Attachments

 

Programme Specification

 

 

 

SECTION A: CORE INFORMATION

 

  1.  

Name  of programme:

Electronic Engineering

 

  1.  

Award title:

MSc

Postgraduate Diploma

Postgraduate Certificate

 

  1.  

Programme linkage:

 

Is this part of group of linked programmes between which students can transfer at agreed points? (e.g. a group of programmes with a common set of taught modules)

 

No

 

 

  1.  

Is the programme a top-up only?

No

 

  1.  

Level of award:

Level 7

 

  1.  

Awarding body:

University of Sunderland

 

  1.  

Department:

School of Engineering

 

  1.  

Programme Studies Board:

TBC

 

  1.  

Programme Leader:

Dr Ian Fletcher

 


  1. How and where can I study the programme?

 

At Sunderland:

 

Full-time on campus

Part-time on campus

As work-based learning full-time

 

As work-based learning part-time

 

As a full-time sandwich course

 

As a part-time sandwich course

 

By distance learning

 

 

At the University of Sunderland London campus: 

 

Full-time on campus

 

Part-time on campus

 

As work-based learning full-time

 

As work-based learning part-time

 

As a full-time sandwich course

 

As a part-time sandwich course

 

By distance learning

 

 

At a partner college:

 

Full-time in the UK 

 

Part-time in the UK

 

Full-time overseas

 

Part-time overseas

 

By distance learning

 

As a full-time sandwich course in the UK

 

As a part-time sandwich course in the UK

 

As a full-time sandwich course overseas

 

As a part-time sandwich course overseas

 

As work-based learning full-time in the UK 

 

As work-based learning part-time overseas

 

Other (please specify)

 

 

 

  1. How long does the programme take?

 

 

Min number of years / months

Max number of years / months

Full-time

1

3

Part-time

2

6

Distance learning

 

 

Work-based learning

 

 

 

For start-dates please see the current edition of the Prospectus or contact the relevant department at the University. For start-dates for programmes delivered in a partner college, please contact the college.

 

SECTION B:  FURTHER CORE INFORMATION

 

Use Outline Programme Proposal Form for ADC, for questions 12 to 23

 

  1. Learning and teaching strategy

 

The pedagogic strategy for this programme is based around the integration of two core approaches:

1)      Systems Engineering. Professional Engineers rarely function in isolation and Masters level graduates should be prepared to quickly progress to a leadership role with responsibility for integrating the outputs of a team into a coherent and effective engineering solution. Varous definitions exist for the systems engineering approach but that presented by Kossiakofff et al (Systems Engineering Principles and Practice – Second Edition, Alexander Kossiakoff, Fig 4.5 p78) would seem to be most appropriate here with three stages:

  1. Advanced Development where the requirements are evaluated, specifications are created along with a development plan
  2. Engineering Design where the individual components are designed and implemented and a test and evaluation plan is created and
  3. Integration and evaluation where the various subsystems are integrated to test and evaluate their performance against the original requirements for the system.

The significance of a engineers at this level being able to adopt a systems approach is recognised by the relevant professional bodies and is enshrined within the “Accreditation  of Higher Education Programmes (AHEP) document which specifies the outcomes that higher education programmes must achieve in order to be eligible for accreditation.

2)      Problem Based Learning. The PBL approach has been championed by a number of high profile Engineering faculties including Aalborg University, Denmark and Deakin University in Australia. PBL is also being implemented across a range of disciplines due to its ability to develop team working and problem solving skills alongside subject knowledge.

In addition to identifying the pedagogic underpinnings it has been necessary to consider several contextual issues:

  • As an MSc programme which shares modules with an integrated, undergraduate MEng programme, there will be a blend of students who have studied earlier content either at Sunderland or at a previous institution. Thus while they are likely to have similar levels of knowledge and skills, they may have studied to differing levels on particular aspects of the subject or, on a practical level, have used different platforms or software.
  • Students entering from different cultural backgrounds are likely to have different levels of experience in project work.
  • Some students may join the programme after a period in employment following an undergraduate qualification and thus may require support in making the adjustment back to study.

