Attachments

 

Quality Handbook

 

 

 

Programme Specification

 

SECTION A: CORE INFORMATION

 

  1.  

Name  of programme:

Public Health

 

  1.  

Award title:

MSc

 

  1.  

Programme linkage:

 

Is this part of group of linked programmes between which students can transfer at agreed points? (e.g. a group of programmes with a common set of taught modules)

Yes

 

This programme is one of a group of related programmes which also includes:

MSc Nursing

MSc Health Safety & Wellbeing

 

It is possible to transfer between these programmes at certain points. This may be subject to particular requirements.

 

  1.  

Is the programme a top-up only?

No

 

  1.  

Level of award:

Level 7

 

  1.  

Awarding body:

University of Sunderland

 

  1.  

Department:

Faculty of Health Sciences and Wellbeing

 

  1.  

Programme Studies Board:

Postgraduate Health

 

  1.  

Programme Leader:

Dr. Floor Christie

 


  1. How and where can I study the programme?

Tick all boxes that apply

 

At Sunderland:

Full-time on campus

Part-time on campus

As work-based learning full-time

 

As work-based learning part-time

 

As a full-time sandwich course

 

As a part-time sandwich course

 

By distance learning

 

 

At the University of Sunderland London campus: 

 

Full-time on campus

  

Part-time on campus

As work-based learning full-time

 

As work-based learning part-time

 

As a full-time sandwich course

 

As a part-time sandwich course

 

By distance learning

 

 

At a partner college:

 

Full-time in the UK 

 

Part-time in the UK

 

Full-time overseas

 

Part-time overseas

 

By distance learning

 

As a full-time sandwich course in the UK

 

As a part-time sandwich course in the UK

 

As a full-time sandwich course overseas

 

As a part-time sandwich course overseas

 

As work-based learning full-time in the UK 

 

As work-based learning part-time overseas

 

Other (please specify)

n.a.[1]

 

  1. How long does the programme take?

 

 

Min number of years / months

Max number of years / months

Full-time

1 year

3 years

Part-time

2 years

3 years

Distance learning

 

 

Work-based learning

 

 

 

For start-dates please see the current edition of the Prospectus or contact the relevant department at the University. For start-dates for programmes delivered in a partner college, please contact the college.

 

SECTION B:  FURTHER CORE INFORMATION

 

Use Outline Programme Proposal Form for ADC for questions 12 to 23

 

24. Learning and teaching strategy

 

The curriculum is designed to meet the requirements for post-graduate qualifications as stipulated by the QAA for Higher Education.  The programme has been designed to take account of the increasingly broad societal focus of public health in particular and the structural, political and organizational strategies which have been adopted in the UK and internationally to identify and characterise modern health and health-care challenges and better respond to them.

 

To meet these challenges there are three strands, each one emphasising a different aspect of change and development in the role of the practitioner.  Common to all areas is knowledge, ways in which knowledge is constructed and applied and methods of inquiry. These issues will be addressed in the first part of the programme, which will equip the practitioner to develop their skills and knowledge and will enable them to focus on their chosen branch.

 

At this level (post-graduate) students are expected to be self-directed, and the underpinning philosophy of the curriculum is empowerment of the student.  A wide variety of strategies are used in the delivery of the curriculum.  Common to all modules is the relationship of the theory to practice, which is addressed in a variety of ways.  There will be formal input of information for students are expected to apply and discuss this knowledge in the session.  Assignments are designed to relate theory to practice in a clear and focused manner.

 

The curriculum employs a variety of teaching methods to allow students to gather the requisite knowledge base as well as the many subject specific and generic skills required of a graduate of the course. There will be formal input of information for student s which will supplement group work, which encourages students to investigate and apply the knowledge gained in these lectures. These classes include the presentation of theory and opportunities are given to the students to discuss and explore issues in detail and to reflect on its application to practice. 

 

  1. Retention strategy

 

The course is structured is such a way as to be able to identify early (by means of mid-term tasks and assignments), whether any students are struggling with the course content and provide additional support where required.

