessed by way of portfolio and appraisal in Semester 2

Semester 3 – May to August

Legal Practice Project

60

40%

Supervised coursework

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The following table is designed to demonstrate the anticipated workload for students across each semester in terms of weekly and overall contact time, learning hours and hours of supervised assessment. Advanced Legal Practice is spread across Semesters 1 and 2 and so its impact is taken into account in relation to each semester respectively.

 

This demonstrates that the programme achieves its aim of producing a balanced workload for students across the year.

 

Title

Credits

Weekly Contact Time

Total Contact Time/NLH

Supervised Assessment Hrs

Semester 1 – September to January

 

Business Law & Practice (inc. Taxation & Business Accounts)

25

5

60/300

4

Property Law & Practice

20

4

48/225

3

1 Elective

10

 

2

24/100

3

Total (Inc. ALP)

55

13.5

162/775

12

Semester 2 – January to May

 

Litigation & Advocacy

20

4

48/225

4

Wills & Administration of Estates

15

2

24/100

N/A

Solicitors’ Accounts

5

1

12/50

2

1 Elective

10

2

24/100

3

1 Elective

10

2

24/100

3

Total (Inc. ALP)

85

13.5

162/725

12

Across Semesters 1 & 2 – September to May

 

Advanced Legal Practice

-Live client module incorporating   Professional Conduct & Regulation and the Course Skills of:-

  • Interviewing & Advising;
  • Legal Writing;
  • Practical Legal Research

Students will work on cases that complement their elective choices.

25

2.5

60/300

PCR Sem 1 – 2hrs

 

 

C/Skills Sem 2- C/work

Semester 3 – May to August

 

Legal Practice Project

60

TBC

10/500

 

Total

200

 

324/2000

24

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Part – time Programme Structure

 

Students will have the option of studying the programme part – time over two years. In keeping with the objectives of the programme part – time students will undertake Advanced Legal Practice over both years and must attempt PCR in the first January following their enrolment on the programme and submit their reflective portfolios in May of their second year. Students will be expected to attend taught sessions in ALP during the first year. Similarly, Litigation & Advocacy and Wills & Administration of Estates must be taken in Semester 2 of the second year.

This is to ensure that students secure a firm understanding of PCR at the earliest opportunity to inform and underpin their studies for the duration of the programme, whilst allowing for the formative development of skills and experience over the longest possible period in keeping with the aims of the programme.

 

Accordingly, the structure of the part – time programme is as follows: -

 

Title

Credits

Weekly Contact Time

Total Contact Time/NLH

Supervised Assessment Hrs

Year 1 - Semester 1 – September to January

 

Business Law & Practice (inc. Taxation & Business Accounts)

25

5

60/300

4

Advanced Legal Practice (PCR)

25*

2.5

30/75

2

Total

25

7.5

90/375

6

Year 1 – Semester 2 – February to May

1 Elective

10

 

2

24/100

3

1 Elective

10

2

24/100

3

Solicitors’ Accounts

5

1

12/50

2

Advanced Legal Practice

-

2.5

30/75

-

Total

25

7.5

90/325

8

Year 2 – Semester 1 – September to January

Property Law & Practice

20

4

48/225

3

1 Elective

10

2

24/100

3

Advanced Legal Practice

-

1

12/75

-

Total

30

7

84/400

6

Year 2 – Semester 2 – January to May

Litigation & Advocacy

20

4

48/225

4

Wills & Administration of Estates

15

2

24/100

-

Advanced Legal Practice

25*

1

12/75

-

Total

60

7

84/400

4

 

 

 

 

*Credits are awarded at on submission of all assessments at the end of Semester 2, Year 2.

 

Students benefit from an increased proportion of contact time in Advanced Legal Practice and will be welcome to attend any workshops in that module during their second year even though they will have undertaken those sessions in Year 1.

 

Part-time students will attend the same sessions as full – time students and will still be required to attended taught sessions and work on their live client cases over at least two working days. This part – time offering is not, therefore, intended to appeal to a new market as such; it is simply there as an option for students who think this is right for them and would prefer to undertake the programme on this basis. 

Students will also be introduced to the requirements of the Legal Practice Project during induction week and in Semester 1 Year 1 alongside full-time students so that they can begin to identify a focus for their research and find an appropriate supervisor. They will be expected to submit their research plans in August of Semester 3 Year 1 with final submissions in August the following year.  

 

  1. How will I be taught? Modes of teaching and learning aligned with KIS – choose one or more

 

Scheduled teaching activities

X

Independent study

X

Placement

 

 

Students will receive classroom teaching in the form of 1 hour lectures and 2 hour workshops in respect of each Course Skill, Core Practice Area and Vocational Elective. A lecture in one week will be used to introduce the subject matter to be explored in greater detail during the workshop at the start of the following week. Students can expect up to 3 hours’ advance preparation for such workshops and classroom teaching will, so far as possible, take place over just two days per week to allow three clear working days for students to engage with the subject matter and advance preparation.

 

Lectures will provide the opportunity for tutors to explain new concepts to the whole class. Small class sizes will enable such sessions to be informal and interactive, allowing tutors to take questions, to outline areas of knowledge, indicate methods of tackling a problem and demonstrate methods of analysis and synthesis of materials. Audio-visual aids will be used as appropriate, such as the use of overhead slides, ‘PowerPoint’ and video. Key points will often be outlined in handouts available through SunSpace. Copies of all lecture presentations will also be available through SunSpace prior to the lecture taking place.

 

Workshops will explore subject matter through immersive and interactive activities, designed to enable students to learn through experience and expose them to common transactions that they will encounter during their early careers in practice. Workshops will be entirely practical in nature and students will have many opportunities throughout the course to develop and practice the Course Skills and other key transferable skills in a range of modules. Students will be expected to participate fully in sessions and to give and receive feedback from tutors and peers as part of their development as reflective and responsible practitioners.

 

Three of the Course Skills (Interviewing & Advising, Practical Legal Research and Legal Writing) along with Professional Conduct & Regulation will be delivered in the context of the live client Advanced Legal Practice module which will involve students working on genuine legal problems and transaction in Sunderland Student Law Clinic. This module will run across Semesters 1 and 2 to afford students the greatest possible exposure to the development of these skills in a live client professional context. Students will also work on cases which complement, so far as possible, the areas of law they have chosen to study in their Vocational Electives.

 

The programme aims to develop students who are actively engaged in and take responsibility for their own learning so that they develop as reflective and conscientious practitioners. Students will be encouraged to think critically and develop problem solving skills which are essential to employers. This will be achieved through live client and simulated transactional work as appropriate to ensure that skills are developed in a realistic context over the course of both Semesters 1 and 2. 

 

The programme will make appropriate use of Problem Based Learning techniques, particularly in the Vocational Elective modules.  Teaching in these modules will centre on case studies which require students to follow a prescribed process to enable them to unpick the legal and factual issues, explore the subject matter through research of those issues before arriving at reasoned conclusions. This allows for the development of analytical and problem solving skills and is designed to simulate how students will likely encounter and be required to deal with new areas of law in practice. In particular, use of case studies in this way will require students to: -

 

  • Identify accurately the issues in need of research and to bring that information together;
  • Apply subject specific legal knowledge to a realistic and/or practical context;
  • Make critical judgments of the merits of a particular argument;
  • Present and make reasoned choices between alternative solutions; and
  • Present that information in an appropriate manner according to the intended audience.

 

Across all modules students will work with our legal practice case management software, Clio, so that they become accustomed to the technology and working practices they will encounter in legal practice. This will include becoming accustomed to carrying out conflict checks, ensuring records are kept accurate and up to date, recording time and generating ‘bills’.

 

Teaching methods employed across the programme aim to expose students to skills and knowledge in a realistic and relevant way. For example, students will put their learning of Wills & Administration of Estates into practice through drafting a Will for a simulated client during their assessment in Legal Drafting. Students studying Property Law & Practice will simultaneously run two simulated client files as they work through two conveyancing transactions from the perspective of both the buyer and seller. Students in Litigation & Advocacy can expect to develop their advocacy skills in a range of civil and criminal contexts. Across all modules there will be a focus on practical legal research and in Semester 3 students will draw on all they have learned and prepare a dissertation focussing on an aspect of legal practice.