Based on these considerations the following delivery pattern is proposed as a template to be adapted and applied in each module as appropriate:

1)      Preparation Phase. Students are introduced to relevant theoretical and practical skills using a mixture of lectures, tutorials and guided laboratory/practical activities. The aim of these sessions will be to provide students with a common level of knowledge and to introduce the core concepts of study at this level.

2)      Problem based system design exercise

  1. Introduction to the problem – students will be introduced to a problem which will require them to exercise judgement, carry out research and adopt a systems based approach. A necessary and deliberate aspect of this approach is that the problem will be incompletely specified mirroring situations students will face in employment at this level
  2. Analysis and Planning – students will work in groups to develop system level functional specifications. This will require that the problem is analysed and decomposed, that plans are made for the implementation and that interfaces between each subsystem are defined.
  3. Subsystem development and testing – students will work individually to develop and test their own elements based on the agreed plans.
  4. Integration – all elements will be combined, tested and evaluated as a whole relative to the original requirements.

This approach will be adopted across a range of technical modules. The exact details of the scale and duration will be determined to best suit the subject matter in question.

 

  1. Retention strategy

 

The main theme of the postgraduate retention strategy is engagement and support. This has been developed over a number of years and recognises the importance of supporting the student faculty towards their academic and professional goals. This strategy acknowledges support requirements have evolved, yet maintains the priorities of academic success and personal wellbeing. The strategy themes of engagement and support are characterised into two sections; Personal tutoring and Curriculum and Community.  

 

Personal tutoring

 

Personal tutoring is a key feature of the MSc programmes. A specific member of staff is assigned to each student at the beginning of each stage offering structured support meetings. In addition to this structured approach, personal tutors offer the opportunity to discuss matters informally – whenever the need arises. Meetings are not simply used to resolve areas of concern, but a forum for advising and mentoring the student to achieve all their goals. This can be based on the personal experience of the tutor – or signposting the student towards a more useful University facility. The personal tutoring experience will be different for each individual student, as the agenda is driven from both participants. The tutor will use analytics information representing attendance and engagement, but recognises this information is indicative. The true value in the process will come from the subsequent meeting and conversation.

 

Curriculum & Community

 

The retention strategy recognises that staff may not always be available or appropriate for student support needs. From this perspective, peer support groups are encouraged and facilitated. One particular technique for encouraging this is our Induction programme, which takes place in Freshers’ Week. The programme is open to all new (and existing) students and involves essential information from an academic, social and wellbeing perspective. Furthermore, a practical, fun, group activity is included to introduce students to each other in a focussed environment. Anecdotal evidence suggests friendships made at this stage, transform into informal study groups which continue throughout the subsequent degree.

 

Techniques to encourage a peer support network are also a part of the formal assessment schedule of several modules. Coursework which involve design work or laboratory experiments are often group orientated. This is not to dilute the volume of work, but to improve the engagement in what can be perceived as an intimidating activity.  Conclusively, peer support in these tasks ensures a high degree of engagement in a variety of formal assessment activities.

 

Encouraging student support through an Engineering community is continued with all Faculty staff. Access to staff for academic or personal issues is not exclusive to the personal tutor. For several years, staff have adopted and employed and open door policy for student issues. No formal appointment is required for a discussion – if the member of the faculty team is available they will attempt to resolve the query at that time. The high regard placed by students on this aspect of the engineering retention strategy is well recognised, through informal feedback and SSLC meetings.

 

Finally, curriculum and community is brought together through the Faculty encouraging student participation in professional body competitions. The events are competitive, friendly and team based, involving the completion of a specified practical activity. Crucially, the students are competing against other Universities. As well as developing the skills of the student, the competitions expose the student in a friendly environment to a wider engineering community, strongly linked to some of their career goals. This link is seen as vital, allowing the student to connect their own programme of study to an engineering world they aspire to be a part of.