 

26.Any other information

 

The programme has recently been extensively revised and updated to align the syllabus content with core competencies in public health as stipulated in the syllabus for the professional training by the UK Faculty of Public Health.

 


SECTION C:  TEACHING AND LEARNING

 

27.What is the programme about?

 

The MSc in Public Health provides a comprehensive professional grounding in modern public health knowledge, skills and practice equipping graduates to work in research or applied public health roles in the UK or internationally. The programme is very much tailored to addressing the underlying complexity and the wider societal and environmental determinants of health and disease, which confront all health professionals concerned with better understanding and improving population health.

 

28.What will I know or be able to do at the end of the programme?

 

Learning Outcomes Postgraduate Certificate – Skills

By the end of this part of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

 

S1To be able to interpret and explain the significance of patterns of ill health in populations and the methods used to study them.

 

Learning Outcomes Postgraduate Certificate – Knowledge

By the end of this part of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

 

K1Have a broad appreciation of the determinants of health and disease in populations and of recent developments in the public health response at local, national and international levels.

 

Learning Outcomes Postgraduate Diploma – Skills

By the end of this part of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

 

S2To be able to critically evaluate published (public health) research and provide informed and meaningful analysis of public health programmes and policies.

 

Learning Outcomes Postgraduate Diploma – Knowledge

By the end of this part of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following: The core module is: Applied Public Health Practice and students choose either The Epidemiology and Health Measurement module or Leadership and Management in Health module.

 

K2To have acquired a sound grasp of the theories and principles, as well as the historical development of modern public health practice and study methodologies.

 

Learning Outcomes Masters – Skills

By the end of this part of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

 

S3To be able to understand and apply appropriate research and analytical skills to addressing the modern complex public health problems of developed and developing societies.

 

S4To be able to critically evaluate published public health research at a level commensurate with professional peer review practice.

 

Learning Outcomes Masters – Knowledge

By the end of this part of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

 

K3Have acquired a strong foundation in the principles and underlying component disciplines of modern public health practice including the social and environmental determinants of health               and disease in populations and communities.

 

K4A practical applied knowledge and appreciation of the application of public health methods, from health care public health to international disease control and prevention programmes. 

 

29.What will the programme consist of?

 

Taught postgraduate programmes generally consist of a number of taught modules leading to the award of a Postgraduate Certificate (60 credits) or Postgraduate Diploma (120 credits). A Masters qualification (180 credits) usually culminates in a major piece of independent work such as a project or dissertation. All modules are at postgraduate level (level 7 in the UK’s national scheme). The summary below describes briefly what is contained in the programme. The programme structure, including a detailed list of modules, can be found in the programme regulations.

 

The MSc programme is designed as a progressive three stage development starting with underlying research principles, sociological perspectives and an understanding of epidemiology which is the fundamental scientific discipline underpinning all of public health research and practice, including modern complex embedded patterns of chronic disease and their respective risk factors. From the outset (i.e. Certificate Level), the programme has a strong applied focus, with students prompted to consider their practical research topic of interest at an early stage. There will be opportunities and encouragement also to explore topics which are active research areas of the department as well areas of collaboration with local / regional public health partners such as Local Authorities and Public Health England. The second stage of the programme (i.e. Diploma Level), deals with applied public health, making extensive use of case studies including field visits; the theory and practice of health improvement and its origins in traditional health promotion and thirdly international / global perspectives on research and practice in public health. As is common to most taught MSc programmes, the third stage (Masters) involves students undertaking their own research dissertations which ideally builds upon their identified areas of interest developed in the applied research methods module. 

