Attachments

 

 

Programme Specification

 

 

 

SECTION A:CORE INFORMATION

 

  1.  

Name of programme:

Electronic and Electrical Engineering

 

  1.  

Award title:

Bachelor of Engineering (BEng Honours)

Master of Engineering (MEng)

 

  1.  

Programme linkage:

 

Is this part of group of linked programmes between which students can transfer at agreed points?

 

Yes

 

If yes:

This programme is one of a group of related programmes which also includes:

 

  • BEng (Hons) Automotive Engineering
  • BEng (Hons) / MEng Mechanical Engineering
  • BEng (Hons) / MEng Manufacturing Engineering

 

 

It is possible to transfer between these programmes at certain points. This may be subject to particular requirements.

 

This programme is also available as a ‘sandwich’ programme with a placement option.

 

  1.  

Is the programme a top-up only?

 

No

  1.  

Does the programme have a Foundation Year (Level 3) associated with it so that students enter for a four-year programme and progress directly from the Foundation Year to Stage 1 without having to re-apply?

 

Yes

 

If yes:

You can take a Foundation Year (Level 3) as an integral part of this programme of study. For details of the Foundation Year see the programme specification for the Engineering Integrated Foundation year.

 

  1.  

Level of award:

 

Level 6 (BEng Hons)

Level 7 (MEng)

 

  1.  

Awarding Body:

University of Sunderland

 

  1.  

Department:

School of Engineering

 

  1.  

Programme Studies Board:

TBC

 

  1.  

Programme Leader:

 

Dr Ian Fletcher

  1. How and where can I study the programme?

 

At Sunderland:

 

Full-time on campus

Part-time on campus

As work-based learning full-time

 

As work-based learning part-time

 

As a full-time sandwich course

As a part-time sandwich course

By distance learning

 

 

At the University of Sunderland London campus: 

 

Full-time on campus

 

Part-time on campus

 

As work-based learning full-time

 

As work-based learning part-time

 

As a full-time sandwich course

 

As a part-time sandwich course

 

By distance learning

 

 

At a partner college:

 

Full-time in the UK 

 

Part-time in the UK

 

Full-time overseas

*

Part-time overseas

*

By distance learning

 

As a full-time sandwich course in the UK

 

As a part-time sandwich course in the UK

 

As a full-time sandwich course overseas

 

As a part-time sandwich course overseas

 

As work-based learning full-time in the UK 

 

As work-based learning part-time overseas

 

Other (please specify)

 

 

*BEng programmes only are offered at partner colleges.

 

 

  1. How long does the programme take?

 

 

Min number of years / months

Max number of years / months

Full-time

4 years (MEng)

5 years (MEng with placement)

3 years (BEng)

4 years (BEng with placment)

7 years (all programmes)

Part-time

8 years (MEng)

6 years (BEng)

10 years

Distance learning

 

 

Work-based learning

 

 

 

For start-dates please see the current edition of the Prospectus or contact the relevant department at the University. For start-dates for programmes delivered in a partner college, please contact the relevant college.

 

SECTION B:FURTHER CORE INFORMATION 

 

Use Outline Programme Proposal Form for ADC for questions 13 to 25

 

  1. Learning and teaching strategy. 

 

Within all levels of the programme students gain experience of a wide range of different approaches to learning, from traditional lectures and tutorials to directed study and on-line resources. The modules are delivered using a variety of relevant and appropriate learning experiences, for example, formal lectures, tutorials, case studies, software learning, problem based learning and directed reading. It is anticipated that as and when new/additional facilities become available there will be move towards placing greater emphasis upon problem based learning across all levels of the programme.

All modules utilise the virtual learning environment. The degree of this utilisation will be determined by the module team based upon the nature of the module. A ‘fit for purpose’ approach will be adopted when determining the extent of this utilisation.

 

The BEng programme will require students to understand engineering concepts, techniques used to analyse engineering systems and the processes used for the synthesis of solutions to engineering problems. Students will need to demonstrate that they can apply their knowledge and understanding to an increasingly complex and realistic range of engineering systems. The key skills of organisation and time management will also need to be exercised, in both an individual and a team context, to produce timely solutions to assignments, together with communication and presentation skills to adequately describe their solutions, either in reports, or by presentation to staff and their peers.  Thus, a range of learning and teaching methods, appropriate to the subject and the situation will be utilised, to encourage understanding, develop skills and abilities and to motivate students. Also, where appropriate, expertise and facilities within the Department and the Faculty developed through research and reach-out activities will be utilised to enhance the student learning experience and to reinforce the relevance of the programmes’ content to industry.

 

Conventional lectures and tutorials will be used where appropriate. For example to deliver introductory analytical modules where the development of theory in a structured and logical sequence, reinforced by students’ work sheets and tutorial support, has been found to be the most satisfactory technique. The practical application of engineering theory will be reinforced by laboratory sessions, in which students will have to maintain appropriate records, analyse and critically appraise their results and present their findings in a lucid and succinct laboratory report. ‘The critical appraisal’ component of laboratory work is introduced in taught modules at Stage 1 and developed by appropriate tutorial, design and coursework assignments and examinations at Stages 2 and 3.

 

A broad base of engineering skills and knowledge is introduced in Stage 1 of the programme to provide students a solid working background from which are developed the skills salient to the programme’s specialist theme of manufacturing engineering. Students face increasing levels of academic challenge as the prior knowledge gained in the earlier stages of the programme is built upon to develop their ability in the final Stage to that required of a professional manufacturing engineer. For example Manufacturing & Materials and Design, Drawing and Practical Skills and Electronic & Electrical Principles are introduced at Stage 1 and respectively enhanced at Stage 2 by the higher level modules Manufacturing Processes, Electrical Power Systems & Machines and Electronics. Students’ engineering skills, knowledge and abilities are further developed and combined with essential management skills in the final year modules Manufacturing Systems Design and Professional Engineering Management Techniques. The final Stage project module provides further opportunity for students to combine, apply and enhance knowledge and understanding gained from various modules at all Stages of the programme.       

 

In the past students have complained that some of the modules appear to lack relevance to their chosen degree programme, for example some electrical students have queried the need to study mechanical engineering. The course team does not accept this and has made strenuous efforts to persuade students that all of their studies are fully relevant. As is the norm across the HE sector, the engineering team firmly believes that all engineering students should have as broad a base as possible and this is reflected by the inter-disciplinary nature of the modules at Stage 1. All lecturers take pains to ensure that the students understand the context of their teaching by explaining, for example, that a large percentage of the value of a modern car/manufacturing system drive is taken up by electrical systems. “Today we are going to talk about the design of electrical motors as they are used in the context of ……… “.

 

Further, the teaching of engineering mathematics is now entirely in the hands of engineering lecturers, whereas in the past mathematicians have delivered this part of the curriculum. This does help ensure that only the most practically useful techniques are covered and that efforts are made to explain the application of all of the material in an engineering context. “We use differentiation to determine the rate of change of a parameter, for example the rate of change of velocity gives the acceleration of a vehicle/production line.”

 

To encourage engagement with the analytical subjects’ coursework, ‘directed tutorials’ are included in the Learning and Teaching strategy which help to build student confidence and develop skills needed in these areas. In mathematics additional support is also available via ready access to tutors and study packs developed in conjunction with the University’s Learning Development Services (LDS) department.  Students who are found to be weak in mathematics are directed to attend additional tutorial sessions provided by the University maths tutor. In recent years volunteer mentors from higher Stages of the engineering programmes have undertaken weekly maths tutorial support sessions with the Stage 1 students. When the sessions are available they become part of the weekly timetable.

 

In contrast to analytical subjects, the synthesis of solutions to open ended manufacturing engineering problems, requires a different approach and involves a process which is much more student centric. This is facilitated by the opportunity to temporarily suspend judgement, to postulate and explore alternative solutions. In subjects exploring system design issues, challenging assignments, often involving teamwork, will be used to encourage creativity and provide the opportunity to combine, select and apply the analytical skills and abilities, acquired in the individual modules of the programme, to the solution of ‘real’ problems, thus integrating learning across the programme.

 

Students will also be exposed to a range of practical engineering skills, including the safe use of hand and machine tools. This ‘hands on’ experience of basic manufacturing methods will give a direct appreciation of the ‘process capability’ of such methods. There will also be the opportunity for the acquisition of practical skills by the design and construction of the Formula Student (see later) car and in laboratory sessions.  Hand drawing skills and draughting conventions will be taught and students will go on to develop skills in using industry standard, commercial engineering software to support their studies.