 

  1. Any other information

 

SECTION C:  TEACHING AND LEARNING

 

  1. What is the programme about?

 

The programme is designed to equip graduates in an Electronic and/or Electrical Engineering discipline with the knowledge and skills that the need to deploy the latest electronic technologies in a variety of situations. An emphasis will be placed on the successful implementation of solutions encompassing design, development and testing phases within a whole system context.

 

  1. What will I know or be able to do at the end of the programme?

 

Learning Outcomes Postgraduate Certificate – Skills

By the end of this part of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

 

  • S1 Apply technological knowledge to develop creative and innovative solutions to problems within the electronic engineering sector.

 

  • S2 Conduct appropriate research into the current state-of-the-art in the electronics industry to inform the development of engineering solutions.

 

  • S3 Apply skills in problem solving, communication, information retrieval and the effective use of IT facilities.

 

Learning Outcomes Postgraduate Certificate – Knowledge

By the end of this part of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

 

  • K1 Critical and applied knowledge of the fundamental engineering principles used in advanced electronic and automated systems.

 

  • K2 Critical and applied knowledge of the principles of systems modelling and model-based design to achieve defined specifications.

 

 

Learning Outcomes Postgraduate Diploma – Skills

By the end of this part of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

  • S4 Apply and critically evaluate the impact of electronic systems, automation and information technologies to enhance a manufacturing or control process or operation.

 

  • S5 Apply the principles of design, testing and fault analysis to enhance the efficiency and effectiveness of an electronic system.

 

 

Learning Outcomes Postgraduate Diploma – Knowledge

By the end of this part of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

 

  • K3 Critical and applied knowledge of how automation and mechatronic systems can enhance engineering operations.

 

  • K4 Applied knowledge of wider, contextual engineering principles and applications with and within which electronic engineers are respectively likely to be familiar and operate.

 

Learning Outcomes Masters – Skills

By the end of this part of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

 

  • S6 Identify and scope a project relevant to the electronics sector and critically evaluate and demonstrate the potential benefits and difficulties in realising the project.

 

  • S7 Plan, execute, document and evaluate a technical project relevant to the electronics industry and critically evaluate and discuss the success and impact of the project.

 

Learning Outcomes Masters – Knowledge

By the end of this part of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

 

  • K5 Critical knowledge of the professional standards in Engineering.

 

  • K6 An in-depth, extensive and applied knowledge of a highly specialised topic relevant to electronic engineering.

 

  1. What will the programme consist of?

 

Taught postgraduate programmes generally consist of a number of taught modules leading to the award of a Postgraduate Certificate (60 credits) or Postgraduate Diploma (120 credits). A Masters qualification (180 credits) usually culminates in a major piece of independent work such as a project or dissertation. All modules are at postgraduate level (level 7 in the UK’s national scheme). The summary below describes briefly what is contained in the programme. The programme structure, including a detailed list of modules, can be found in the programme regulations.

 

The programme has been developed to support students in making the transition from being a competent and educated engineer to being a critical and reflective engineer and manager who can evaluate a particular mechanical process or system, collecting and analysing appropriate data and drawing on relevant research, to improve its operation and reduce costs.

 

The structure has thus been designed to support students in making this transition. Thus the subject specific content is bookended with:

 

  • An introductory module, ENGM106 Research in Practice (30 credits), designed to provide students with an understanding of the expectations of Masters-level work and support in developing the appropriate research and communication skills required at this level.

 

  • A final project or dissertation module, ENGM123 Project/Dissertation (60 credits), where students can deploy the relevant research and critical analysis skills and draw on the knowledge they have gained during the course of the programme to address a real engineering problem or research question at the forefront of the discipline.