 

The programme is therefore designed across the following three main phases:

 

  • The first part, which equates to a Post-Graduate Certificate, is designed to give the students the underpinning skills of enquiry and appraisal to ensure an evidence base to their clinical practice. The emphasis on legal and ethical frameworks and philosophical approaches will address issues of critical thinking, analysis and evaluation. This will ensure students have the necessary skills to take full benefit of the analysis of their practice.
  • The Postgraduate Diploma in Public Health aims to ensure that students are given an opportunity to examine wider the determinants of health at both individual and societal levels and to analyse them to a high degree with a view to facilitating health improvement and reducing health inequalities. This comprehensive grounding will enable them to identify and evaluate policies and interventions for population health improvement from local community settings through to national and international levels.
  • The project module in the MSc final year encourages independent thinking and reflective practice by embarking on a research project with an emphasis on examining solution(s) or responses to a practical public health problem(s) or issue(s). This will serve to consolidate learning over the programme enabling graduates to apply the knowledge and skills gained to tackling real world public health priorities and tailor their approach in accordance with their desired career direction (e.g. public health research, advocacy, policy or practice). 

 

Teaching and learning will be delivered following the University’s ‘Teaching, Learning and Assessment Strategy’. A wide variety of approaches will be used e.g. lectures, seminars, tutorials, workshops, guided study and self-study.

 

Presentations and large / small group discussions will provide students with opportunities for exploration and practice both model skills and techniques taught which they will then apply in their clinical practice. Students will be expected to bring their experiences from clinical practice into classroom discussion and to apply the new knowledge and skills from each module in their work environment.

 


 

 

 


 

 


 

30.How will I be taught?

 

Scheduled teaching activities

Yes

Independent study

Yes

Placement

Optional: summer term from 2017/18

 

At this level (post-graduate) students are expected to be self-directed, and the underpinning philosophy of the curriculum is empowerment of the student.  A wide variety of strategies are used in the delivery of the curriculum.  Common to all modules is the relationship of the theory to practice, which is addressed in a variety of ways.  There will be formal input of information for students are expected to apply and discuss this knowledge in the session.  Assignments are designed to relate theory to practice in a clear and focused manner.

 

The curriculum employs a variety of teaching methods to allow students to gather the requisite knowledge base as well as the many subject specific and generic skills required of a graduate of the course. There will be formal input of information for student s which will supplement group work, which encourages students to investigate and apply the knowledge gained in these lectures. These classes include the presentation of theory and opportunities are given to the students to discuss and explore issues in detail and to reflect on its application to practice. 

 

All teaching within the course is focussed in terms of the application of the knowledge gained in practice. The curriculum is designed to ensure that graduates are able to combine a solid knowledge of the evidence base with enhanced practical skills, an ability to think laterally and to express sound clinical reasoning to respond to the many challenges facing the modern clinician and in meeting the current health agenda. Students are further prepared for professional practice through a development of an awareness of legislative issues.

 

Additional support will be given within tutorials, if and when required.   

 

  • Lectures or equivalent: formal lectures are delivered by the teaching team. Further direct staff contact is provided through support for CAL or open learning units, etc., examination sessions and scheduled supervision of projects. Visiting lecturers in specialised areas deliver keynote lectures allowing them to share valuable, current experience with the students. Handouts covering key points are also provided or (it is planned) accessed through WebCT. The students are expected to augment these both in lectures and using directed learning.
  • Seminars / Workshops: seminars and workshops are strongly integrated into the programme to illustrate and expand theoretical principals, encourage team work, and develop peer and self-assessment. 
  • Tutorials: these will usually be in smaller groups and provide a major input from internal or external staff, but may not involve the same level of student output as workshops.
  • Directed self-study: students make use of many modes of study in the various specified learning activities summarised in the module descriptors, including selfdirected study of presented material, working through set examples, preparation for workshop presentations, prescribed reading or other media work directly related to taught material and project work. Where open-learning or similar student-centred schemes are used; these are presented in association with keynote lectures.
  • Advised selfstudy: reference to additional sources of information will be given to enable students to read around the module topic to provide opportunities for a broadening of knowledge.
  • The integration of knowledge whenever appropriate, through integrative assignments, and development of a deep understanding of the principles and practice of health and bio psychosocial models will be encouraged.
  • For each module, students will receive a module guide. Further information about the modules that make up the wider programme is included within this integrated programme guide. The module guide will detail the contact details of the module leader, syllabus, unit(s) titles, and assessment strategy of the module. Each module guide will consist of a carefully structured study plan to ensure that students cover the appropriate materials. Basic information will be provided in the module and students will be informed as to appropriate sources of additional material as required.
  • Independent work is also expected throughout the programme culminating in the final year with an extensive study in a particular chosen area. Each student will be designated their own research supervisor and is expected to demonstrate reflective, data gathering and analysis skills, while discussing results and their relevance to past and present studies.
  • Presentation of work is delivered using a variety of methods to allow the students to illustrate their ability to interpret and communicate data. This includes formal write up of case studies, verbal presentations, role play/simulation. 
  • Students are given directed learning and are signposted to specific websites, journals and books to encourage continuing professional development and maintenance of their personal development files. They are expected to read widely, highlighting the importance of life-long learning.