 

Presentation methods will be varied to suit circumstances, to maintain interest and provide alternative routes to acquire understanding to suit the preferred learning style of a particular student. Use of the University’s virtual learning environment, SunSpace is expected and encouraged in all modules. The value of this resource not simply as the host of learning materials but as a focus for communication with and between defined groups of students is widely acknowledged and is expected to play an increasingly supportive and valuable role as a learning tool.

 

Further, students will be encouraged to take increasing levels of responsibility both for their own learning and the support of their fellow students and to recognise the value of doing this in the context of lifelong learning. In this context the programme provides a framework for students to acquire the core transferable skills of numeracy, group working and communication abilities via reports, drawings and presentations; confidence in the use of IT and modern software tools; the ability to conduct independent research.

 

Students are encouraged to extend the scope and depth of their learning experience by undertaking an industrial placement year. In almost every case, students find this a motivating and maturing experience which enhances their personal qualities, frequently leads to the identification of interesting and challenging individual final year projects and enhances their employability. Some students return to their placement employer on graduation. A professional placement service, within the Faculty, assists with the identification of appropriate placement opportunities. In addition, the University’s Careers and Employability Service facilitates placement applications through the provision of advice on the preparation of CV’s and developing interview skills. To provide further encouragement and support, the Engineering Team Leader compiles an email list of Stage 2 students across all programmes and sends regular emails to all students, throughout the academic year, which contain details of local, national and international placement opportunities. Presentations at the University are arranged by the Engineering Team Leader for companies wishing to host a placement student for the academic year ahead and all Stage 2 students are invited and encouraged to attend.    

 

Some learning opportunities have a particularly strong motivational character. For example students on the programme are invited to join the Formula Student project, in which a single seater, formula restricted racing car is designed, manufactured and entered into a competition that is open to all undergraduate students across the world. Managed by a member of academic staff, students run the project themselves and are responsible for raising money from sponsorship to fund the exercise. The Formula Student team is allocated a design and a build area, currently at the University’s Industry Centre, in which they have access to manufacturing and other facilities to enable them to complete the project.

 

A strong emphasis is also placed on non-engineering subject areas which primarily occurs in Stage 3 of the programme when students have developed a solid understanding of the relevant engineering subject disciplines. The Professional Engineering Management Techniques and Manufacturing Systems Design modules aim to provide students with the management techniques which employers expect them to demonstrate and apply soon after graduation.

 

Professional Engineering Management Techniques focuses on the responsibilities of the professional engineer through exploring “the constraints placed on the engineering professional by UK Environmental and Health and Safety legislation and probes how this impacts the systems and procedures that need to be developed in the workplace” (See Module Descriptor). Students’ management skills and awareness of the role of the engineer in society are also developed in this module. It investigates and applies resource scheduling and control techniques applied to the management of a project.

 

The Manufacturing Systems Design concentrates on the application of appropriate management tools to maximize productivity in manufacturing and on advanced maintenance strategies.

 

Stage 4 of the MEng programme adopts the principles of Systems Engineering as an underlying theme. Thus, wherever applicable, students will receive an initial block of conventional classroom and laboratory teaching to allow them to develop the core skills and knowledge relevant to the discipline. They will then engage in problem based exercises where, as a group, they must follow the principles of systems engineering to decompose the problem, work individually to develop subsystems that must then be integrated as a complete solution. This wil provide students with exposure to the type of collaborative work they are likely to encounter in an industrial setting.

 

At Stage 1 of the programme the Design Drawing and Practical Skills module, EAT100, introduces and explains the design process rationale. This design module provides a basis for  later modules which require the solution of a problem-based assignment which helps to develop students’ problem solving and time management skills. The design module also raise students’ awareness of the practicalities of the engineering profession and that there is rarely a single correct solution to a given problem. Instead, the nature of the design module helps them to realise that in the real world there is most often a need to achieve an optimum through a compromise which can satisfy, for example, the demands of performance, cost and aesthetics, while taking heed of environmental and ethical requirements.

 

 

  1. Retention strategy

 

The main theme of the undergraduate retention strategy is engagement and support. This has been developed over a number of years and recognises the importance of supporting the student faculty towards their academic and professional goals. This strategy acknowledges support requirements have evolved, yet maintains the priorities of academic success and personal wellbeing. The strategy themes of engagement and support are characterised into two sections; Personal tutoring and Curriculum and Community.  

 

Personal tutoring

 

Personal tutoring is consistent throughout all stages of the BEng and MEng programmes. A specific member of staff is assigned to each student at the beginning of each stage offering structured support meetings. In addition to this structured approach, personal tutors offer the opportunity to discuss matters informally – whenever the need arises. Meetings are not simply used to resolve areas of concern, but a forum for advising and mentoring the student to achieve all their goals. This can be based on the personal experience of the tutor – or signposting the student towards a more useful University facility. The personal tutoring experience will be different for each individual student, as the agenda is driven from both participants. The tutor will use analytics information representing attendance and engagement, but recognises this information is indicative. The true value in the process will come from the subsequent meeting and conversation.

 

Curriculum & Community

 

The retention strategy recognises that staff may not always be available or appropriate for student support needs. From this perspective, peer support groups are encouraged and facilitated. One particular technique for encouraging this is our Induction programme, which takes place in Freshers Week. The programme is open to all new (and existing) students and involves essential information from an academic, social and wellbeing perspective. Furthermore, a practical, fun, group activity is included to introduce students to each other in a focussed environment. Anecdotal evidence suggests friendships made at this stage, transform into informal study groups which continue throughout the subsequent degree.

 

Techniques to encourage a peer support network are also a part of the formal assessment schedule of several modules. Coursework which involve design work or laboratory experiments are often group orientated. This is not to dilute the volume of work, but to improve the engagement in what can be perceived as an intimidating activity.  Conclusively, peer support in these tasks ensures a high degree of engagement in a variety of formal assessment activities.

 

Encouraging student support through an Engineering community is continued with all Faculty staff. Access to staff for academic or personal issues is not exclusive to the personal tutor. For several years, staff have adopted and employed an open door policy for student issues. No formal appointment is required for a discussion – if the member of the faculty team is available they will attempt to resolve the query at that time. The high regard placed by students on this aspect of the engineering retention strategy is well recognised, through informal feedback and SSLC meetings.

 

Finally, curriculum and community is brought together through the Faculty encouraging student participation in professional body competitions. The events are competitive, friendly and team based, involving the completion of a specified practical activity. Crucially, the students are competing against other Universities. As well as developing the skills of the student, the competitions expose the student in a friendly environment to a wider engineering community, strongly linked to some of their career goals. This link is seen as vital, allowing the student to connect their own programme of study to an engineering world they aspire to be a part of.

 

 

  1. Any other information

 

SECTION C:TEACHING AND LEARNING

 

  1. What is the programme about?

 

The aim of the programme is :

 

  • To provide, within a modular framework, a programme, which, while embodying a balanced common core with other engineering programmes, provides the academic integrity and professional focus for engineers and technologists in the electronic and electrical engineering industries.

 

  • To provide an educational experience which meets the aspirations of students and the market needs, locally, nationally and internationally.

 

  • To provide a rewarding and supportive environment where students can develop not only knowledge and practical abilities in specific areas, but also key transferable skills.

 

  • To provide an opportunity for students to gain industrial experience via a placement year.

 

  • To develop graduates with the specific knowledge, analytical ability and design skills appropriate for a professional electronic or electrical engineer and hence prepare graduates for employment in the electronic or electrical engineering sectors.

 

 

  1. What will I know or be able to do at each Stage of the programme

 

Learning Outcomes Stage 1 – Skills  

 

 

By the end of this Stage of the programme successful students will demonstrate the ability to:

 

  • S1undertake basic mathematical modelling of simple engineering systems.

 

  • S2compile, manipulate and interpret basic commercial information.

 

  • S3use appropriate software to assist in basic analysis, communication and design methodologies.

 

 

Learning Outcomes Stage 1 – Knowledge

 

By the end of this Stage of the programme successful students will demonstrate knowledge in:

 

  • K1basic Engineering mathematics including calculus.

 

  • K2introductory mechanical and electrical engineering and manufacturing technology and processes.

 

  • K3processes involved in carrying out and reporting a simple engineering project.

 

  • K4environmental issues as they impinge upon engineering activity.

 

Learning Outcomes Stage 2 – Skills as above plus

 

By the end of this Stage of the programme successful students will demonstrate the ability to:

 

  • S4Evaluate electronic and electrical systems.

 

  • S5Develop instrumentation and control systems.