 

The subject content modules on the programme that form the middle portion of the programme are:

 

  • ENGM109 Advanced Electronic Systems (30 Credits). In this module students will examine the components, systems and processes that can be used to design and implement modern electronic systems to include microcontrollers, SoC, FPGAs and DSPs. Contemporary approaches such as Model-Based Design, In-Circuit Simulation and ‘X’ in the loop will also be explored.

 

  • ENGM110 Automation and Mechatronics (30 Credits). This module will allow students to become proficient in creating automated systems that can operate collaboratively using technologies such as PLCs, HMIs and SCADA. Students will examine the issues relating to the increasing levels of connectivity for such devices such as cybersecurity and integrity. Students will gain hands on experience of implementing connected automation systems to include an awareness of a range of physical actuators.

 

Students will also be able to select one module from a range of option modules which will provide them with a broader appreciation of current engineering practice. These option modules are:

 

  • ENGM118 Engineering Management Practice (30 Credits). This module will provide an introduction to some of the issues facing modern engineering operations to include operations management and improvement, lean manufacturing techniques, supply chain management and development, maintenance strategy and development and condition monitoring and predictive maintenance.

 

  • ENGM120 Smart Factories (30 Credits). This module will investigate the latest technology that can be deployed to improve the effectiveness of manufacturing facilities. This will include the use of Smart Instrumentation, Industry 4.0 and Internet of Things (IoT) technologies and Robotics and Automation technologies.

 

  • ENGM119 Advanced Materials Engineering (30 Credits). This module will introduce students to the latest research into the production, characterisation and application of advanced materials to include examples from the Faculty’s research into applications of Graphene.

 

  1. How will I be taught?

 

Scheduled teaching activities

Independent study

Placement

 

 

The programme will be delivered using a wide range of teaching methods that are designed to help students meet the learning outcomes and to prepare them for employment. As such each module will feature a significant portion of students engaging in practical activities.

 

The introductory, Research in Practice module (ENGM106) will be delivered at the start of the programme. This module is design to support students in the development of the academic writing and research skills required for both academic and professional practice at this level. As such the focus of delivery will be on students developing these skills through weekly exercises. Students will participate in weekly lecture/tutorial session and will work through a series of tasks which contribute to the production of a research paper or poster to be submitted to a faculty research conference which students will attend at the end of the module.

 

The technical modules (ENGM109/ENGM110) will be delivered initially using a blend of lecture/tutorial sessions and guided practical activities which will developed key skills and knowledge and will allow students to develop a common grounding in the field they are working in. The latter portions of the module will then focus on a problem based learning approach where students must develop a solution to a problem, carrying out research, analyses, design and development as appropriate. These activities will include distinct individual and group activities and students will need to take a systems based approach to solving the problem.

 

The Project/Dissertation module (ENGM123) is primarily supported through individual supervised. Students will be inducted into the project module and will be supported in identifying and specifying their project through lecture/tutorials prior to commencing the project work. The length of the ‘supervised’ period will be extended for students studying at a part-time rate. The project is the ultimate expression of the students’ ability to engage in Engineering Practice at this level and thus the role of the supervisor will be to offer advice or respond to questions rather than to direct the project.

 

A list of the modules in the programme can be found in the Programme Regulations.

 

A summary of the types of teaching, learning and assessment in each module of the programme can be found in the Matrix of Modes of Teaching.

 

  1. How will I be assessed and given feedback?

 

Written examinations

Coursework

Practical assessments

 

A summary of the types of teaching, learning and assessment in each module of the programme can be found in the Matrix of Modes of Teaching.

 

The generic assessment criteria which we use can be found here. Some programmes use subject-specific assessment criteria which are based on the generic ones.

 

This programme uses the Generic University Assessment Criteria

YES

NO

This programme uses the Subject Specific Assessment Criteria

YES

NO

 

The University regulations can be found here.

 

Where appropriate, students will undertake written examinations but these will consist of long form questions where students will be presented with an industrially relevant scenario and must carry out a critical analysis to develop a solution to a given problem.