 

General Principles

 

The University has a ‘duty of care’ to ensure that all graduates are fit for practice. In essence, this requires that all graduates meet a set of minimum threshold standards of   competence in the taught skills. Thus the programme aims to build on core knowledge, cognitions and skills, introducing ideas and interventions, assessment approaches and instruments, which have been demonstrated through research to have been effective, and to consider these in the context of team work and service configurations and acceptability to service users and carers.

 

The award of the certificate, diploma and MSc degree requires that all modules are passed.  The programme team have therefore developed a set of programme specific regulations that will promote the higher standard of achievement. This is not beyond the reach of our students, who generally have higher entry skills and experience than the majority of students on other programmes, and will support the University’s desire to enable students to reach their full potential. As integration of learning is especially important for the students, reflecting this key ability in professional practice, all students will be required to pass all modules at each level before progressing to the next level. 

 

The diversity of cultures represented within student cohorts represents a significant opportunity for peer group learning beyond the context of an academic curriculum and students from across the programme are encouraged to share their life and educational experiences as a means of enriching the overall student experience.

 

The University VLE will be used as a mechanism of centrally storing lecture and seminar briefs and core documentation from the programme and regular announcements will be posted for students on the programme.

 

Programme Content

 

A list of the modules in the programme can be found in the Programme Regulations.

 

A summary of the types of teaching, learning and assessment in each module of the programme can be found in the Matrix of Modes of Teaching.

 

31.How will I be assessed and given feedback?

 

Written examinations

Yes

Coursework

Yes (written assignments & dissertation)

Practical assessments

Yes (course presentations)

 

A summary of the types of teaching, learning and assessment in each module of the programme can be found in the Matrix of Modes of Teaching.

 

The generic assessment criteria which we use can be found here. Some programmes use subject-specific assessment criteria which are based on the generic ones.

 

This programme uses the Generic University Assessment Criteria

YES

 

This programme uses the Subject Specific Assessment Criteria

 

NO

 

The University regulations can be found here.

 

Assessment:

Assessment on the programme is mainly through a combination of end of term written assignments and mid-term presentations or in class exercises. A written multiple choice exam will form part of the assessment in Epidemiology (HSSM67).  The mid-term assessments allow students to gain an early appreciation of the level of understanding required in each respective module and effectively serve as an early indicator of progress and successful engagement with the programme. Presentations are also an effective means of developing communication skills and assessing if students are able to “think on their feet” and defend their ideas – key skill areas for a developing public health professional.  Written assignments of course, assess the ability to logically structure your work and write coherently on an application of the module knowledge and principles, usually focusing on a problem area or topic of your own interest that is relevant to the syllabus.  The dissertation assesses your capacity to propose, design and execute your own original research project. For those without a clear idea of what they would like to study for their dissertation, topic areas will be circulated that fit with currently active research areas within the public health team. 