 

  • S6Apply appropriate analysis techniques to signals and systems

 

  • S7Use appropriate software design methods to implement reliable programme

solutions to engineering problems

 

  • S8Evaluate and select suitable material and manufacturing processes on the

basis of given requirements.

 

Learning Outcomes Stage 2 – Knowledge as above plus

 

By the end of this Stage of the programme successful students will demonstrate:

 

  • K5Critical knowledge of analogue and digital electronics, electrical power

systems, instrumentation and control.

 

  • K6Knowledge and critical understanding of the mathematics associated with

advanced analysis.

 

  • K7Working knowledge of simulation and programming in an engineering context.

 

 

Learning Outcomes Stage 3 – Skills as above plus

By the end of this Stage of the programme successful students will demonstrate the ability to:

 

  • S9 Independently plan and execute a project, critically appraise and effectively

report the outcome of a project, and demonstrate initiative, creativity and

financial awareness.

 

  • S10Design and evaluate electronic systems.

 

  • S11Analyse and evaluate electrical power networks and performance calculations relating to electrical machines.

 

  • S12Design and appraise maintenance and efficiency strategies.

 

 

Learning Outcomes Stage 3 – Knowledge as above plus

 

By the end of this Stage of the programme successful students will demonstrate:

 

  • K8Expert knowledge of an area of engineering evidenced in the form of an independent project.

 

  • K9 Advanced knowledge of operational systems and strategies used in

manufacturing.

 

Learning Outcomes Stage 4 (MEng Only) – Skills

  • S13 Apply technological knowledge to develop creative and innovative solutions to engineering problems within the electrical and electronic engineering sector.

 

  • S14 Conduct appropriate research into the current state-of-the-art in the electronic and electrical engineering industry to inform the development of engineering solutions.

 

  • S15 Application of skills in problem solving, communication, information retrieval and the effective use of IT facilities.

 

 

  • S16 Apply and critically evaluate the impact of electronic systems, automation and information technologies to enhance a manufacturing or control process or operation.

 

  • S17 Plan, execute, document and critically evaluate an interdisciplinary technical project in relevant industries and critically evaluate and discuss the success and impact of the project.

 

  • S18 Exercise initiative and personal responsibility, to integrate theory and implement solutions to engineering problems, work with technical uncertainty, demonstrate an understanding of current practice and its limitations, and some appreciation of likely new developments.

 

  • S19 Appreciate  different roles within an engineering team and the ability to exercise initiative, personal and team responsibility.

 

Learning Outcomes Stage 4 (MEng Only) – Knowledge

  • K11 Applied knowledge of the engineering principles, materials and systems that underpin advanced electronic and automated systems.

  • K12 Critical and applied knowledge of the principles of systems modelling and model-based design to achieve defined specifications.

 

  • K13 Understanding of teamwork and management practices in the electronics and automation industries.

 

  • K14 Critical and applied knowledge of how automation and mechatronic systems can enhance engineering operations.

 

  • K15 Working knowledge of commercial, ethical, regulatory and environmental factors that influence the choice of solutions to engineering problems.

 

  • K16 An extensive applied knowledge of a specialised topic relevant to electronic engineering

 

  • K17 Critical knowledge of the professional standards in Engineering and their relevance to career development in the electronics industry.

 

Learning Outcomes – Ordinary degree

If you are awarded an Ordinary degree you will have achieved the majority of the learning outcomes for the programme studied. However you will have gained fewer credits at Stage 3 than students awarded an Honours degree, your knowledge will typically be less broad and you will typically be less proficient in higher-level skills such as independent learning.

 

  1. What will the programme consist of?

 

Each undergraduate programme consists of a number of Stages from a minimum of 1 to a maximum of 4, each of which is equivalent to a year’s full-time study. The summary below describes briefly what is contained in each Stage. Most programmes have a mixture of core (i.e. compulsory) modules and optional ones, often with increasing choice as you move through the programme and gain in experience. In some programmes the choice of optional modules gives you particular ‘routes’ through the programme. The programme structure including a detailed list of modules can be found in the programme regulations.

 

 

Stage 1: (BEng/MEng) Core modules: 120 credits. At stage 1 the programme shares a common orientation with the other BEng/MEng Engineering programmes in the relevant mathematical principles that underpin the profession. The modules included are:

 

  •   MAT135 Engineering Mathematics (20 Credits) Basic numeracy; Algebraic manipulation; Equations; Elementary trigonometry; Differential calculus; Integral calculus; Differential equations: Matrix algebra; Vector algebra.

 

  •     EAT100 Design, Drawing and Practical Skills (20 Credits) Engineering drawing (to include Engineering drawing to ISO standards; Views, sections, dimensions and tolerances; Arrangement, detail and assembly drawings; 2D CAD drawing), The Design Process (Techniques for problem identification and specification writing; Structured design methodologies for the generation of ideas; Systematic evaluation techniques (including the Weighted Objectives Method) and Basic Workshop Practice (Workshop safety; Basic production processes).

 

  •     EAT103 Applied Mechanics (20 Credits) General theory (Dimensions, Units (basic and derived); Identification of force, types of force; systems of force resolution of a two-dimensional force into components; resultant of a two-dimensional concurrent force system; moments of a force, the couple and torque. static equilibrium; “free body” principle applied to solids.) Machine dynamics (Uniform motion; Newton’s laws of motion; work, energy and power; plane motion of rigid bodies and interconnected systems; momentum, impact, impulse, coefficient of restitution; simple harmonic motion; friction power transmission systems) and Strength of materials (Elastic properties of materials.  Direct stress and strain; properties of section; second moment of area; moment of inertia; bending and torsion; stresses and strains in pin-jointed frames; simple beams and thin cylinders; statically indeterminate systems; compound bars)

 

  •   EAT104 Manufacturing and Materials (20 Credits) Materials & Manufacturing (Properties and processing of Engineering materials; Fundamental manufacturing methods; Manufacturing process selection; Software-aided materials and process selection; Systems and organisation in manufacturing industries; Economic considerations and product costing; Quality control methods;) and Ethics in manufacture (Ethical and environmental issues e.g. energy consumption raw material conversion; environmental issues at the end of the useful life of the product; environmental pollution; potential hazards caused during the manufacturing process)

 

  •     EAT118 Energy Conversion (20 Credits) Thermodynamics and fluid mechanics (Introduction to thermodynamics; definitions of thermodynamic systems; properties; temperature; pressure; ideal gas law, heat capacity. Heat and work transfer. Steam and steam tables. 1st Law of Thermodynamics; Heat engine theory. 2nd Law of Thermodynamics; Fluid Statics; Fluid Dynamics: conservation of mass, momentum and energy; primary and secondary losses in pipes. Dimensional analysis.) Electrical and Magnetic Circuit Theory (Electrical and magnetic; Electrical terms and units; Electrical components; Basic electrical circuit theory. Basic magnetic circuit theory) and Electrical Systems (Simple electrical systems; operating principles and behaviour as energy conversion systems. Motors; Generators; Transformers; Power distribution systems)

 

  •     EAT119 Electronic & Electrical Principles (20 Credits) Basic Electrical Theory (Voltage, Current and Power. Kirchoff’s Voltage and Current Laws), Passive Electrical Components (Resistor: Insulators, Conductors, Resistivity and Resistance. Ohm’s Law, Series & Parallel connection, Potential Dividers, Circuit loading and practical selection. Capacitor: Electrostatic and Electric field theory, Capacitance, Analysis of Simple Circuits. Inductor: Electromagnetism, Lenz’s Law, Analysis of Simple Circuits) Circuit Analysis (Mesh and Nodal Analysis, Superposition, Norton and Thevenin) AC Theory (Peak, RMS, frequency and phase shift. Resistance, reactance. Impedance and phasor diagrams) Basic Electronic Technology (Semiconductor theory. The operation of diodes, transistors and thyristors and the analysis of simple circuits that include them) Digital Logic (Logic gates, truth tables, Boolean logic, Logic implementation and minimisation) Practical Issues - Electrical Safety, Electrical Measurement, Interference and grounding.

 

Stage 2: (BEng/MEng) Core modules: 120 credits

 

  •     EAT227 Manufacturing Processes (20 Credits) Process Selection; Manufacturing with Glass and Ceramics:  Manufacturing with Metals; Manufacturing with Polymers; Thermoplastic and thermosetting polymers. Manufacturing with Polymer Composites. Nature of polymer composites. Nature of unsaturated polyester resin/glass composite systems. Lay-up techniques. Matched die moulding, Spray-up. Filament winding.  Calculation of winding angles for specific design requirements. Injection moulding and RRIM.