 

A list of the modules in the programme can be found in the Programme Regulations.

 

A summary of the types of teaching, learning and assessment in each module of the programme can be found in the Matrix of Modes of Teaching.

 

  1. How will I be assessed and given feedback? Modes of assessment aligned with KIS: choose one or more.

 

Written examinations

          

Coursework

          

Practical assessments

          

 

A summary of the types of teaching, learning and assessment in each module of the programme can be found in the Matrix of Modes of Teaching.

 

The generic assessment criteria which we use can be found here. Some programmes use subject-specific assessment criteria which are based on the generic ones.

 

This programme uses the Generic University Assessment Criteria

YES

NO

This programme uses the Subject Specific Assessment Criteria

YES

NO

 

The University regulations can be found here.

 

The SRA prescribes that assessments on the LPC must be transactional in nature and use an appropriate variety of mostly supervised assessment methods. Students must achieve a pass mark of 50% in each Core Practice Area, Vocational Elective, Solicitors Accounts, Taxation, Professional Conduct and Regulation and Wills & Administration of Estates. Each of the Course Skills will be assessed on a Competent/Not Yet Competent basis. The Legal Practice Project has a pass mark of 40%.

 

The SRA prescribes the Learning Outcomes that students are required to achieve in each module other than the Legal Practice Project. Each of the Learning Outcomes are assessable and students will not be told which will feature directly in any given assessment. However, the SRA does not require that each Learning Outcome actually be assessed. Students will be required to develop and achieve each of the Learning Outcomes through their formative studies and can expect their summative assessments to cover a robust selection of the Learning Outcomes for any given module.

 

The Core Practice Areas of Business Law & Practice, Property Law & Practice and Litigation will each be assessed by way of unseen, open-book supervised assessment. A minimum of 5% of the marks in each Core Practice Area assessment will be allocated to the pervasive topic of Professional Conduct & Regulation.

 

Students can expect to encounter a variety of traditional examinations and supervised practical assessments in their Core Practice Areas.

 

Professional Conduct  & Regulation will be assessed by way of a 2 hour unseen open-book examination in addition to having at least 5% of the marks in each Core Practice Area assessment allocated to it.

 

Solicitors’ Accounts will be assessed by way of a 2 hour unseen open-book examination.

 

Each of the five Course Skills of Practical Legal Research (PLR), Writing, Drafting, Interviewing and Advising, and Advocacy shall be assessed once on a Competent/Not Yet Competent basis. 

 

Advocacy will be assessed in the context of the Litigation module by way of supervised oral submissions in a bail or interim application.

 

PLR, Writing and Interviewing & Advising will be assessed in the context of the live client Advanced Legal Practice Module and will be unsupervised.

 

Each Elective module will be assessed by way of a single three hour, open-book supervised assessment.

 

Wills & Administration of Estates will be assessed in the context of the Course Skill of Drafting in which students will be required to draft a Will. 

 

Taxation will be assessed in the context of Business Law & Practice.

 

The assessment methods adopted on this programme, formulated so as to address the provisions of the QAA Framework and the University’s Academic Strategy whilst meeting the requirements of the SRA, are designed to:

 

  • Ensure that all students can demonstrate having achieved a robust selection of the Learning Outcomes. Module Learning Outcomes are directly related to Programme Learning Outcomes and all assessments indicate the Module Learning Outcome being assessed;
  • Assess achievement, both formatively and summatively, over the whole programme;
  • Distinguish between levels of achievement and reward attainment of objectives;
  • Utilise a range of assessment methods and techniques which are valid, reliable, educationally impactful and which engage student interest and foster enthusiasm for the subject; and
  • Avoid/limit the possibility of cheating, plagiarism and collusion, through the design of innovative assessment tasks and through the use of available plagiarism detection software and effective assessment supervision and invigilation.

 

Students are informed at the outset of the programme, in class and via Module Guides of the nature, timing and criteria for each assessment. All assessments are moderated by designated tutors internally and by the External Examiner before use. Careful moderation processes and scrutiny of assessment ensure equivalence of standard and appropriateness of assessment for measuring outcomes. An internal and external moderation operates likewise with regard to marking completed student work.

Extra-curricular activities also support the assessment process, not just as valuable enhancements to a student’s CV and employment prospects but also of the skills which students must demonstrate in their assessments. The activities in which the students engage as part of Mooting and Debating, for example, all allow students to develop their legal and transferrable skills and offer the opportunity to practice and hone these skills in a non-assessed environment. Furthermore, students have the opportunity to participate in “Brown Bag” Seminars. These seminars allow the students to update the researching community about ongoing research in an informal setting. This allows students to talk about their research amongst staff and students. The seminars are an excellent opportunity to network and showcase research. 

 

The University aims to return marked assessments and feedback within 4 working weeks of the assignment submission date after internal moderation process have been completed. If this is not possible, students will be notified by the Module Leaders when the feedback is available and how it can be obtained.

 

The Academic Misconduct Regulations and associated guidance can be found here. It is the responsibility of students to ensure they are familiar with their responsibilities in regards to assessment and the implications of an allegation of academic misconduct.

 

Students should refer to the University Regulations for information on degree classifications.

 

  1. Teaching, learning and assessment matrix

  1. How does research influence the programme? 

Teaching, learning and assessment within the School of Law is greatly influenced by the research activities of members of the group.

 

Research within Sunderland Law School is focused around the interdisciplinary RISE International Research Centre. The Law Cluster is one of five research clusters that operate within RISE. The Law research cluster seeks to promote academic debate within the area of law as broadly conceived, although the team has particular expertise in Criminal Law, the Law of Evidence, Constitutional and Administrative Law, Human Rights Law, Counter-Terrorism Law, International Law, International Economic Law, Sports Law, and Space Law. The cluster also aims to promote academic debate and engage with the wider academic community at a regional, national and international level. The Cluster draws together the research and scholarly activity of members, embracing a range of approaches to scholarship including socio-legal, critical, doctrinal and black-letter. Cluster members sit on academic journal editorial boards, organize and lead scholarly associations, and present at national and international conferences.

 

The Law team is committed to the progressive deployment of a research active curriculum. This serves both to enhance the student experience through teaching informed by current research and also to empower individual members of staff to enhance their research profile. The programme teaching team is particularly active in the field of Clinical Legal Education and participate in annual international conferences in this area. The team are exploring in particular methods of teaching, learning and assessment which have been brought to bear in the development of this programme.

 

  • Dr Caroline Gibby

Team Leader Law & Solicitor, Programme Leader

 

Caroline has joined the Law school as Head of Law She qualified as a Solicitor in 1990 and became a partner in a High St firm in Northants in 1996- practising in civil litigation.

She has research interests in clinical legal education and pedagogy and has published in these areas and is a regular contributor to national and international academic conferences presenting on the challenges within legal education for students and teachers. Her practice area of interest is vulnerable clients, with focus on private client work. In addition to this Caroline is completing 2 book chapters which focus on wellbeing in the law

 

  • David Sixsmith

Lecturer and Clinic Supervisor

 

David has 10 years’ experience in practice at high street firm Evans & Co,. He has particular expertise in property, wills & probate and civil disputes. David was made a Partner with Evans & Co in 2016. David teaches Property Law & Practice and Wills & Administration of Estates.

His area of academic interest is in Civil litigation and the impact of the Jackson reforms on practice and justice.

 

  • Kevin Greene

Senior Lecturer in Law & Solicitor

 

Kevin’s research is also in legal education, the teaching of law as a subject, and in particular the use of law clinics and educational tools. His interest in this area is illustrative of his study of academic assessment as a discrete subject at the University of Cambridge in 2013. 

 

Kevin’s current focus is on two related projects; one project is designed to look at a possible divergence between the priorities of the different stakeholders in law clinics, and how reliable and valid assessment methods can be developed.

 

Kevin’s second project looks at assessment of law clinics more generally and the widespread use of reflective diaries as an element of this assessment.  The focus of this research is not to dispute the overarching aim of reflection, but to ask if reflection and the artefacts use as evidence of reflection provide valid and reliable forms of creditable material.