 

Coursework assessments will feature a blend of the following activities and attributes to support students in developing the research and analysis skills required at this level:

 

  • Process or system assessment and benchmarking
  • Data collection and analysis
  • Secondary research to identify current trends and potential solutions to industrial problems
  • Systems engineering exercises where students must dissect the solution to a problem into individual elements that must be collectively specified, developed individually and then integrated to form a complete solution.

 

Wherever possible assessment topics will be sourced from real industrial problems and the Engineering team have a rich pool of collaborating companies who have supported such exercises. Real-world context is seen as a critical factor in the development of assessments that will be of benefit to the students’ learning process. This is particularly true for the final project or dissertation (ENGM123) where students will be encouraged to identify or create a project topic grounded in a real problem.

 

The University aims to return marked assessments and feedback within 4 working weeks of the assignment submission date after internal moderation process have been completed. If this is not possible, students will be notified by the Module Leaders when the feedback is available and how it can be obtained.

 

The Academic Misconduct Regulations and associated guidance can be found here. It is the responsibility of students to ensure they are familiar with their responsibilities in regards to assessment and the implications of an allegation of academic misconduct.

 

Students should refer to the University Regulations for information on degree classifications.

 

 


  1. Teaching, learning and assessment matrix

 

Matrix of modes of teaching, learning and assessment

 

NB. Not all option modules may be offered in any one academic year and will depend on the availability of staff and the priorities of the school. In addition, modules will usually need to be selected by a minimum number of students. Option modules may be available on more than one programme and the Programme Leaders will liaise with the Faculty Management Team to ensure there is a reasonable amount of choice in any given year.

 

Programme Learning Outcomes – Knowledge

 

Code

Title

C/O

Modes of T&L

Modes of Assessment

Learning Outcomes

K1

K2

K3

K4

K5

K6

ENGM106

Research in Practice

C

Lecture, tutorial, guided independent reading and written research case studies, and development of a student peer-reviewed portfolio

  • CW - Phased production of a written portfolio exercise
  • CW –conference presentation at a Faculty research event

D
A

 

D

D
A

D
A

D
A

ENGM109

Advanced Electronic Systems

C

Lectures, lab-based tutorials, problem-based development exercises.

  • CW – Research and modelling exercise.
  • CW – Practical design exercise

T
D
A

T
D
A

T

D

A

T
D
A

D

T
D
A

ENGM110

Automation and Mechatronics

C

Lectures, guided lab-based exercises, culminating in PBL group based system development.

  • CW – Literature review exercise
  • CW – System development exercise

T

D
A

 

D
 

T

D
A

T

D
A

D

T

D
A

ENGM123

Project/ Dissertation

C

Group Lectures & tutorials, Supervision of individual project work, conducted at work, in the University, and in private study, as appropriate.

  • CW – Project Plan
  • CW – Written report
  • Practical – Presentation and Viva

D
A

D
A

D
A

D
A

D
A

D
A

Options (Students choose one option)

 

ENGM118

Engineering Management Practice

O

Lectures, Tutorials

  • CW – Research Exercise
  • CW – Maintenance Plan

 

 

 

 

 

 

ENGM119

Advanced Materials Engineering

O

Lectures, Tutorials

  • CW – Research Exercise
  • Examination

TDA

 

 

TDA

 

 

ENGM120

Smart Factories

O

Lectures, Tutorials

  • CW – Research Exercises
  • Examination

TDA

 

 

TDA

 

 

 


Programme Learning Outcomes – Skills

 

Code

Title

C/O

Modes of T&L

Modes of Assessment

Learning Outcomes

S1

S2

S3

S4

S5

S6

S7

ENGM106

Research in Practice

C

Lecture, tutorial, guided independent reading and written research case studies, and development of a student peer-reviewed portfolio

  • CW - Phased production of a written portfolio exercise
  • CW –conference presentation at a Faculty research event

D
A

D
A

T

D
A

D
A

D

T

D

A

T

D
A

ENGM109

Advanced Electronic Systems

C

Lectures, lab-based tutorials, problem-based development exercises.