32.Teaching, learning and assessment matrix

 

Matrix of modes of teaching, learning and assessment [2]

Module

Code

Core / optional

Modes of T&L

Modes of Assessment

LO S1

LO K1

LO S2

LO K2

LO S3

LO K3

Epidemiology & Health Measurement

HSSM67

Optional

Lectures, Computer labs, Group work private study, seminars

Written Multiple choice exam & Essay

Taught Developed Assessed

Taught Assessed

Taught, assessed

Taught Assessed

Taught Assessed

Taught Assessed

Health Research Methods & Critical Appraisal

HSSM66

Core

Lectures, Computer labs private study, group work, seminars

Individual written report and presentation

Developed

Taught Assessed

Taught Assessed

Taught Assessed

Taught

Taught Assessed

[3]Sociological Perspectives & Global Health

HSSM65

Core

Lectures, private study, group work, seminars

Essay

Developed

Developed

Assessed

Taught Assessed

Taught

Assessed

Taught Assessed

[4]Applied  Public Health Practice (includes Health Improvement)

HSSM68

Core

Lectures (including expert external speakers), Group work, private study, seminars

Poster presentation & Essay

Taught Developed Assessed

Taught Assessed

Taught, assessed

Taught Assessed

Taught Assessed

Taught Assessed

Leadership and Management in Health

HSSM69

Optional

Lectures, private study, group work, seminars

Poster Presentation & Essay 

Developed

Taught Assessed

Taught Assessed

Taught Assessed

Taught

Developed

Taught Assessed

MSc Dissertation

HSSM70

Core

private study, 1-2-1 tuition

MSc Dissertation

Assessed

Assessed

Assessed

Assessed

Assessed

Assessed


 

33.How does research influence the programme? 

 

As far as possible the MSc revised programme aims to capitalise on existing research interests of students (if already developed) and on the emerging research strengths of the department which has a growing reputation in a number of areas including sociological aspects of global / international health, as well as local government public health policies and programmes, including the obesogenic environment and local alcohol policies. Masters student are also encouraged to attend acclaimed regional FUSE research seminars with national and international profile speakers as well as attend the annual UK Faculty of Public Health Conference, which a significant number have done in recent years.

 

SECTION D EMPLOYABILITY

 

34.How will the programme prepare me for employment?

 

The programme gives you the opportunity to develop advanced skills and knowledge which you can use in the future. Some postgraduate programmes are associated with a particular career path but most skills can be applied to a range of employment situations. Some opportunities and employment related strengths of our programme are listed below:

 

 

  • As such it provides a solid grounding for a career with public health practice, research or policy development, with either a UK or an international focus. The international breadth of the student cohort at Sunderland enables students to obtain a rich globalised perspective on public health opportunities.

 

  • The department at Sunderland also enjoys close collaborative links with local authority departments of public health and the regional office of Public Health England, where summer placement opportunities which are integrated with dissertation topics will be available from the 2017/18 academic year.

 

For information about other opportunities available to our students who study on campus, click here.

 

Additional opportunities to develop your experiences more widely will vary if you study at one of our partner colleges. For information about the extra-curricular activities available in any of our colleges please contact the college direct. 

 

35.Particular features of the qualification

 

Graduates of this programme will be well placed to prepare for Faculty of Public Health Membership exams and we are exploring how best to provide ongoing support for students interested in this opportunity. Completion of part A membership exams qualifies successful candidates for membership of the Faculty if Public Health, which enables candidates to use the designation MFPH and is a recognised route to Fellowship of the Faculty and onward recognition of high level competence in public health to a level commensurate with working as a consultant in Public Health. Recognition for the MSc is also being sought from the Royal Society of Public Health (https://www.rsph.org.uk/). 

 

36.Professional statutory or regulatory body (PSRB) accreditation.

 

PSRB accreditation is not relevant to this programme 

 

PSRB accreditation is currently being sought for this programme: from Royal Society for Public Health

Yes: https://www.rsph.org.uk/

This programme currently has PSRB accreditation

 

The programme is currently accredited until:

 

There are programme-specific regulations relating to the following. Details are given in the programme regulations:

 

The modules to be studied

 

Pass-marks for some or all modules and/or parts

(elements) of modules 

 

Placement requirements

 

Attendance requirements

 

Professional practice requirements

 

Final or overall mark for the award  

 

Other 

 

 

 

Interim or exit awards are not accredited. 