 

  • Fiona Cartwright

Lecturer in Law & Solicitor

 

Fiona’s research centres on supervision of students in a clinical setting, particularly around the extent to which tutors should direct students in their work. Fiona’s research has been especially helpful in considering how best to support students in the completion of their formative work across all modules and also how best to differentiate teaching methods in a way that effectively supports students of differing abilities.

 

SECTION D EMPLOYABILITY

 

  1. How will the programme prepare students for employment?

 

This programme is entirely focused on preparing students for employment. The programme team has given careful consideration as to how best to achieve the requirements of the SRA in preparing students for entry into the legal profession whilst also taking close account of the views and requirements of employers in our region.

 

The programme is geared towards developing students’ skills and experience across a wide variety of transactions and areas of legal practice in a way that will enable them to develop as reflective, responsible and conscientious new practitioners whilst making a positive contribution to employers’ businesses from day one.

 

Students will develop the Course Skills and other key transferable skills across both Semesters 1 and 2, providing the greatest possible exposure and largely in a live client setting. The programme will provide students with at least a year’s work experience in a professional legal setting of the kind they can expect to encounter in practice; many graduates of the programme will in fact leave with two years’ such experience having also studied in Sunderland Student Law Clinic at undergraduate level.

 

Live client work will also allow students to develop so called ‘soft skills’ which are often beyond the reach of simulated work yet which are highly valued by employers. The ability to empathise, listen and respond to the unexpected needs of a wide variety of clients are hugely important aspects of what it is to be a lawyer. Live client work also provides a healthy pressure that may also be absent or less impactful in simulated work; the client and their issue is real and they are counting on the student to provide genuine assistance. Such pressure is helpful in that is it is realistic and tends to bring out the best is us, whilst requiring students to consider the emotional and practical effects that legal disputes and transactions can have on client’s lives.

 

Live client work requires students to build genuine working relations with clients which is an essential aspect of success in legal practice. Employers want junior practitioners who can get on and build commercial relations with clients so that, over time, they begin to contribute to the development of the business.

 

Through the development of knowledge and skills in live client and simulated work students will graduate from the programme able to perform and carry out, under appropriate supervision, a wide range of legal tasks and transactions. Students will be able to represent clients at routine hearings in a civil and criminal context, draft Wills and many of the main conveyancing documents, write advice letters to a range of clients ensuring the needs of the recipient are met, research solutions to difficult problems and effectively gather information from clients and others to name but a few. Students on the specialist Commercial or High Street routes will be able to tailor additional knowledge and skills to suit their intended areas of specialism and will be able to draft commercial contracts and leases on the one hand or handle divorce or personal injury proceedings on the other.

 

A range of high street, regional, national and international law firms and ‘not for profit’ organisations have participated in the development of this programme including: -

 

  • Evans & Co Solicitors
  • Sweeney Miller LLP
  • Muckle LLP
  • Newcastle Law Centre
  • Bond Dickinson LLP
  • Clyde & Co

 

The programme aims to deal with many of the criticisms expressed by these employers about many of the graduates of similar courses at competitor institutions, in particular through the prolonged exposure to skills and the focus on experience in a live client setting and the drive to make teaching and learning activities and experiences as realistic as possible through, for example, the use of case management software and professional case management procedures.

 

There are also opportunities for on-campus students outside the programme of study for students to: -

 

  • Undertake work placements/internships;
  • Meet and work with active professionals in the field;
  • Showcase their work to potential employers; and
  • Participate in the Mooting and Debating Society.

 

For information about other opportunities available to our students who study on campus, click here.

 

  1. Particular features of the qualification.

 

Completion of this programme will provide students with a recognised Legal Practice Course qualification for the purposes of the Solicitors’ Regulation Authority (SRA) and entitles students to enter into a training contract or complete a period of recognised training as stipulated by the SRA following which they will be entitled to be admitted to the Roll of Solicitors in England & Wales.

 

Any student wishing to be admitted as a Solicitor in England and Wales must successfully complete a Legal Practice Course that has been approved by the Solicitors’ Regulation Authority.

 

  1. Professional statutory or regulatory body (PSRB) accreditation.

 

PSRB accreditation is not relevant to this programme 

 

PSRB accreditation is currently being sought for this programme

X

This programme currently has PSRB accreditation

 

The programme is currently accredited until: N/A

 

The relevant PSRB(s) is: Solicitors’ Regulation Authority (SRA)

 

The terms of the accreditation are as follows:

 

The programme is recognised as:-

 

A Legal Practice Course (LPC) for the purposes of the SRA’s requirements of the vocational stage of legal training to be admitted as a Solicitor in England & Wales

 

Accreditation gives graduates (status / exemption):-

 

the right, upon successful completion of a training contract or other period of recognised training which may be undertaken before, during or after the programme, to be admitted as a Solicitor in England & Wales.

 

This depends upon successful completion of the programme.

 

There are programme-specific regulations relating to the following. Details are given in the programme regulations:

 

The modules to be studied

X

Pass-marks for some or all modules and/or parts

(elements) of modules 

X

Placement requirements

 

Attendance requirements

 

Professional practice requirements

X

Final or overall mark for the award  

X

Other 

 

 

 

 

Students can be awarded a Postgraduate Certificate on successful completion of 60 credits.  

 

SECTION E PROGRAMME STRUCTURE AND REGULATIONS

 

Programme Regulation/s

 

Name of programme: LLM Legal Practice (LPC)

Title of final award: LLM Legal Practice (LPC)

Interim awards[1]: Postgraduate Certificate in Legal Practice (60 credits)

Accreditation: Accreditation from the Solicitors Regulation Authority is currently being sought for the LLM Legal Practice (LPC). The Postgraduate Certificate is not accredited. The LLM in Legal Practice (non-exempting) is not accredited.

 

University Regulation 2.2.3

2.2.3 Wherever possible, the standard module size is used but the following sizes are permitted:

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LLM Legal Practice (LPC) regulation 2.2.3

2.2.35, 10 and 25 credit modules are also approved for this programme.

 

University Regulation 2.3.2

2.3.2          The maximum period of registration on a programme of study is three times the normal full-time registration period, i.e. 3 years for a one-year degree programme.

LLM Legal Practice (LPC) regulation 2.3.2

2.3.2 For the part-time LLM Legal Practice only, the maximum period of registration on the programme is five years. For the full-time LLM Legal Practice, the maximum period of registration on the programme is three years. In both cases the date used to calculate maximum period of registration starts on the date of the first attempt of the first element of assessment on the programme, not the date of the student’s initial registration with the University.

 

University Regulation 3.3

3.3   A student may not register on a taught postgraduate programme for more than 180 credits in one teaching year.

 

LLM Legal Practice (LPC) Regulation 3.3

 

3.3A student may not register on a taught postgraduate programme for more than 200 credits in one teaching year.

 

University Regulation 4.1.5

4.1.5Where a student is eligible for the award of a Master’s Degree, the Board will award a Merit or Distinction according to the regulations for the award.

LLM Legal Practice (LPC) Regulation 4.1.5

 

4.1.5The classification of such an award will be made by the Programme Assessment Board and will be recorded separately to the official transcript required by the Solicitors Regulation Authority.

 

University Regulation 4.2

4.2.1  The overall pass mark for each module is 40%. To pass a module a student must also have submitted work for each element of assessment.

4.2.2  Where module assessment comprises two or more contributory elements, a pass will be awarded where a student achieves at least 40% in the overall module mark, providing that the student has submitted assessment in all elements. The student does not need to achieve a mark of 40% in each element.

4.2.3  A requirement may be imposed that students pass (at 40%) each element of assessment within the module to meet PSRB requirements or, where one or more learning outcomes are assessed in only one element of assessment, to ensure that module learning outcomes are met. Such a requirement must be approved on behalf of Academic Board and included in the programme-specific regulations and the module information provided to students.