 

  •     EAT237 Microprocessor and PLCs (20 Credits) Problem Analysis and Program Design - The process of analysing a given problem and designing a program will be investigated in a problem-based fashion decoupled from hardware specific issues. Students will be exposed to a range of industrial applications and embedded systems and asked to develop a flow chart and begin to consider the requirements for the hardware. Microprocessors - The internal architecture of microprocessors / microcontrollers will be described including a description of the operation of the various internal features and subsystems such as memory systems, ADC, DACs and system clocks. Serial and parallel data transfer between microprocessors / microcontrollers and other devices will be investigated using a range of protocols. Microprocessor Programming - The various techniques for programming a microprocessor will be investigated including assembly language, C programming and graphical approaches. Students will be encouraged to consider the merits of each approach and appreciate the importance of selecting the correct one. Basic assembly language and ‘C’ programming skills will be developed through practical activities. PLCs (The internal architecture of a PLC system will be explored alongside their application to a range of industrial problems. The hardware design of PLCs will be studied relative to the areas in which they are applied. PLC Programming (The various programming methodologies for PLCs will be investigated and students will gain experience in programming a PLC building on the earlier design stage of the module using a problem based learning framework. Instrumentation and Sensing for Programmable Systems (The role of sensors in programmable systems will be explored to include the use of simple signal conditioning circuit applications to include op-amps and comparators, and the role and operation of Analogue to Digital Converters (ADCs) and Digital to Analogue Converters (DACs).

 

  •     EAT238 Control and Instrumentation (20 Credits) System Modelling and Representation. Block diagrams and their manipulation. The transfer function and its relationship to differential equations, poles and zeros. First and Second order Systems. Time response and the Final value theorem. Sensors Instrumentation and measurement system structures. Static and dynamic performance. Sources of measurement error and noise. Primary sensing techniques applicable to mechanical, electrical and fluid systems. Signal Conditioning Signal amplification. Standard ranges & signal Conversion. Filtering,open and closed loop control systems. The advantages and costs of feedback. Stability.Frequency response. Root locus plots.Controller Design Gain compensation. PID Control.Computer Control Analogue-to-digital and digital-to-analogue conversion. Sample-and-hold circuits. Multiplexing techniques. Digital Implementation of Algorithms.SCADA SystemsThe role of SCADA systems in modern manufacturing environments will be covered in the context of a modern, automated manufacturing environment.

 

  •     EAT239 Mathematics, Statistics and Simulation (20 Credits) Laplace transforms Transforms and inverse functions, solution of differential equations, step and impulse functions. Fourier series Odd and even functions, harmonics, half range series. Statistics Descriptive statistics, probability laws, discrete probability distributions, continuous probability distributions.Discrete TimeSignal definitions and classifications.basic signals. Z-Transform Models, the pulse transfer function and its relation to difference equations. Convolution transform methods.Modelling Development of static and dynamic models of various types of system.Differential Equations, State Variables and Transfer Functions. Simulation/Analysis Numerical integration. MATLAB and SIMULINK software.

 

  •     ELX214 Electrical Power systems and Machines (20 Credits) Power Generation Systems Traditional and alternative sources of primary energy. The principles and practice of energy conversion, environmental factors, relative costs of production. Consumer costs and tariffs.Power TransmissionTransmission line and cable parameters. Overhead line configurations. Line inductance and capacitance calculations. Equivalent circuits for lines and cables.Load factor, diversity factor, etc. Power factor improvement. Comparison of a.c. and               d.c. systems for EHV transmission.Power Systems Power system components and their representation. Rating of equipment. The per-unit system. Complex power and the effects on system performance.System disturbances and Protection: Causes and effects. Surges and overvoltages and their evaluation. Faults: types, relative severity and analysis. Switchgear, and protective devices: function and types. Outline of common schemes of protection. Electrical MachinesFundamentals of electromagnetic machines, magnetic fields, energy conversion, torque, speed, losses.Single phase power transformer, principles and voltage current relationships.D.C. machines: principles, operation and construction; field connections and torque speed characteristics.Synchronous machines: construction, rotating field, excitation and characteristics.AC motor: construction. principles, Induction, slip, torque, slip ring devices, speed control. Efficiency and operational costs.

 

  •     ELX218 Electronics (20 Credits) Basic semiconductor devices.The operation, properties and applications of diodes, transistors and other semiconductor devices. Transistor amplifier design. Switching Circuits. logic families. Power electronic devices and applications. Optoelectronics.Operational amplifiers. Operational analysis, linear and non-linear applications. Sequential logic Design & Implementation. Counters and registers. Circuit Design. Random access memory, Read Only Memory and logic arrays. Electronic Circuit Emulation.

     Modelling and the use of CAD (e.g. PSpice/Multisim)

  •      

 

Sandwich Year Placelement: (BEng/MEng)  Optional - 120 credits

 

  •     EAT241 Engineering Placement (120 Credits) The student will spend 35 weeks minimum (excluding holidays) working in industry in a position approved by the placement tutor and programme leader. The student is responsible to an industrial supervisor within the placement company, and will negotiate and agree a learning contract with the industrial supervisor. The visiting academic tutor will subsequently vet and approve the learning contract. Throughout the placement, the student will compile a portfolio of supporting evidence to demonstrate the achievement of the objectives identified in the learning contract,and the academic supervisor will authenticate this evidence.

 

Stage 3: (BEng/MEng) Core modules: 120 credits

 

  •     ENX313 Project (40 Credits) The identification of an engineering problem. Construction of a project brief. Research and preliminary work. Submission of an interim report. The undertaking of a substantial piece of work that must involve the solution of an engineering problem, in addition to a literature survey. The submission of a final report and a project viva.

 

  •     ENX300 Manufacturing Systems Design (20 Credits) Manufacturing Systems Design and Analysis(JIT, theoretical and practical implementation of JIT techniques, Lean Manufacturing, maintenance, tools of analysis and improvement.  Overall Equipment Effectiveness(OEE), pull and push production systems, Theory of constraints, kanban systems (theory and application), Single minute exchange of dies (SMED),control of inventories , Rank-order clustering, Product flow diagrams), Maintenance Strategies (‘Run to failure` (RTF), Total Productive Maintenance (TPM), Reliability Centred Maintenance (RCM) and Condition Based Maintenance (CBM)) Manufacturing Analysis (Continuous and breakthrough  improvement approaches. Analysis of existing performance, 6 sigma (DMAIC), Kaizen, Ishikawa diagrams)

 

  •     EAT340 Professional Engineering Management Techniques (20 credits) The module provides a broad introduction to business practices and topics relevant to engineering management. It covers key aspects of Human of Resource management, Operations, Marketing, Finance, Personal development and Project Management. The module begins with a brief overview of the constraints placed on the engineering professional by UK Environmental and Health and Safety legislation and probes how this impacts the systems and procedures that need to be developed in the workplace. Other key topics include: the ethical behaviour of engineers, people management, team working and the development of written and verbal communication skills. In the second semester, the focus is placed on project management. Here, the student is systematically taken through the full project life cycle including project planning, feasibility, evaluation and control. As part of this delivery all of the relevant techniques are discussed including but not exhaustively: WBS activity sequencing, cost benefit analysis (discounted cash flow, payback, return on investment ROI etc.) earned value and project risk.

 

  •     ELX303 Electrical Power (20 Credits) Applications and performance of DC machinesMagnetism, electromagnetism, modelling of field interaction and operating parameters.. Operating characteristics, energy efficiency, energy loss within electrical machines. Factors affecting machine performance, stability, machine design and construction, traditional methods of speed and direction control.AC motors and generators, their operation, performance and control Performance of synchronous machines, excitation calculations, reactance and equivalent circuits. Voltage regulation and machine performance, predicting system behaviour. Fault conditions, modelling of machine response. Induction motor characteristics, performance, speed control, fault conditions, electrical testing. Generation, transmission and distribution systems, their operation under normal and fault conditions.Electrical power generation, planning and integration load forecasting, security, economics, despatch, pricing, environmental factors.Generation control, system voltage and prime mover control. Maintaining system parameters within specification – legal and system requirements, control methods, permitted variation. Steady state and transient stability, equal area criterion, inertia constants, swing equation and its solution. Software modelling and simulation.The protection of electrical generation, transmission and distribution systems. Protection of lines, transformers, generators and equipment in the transmission and distribution network. Methods of protection such as the use of differential circuits, restricted earth fault protection. Arrangements of Current Transformers, switchgear, Computer based protection arrangements. Substation design, switching arrangements. Modelling of performance and operational characteristics.Power electronics, and control applications.Power electronic devices, their applications in Transmission and distribution systems and in machine control. E.g. MOSFET, Thyristor, IGBT. Power electronics applications in FACTS. Power electronics in converters – system design and modelling, thermal management, performance and applications. DC and AC motor control, Inverters and variable speed drives. DC- DC converters, design, construction and performance.Grid management technologies.Data collection and analysis, Flexible AC Transmission Systems (FACTs) FACTs techniques E.g. Dynamic Voltage Restorer DVR. Load flow and fault calculations, nodal analysis, symmetrical components, use of digital computer and expert systems, SMART grid.