 

SECTION E:  PROGRAMME STRUCTURE AND REGULATIONS

 

Please complete and insert Part B of the Programme Regulations Form, for questions 37 and 39

 

SECTION F:  ADMISSIONS, LEARNING ENVIRONMENT AND SUPPORT

 

40.What are the admissions requirements?

 

Admission to the programme requires evidence of achievement at Undergraduate Level Study to degree level and a minimum IELTS requirement of 6 for international students.

 

The University’s standard admissions requirements can be found in the university regulations.

Programme-specific requirements which are in addition to those regulations are given below. 

 

Can students enter with advanced standing?

Yes

 

 

If yes, to which Stages?

Stage 1

 

Stage 2

 

Stage 3

 

Stage 4

 

 

The University has a process by which applicants whose experience to date already covers one or more modules of the programme they are applying for may seek Accreditation of Prior Learning (APL). Full details can be found here but if you think that this may be relevant to you, please contact the department which offers the programme you are interested in.

 

41.What kind of support and help will there be?

 

The central support systems provide a fair and equitable admissions service.  University open days are usually held four times per year. Students are also made aware of programmes through conventional advertising, through the extensive collaboration with health care providers and through the University’s growing reputation for innovative market-led programmes.

 

All applicants are sent both general and specific programme information. Telephone advice is available and the admissions tutors offer appointments to discuss career opportunities. The regular presence of university staff within the local trusts also provides opportunities for discussion and advice. This is confirmed by the number of students from the local trusts who are enrolled on programmes.

 

All new students have a formal induction when they receive a comprehensive induction pack which includes details of the programme, modules, assessments and assessment regulations. The induction also includes visits and/or talks about the library facilities, computing and other resources. Following induction, provision is made for registration. Continuing students attend a registration evening.

 

Students’ appreciation of the induction process is assessed by student feedback and programme evaluation; as a result, during the last three years the process has been successfully improved. When programmes are offered off-campus appropriate induction and registration takes place at the site of programme delivery.

 

As the teaching team is small much of the contact is at an informal level. Academic support is also offered at modular level. Special help is available, for example, by referring students to other members of staff within the wider team.  Furthermore access to specific open learning material produced by the university is also available. The Effective Learner open learning package has been helpful to students.  Students with learning difficulties are usually identified during previous training. Nevertheless problems which are identified during study at the University are addressed and support provided. 

 

All students are allocated a personal tutor at the beginning of their studies from staff teaching on the programme. Two course representatives are also nominated by the class who have regular meetings with the programme lead.

 

The University provides a range of professional support services including health and well-being, counselling, disability support, and a Chaplaincy. Click on the links for further information.

 

Please see the relevant college prospectus or website for details of student support if you are planning to study in one of our partner colleges.

 

42.What resources will I have access to?

 

On campus

In a partner college

 

By distance learning

 

 

 

 

 

 

On campus

Tick all that apply

General Teaching and Learning Space

IT

Library

VLE

Laboratory

 

Studio

 

Performance space

 

Other specialist

 

Technical resources 

 

 

Text for details listed above:

 

Information about the University’s facilities can be found here.

 

Please see the relevant college prospectus or website for details of college learning resources if you are planning to study in one of our partner colleges.

 

43.Are there any additional costs on top of the fees?

 

No, but all students buy some study materials such as books and provide their own basic study materials.

 

Yes (optional) All students buy some study materials such as books and provide their own basic study materials. In addition there are some are additional costs for optional activities associated with the programme (see below)

Yes (essential) All students buy some study materials such as books and provide their own basic study materials. In addition there are some are essential additional costs associated with the programme (see below)

 

 

Additional optional costs may be incurred on optional field trips (two to be organised as part of applied public health, which will be on Wednesday afternoons in term 2: modest within region travel costs only) and attendance at the annual UK Faculty of Public Health conference is encouraged (for which we there is a substantial student discount and assistance with attendance costs, so total cost, depending on location, should not exceed £100.00).