  • CW – Research and modelling exercise.
  • CW – Practical design exercise

T
D
A

D
A

D
A

T
D
A

T
D
A

D
A

D

ENGM110

Automation and Mechatronics

C

Lectures, guided lab-based exercises, culminating in PBL group based system development.

  • CW – Literature review exercise
  • CW – System development exercise

D
A

D
A

D

T

D
A

D
A

D
A

D
A

ENGM123

Project/ Dissertation

C

Group Lectures & tutorials, Supervision of individual project work, conducted at work, in the University, and in private study, as appropriate.

  • CW – Project Plan
  • CW – Written report
  • Practical – Presentation and Viva

D
A

D
A

D
A

D
A

D
A

D
A

D
A

 

ENGM118

Engineering Management Practice

O

Lectures, Tutorials

  • CW – Research Exercise
  • CW – Maintenance Plan

 

 

TDA

 

 

 

 

ENGM119

Advanced Materials Engineering

O

Lectures, Tutorials

  • CW – Research Exercise
  • Examination

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ENGM120

Smart Factories

O

Lectures, Tutorials

  • CW – Research Exercises
  • Examination

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



 

  1. How does research influence the programme? 

 

Opportunities to develop research skills are embedded throughout the programme. Students will receive an initial academic orientation in the expectations in terms of their own application of research. These skills will be developed in each modules e.g. students will be presented with both academic papers and technical documentation to review and evaluate in the context of a given industrial scenario. The project/dissertation module will require students to identify, plan and execute a significant piece of research work. Support and guidance will be provided in the planning stage and students will be supported by research active supervisors during the execution stage.

 

The programme content is influenced and based on the wide variety or research that is taking place in the faculty to include:

 

  • Research into Advanced Maintenance Strategies and their adoption in a variety of industries.
  • The application and benefits of Advanced Instrumentation and Industry 4.0 technology in modern industrial environments.
  • Research into applications of modern engineering materials such as graphene.
  • Research and Knowledge Transfer activities relating to new product development processes.
  • Investigation in to the Human Factors and Psychology involved in industrial training activities and how new technologies can be deployed to enhance skills development.
  • Activities carried out through the Institution for Automotive and Manufacturing Advanced Practice (AMAP) whose mission is to support industry in applying the latest research and advancements in engineering practice.
  • The University hosts and manages the North-East Maintenance Forum (NEMF) which is attended regularly by a significant range of Industrial representatives to share research and best practice.

 

These research and reach-out activities will be used throughout the programme to inform case studies and provide topics for assignment and the final project/dissertation module.

 

 

SECTION D EMPLOYABILITY

 

  1. How will the programme prepare me for employment?

 

The programme gives you the opportunity to develop advanced skills and knowledge which you can use in the future. Some postgraduate programmes are associated with a particular career path but most skills can be applied to a range of employment situations. The skills which this programme is designed to develop are listed below.

 

  • The curriculum of the programme has been developed to meet the current needs of employers across diverse fields, both national and international, in line with the guidance of the relevant professional institutes [The Institution of Engineering and Technology (IET)].
  • The curriculum predominately consists of technical knowledge and skills to enable the pursuit of a career in a wide variety of mechanical engineering roles. 
  • In addition, close attention has been given to ensuring that the curriculum is at the forefront of the academic discipline and clearly at “M” level in line with QAA framework benchmarks for postgraduate qualifications.

 

There are also opportunities for on-campus students outside your programme of study.

 

Students are encouraged to join their relevant Engineering Council professional association. The University holds Academic Partner status with the Institution of Engineering and Technology (IET) and has close links with both the local branch and various technical committees within the IET providing students with opportunities to attend a range of events and lectures. Students are also encouraged to join the Association for Project Management (APM) which organises monthly talks/seminars by external speakers. 