 

  •     ELX304 Electronic Systems Design (20 Credits) Digital Logic Design Synchronous and asynchronous design, Arithmetic structures. Digital Logic Hardware Implementation Memory, Gate Arrays, Programmable Devices and Semi-custom VLSI design. VLSI Design Principles VLSI design philosophy and technologies, Scaleable design, Physical problems, Regular array structures and Analogue VLSI.

 

 

Stage 4: (MEng only) Core modules: 120 credits At stage 4 the MEng programme consists of the following modules:

 

  •     An introductory module, ENGM106 Research in Practice (30 credits), designed to provide students with an understanding of the expectations of Masters-level work and support in developing the appropriate research and communication skills required at this level.

 

  • ENGM109 Advanced Electronic Systems (30 Credits). In this module students will examine the components, systems and processes that can be used to design and implement modern electronic systems to include microcontrollers, SoC, FPGAs and DSPs. Contemporary approaches such as Model-Based Design, In-Circuit Simulation and ‘X’ in the loop will also be explored.

 

  • ENGM110 Automation and Mechatronics (30 Credits). This module will allow students to become proficient in creating automated systems that can operate collaboratively using technologies such as PLCs, HMIs and SCADA. Students will examine the issues relating to the increasing levels of connectivity for such devices such as cybersecurity and integrity. Students will gain hands on experience of implementing connected automation systems to include an awareness of a range of physical actuators.

 

  •     ENGM112 Group Project (30 Credits) This module will provide students with an in-depth experience of working in a team to solve a real engineering problem. Students will work in groups of approximately four on a problem presented at the outset of the module. The problem presented will be based on an industrially relevant scenario and the students will work through the design, planning and implementation of a solution.

 

  1. How will I be taught?

 

Scheduled teaching activities

Independent study

Placement

 

The rationale behind the teaching and learning strategy used on the programme is to apply a broad range of methods which reflect the different types of learning that students undertake in terms of both skill development and knowledge acquisition. The strategy is also designed to provide a diversity of learning experiences that aims to address the different learning styles of the students.  The programme modules are delivered using a variety of relevant and appropriate learning experiences, for example, formal lectures, tutorials, case studies, software based learning, problem based learning and directed reading.

 

Skills acquisition is an important focus of the programme and its aims are:

  • To provide, within a modular framework, a programme which, while embodying a balanced common core with other engineering programmes, provides the academic integrity and professional focus for engineers and technologists in a range of engineering industries.
  • To provide an educational experience which meets the aspirations of students and the market needs, locally, nationally and internationally.
  • To provide a rewarding and supportive environment where students can develop not only knowledge and practical abilities in specific areas, but also key transferable skills.
  • To provide an opportunity for students to gain industrial experience via a placement year.

 

  • To produce graduates with the specific knowledge, analytical ability and design skills appropriate for a professional manufacturing engineer and who can apply these skills in the diverse range of engineering industries in which manufacturing engineers are employed.

 

  • To produce graduates who can work responsibly and as a professional engineer in accordance with the requirements of the professional engineering bodies.

 

  • To produce graduates with a range of key transferable and intellectual skills that can be applied to the role of professional Engineer.

 

 

Employability is a key feature of this programme and the development of transferable skills including teamwork, problem solving, IT skills, oral & written communication, analytical & critical thinking as well as discipline specific engineering skills forms a fundamental part of the programme. Concepts of professionalism related to engineering are introduced at Stage 1 in the design module and developed at the later stages of the programme.

 

The Programme team is well aware of the need for graduate engineers to work effectively as part of a team and places great emphasis upon the benefits of group work throughout all Stages of the degree to encourage and facilitate this. Group work is an integral part of many of the modules, for example in laboratory work in EAT103, EAT104, EAT119, EAT237, EAT239, and is a structured into the assessment regime within a number of the modules, e.g. EAT100. Group working in the form of informal tutorial support groups is also encouraged at all Stages of the programme. 

 

Through the Stage 1 module, Design, Drawing and Practical Skills students are introduced to basic workshop practice and workshop safely. Part of the assessment regime is a group project in which students are required to design, build and test an engineering artefact to achieve a given function. The design begins in Semester 1 and combines elements of the engineering design process along with applications of an industry standard CAD programme, both of which are delivered within the module itself. In Semester 2 the students are taken into the Department’s workshop where they are a given a series of lectures on essential workshop safety before undertaking an introduction to manual engineering skills and machining. The skills learned are then applied in producing the required artefact which is subsequently tested against the given design brief and against the design specification prepared by the students. Students also develop their communication skills in the module through the writing of a technical design report. Advanced writing and research skills will be further developed by MEng students in ENGM106

 

A list of the modules in each Stage of the programme can be found in the Programme Regulations.

 

A summary of the types of teaching, learning and assessment in each module of the programme can be found in the Matrix of Modes of Teaching.

 

  1. How will I be assessed and given feedback? 

Written examinations

Coursework

Practical assessments

 

A summary of the types of teaching, learning and assessment in each module of the programme can be found in the Matrix of Modes of Teaching.

 

The generic assessment criteria which we use can be found here. Some programmes use subject-specific assessment criteria which are based on the generic ones.

 

This programme uses the Generic University Assessment Criteria

YES

NO

This programme uses the Subject Specific Assessment Criteria

YES

NO

 

The University regulations can be found here. Furthermore the programme is subject to programme specific regulations to meet the requirements for IET accreditation.

 

The programme team acknowledges that learning can often be driven by assessment and the assessment strategy reflects this link. Assessments are therefore arranged to ensure that the key learning goals of the modules are covered.

 

In setting assignments care will be taken to ensure that they can be can be completed within the learning time associated with the module and module/programme leaders will counsel students on the importance of good time management. To assist with this, assignments will normally include guidance as to the amount of time to be expended and the nature of the required outcomes.

 

Regarding the nature of assessments there is a balance to be struck between formal examinations and coursework assessment. Examinations make an efficient use of staff time, reduce the likelihood of plagiarism and help to ensure that the students are working under a time pressure that is typical of some employment situations. The professional engineering institutions have for a number of years now indicated a preference towards this form of assessment and so the programme team have determined that, where appropriate, examinations will form part of the assessment regime.

 

However, many of the students joining the programmes have little experience of 3hr unseen examination papers, and are more used to a series of phase tests, or opportunities to break down their assessment within a subject into discreet areas which make a proportional contribution to the overall score. The Stage 1 assessment provides a number of unseen mini examinations or phase tests (TCTs) rather than a single three hour examination. This has been found to be beneficial in terms of attendance at classes, achieving learning goals to build a foundation for further study and improved pass rates.

 

Experience has also shown that it is easy to overburden students with assessment. The programme team has therefore deliberated on the number of assessments in each module and, in accordance with all of the above considerations, has formulated the following, typical Assessment Regime

 

Stage 1

20 credit module – Typically 2 forms of assessment (50% Phase tests and 50% coursework)

 

Stage 2

20 credit module – Typically 2 forms of assessment (Typically comprising 70% Exam (3 hour) and 30% coursework OR 2 Courseworks one of which will normally be a group assignment)

 

Stage 3

If examined - 100% exam

If not examined - maximum of 2 pieces of coursework.

 

Stage 4

Typically 2 elements of assessments (typically coursework) per 30 credit module.

 

Typically, coursework more accurately models the types of assignments that might be undertaken in industry, while the expanded timescale involved in this assessment format means that a more in depth and/or holistic view may be taken. Some subjects lend themselves more readily to coursework assessment while others, are better assessed by means of examinations/TCTs or a combination of the two. The most appropriate model is employed in each case.

 

In some subjects, e.g. design, students are required to undertake a project that lasts the entire year. Experience has shown that they fare better if the task is broken down into elements that are submitted at regular intervals throughout the year, e.g. concepts, concept selection etc. The strategy imposes good time management on students, ensuring that they don’t leave the work until it is too late for it to be completed. Whilst additional submissions are required, there is no increase in the assessment burden for students. This approach tends to replicate real world activity and promote engagement and deeper learning.