 

LLM Legal Practice (LPC) Regulation 4.2

 

4.2You must achieve a minimum mark of 50% in order to pass each element of assessment. In Advanced Legal Practice, the Course Skills of Practical Legal Research, Writing and Interviewing & Advising will be assessed will be assessed on a pass/fail basis on a judgment of ‘competent / not yet competent’. In Litigation and Advocacy, the Course Skill of Advocacy will be assessed will be assessed on a pass/fail basis on a judgment of ‘competent / not yet competent’. In Wills & Administration of Estates, the Course Skill of Drafting will be assessed on a pass/fail basis on a judgment of ‘competent / not yet competent’.

 

University Regulation 4.3.1

4.3.1 Referrals

 

(a)     When a student fails to achieve the overall pass mark for the module at the first attempt, he/she will have the right to be re-assessed in that module, once only, without attendance, at a time specified by the appropriate Module Assessment Board. Up to 180 credits may be re-assessed in this way.

 

(b)    A student may only be referred in the elements which he/she has failed.

 

(c)     When a student is re-assessed in a module (by coursework and/or by written examination) under 4.3.1(a) above, the marks obtained in the elements of assessment passed at the first attempt shall stand whereas the maximum mark that may be awarded for the referred elements is 40%. The overall mark for the module will be calculated on the basis of the original marks for the elements passed at the first attempt and the capped marks gained in the referred elements.

 

LLM Legal Practice (LPC) Regulation 4.3.1

 

4.3.1 Referrals

 

(a) When a student fails to pass any element of assessment at the first attempt, he/she will have the right to be re-assessed in that element of assessment, twice only, without attendance, at a time specified by the appropriate Module Assessment Board.

 

(b) A student may only be referred in the elements which he/she has failed.

 

(c) When a student is re-assessed in an element of assessment (by coursework and/or by written examination) under 4.3.1(a) above, the marks obtained in all the elements of assessment will not be capped.

 

University Regulation 4.3.2

4.3.2. Repeat with attendance or by an alternative mode of study

 

(a)     When a student has failed a module at both the first attempt and when subsequently reassessed under 4.3.1, he/she may, at the discretion of the Programme Assessment Board and taking into account the recommendations of the Module Assessment Board, attempt that module again, once only, with attendance or in an alternative mode of study as deemed by the Board to be appropriate. Up to 180 credits may be repeated in this way. Where applicable students may therefore be studying a full-time programme in part-time mode for one year. The standard applicable fee is charged.

 

(b)    In the case of a repeat with attendance or by an alternative mode of study the student will retake the assessment for all the elements of assessment and no marks from previous attempts will be carried forward. The overall mark for the module will be capped at 40%.

 

(c)     A student who fails assessment for the repeat is entitled to one final reassessment as a referral (cf 4.3.1). The marks for the referral(s) and for the module as a whole will be capped at 40%.

 

(d)    Substitution of an alternative module is not permitted at Masters level.

 

LLM Legal Practice (LPC) Regulation 4.3.2

 

4.3.2. Repeat with attendance or by an alternative mode of study

 

(a)     Where a student has failed any element of assessment, other than in an optional module, after the 3 maximum attempts permitted, the Programme Assessment Board has the discretion to either withdraw the student from the programme or to allow the student to begin the entire programme again from semester 1, once only, with attendance. Up to 200 credits may be repeated in this way. Where applicable students may therefore be studying a full-time programme in part-time mode for one year. The standard applicable fee is charged.

 

(a)(ii) Where a student has failed any element of assessment in an optional module after the 3 maximum attempts permitted, the Programme Assessment Board has the discretion to allow the student to either repeat that module, once only, with attendance, as per 4.3.2(b) below, or to allow the student to select an alternative optional module. In either case the standard fee for that module is charged.

 

(b)    In the case of a repeat with attendance or by an alternative mode of study the student will retake all the elements of assessment in the modules being repeated and no marks from previous attempts will be carried forward. The overall mark for the module will not be capped.

 

(c)     A student who fails any element of assessment in any module being repeated is entitled to two final reassessment referrals (cf 4.3.1). The marks for the referral(s) and for the module as a whole will not be capped.

 

University Regulation 6.1.3

 

6.1.3 Exit qualifications may be awarded for all Master’s degrees as Postgraduate Certificates or Diplomas of Higher Education. The name of the exit qualification shall be the same as that for the Master’s degree unless an alternative name is approved at programme validation and recorded as a programme-specific regulation.

 

LLM Legal Practice (LPC) Regulation 6.1.3

 

6.1.3The exit qualification of Postgraduate Diploma of Higher Education is not permitted on this programme.

 

University Regulation 6.4.1

Regulation 6.4.1 Master’s degree

(a) A Master’s degree is awarded for the achievement of 180 credits at Level 7 as required by the programme regulations.

 

LLM Legal Practice (LPC) Regulation 6.4.1

6.4.1Master’s degree

(a) A Master’s degree is awarded for the achievement of 200 credits at Level 7.

(d)  <new provision>

For the purposes of determining an award classification, the module marks that will be used will be those calculated on the basis of the first attempt at each assessment. Where there has been more than one attempt made at an element of assessment, the mark used for the purposes of calculating the module total for classification purposes will be capped at 50%.

 

LLM Legal Practice (LPC) Regulation 6.5.1

 

Regulation 6.5.1 entry with advanced standing does not apply on this programme.

 

Regulations apply to students commencing their studies from (please state the date / intake that these regulations will apply to students for each Stage):

 

Regulations apply to students

Date the regulations apply

Intakes affected

Stage 1

September 2016

ALL INTAKES TO PROGRAMME

 

Semester 1

 

Core modules:

 

Code

Title

Credits

LAWM71

Business Law and Practice

25

LAWM72

Property Law and Practice

20

 

1 Option

10

LAWM70

Advanced Legal Practice* this module runs across semester 1 and 2

25

 

Optional Modules

Choose a single 10 credit optional module from the following list

 

Code

Title

Credits

LAWM76

Commercial Contracts

10

LAWM79

Family Law and Practice

10

 

Elective modules

There is no provision for an elective module at semester 1.

 

Progression Regulations

In order to meet the requirements of the Solicitors Regulation Authority, the following exceptions to the University regulations have been approved by Academic Board:

 

4.2You must achieve a minimum mark of 50% in order to pass each element of assessment. In Advanced Legal Practice, the Course Skills of Practical Legal Research, Writing and Interviewing & Advising will be assessed on a pass/fail basis on a judgment of ‘competent / not yet competent’.

 

4.3.1 (a) When a student fails to pass any element of assessment at the first attempt, he/she will have the right to be re-assessed in that element of assessment, twice only, without attendance, at a time specified by the appropriate Module Assessment Board.

 

(b) A student may only be referred in the elements which he/she has failed.

 

(c) When a student is re-assessed in an element of assessment (by coursework and/or by written examination) under 4.3.1(a) above, the marks obtained in all the elements of assessment will not be capped.

 

4.3.2. Repeat with attendance or by an alternative mode of study

 

(d)    Where a student has failed any element of assessment, other than in an optional module, after the 3 maximum attempts permitted, the Programme Assessment Board has the discretion to either withdraw the student from the programme or to allow the student to begin the entire programme again from semester 1, once only, with attendance. Up to 200 credits may be repeated in this way. Where applicable students may therefore be studying a full-time programme in part-time mode for one year. The standard applicable fee is charged.

 

(a)(ii) Where a student has failed any element of assessment in an optional module after the 3 maximum attempts permitted, the Programme Assessment Board has the discretion to allow the student to either repeat that module, once only, with attendance, as per 4.3.2(b) below, or to allow the student to select an alternative optional module. In either case the standard fee for that module is charged.

 

(e)     In the case of a repeat with attendance or by an alternative mode of study the student will retake all the elements of assessment in the modules being repeated and no marks from previous attempts will be carried forward. The overall mark for the module will not be capped.

 

(f)      A student who fails any element of assessment in any module being repeated is entitled to two final reassessment referrals (cf 4.3.1). The marks for the referral(s) and for the module as a whole will not be capped.