 

The University hosts and manages the North-East Maintenance Forum (NEMF) which is attended regularly by a significant range of Industrial representatives to share research and best practice.

 

For information about other opportunities available to our students who study on campus, click here.

 

Additional opportunities to develop your experiences more widely will vary if you study at one of our partner colleges. For information about the extra-curricular activities available in any of our colleges please contact the college direct. 

 

  1. Particular features of the qualification. (optional)

 

  1. Professional statutory or regulatory body (PSRB) accreditation. Choose one of the following.

 

PSRB accreditation is not relevant to this programme 

 

PSRB accreditation is currently being sought for this programme

This programme currently has PSRB accreditation

 

Accreditation will be sought from the Institute of Engineering and Technology following the completion of the first cohort.

 

SECTION E:  PROGRAMME STRUCTURE AND REGULATIONS

 

Please complete and insert Part B of the Programme Regulations Form, for questions 37 and 39

 

SECTION F:  ADMISSIONS, LEARNING ENVIRONMENT AND SUPPORT

 

  1. What are the admissions requirements?

 

 

The University’s standard admissions requirements can be found in the university regulations.

Programme-specific requirements which are in addition to those regulations are given below. 

 

The entry requirement for the MSc Electronic Engineering programme is normally a good honours degree (2:2 or above) or equivalent in Electrical or Electronic Engineering or a closely related subject.

 

Can students enter with advanced standing?

Yes

No

 

The University has a process by which applicants whose experience to date already covers one or more modules of the programme they are applying for may seek Accreditation of Prior Learning (APL). Full details can be found here but if you think that this may be relevant to you, please contact the department which offers the programme you are interested in.

 

  1. What kind of support and help will there be?
  1. in the department:

 

The MSc Electronic Engineering programme will have an active Programme Space on the university’s virtual learning environment. This provides a powerful mechanism to maintain communication between students whilst at the University and to provide will provide:

 

  • Information (programme handbook and specification)
  • Frequently Asked Questions
  • Calendar (key events can be highlighted)
  • Communication (email and discussion tool)
  • Relevant link sites (e.g. to relevant professional bodies)

 

The overall strategy for support and guidance is three-pronged: accessibility to staff and resources; provision of relevant and reliable information; and operation of a responsive system for managing problems as they arise.

 

All students have individual access to their Programme and Module leaders. All engineering staff comply with the University policy document “Guidance and Good Practice on Responses to Student Emails and other Student Contact” and supplement this with an open-door policy. There is also extensive use of face to face and online interaction to provide flexible and efficient communication on day to day issues.

 

The first term of study is treated as one continuous induction period into University life. Close monitoring of student attendance is undertaken by both module and programme leaders and, where necessary, one-to-one interviews with students who default on expected attendance levels to identify any underlying issues.

 

In line with University guidelines Personal Tutor meetings are arranged with the Personal Tutor for each student in the cohort during the first and second terms.

 

Programme teams meet with student representatives each term in Staff Student Liaison Committees (SSLCs) in order to formally address issues around the student experience. In many instances, issues can quickly and easily be resolved in this way. In some cases they need referral to the Boards of Study. In either event, the VLE is used as a mechanism for formally feeding back to the students regarding the resolution or otherwise of the issues raised.

 

 

  1. in the university as a whole:

The University provides a range of professional support services including wellbeing, counselling, disability support, and a Chaplaincy. Click on the links for further information.

 

  1. What resources will I have access to?

 

On campus

In a partner college

 

By distance learning

 

 

On campus

Tick all that apply

General Teaching and Learning Space

 

IT

Library

VLE

Laboratory

Studio

 

Performance space

 

Other specialist

 

Technical resources 

 

The programme has access to excellent resources which allow a diverse teaching and learning style appropriate to the modules as appropriate:

 

  • The latest teaching and learning facilities, including the Learning Laboratory, IT suites providing access to engineering simulation and CAD software, some of which are available to students at no cost for installation on their own computers.