 

Students are also expected to develop core transferable skills in addition to technical understanding and abilities; assessments are in place to encourage this development. For example, presentations form an integral part of the assessment of a number of the modules and especially the final year individual project. Presentations are also sometimes employed to assess progression through a task e.g. in the first year design and build project, but do not necessarily form part of the assessment regime. Reference to the tables describing the learning and teaching methods also shows that students are required to participate in seminars and group work, developing communication and interactive skills, and undertake case studies requiring information search skills. In all of these activities they will be encouraged to use IT skills for gathering, analysing and presenting information. Exposure to this wide range of learning opportunities is reflected in the wide range of methods used to assess the learning outcomes for each module as students’ capabilities in these various activities form a component of the assessment for many of the modules.

 

The assessment strategies for the various modules used in the programmes are summarised in the tables in Appendix 2. They illustrate the wide variety of assessment methods and that modules are typically assessed by more than one method.

 

The programme team makes extensive use of the University Virtual Learning Environment, to deliver assessments and provide feedback. This has proved to be a very useful strategy in promoting prompt, clear and detailed feedback on assignments submitted and in addition provides useful ‘back up’ copies of marked student work.

 

The University aims to return marked assessments and feedback within 4 working weeks of the assignment submission date after internal moderation processes have been completed. If this is not possible, students will be notified by the Module Leaders when the feedback is available and how it can be obtained.

 

The Academic Misconduct Regulations and associated guidance can be found here. It is the responsibility of students to ensure they are familiar with their responsibilities in regards to assessments and the implications of an allegation of academic misconduct.

 

Students should refer to the University Regulations for information on degree classifications and compensation between modules.

 

 

 

 


 

  1. Teaching, learning and assessment matrix

 

Level 4

Programme Learning Outcomes – Knowledge

 

Code

Title

C/O

Modes of T&L

Modes of Assessment

Learning Outcomes

K1

K2

K3

K4

EAT100

Design, Drawing and Practical Skills

C

Lectures,Tutorials,Labs

TCT

Coursework

 

TDA

TDA

TDA

EAT103

Applied Mechanics

C

Lectures,Tutorials,Labs

TCT

Coursework

D

TDA

 

 

EAT104

Manufacturing and Materials

C

Lectures,Tutorials,Labs

Lab reports

Coursework

 

 

TDA

 

TDA

EAT118

Energy Conversion

C

Lectures,Tutorials,Labs

TCT

Coursework

 

TDA

 

 

EAT119

Electrical & Electronic Principles

C

Lectures,Tutorials,Labs

Lab reports

TCT

 

D

TDA

 

 

MAT135

Engineering  Mathematics

C

Lectures,Tutorials,Labs

TCT

Coursework

TDA

 

 

 

 

 


Programme Learning Outcomes – Skills

 

Code

Title

C/O

Modes of T&L

Modes of Assessment

Learning Outcomes

S1

S2

S3

EAT100

Design, Drawing and Practical Skills

C

Lectures,Tutorials,Labs

TCT

Coursework

TDA

 

TDA

EAT103

Applied Mechanics

C

Lectures,Tutorials,Labs

TCT

Coursework

TDA

 

 

EAT104

Manufacturing and Materials

C

Lectures,Tutorials,Labs

Lab reports

Coursework

 

 

TDA

 

EAT118

Energy Conversion

C

Lectures,Tutorials,Labs

TCT

Coursework

TDA

 

 

EAT119

Electrical & Electronic Principles

C

Lectures,Tutorials,Labs

Lab reports

TCT

 

TDA

 

TDA

MAT135

Engineering  Mathematics

C

Lectures,Tutorials,Labs

TCT

Coursework

TDA

 

 

 


Level 5

 

Programme Learning Outcomes – Knowledge

 

Code

Title

C/O

Modes of T&L

Modes of Assessment

Learning Outcomes

K5

K6

K7

EAT227

Manufacturing Processes

C

Lectures

Tutorials

Workshops

Assignment

Examination

 

 

TDA

EAT237

Microprocessor and PLCs

C

Lectures

Tutorials

Practicals

System Design Assignment

Examination

TDA

 

TDA

EAT238

Control & Instrumentation

C

Lectures

Tutorials

Workshops

System Design Assignment

Examination

TDA

TDA

TDA

EAT239

Mathematics, Statistics & Simulation

C

Lectures

Tutorials

Workshops

Simulation Assignment

Examination

 

TDA

TDA

ELX214

Electrical Power systems and Machines

C

Lectures

Tutorials

Practicals

Labs

Assignment

Examination

TDA

 

TDA

ELX218

Electronics

C

Lectures

Tutorials

Workshops

Labs

System Design & Build Assignment

Examination

TDA

 

TDA

 


Programme Learning Outcomes – Skills

 

 

Code

Title

C/O

Modes of T&L

Modes of Assessment

Learning Outcomes

S4

S5

S6

S7

S8

EAT227

Manufacturing Processes

C

Lectures

Tutorials

Workshops

Assignment

Examination

 

 

 

 

TDA

EAT237

Microprocessor and PLCs

C

Lectures

Tutorials

Practicals

System Design Assignment

Examination

TDA

TDA

 

TDA

 

EAT238

Control & Instrumentation

C

Lectures

Tutorials

Workshops

System Design Assignment

Examination

TDA

TDA

TDA

TDA

 

EAT239

Mathematics, Statistics & Simulation

C

Lectures

Tutorials

Workshops

Simulation Assignment

Examination

 

TDA

TDA

TDA

 

ELX214

Electrical Power systems and Machines

C

Lectures

Tutorials

Practicals

Labs

Assignment

Examination

TDA

 

 

 

 

ELX218

Electronics

C

Lectures

Tutorials

Workshops

Labs

System Design & Build Assignment

Examination

TDA

 

 

TDA

 

 


Level 6

 

Programme Learning Outcomes – Knowledge

 

Code

Title

C/O

Modes of T&L

Modes of Assessment

Learning Outcomes

K8

K9

EAT340

Professional Engineering Management Techniques

C

Workshops

Simulations

Observations

Coursework

Examination

 

TDA

ELX303

Electrical Power

C

Lectures

Tutorials

Workshops

Examination

 

 

ELX304

Electronic Systems Design

C

Lectures

Tutorials

Case Studies

Examination

 

TDA

ENX300

Manufacturing Systems Design

C

Lectures

Tutorials

Seminars

Workshops

Examination

 

TDA

ENX313

Project

C

Lectures

Supervisory Support

Coursework

TDA

 

 


Level 6

 

Programme Learning Outcomes – Skills

 

Code

Title

C/O

Modes of T&L

Modes of Assessment

Learning Outcomes

S9

S10

S11

S12

EAT340

Professional Engineering Management Techniques

C

Workshops

Simulations

Observations

Coursework

Examination

TDA

 

 

 

ELX303

Electrical Power

C

Lectures

Tutorials

Workshops

Examination

 

TDA

TDA

 

ELX304

Electronic Systems Design

C

Lectures

Tutorials

Case Studies

Examination

 

TDA

 

 

ENX300

Manufacturing Systems Design

C

Lectures

Tutorials

Seminars

Workshops

Examination

TDA

 

 

TDA

ENX313

Project

C

Lectures

Supervisory Support

Coursework

TDA

 

 

 

 

 


Level 7

 

Programme Learning Outcomes – Knowledge

 

Code

Title

C/O

Modes of T&L

Modes of Assessment

Learning Outcomes

K11

K12

K13

K14

K15

K16

K17

ENGM106

Research in Practice

C

Lecture, tutorial, guided independent reading and written research case studies, and development of a student peer-reviewed portfolio

  • CW - Phased production of a written portfolio exercise
  • CW –conference presentation at a Faculty research event

D
A

 

D
A

D
A

T

D
A

D
A

D
A

ENGM109

Advanced Electronic Systems

C

Lectures, lab-based tutorials, problem-based development exercises.

  • CW – Research and modelling exercise.
  • CW – Practical design exercise

T
D
A

T
D
A

D
A

T
D
A

 

T
D
A

D

ENGM110

Automation and Mechatronics

C

Lectures, guided lab-based exercises, culminating in PBL group based system development.

  • CW – Literature review exercise
  • CW – System development exercise

T

D
A

 

D
 

D
A

T

D
A

D

T

D
A

 

ENGM122

MEng Group Project

C

Introductory Lectures, Tutorials, Group supervision, Individual and group project work.