 

Semester 2

 

Core modules

 

Code

Title

Credits

LAWM73

Litigation & Advocacy

20

LAWM75

Wills & Administration of Estates

10

 

LAWM74

Solicitors’ Accounts

5

LAWM70

Advanced Legal Practice* this module runs across semester 1 and 2

25

 

Optional modules

Choose 2 modules totalling 20 credits from the following list:

 

Code

Title

Credits

LAWM77

Commercial Property

10

LAWM78

Employment Law & Practice

10

LAWM80

Housing Law & Practice

10

LAWM81

Advanced Personal Injury Litigation

10

 

Elective modules

There is no provision for an elective module at semester 2.

 

Progression Regulations for semester 2 modules

In order to meet the requirements of the Solicitors Regulation Authority, the following exceptions to the University regulations have been approved by Academic Board:

 

4.2You must achieve a minimum mark of 50% in order to pass each element of assessment. In Advanced Legal Practice, the Course Skills of Practical Legal Research, Writing and Interviewing & Advising will be assessed will be assessed on a pass/fail basis on a judgment of ‘competent / not yet competent’. In Litigation and Advocacy, the Course Skill of Advocacy will be assessed will be assessed on a pass/fail basis on a judgment of ‘competent / not yet competent’. In Wills & Administration of Estates, the Course Skill of Drafting will be assessed on a pass/fail basis on a judgment of ‘competent / not yet competent’.

4.3.1The same programme-specific regulations apply as for semester one

4.3.2The same programme-specific regulations apply as for semester one.

 

Semester 3

 

Core modules

 

Code

Title

Credits

LAWM82

Legal Practice Project

60

 

 

Elective modules

There is no provision for an elective module at semester 3.

 

Progression Regulations

With the exception of the general programme specific regulations above, there are no programme specific regulations at semester 3.

 

SECTION F ADMISSIONS, LEARNING ENVIRONMENT AND SUPPORT

 

  1. What are the admissions requirements?

 

The University’s standard admissions requirements can be found in the university regulations.

Programme-specific requirements which are in addition to those regulations are given below. 

 

Applicants will be required to have achieved a 2ii undergraduate degree classification in any discipline.

 

Graduates who have not achieved this minimum degree classification in the context of a Qualifying Law Degree (QLD) approved by the Solicitors’ Regulation Authority must also have successfully completed the Graduate Diploma in Law (GDL) in addition in order to be admitted to the programme.

 

Where an applicant’s first language is not English, they will be required to demonstrate evidence of achievement of Level 6 overall in the International English Language Testing Scheme (IELTS), with all element scores at 5.5 or higher. Alternatively, a Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) score of at least 550 and/or a pass in the University’s own English Language Proficiency Test is required.

 

Can students enter with advanced standing?

Yes

No

 

If yes, to which Stages?

Stage 1

 

Stage 2

 

Stage 3

 

 

If yes, with what qualifications? N/A

 

The University has a process by which applicants whose experience to date already covers one or more modules of the programme they are applying for may seek Accreditation of Prior Learning (APL). Full details can be found here but if you think that this may be relevant to you, please contact the department which offers the programme you are interested in.

 

  1. What kind of support and help will there be?

 

  1. in the department: -

 

All students are allocated a personal tutor during induction week. The personal tutor will provide a point of contact and information, and whilst many of the student support functions will be carried out by University-wide services, the personal tutor will direct students to the relevant support services. Sunderland Law School has an open-door policy, allowing students to drop in whenever necessary. Basic study skills are included in the induction programme and on SunSpace. Departmental staff provide information and guidance on the possible careers available to students, through a variety of mechanisms.

 

  1. in the university as a whole: -

 

The University provides a range of professional support services including health and well-being, counselling, disability support, and a Chaplaincy. Click on the links for further information.

 

  1. What resources will I have access to?

 

On campus

X

In a partner college

 

By distance learning

 

 

On campus

Tick all that apply

General Teaching and Learning Space

X

IT

X

Library

X

VLE

X

Laboratory

 

Studio

 

Performance space

X

Other specialist

X

Technical resources 

X

 

University Library & Study Skills support 

University Library & Study Skills, (UL&SS), supports students with the provision of a high quality learning environment, comprehensive print and online resource collections, 1400 study places, 300+ PCs, online module reading lists and study skills support.

 

All students have the full use of the University’s two libraries. The libraries are accessible during extensive opening hours and in core teaching weeks both Murray and St Peter’s libraries have provision for additional unstaffed access. The latest opening hours can be found on the library website at library.sunderland.ac.uk/about-us/opening-hours/

 

The UL&SS web site library.sunderland.ac.uk provides a gateway to information resources and services for students both on and off campus. Tailored resources and support are available from specific subject areas of the UL&SS web site and a ‘Live Chat’ function enables student to access library support and help 24/7.

 

My Module Resources moduleresources.sunderland.ac.uk/

Module reading lists are live interactive resource lists available from within online module spaces on Canvas and the University’s library website.

 

What do you get?

          Real time library information, both availability and location of print books, plus being able to place reservations on books that are already on loan

          Allows you to set up RSS alerts for changes and additions to your Module Resource  list

          Smartphone and tablet friendly – providing QR capture, touch screen functionality and e-resource access

 

How does this help you?

          Getting the right resources easily from flexible access points

          Receive guidance from your tutor on what to read  at a point of need by using search filters

          Access to a wider range of resources to support learning.

 

Study Skills Support

University Library Services includes a robust study skills support offer, available to all our students across the University both on and off campus, contributing to students’ attainment and the quality of their experience.

 

Skills delivery options include:

  • Online Skills Support including:  videos, webinars and Skype sessions, online assignment drop-ins using LibraryTalk will be held weekly to engage those students not on campus and provide additional support at the point of contact. Online study skills guides and tutorials are available to download from: library.sunderland.ac.uk/services-and-support/skills/guides// and from a link on your Canvas module spaces.
  • On campus assignment skills drop-in events - Throughout key teaching weeks when students are encouraged to attend with any assignment queries.
  • Embedded skills sessions - Throughout teaching periods embedded skills sessions are a key element to support academic learning. Study skills support team and Liaison Librarians will work with your lecturers to provide the support necessary in your subject areas.
  • Dissertation workshops - Dissertation skills support will be provided in early June to ‘Kickstart your Dissertation’. Bookable workshops will be held demonstrating how to begin a dissertation, using University library resources to support your work, and managing references for a substantial project. Sessions will be cross-subject focusing on the skills and resources required for completing a dissertation.
  • One to One - Study Skills Advisers will be on hand to support students in a range of study skills including: effective reading, reporting writing, academic writing and referencing, note taking, critical thinking, analysis and evaluation, reflective writing, group work and presentation skills. Sessions will be booked centrally and can include study groups and 1 to 1 advice.  Students who would like to request support from Study Skills Advisers can do so from:

library.sunderland.ac.uk/services-and-support/skills/one-to-one-support/

  • For those studying independently away from the university campus, 1 to 1 support is available via Skype.

 

Access to other libraries

There may be occasions when you find it useful to use other university libraries for your studies in addition to the resources available at the University of Sunderland. Students may be able to borrow items or to access collections on a reference basis at a number of institutions throughout the UK by joining the SCONUL access scheme. To find out more and apply to join the scheme, go to: www.access.sconul.ac.uk

 

Information about the University’s facilities can be found here.

 

  1. Are there any additional costs on top of the fees?

 

No, but all students buy some study materials such as books and provide their own basic study materials.

X

Yes (optional) All students buy some study materials such as books and provide their own basic study materials. In addition there are some are additional costs for optional activities associated with the programme (see below)

 

Yes (essential) All students buy some study materials such as books and provide their own basic study materials. In addition there are some are essential additional costs associated with the programme (see below)

 

 

 

Students are provided with the recommended text in each module (other than for their Legal Practice Project) the cost of which is included in the Course Fees. Students may wish to purchase additional texts and materials, the cost of which they must meet themselves.

 

  1. How are student views represented?

 

All taught programmes in the University have student representatives for each programme who meet in a Student-Staff Liaison Committee (SSLC) where they can raise students’ views and concerns. The Students’ Union and the faculties together provide training for student representatives. SSLCs and focus groups are also used to obtain student feedback on plans for developing existing programmes and designing new ones. Feedback on your programme is obtained every year through module questionnaires and informs the annual review of your programme. Student representatives are also invited to attend Programme and Module Studies Boards which manage the delivery and development of programmes and modules.  Faculty Academic Committee also has student representation. This allows students to be involved in higher-level plans for teaching and learning. At university level students are represented by sabbatical officers who are the elected leaders of the Students’ Union.