 

44.How are student views represented?

 

All taught programmes in the University have student representatives for each programme who meet in a Student-Staff Liaison Committee (SSLC) where they can raise students’ views and concerns. The Students’ Union and the faculties together provide training for student representatives. SSLCs and focus groups are also used to obtain student feedback on plans for developing existing programmes and designing new ones. Feedback on your programme is obtained every year through module questionnaires and informs the annual review of your programme. Student representatives are also invited to attend Programme and Module Studies Boards which manage the delivery and development of programmes and modules.  Faculty Academic Committee, also has student representation. This allows students to be involved in higher-level plans for teaching and learning. At university level on Students are represented on University level Committed by sabbatical officers who are the elected leaders of the Students’ Union.

 

The University’s student representation and feedback policy can be found here.

 

Every two years we participate in the national Postgraduate Taught Experience Survey (PTES) which is run by the Higher Education Academy.

 

Programmes offered in partner colleges: If you are studying in one of our partner colleges the college will have its own mechanisms for obtaining student feedback. Some of these may be the same as those on-campus at the University but others may be different. You should ask your college for further information.

 

For distance learning operated from Sunderland: if you are studying by distance learning you will have slightly different arrangements from those used on campus. In particular you are likely to have virtual rather than physical meetings and discussions. However these arrangements should provide comparable opportunities for you to give feedback. Details are given below.  

 

SECTION G: QUALITY MANAGEMENT 

 

45.National subject benchmarks

 

The Quality Assurance Agency for Higher Education publishes benchmark statements which give guidance as to the skills and knowledge which graduates in various subjects and in certain types of degree are expected to have. They do not cover all subjects at postgraduate level but those which exist can be found at here.

 

Are there any benchmark statements for this programme?

 

NO

 

The subject benchmark(s) for this programme is/are:

 

The QAA also publishes a Framework for Higher Education Qualifications (FHEQ) which defines the generic skills and abilities expected of students who have achieved awards at a given level and with which our programmes align. The FHEQ can be found here.

 

46.How are the quality and standards of the programme assured?

 

The programme is managed and quality assured through the University’s standard processes. Programmes are overseen by Module and Programme Studies Boards which include student representatives. Each year each module leader provides a brief report on the delivery of the module, identifying strengths and areas for development, and the programme team reviews the programme as a whole. The purpose of this is to ensure that the programme is coherent and up-to-date, with suitable progression through the programme, and a good fit (alignment)  between what is taught and how students learn and are assessed - the learning outcomes, content and types of teaching, learning and assessment. Student achievement, including progress through the programme and the way in which the final award is made, is kept under review. The programme review report is sent to the Programme Studies Board and the Faculty in turn reports issues to the University’s Quality Management Sub-Committee (QMSC).

 

External examiners are appointed to oversee and advise on the assessment of the programme. They ensure that the standards of the programme are comparable with those of similar programmes elsewhere in the UK and are also involved in the assessment process to make sure that it is fair. They are invited to comment on proposed developments to the programme. Their reports are sent to the Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Academic) as well as to the Faculty so that issues of concern can be addressed.

 

All programmes are reviewed by the University on a six-yearly cycle to identify good practice and areas for enhancement. Programmes are revalidated through this review process. These reviews include at least one academic specialist in the subject area concerned from another UK university. The University is subject to external review by the Quality Assurance Agency for Higher Education on a six-year cycle. Their review reports for Sunderland can be found at here.

 

Further information about our quality processes can be found here.

 

Please also complete the SITS form.

 


[1] n.a.: denotes not applicable

[2] Please note following two contingency measures for transitional period of overlapping programmes – essential given very restricted staffing levels:

[3] Global Health component to be taught in term 1 for Jan 2019 intake alongside Oct 2018 intake.

[4] Jan 2019 Intake to attend lectures with Oct 2018 intake (due to restricted availability of external speakers and ensuring course consistency. The Jan intake will not be assessed until the summer term to preserve 60 credit per term structure.