  • CW – Plannig Report
  • CW – Implementation Report

 

D
A

D
A

D
A

D
A

D
A

D
A

D
A

 

 


 

Programme Learning Outcomes – Skills

 

Code

Title

C/O

Modes of T&L

Modes of Assessment

Learning Outcomes

S13

S14

S15

S16

S17

S18

S19

ENGM106

Research in Practice

C

Lecture, tutorial, guided independent reading and written research case studies, and development of a student peer-reviewed portfolio

  • CW - Phased production of a written portfolio exercise
  • CW –conference presentation at a Faculty research event

D
A

D
A

T

D
A

D
A

T

D
A

D
A

D
A

ENGM109

Advanced Electronic Systems

C

Lectures, lab-based tutorials, problem-based development exercises.

  • CW – Research and modelling exercise.
  • CW – Practical design exercise

T
D
A

D
A

D
A

T
D
A

D

D
A

D

ENGM110

Automation and Mechatronics

C

Lectures, guided lab-based exercises, culminating in PBL group based system development.

  • CW – Literature review exercise
  • CW – System development exercise

D
A

D
A

D

T

D
A

D
A

D
A

D
A

ENGM122

MEng Group Project

C

Introductory Lectures, Tutorials, Group supervision, Individual and group project work.

  • CW – Plannig Report
  • CW – Implementation Report

 

D
A

D
A

D
A

D
A

D
A

D
A

D
A

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


  1. How does research influence the programme? 

 

Many of the academic staff teaching on the programme are research active and in a variety of areas. This informs the teaching on and the development of the modules on the programme particularly in the areas of e.g. lightweight materials, crash dynamics, control engineering, and maintenance practices. 

 

Students learn about the process of research and develop research skills in a number of modules on the programme. For example in Stage 1 students undertake a design and build project which requires them to undertake small scale research to determine critical data for the successful completion of the design aspect of the project. This is subsequently developed through the other Stages of the programme and in the final year project students undertake a literature review and are required to critically appraise the data they have gleaned from the literature.

 

Research is particularly significant at Masters Level and as such, in addition to the need to preform research being embedded in every module, students will be supported in the development of research skills as part of the module ENGM106 Research in Practice.

 

SECTION D:EMPLOYABILITY

 

  1. How will the programme prepare me for employment?

 

The programme gives you the opportunity to develop skills which you can use in the future. Some skills are more specific than others to the subject area, or to a particular type of activity, but all skills can be applied in a range of employment situations, sometimes in quite unexpected ways. The skills which this programme is designed to develop are listed below.

 

In 2012 Sir James Dyson predicted that by 2015 there would exist in the UK a shortfall of around 200,000 engineers. It is to be expected that successful graduates from the BEng (Hons) Mechanical Engineering degree programme will therefore be in demand.

 

The BEng (Hons) Mechanical Engineering programme has been designed to provide you with the opportunity to develop the broad range of skills required by the Engineering industry. The programme aims to provide students with a good range of engineering skills and knowledge not only in the area of mechanical engineering, but also aspects of management and electrical engineering.

 

In Stage 1 of the programme you will be introduced to areas such as Manufacturing & Materials, Engineering Design, Electronic & Electrical Principles, Applied Mechanics and Thermofluids.  In Stage 2 development and/or application of these knowledge and skills will continue. On successful completion of Stage 2 you will have the opportunity to undertake a placement where you will be able to apply, in an industrial setting, the knowledge and skills you have acquired.

 

The benefits of undertaking a year’s paid industrial placement within an engineering company are widely acknowledged. Employers put great value on the interpersonal and communication skills developed by students during the placement year.  As a consequence, students who have taken a placement year are viewed by employers as being more significantly employable than those who have not.  In addition, research has indicated that on graduating, students who have taken the placement option are likely to achieve one degree classification higher than they would otherwise have achieved. All on campus, full time students are strongly encouraged to undertake a placement and support is provided in a number of ways to help student achieve this.

 

The Engineering Team Leader prepares a mailing list of Stage 2 students and circulates placement opportunities, from a variety of local, national and international sources to all of them.  Face to face training in the writing of CVs and placement applications is arranged with the University’s Careers and Employability Service who also offer practice interviews for students.  The Engineering Team Leader liaises with potential placement providers to organise visits to the University so they can make presentations to students to raise their awareness of the placement opportunities available to them within their organisations. 

 

A similar mailing list is prepared for final year students and all Stage 3 students receive emails detailing local, national and international vacancies open to them.

 

To support students in obtaining a placement or post graduate employment training can be provided on specialist software available within the University. 

 

The assessment regime employed across all stages of the programme is designed to encourage and develop the required skills and knowledge demanded by employers. Examinations make an efficient use of time, reduce the likelihood of plagiarism and help to ensure that the students are working under a time pressure that is typical of some employment situations. Students are often required to work in groups in completing an assessment and this helps to promote group working and interpersonal skills so highly valued by employers and the professional engineering bodies. An identified and firm hand in date for all assignments replicates the deadlines commonly encountered in the world of work and so promotes student employability.  

 

As a professional mechanical engineer you will need to be familiar with and able to apply management techniques to ensure satisfactory and timely completion of projects and to plan for this appropriately. Your employer may also require you to implement and manage the commissioning procedures required to ensure reliable and productive running of the machines within the company. The specialist knowledge and skills required to do this effectively, within various engineering industries, are provided across a number of modules in Stage 3 of the programme.    

 

Employability in engineering is the key feature of this programme and the development of transferable skills including teamwork, problem solving, IT skills, oral & written communication, analytical & critical thinking as well as the essential engineering skills form a fundamental part of the programme. Concepts of professionalism and engineering ethics are introduced at Stage 1 and subsequently developed in the later Stages of the programme

 

There are also opportunities for on-campus students outside your programme of study.

 

All students are actively encouraged to engage with ‘Sunderland Futures’ which offers a range of CV enhancing opportunities and a chance to make a submission and be awarded the Sunderland Professional Award (SuPA). This is a nationally recognised award for the extra-curricular activities undertaken by students during their time of study that employers find so attractive.

 

Students are encouraged to join their relevant Engineering Council professional association. The University holds Academic Partner status with the Institution of Engineering and Technology (IET) and has close links with both the local branch and various technical committees within the IET providing students with opportunities to attend a range of events and lectures. Students are also encouraged to join the Association for Project Management (APM) which organises monthly talks/seminars by external speakers. 

 

The University hosts and manages the North-East Maintenance Forum (NEMF) which is attended regularly by a significant range of Industrial representatives to share research and best practice.

 

 

For information about other opportunities available to our students who study on campus, click here.

 

Additional opportunities to develop your experiences more widely will vary if you study at one of our partner colleges. For information about the extra-curricular activities available in any of our colleges please contact the college direct. 

 

  1. Particular features of the qualification (optional)

 

  1. Professional statutory or regulatory body (PSRB) accreditation. 

 

PSRB accreditation is not relevant to this programme 

 

PSRB accreditation is currently being sought for this programme

This programme currently has PSRB accreditation

 

The BEng programme is currently accredited until 2021.

 

Please see PSRB Renewal Process for information on the renewal process.

The relevant PSRB(s) is the Institution of Engineering and Technology. 

 

Accreditation for the MEng programme will be sought upon completion of the first cohort.

 

The terms of the accreditation are as described in the enclosed Programme Specific Regulation – see the relevant appendix to this specification document.

 

The BEng programme is recognised as partially meeting the educational requirements for Chartered Engineering status

 

The MEng programme has been designed to fully meet the educational requirements for Chartered Engineering Status.

 

This depends upon successful completion of the programme. Completion of the programme does not guarantee that Chartered Engineer status will be granted as this is dependent on demonstration of a range of personal and professional skills and attributes as described in the UK Standard for Professional Engineering Competence.

 

There are programme-specific regulations relating to the following. Details are given in the programme regulations:

 

The modules to be studied

 

Pass-marks for some or all modules and/or parts

(elements) of modules 

Requirements for progression between one Stage and another

Placement requirements

 

Attendance requirements

 

Professional practice requirements

 

Degree classification  

 

Other 

 

 

 

 

Interim or exit awards are not accredited with the exception of where students leave the MEng programme early with an accredited BEng award.

 

 

 

SECTION E:PROGRAMME STRUCTURE AND REGULATIONS

 

Complete and insert Part B of the Programme Regulations Form, for questions 39 and 40

 

SECTION F:ADMISSIONS, LEARNING ENVIRONMENT AND SUPPORT

 

  1. What are the admissions requirements?

 

The University’s standard admissions requirements can be found in the university regulations. Programme-specific requirements which are in addition to those regulations are given below.