 

The University’s student representation and feedback policy can be found here.

 

Every two years we participate in the national Postgraduate Taught Experience Survey (PTES) which is run by the Higher Education Academy.

 

In addition Sunderland Law School has an open door policy and invite students to call in to discuss any issues or feedback they may have at any time. Students will have a personal tutor with whom they will meet regularly. This programme has a low staff/student ratio and a high level of personal contact time which, coupled with the formal measures in place, provides comprehensive pastoral support with multiple formal and informal avenues through which students will be consulted and can provide feedback.

 

Individual module leaders will make use of online surveys to capture feedback relating to their subjects. This provides students with an additional opportunity to provide feedback which they may prefer to give anonymously, though all students will be encouraged to speak with module or personal tutors about any concerns they may have at any time.

 

SECTION G QUALITY MANAGEMENT 

 

  1. National subject benchmarks

 

The Quality Assurance Agency for Higher Education publishes benchmark statements which give guidance as to the skills and knowledge which graduates in various subjects and in certain types of degree are expected to have. They do not cover all subjects at postgraduate level but those which exist can be found at here.

 

Are there any benchmark statements for this programme?

YES

NO

 

The subject benchmark(s) for this programme is/are:

 

http://www.qaa.ac.uk/docs/qaa/subject-benchmark-statements/sbs-law-15.pdf?sfvrsn=ff99f781_10

 

The benchmarks are also based on the QAA’s publication on the Framework for Higher Education Qualifications (FHEQ) which defines the generic skills and abilities expected of students who have achieved awards at a given level and with which our programmes align. The FHEQ can be found here.

 

The programme also meets the minimum requirements of the Legal Practice Course prescribed by the Solicitors’ Regulation Authority.

 

  1. How are the quality and standards of the programme assured?

 

The programme is managed and quality assured through the University’s standard processes. Programmes are overseen by Module and Programme Studies Boards which include student representatives. Each year each module leader provides a brief report on the delivery of the module, identifying strengths and areas for development, and the programme team reviews the programme as a whole.  The purpose of this is to ensure that the programme is coherent and up-to-date, with suitable progression through the programme, and a good fit (alignment) between what is taught and how students learn and are assessed - the learning outcomes, content and types of teaching, learning and assessment. Student achievement, including progress through the programme and the way in which the final award is made, is kept under review. The programme review report is sent to the Programme Studies Board and the Faculty in turn reports issues to the University’s Quality Management Sub-Committee (QMSC).

 

External examiners are appointed to oversee and advise on the assessment of the programme. They ensure that the standards of the programme are comparable with those of similar programmes elsewhere in the UK and are also involved in the assessment process to make sure that it is fair. They are invited to comment on proposed developments to the programme. Their reports are sent to the Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Academic) as well as to the Faculty so that issues of concern can be addressed.

 

All programmes are reviewed by the University on a six-yearly cycle to identify good practice and areas for enhancement. Programmes are revalidated through this review process. These reviews include at least one academic specialist in the subject area concerned from another UK university. The University is subject to external review by the Quality Assurance Agency for Higher Education on a six-year cycle. Their review reports for Sunderland can be found at here.

 

Further information about our quality processes can be found here.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Quality Handbook

 

 

 

SITS SUMMARY PROGRAMME/SHORT COURSE DETAILS

(Form to be completed electronically by the Faculty and forwarded to the Quality Support Officer supporting the Approval event, or sent to Planning & MI for faculty devolved processes before sending to Quality Support (with the exception of Short Courses and GRS))

This form is to be completed when a new programme has been validated and approved so that the programme codes and progression and awards rules can be set up in SITS.  This also needs to be completed at periodic course review when there have been significant modifications to the course.

 

Please note that all details entered onto this form will go onto every student’s record that is attached to this programme and it is therefore imperative that the information is correct. 

 

1 Programme Details

New/ Modification/Review:

Please ensure the minor modification document is included

Modification

Full Programme Title:

LL.M Legal Practice (LPC) / Master of Laws

If replacement for existing course, specify title and course code:

 

Qualification Aim:

e.g. Foundation degree of Science, Bachelor of Arts (Honours)

LL.M Legal Practice (LPC)

Qualification Level (NQF level):

7

JACS 3.0 code

JACS code = e.g. (V100) History, (I100) Computing Science, etc. See HESA Website https://www.hesa.ac.uk/jacs3

M200

Is the programme Open or Closed:

A course is defined as closed when specifically designed for a certain group of people and not also available to other suitably qualified candidates. It may be designed for a particular company however if the same course is also run for other suitably qualified candidates, not employed by the company, then the course is not closed.

Open

Faculty and School:

Faculty of Business, Law and Tourism

Sunderland Law School

Location of study:

e.g. SAGE, Sunderland in London, Sunderland

Sunderland

Last Date Registration (PBI) Number of days:

The number of days after the start date of the course that it is possible for students to register onto it. It is also referred to as the migration date.

 

Programme Leader:

Dr Caroline Gibby

Academic Team for the programme:

Law

Date of Approval/Modification/Review:

December 2017 (Modification)

Date of next review (QS to complete):

2021/2022

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Accrediting Body or PSRB
If yes please attach a completed PSRB form

Yes – Solicitors Regulation Authority

 

Programme Specific Regulations

If yes, please attach a completed Programme Specific Regulations form

Yes

 

Does this programme come under the Key Information Set return?

If yes, please attach a completed KIS form

No

Is this an undergraduate programme whose primary (but not necessarily only) purpose is to improve the effectiveness of practitioners registered with a professional body? If yes, please specify which body:

http://www.hefce.ac.uk/media/HEFCE,2014/Content/Pubs/2016/201622/HEFCE2016_22.pdf  (Page 88, paragraph f)

e.g. a short course aimed at registered nurses

No


Professional Body:

 

 

Interim  Awards

If a student does not achieve their qualification aim, what lower awards might they be entitled to, assuming they have the credits?  The subject title for any lower level award should be given where this is different from the subject of the qualification aim.

 

Interim Award Title

Credits Required

Interim Structure

Please show mandatory requirements if applicable e.g. core module codes

1

PG Certificate in Higher Education

60

n/a

2

 

 

 

3

 

 

 

 

Combined Subjects Programmes only

Will the subject run as Major/Minor/Dual:

 

Any subject(s) not permitted to be combined with this subject:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2 Mode Of Attendance

01                          Full-time

Full-time students are those expected to study for more than 24 weeks per year, for a minimum of 21 hours per week and are paying the full-time fee.

02                          Other Full-time

Students who attend full-time for a period less than 24 weeks per year

 

31Part-time

Students who are expected to study for less than 21 hours per week.

 

31Part-time at Full-time Rate

Students who are studying full-time credits over part-time attendance

 

 

 

3 Admissions

An admissions or MCR code will be created to allow student applications.

Tick appropriate

UUCAS

Universities and Colleges Admission Services

Required for full-time undergraduate programmes only.

 

DDirect Entry

Required for FT, PT, PG and PGR, only where students will be admitted though the admissions teams or where the programme needs to be advertised on the web

GGTTR

Graduate Teacher Training Registry

Education only, where applicable

 

 

 

4Collaborative Provision

UK

 

Overseas

 

Institution

Collaborative Model

Funding Arrangements

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

5aCourse Block

Full-time - Overall length of the programme in months:

12

Part-time - Overall length of the programme in months:

24

Does this course offer a sandwich placement?

If yes, please indicate which programme year this placement is to take place.

No

Programme Year:

Is this compulsory or optional?

Compulsory/Optional

Does this course offer a study abroad year out? If yes, please indicate which programme year this placement is to take place.

No

Programme Year:

Is this compulsory or optional?