 

For Stage 1

 

  • At least 2 GCE Advanced Level qualifications (or Advanced Certificate in Vocational Education) one of which must include Mathematics or Physics. 
  • BTEC National Diploma / GNVQ must be in an appropriate engineering discipline.

 

  • A UK Advanced Diploma in Engineering with at least a category D pass in the Mathematics and Engineering Science modules.

 

 

For Stage 2

 

  • An HNC in a relevant engineering discipline and have covered all of the major subject areas in sufficient depth. (Analytical subject areas need a pass at the level of Merit or above.)

 

For Stage 3

 

  • An HND in a relevant engineering discipline and have covered all of the major subject areas in sufficient depth. (Analytical subject areas need a pass at the level of Merit or above.)

 

 

The current entry requirements for this programme is as specified in the Fees and Entry Requirements section on the programme page on the University’s website.

 

Entry from a University of Sunderland Foundation Year : Integrated Foundation Year Engineering Pathway

 

Can students enter with advanced standing?

Yes

 

 

If yes, to which Stages?

Stage 1

 

Stage 2

Stage 3

Stage 4

 

 

The University has a process by which applicants whose experience to date already covers one or more modules of the programme they are applying for may seek Accreditation of Prior Learning (APL). Full details can be found here but if you think that this may be relevant to you, please contact the department which offers the programme you are interested in.

 

  1. What kind of support and help will there be?
    1. in the department:

 

The BEng/MEng Electronic and Electrical Engineering programme will have an active Programme Space on the university’s virtual learning environment. This provides a powerful mechanism to maintain communication between students whilst at the University and to provide will provide:

 

  • Information (programme handbook and specification)
  • Frequently Asked Questions
  • Calendar (key events can be highlighted)
  • Communication (email and discussion tool)
  • Relevant link sites (e.g. to relevant professional bodies)

 

The overall strategy for support and guidance is three-pronged: accessibility to staff and resources; provision of relevant and reliable information; and operation of a responsive system for managing problems as they arise.

 

All students have individual access to their Programme and Module leaders. All engineering staff comply with the University policy document “Guidance and Good Practice on Responses to Student Emails and other Student Contact” and supplement this with an open-door policy. There is also extensive use of face to face and online interaction to provide flexible and efficient communication on day to day issues.

 

The first term of study is treated as one continuous induction period into University life. Close monitoring of student attendance is undertaken by both module and programme leaders and, where necessary, one-to-one interviews with students who default on expected attendance levels to identify any underlying issues.

 

In line with University guidelines Personal Tutor meetings are arranged with the Personal Tutor for each student in the cohort during the first and second terms.

 

Programme teams meet with student representatives each term in Staff Student Liason Committees (SSLCs) in order to formally address issues around the student experience. In many instances, issues can quickly and easily be resolved in this way. In some cases they need referral to the Boards of Study. In either event, the VLE is used as a mechanism for formally feeding back to the students regarding the resolution or otherwise of the issues raised.

 

 

  1. in the university as a whole:

The University provides a range of professional support services including wellbeing, counselling, disability support, and a Chaplaincy. Click on the links for further information.

 

  1. in a partner college:

Please see the relevant college prospectus or website for details of student support if you are planning to study in one of our partner colleges.

 

  1. What resources will I have access to?

 

On campus

In a partner college

By distance learning

 

 

On campus

 

General Teaching and Learning Space

IT

Library

VLE

Laboratory

Studio

 

Performance space

 

Other specialist

 

Technical resources 

 

The programme has access to excellent resources which allow a diverse teaching and learning style appropriate to the modules as appropriate:

 

  • The latest teaching and learning facilities, including the Learning Laboratory, IT suites providing access to engineering simulation and CAD software, some of which are available to students at no cost for installation on their own computers.

 

  • Multi-disciplinary Engineering laboratories. Including:
    • Product Development Lab
    • Electronics Lab
    • Automation Lab
    • Project Lab
    • Material Characterisation Lab
    • Formulation Lab
    • Thermofluids Lab
    • Mechanical Engineering Lab

 

  • Social learning spaces including:
    • Student learning areas adjacent to the PC cells in the David Goldman Building.
    • Open access computers (with technical support) with access to the usual range of Microsoft Office applications.

 

  • The Institute of Automotive and Manufacturing Advanced Practice (AMAP) provides the Faculty with access to state of the art industry scale equipment which demonstrate advanced manufacturing processes.

 

Information about the University’s facilities can be found here.

 

Please see the relevant college prospectus or website for details of college learning resources if you are planning to study in one of our partner colleges.

 

  1. Are there any additional costs on top of the fees?

 

No, but all students buy some study materials such as books and provide their own basic study materials.

Yes (optional) All students buy some study materials such as books and provide their own basic study materials. In addition there are some are additional costs for optional activities associated with the programme (see below)

 

Yes (essential) All students buy some study materials such as books and provide their own basic study materials. In addition there are some are essential additional costs associated with the programme (see below)

 

 

 

  1. How are student views represented?

 

All taught programmes in the University have student representatives for each Stage (year-group) of each programme who meet in a Student-Staff Liaison Committee (SSLC) where they can raise students’ views and concerns. The Students’ Union and the faculties together provide training for student representatives. SSLCs and focus groups are also used to obtain student feedback on plans for developing existing programmes and designing new ones. Feedback on your programme is obtained every year through module questionnaires and informs the annual review of your programme. Student representatives are also invited to attend Programme and Module Studies Boards which manage the delivery and development of programmes and modules.  Faculty Academic Committee, also has student representation. This allows students to be involved in higher-level plans for teaching and learning. At university level Students are represented on University level Committees by sabbatical officers who are the elected leaders of the Students’ Union.

 

The University’s student representation and feedback policy can be found here.

 

Final-year students are also invited to complete a National Student Survey (NSS) which asks a standard set of questions across the whole country. The results of this are discussed at Programme Studies Boards and at Faculty Academic Committee to identify good practice which can be shared and problems which need to be addressed. We rely heavily on student input to interpret the results of the NSS and ensure that we make the most appropriate changes.

 

If you are studying in one of our partner colleges the college will have its own mechanisms for obtaining student feedback. Some of these may be the same as those on-campus at the University but others may be different. You should ask your college for further information.

 

Supplementing the standard university processes for student support and representation of views and opinions, the team operate an ‘open-door policy’. This can be accessed in person or for example by telephone or email to arrange a meeting with personal tutors, module teams or programme leaders. This allows for views to be expressed and addressed with the appropriate level of formality in a timely fashion.

 

The VLE also offers an effective means by which students and staff can communicate to assure the smooth running of modules and programme.

 

 

SECTION G:QUALITY MANAGEMENT 

 

  1. National subject benchmarks

 

The Quality Assurance Agency (QAA) for Higher Education publishes benchmark statements which give guidance as to the skills and knowledge which graduates in various subjects and in certain types of degree are expected to have. These can be found here.

 

Are there any benchmark statements for this programme?

YES

NO

 

The subject benchmark(s) for this programme is/are: Engineering Subject Benchmark Statement (February 2015)

 

The QAA also publishes a Framework for Higher Education Qualifications (FHEQ) which defines the generic skills and abilities expected of students who have achieved awards at a given level and with which our programmes align. The FHEQ can be found here.

 

  1. How are the quality and standards of the programme assured?

 

The programme is managed and quality assured through the University’s standard processes. Programmes are overseen by Module and Programme Studies Boards which include student representatives. Each year each module leader provides a brief report on the delivery of the module, identifying strengths and areas for development, and the programme team reviews the programme as a whole.  The purpose of this is to ensure that the programme is coherent and up-to-date, with suitable progression from one Stage to another, and a good fit (alignment) between what is taught and how students learn and are assessed - the learning outcomes, content and types of teaching, learning and assessment. Student achievement, including progress between Stages of the programme and degree classification, is kept under review. The programme review report is sent to the Programme Studies Board and the Faculty in turn reports issues to the University’s Quality Management Sub-Committee (QMSC).

 

External examiners are appointed to oversee and advise on the assessment of the programme. They ensure that the standards of the programme are comparable with those of similar programmes elsewhere in the UK and are also involved in the assessment process to make sure that it is fair. They are invited to comment on proposed developments to the programme. Their reports are sent to the Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Academic) as well as to the Faculty so that issues of concern can be addressed.

 

All programmes are reviewed by the University on a six-yearly cycle to identify good practice and areas for enhancement. Programmes are revalidated through this review process. These reviews include at least one academic specialist in the subject area concerned from another UK university. Quality Assurance Agency (QAA) review reports for Sunderland can be found here.

 

Further information about our quality processes can be found here.

 

Please also complete and insert the SITS form.