Compulsory/Optional

 

 

 

6   Major Source of Funding

Please note this relates to funding for the programme and not individual students

HEFCE

Higher Education Funding Council for England

Skills Funding Agency/EFA/Degree Apprenticeship

 

NCTL

National College for Teaching and Leadership

 

Wholly NHS Funded

Partially NHS Funded

Departments of Health/NHS/Social Care. For all Health funded programmes please indicate whether the programme is eligible for an NHS Bursary

-  Eligible for NHS BursaryY/N

 

 

 

Standard Fee

If no then the Learning Resources Form should be attached

Yes/No

Other Funding:

 

– Please Specify:

 

 

 

 

7   Education Programmes Only

This section must be completed for any programmes marked above as ‘NCTL’ funded

Teacher Training Identifier:

 

Teacher Training Scope:

 

Qualification Aim:

QTS and academic award, QTS only, QTS by assessment only

 

 

 

   DETAILS SUPPLIED BY:………………………………………        DATE:………………………..

 

 


Module List

Award, Route (if applicable) and Level

New/ Existing / Modified  Module (N/E/MM)

Module Title

Module Code

Module Credit Value

Whether Core / Option (students must select option modules to the value of 30 credits):

 

Assessment weighting – give % weight for each assessment item

Pre-/co-requisites

Module leader

Other comment (if required)

Date of Entry on SITS.

N/MM only

( After event)

JACS Code



 



 


LLM

MM

Advanced Legal Practice

LAWM70

25

Core

A1 – EXAM (40%)

A2 – PORTFOLIO (60%)

A3 – COURSE SKILL: PRACTICAL LEGAL RESEARCH (PASS/FAIL)

A4 – COURSE SKILL: INTERVIEWING & ADVISING (PASS/FAIL)

A5 – COURSE SKILL: WRITING (PASS/FAIL)

A6 – CLINICAL PRACTICE (0%)

None

Caroline Gibby

300 Learning Hours

 

M200

MM

Business Law & Practice

LAWM71

25

Core

A1 – EXAM (75%)

A2 – EXAM (25%)

None

Gavin Jackson

300 Learning Hours

 

M200

N

Property Law & Practice

LAWM72

20

Core

A1 – EXAM (100%)

None

David Sixsmith

225 Learning Hours

 

M200

MM

Litigation & Advocacy

LAWM73

20

Core

A1 – EXAM (60%)

A2 – EXAM (40%)

A3 – COURSE SKILL: ADVOCACY (PASS/FAIL)

None

Caroline Gibby

225 Learning Hours

 

M200

N

Solicitors’ Accounts

LAWM74

5

Core

A1 – EXAM (100%)

None

Kevin Greene

50 Learning Hours

 

M200

N

Wills & Administration of Estates

LAWM75

15

Core

A1 – COURSEWORK (100%)

A2 – COURSE SKILL: DRAFTING (PASS/FAIL)

None

David Sixsmith

100 Learning Hours

 

M200

MM

Commercial Contracts

LAWM76

10

Option

A1 – EXAM (100%)

None

Caroline Gibby

100 Learning Hours

 

M200

MM

Commercial Property

LAWM77

10

Option

A1 – EXAM (SUPERVISED COURSEWORK) (100%)

None

Gavin Jackson

100 Learning Hours

 

M200

MM

Employment Law & Practice

LAWM78

10

Option

A1 – EXAM (SUPERVISED COURSEWORK) (100%)

None

Alexandra Withers

100 Learning Hours

 

M200

MM

Family Law & Practice

LAWM79

10

Option

A1 – EXAM (SUPERVISED COURSEWORK) (100%)

None

Roiya Hodgson

100 Learning Hours

 

M200

MM

Housing Law & Practice

LAWM80

10

Option

A1 – EXAM (100%)

None

Kevin Greene

100 Learning Hours

 

M200

MM

Advanced Personal Injury Litigation

LAWM81

10

Option

A1 – EXAM (SUPERVISED COURSEWORK) (100%)

None

Caroline Gibby

100 Learning Hours

 

M200

N

Legal Practice Project

LAWM82

60

Core

A1 – DISSERTATION (100%)

None

Caroline Gibby

500 Learning Hours

 

M200


PART B   -  Programme  Regulation/s

 

Name of programme: LLM Legal Practice (LPC)

Title of final award: LLM Legal Practice (LPC)

Interim awards[2]: Postgraduate Certificate in Legal Practice (60 credits)

Accreditation: Accreditation from the Solicitors Regulation Authority is currently being sought for the LLM Legal Practice (LPC). The Postgraduate Certificate is not accredited. The LLM in Legal Practice (non-exempting) is not accredited.

University Regulation 2.2.3

2.2.3 Wherever possible, the standard module size is used but the following sizes are permitted:

Macintosh HD:Users:benmiddleton:Desktop:Screen Shot 2016-03-21 at 20.19.38.png

LLM Legal Practice (LPC) regulation 2.2.3

2.2.35, 10 and 25 credit modules are also approved for this programme.

 

University Regulation 2.3.2

2.3.3           The maximum period of registration on a programme of study is three times the normal full-time registration period, ie 3 years for a one-year degree programme. 


LLM Legal Practice (LPC) regulation 2.3.2

2.3.2 For the part-time LLM Legal Practice only, the maximum period of registration on the programme is five years. For the full-time LLM Legal Practice, the maximum period of registration on the programme is three years. In both cases the date used to calculate maximum period of registration starts on the date of the first attempt of the first element of assessment on the programme, not the date of the student’s initial registration with the University.

 

University Regulation 3.3

3.3   A student may not register on a taught postgraduate programme for more than 180 credits in one teaching year.

 

LLM Legal Practice (LPC) Regulation 3.3

 

3.3A student may not register on a taught postgraduate programme for more than 200 credits in one teaching year.

 

University Regulation 4.1.5

4.1.5Where a student is eligible for the award of a Master’s Degree, the Board will award a Merit or Distinction according to the regulations for the award. 


LLM Legal Practice (LPC) Regulation 4.1.5

 

4.1.5The classification of such an award will be made by the Programme Assessment Board and will be recorded separately to the official transcript required by the Solicitors Regulation Authority.

 

University Regulation 4.2

4.2.1  The overall pass mark for each module is 40%. To pass a module a student must also have submitted work for each element of assessment.

4.2.2  Where module assessment comprises two or more contributory elements, a pass will be awarded where a student achieves at least 40% in the overall module mark, providing that the student has submitted assessment in all elements. The student does not need to achieve a mark of 40% in each element.

4.2.3  A requirement may be imposed that students pass (at 40%) each element of assessment within the module to meet PSRB requirements or, where one or more learning outcomes are assessed in only one element of assessment, to ensure that module learning outcomes are met. Such a requirement must be approved on behalf of Academic Board and included in the programme-specific regulations and the module information provided to students.

 

LLM Legal Practice (LPC) Regulation 4.2

 

4.2You must achieve a minimum mark of 50% in order to pass each element of assessment. In Advanced Legal Practice, the Course Skills of Practical Legal Research, Writing and Interviewing & Advising will be assessed will be assessed on a pass/fail basis on a judgment of ‘competent / not yet competent’. In Litigation and Advocacy, the Course Skill of Advocacy will be assessed will be assessed on a pass/fail basis on a judgment of ‘competent / not yet competent’. In Wills & Administration of Estates, the Course Skill of Drafting will be assessed on a pass/fail basis on a judgment of ‘competent / not yet competent’.

 

University Regulation 4.3.1

4.3.1 Referrals

 

(d)     When a student fails to achieve the overall pass mark for the module at the first attempt, he/she will have the right to be re-assessed in that module, once only, without attendance, at a time specified by the appropriate Module Assessment Board. Up to 180 credits may be re-assessed in this way.

 

(e)      A student may only be referred in the elements which he/she has failed.

 

(f)      When a student is re-assessed in a module (by coursework and/or by written examination) under 4.3.1(a) above, the marks obtained in the elements of assessment passed at the first attempt shall stand whereas the maximum mark that may be awarded for the referred elements is 40%. The overall mark for the module will be calculated on the basis of the original marks for the elements passed at the first attempt and the capped marks gained in the referred elements.

 

LLM Legal Practice (LPC) Regulation 4.3.1

 

4.3.1 Referrals

 

(a) When a student fails to pass any element of assessment at the first attempt, he/she will have the right to be re-assessed in that element of assessment, twice only, without attendance, at a time specified by the appropriate Module Assessment Board.

 

(b) A student may only be referred in the elements which he/she has failed.

 

(c) When a student is re-assessed in an element of assessment (by coursework and/or by written examination) under 4.3.1(a) above, the marks obtained in all the elements of assessment will not be capped.

 

University Regulation 4.3.2

4.3.2. Repeat with attendance or by an alternative mode of study

 

(e)      When a student has failed a module at both the first attempt and when subsequently reassessed under 4.3.1, he/she may, at the discretion of the Programme Assessment Board and taking into account the recommendations of the Module Assessment Board, attempt that module again, once only, with attendance or in an alternative mode of study as deemed by the Board to be appropriate. Up to 180 credits may be repeated in this way. Where applicable students may therefore be studying a full-time programme in part-time mode for one year. The standard applicable fee is charged.

 

(f)      In the case of a repeat with attendance or by an alternative mode of study the student will retake the assessment for all the elements of assessment and no marks from previous attempts will be carried forward. The overall mark for the module will be capped at 40%.

 

(g)      A student who fails assessment for the repeat is entitled to one final reassessment as a referral (cf 4.3.1). The marks for the referral(s) and for the module as a whole will be capped at 40%.

 

(h)     Substitution of an alternative module is not permitted at Masters level.

 

LLM Legal Practice (LPC) Regulation 4.3.2

 

4.3.2. Repeat with attendance or by an alternative mode of study

 

(g)      Where a student has failed any element of assessment, other than in an optional module, after the 3 maximum attempts permitted, the Programme Assessment Board has the discretion to either withdraw the student from the programme or to allow the student to begin the entire programme again from semester 1, once only, with attendance. Up to 200 credits may be repeated in this way. Where applicable students may therefore be studying a full-time programme in part-time mode for one year. The standard applicable fee is charged.

 

(a)(ii) Where a student has failed any element of assessment in an optional module after the 3 maximum attempts permitted, the Programme Assessment Board has the discretion to allow the student to either repeat that module, once only, with attendance, as per 4.3.2(b) below, or to allow the student to select an alternative optional module. In either case the standard fee for that module is charged.

 

(h)     In the case of a repeat with attendance or by an alternative mode of study the student will retake all the elements of assessment in the modules being repeated and no marks from previous attempts will be carried forward. The overall mark for the module will not be capped.

 

(i)       A student who fails any element of assessment in any module being repeated is entitled to two final reassessment referrals (cf 4.3.1). The marks for the referral(s) and for the module as a whole will not be capped.

 

University Regulation 6.4.1

Regulation 6.4.1 Master’s degree

(a) A Master’s degree is awarded for the achievement of 180 credits at Level 7 as required by the programme regulations.

 

LLM Legal Practice (LPC) Regulation 6.4.1

6.4.1Master’s degree

(a) A Master’s degree is awarded for the achievement of 200 credits at Level 7.

(d)  <new provision>

For the purposes of determining an award classification, the module marks that will be used will be those calculated on the basis of the first attempt at each assessment. Where there has been more than one attempt made at an element of assessment, the mark used for the purposes of calculating the module total for classification purposes will be capped at 50%.

 

University Regulation 6.5.1

 

Regulation 6.5.1 (entry with advanced standing) does not apply on this programme.

 

Regulations apply to students commencing their studies from (please state the date / intake that these regulations will apply to students for each Stage):

 

Regulations apply to students

Date the regulations apply

Intakes affected

Stage 1

September 2016

ALL INTAKES TO PROGRAMME

 

Semester 1

 

Core modules:

 

Code

Title

Credits

LAWM71

Business Law and Practice

25

LAWM72

Property Law and Practice

20

 

1 Option

10

LAWM70

Advanced Legal Practice* this module runs across semester 1 and 2

25

 

Optional Modules

Choose a single 10 credit optional module from the following list

 

Code

Title

Credits

LAWM76

Commercial Contracts

10

LAWM79

Family Law and Practice

10

 

Elective modules

There is no provision for an elective module at semester 1.

 

Progression Regulations

In order to meet the requirements of the Solicitors Regulation Authority, the following exceptions to the University regulations have been approved by Academic Board:

 

4.2You must achieve a minimum mark of 50% in order to pass each element of assessment. In Advanced Legal Practice, the Course Skills of Practical Legal Research, Writing and Interviewing & Advising will be assessed on a pass/fail basis on a judgment of ‘competent / not yet competent’.

 

4.3.1 (a) When a student fails to pass any element of assessment at the first attempt, he/she will have the right to be re-assessed in that element of assessment, twice only, without attendance, at a time specified by the appropriate Module Assessment Board.

 

(b) A student may only be referred in the elements which he/she has failed.

 

(c) When a student is re-assessed in an element of assessment (by coursework and/or by written examination) under 4.3.1(a) above, the marks obtained in all the elements of assessment will not be capped.

 

4.3.2. Repeat with attendance or by an alternative mode of study

 

(j)       Where a student has failed any element of assessment, other than in an optional module, after the 3 maximum attempts permitted, the Programme Assessment Board has the discretion to either withdraw the student from the programme or to allow the student to begin the entire programme again from semester 1, once only, with attendance. Up to 200 credits may be repeated in this way. Where applicable students may therefore be studying a full-time programme in part-time mode for one year. The standard applicable fee is charged.

 

(a)(ii) Where a student has failed any element of assessment in an optional module after the 3 maximum attempts permitted, the Programme Assessment Board has the discretion to allow the student to either repeat that module, once only, with attendance, as per 4.3.2(b) below, or to allow the student to select an alternative optional module. In either case the standard fee for that module is charged.

 

(k)     In the case of a repeat with attendance or by an alternative mode of study the student will retake all the elements of assessment in the modules being repeated and no marks from previous attempts will be carried forward. The overall mark for the module will not be capped.

 

(l)       A student who fails any element of assessment in any module being repeated is entitled to two final reassessment referrals (cf 4.3.1). The marks for the referral(s) and for the module as a whole will not be capped.

 

Semester 2

 

Core modules

 

Code

Title

Credits

LAWM73

Litigation & Advocacy

20

LAWM75

Wills & Administration of Estates

10

 

LAWM74

Solicitors’ Accounts

5

LAWM70

Advanced Legal Practice* this module runs across semester 1 and 2

25

 

Optional modules

Choose 2 modules totalling 20 credits from the following list:

 

Code

Title

Credits

LAWM77

Commercial Property

10

LAWM78

Employment Law & Practice

10

LAWM80

Housing Law & Practice

10

LAWM81

Advanced Personal Injury Litigation

10

 

Elective modules

There is no provision for an elective module at semester 2.

 

Progression Regulations for semester 2 modules

In order to meet the requirements of the Solicitors Regulation Authority, the following exceptions to the University regulations have been approved by Academic Board:

 

4.2You must achieve a minimum mark of 50% in order to pass each element of assessment. In Advanced Legal Practice, the Course Skills of Practical Legal Research, Writing and Interviewing & Advising will be assessed will be assessed on a pass/fail basis on a judgment of ‘competent / not yet competent’. In Litigation and Advocacy, the Course Skill of Advocacy will be assessed will be assessed on a pass/fail basis on a judgment of ‘competent / not yet competent’. In Wills & Administration of Estates, the Course Skill of Drafting will be assessed on a pass/fail basis on a judgment of ‘competent / not yet competent’.

4.3.1The same programme-specific regulations apply as for semester one

4.3.2The same programme-specific regulations apply as for semester one.

 

Semester 3

 

Core modules

 

Code

Title

Credits

LAWM82

Legal Practice Project

60

 

 

Elective modules

There is no provision for an elective module at semester 3.

 

Progression Regulations

With the exception of the general programme specific regulations above, there are no programme specific regulations at semester 3.


[1] Same as main award unless agreed otherwise at validation – e.g. to meet PSRB requirements

[2] Same as main award unless agreed otherwise at validation – e.g. to meet PSRB requirements