 

  • Multi-disciplinary Engineering laboratories. Including:
    • Product Development Lab
    • Electronics Lab
    • Automation Lab
    • Project Lab
    • Material Characterisation Lab
    • Formulation Lab
    • Thermofluids Lab
    • Mechanical Engineering Lab

 

  • Social learning spaces including:
    • Student learning areas adjacent to the PC cells in the David Goldman Building.
    • Open access computers (with technical support) with access to the usual range of Microsoft Office applications.

 

  • The Institute of Automotive and Manufacturing Advanced Practice (AMAP) provides the Faculty with access to state of the art industry scale equipment which demonstrate advanced manufacturing processes.

 

Information about the University’s facilities can be found here.

 

Please see the relevant college prospectus or website for details of college learning resources if you are planning to study in one of our partner colleges.

 

  1. Are there any additional costs on top of the fees?

 

No, but all students buy some study materials such as books and provide their own basic study materials.

Yes (optional) All students buy some study materials such as books and provide their own basic study materials. In addition there are some are additional costs for optional activities associated with the programme (see below)

 

Yes (essential) All students buy some study materials such as books and provide their own basic study materials. In addition there are some are essential additional costs associated with the programme (see below)

 

 

 

  1. How are student views represented?

 

All taught programmes in the University have student representatives for each programme who meet in a Student-Staff Liaison Committee (SSLC) where they can raise students’ views and concerns. The Students’ Union and the faculties together provide training for student representatives. SSLCs and focus groups are also used to obtain student feedback on plans for developing existing programmes and designing new ones. Feedback on your programme is obtained every year through module questionnaires and informs the annual review of your programme. Student representatives are also invited to attend Programme and Module Studies Boards which manage the delivery and development of programmes and modules.  Faculty Academic Committee, also has student representation. This allows students to be involved in higher-level plans for teaching and learning. At university level on Students are represented on University level Committed by sabbatical officers who are the elected leaders of the Students’ Union.

 

The University’s student representation and feedback policy can be found here.

 

Every two years we participate in the national Postgraduate Taught Experience Survey (PTES) which is run by the Higher Education Academy.

 

Supplementing the standard university processes for student support and representation of views and opinions, the team operate an ‘open-door policy’. This can be accessed in person or for example by telephone or email to arrange a meeting with personal tutors, module teams or programme leaders. This allows for views to be expressed and addressed with the appropriate level of formality in a timely fashion.

 

The VLE also offers an effective means by which students and staff can communicate to assure the smooth running of modules and programme.

 

SECTION G: QUALITY MANAGEMENT 

 

  1. National subject benchmarks

 

The Quality Assurance Agency for Higher Education publishes benchmark statements which give guidance as to the skills and knowledge which graduates in various subjects and in certain types of degree are expected to have. They do not cover all subjects at postgraduate level but those which exist can be found at here.

 

Are there any benchmark statements for this programme?

YES

NO

 

The subject benchmark(s) for this programme is/are: Engineering Subject Benchmark Statement (February 2015)

 

The QAA also publishes a Framework for Higher Education Qualifications (FHEQ) which defines the generic skills and abilities expected of students who have achieved awards at a given level and with which our programmes align. The FHEQ can be found here.

 

  1. How are the quality and standards of the programme assured?

 

The programme is managed and quality assured through the University’s standard processes. Programmes are overseen by Module and Programme Studies Boards which include student representatives. Each year each module leader provides a brief report on the delivery of the module, identifying strengths and areas for development, and the programme team reviews the programme as a whole. The purpose of this is to ensure that the programme is coherent and up-to-date, with suitable progression through the programme, and a good fit (alignment)  between what is taught and how students learn and are assessed - the learning outcomes, content and types of teaching, learning and assessment. Student achievement, including progress through the programme and the way in which the final award is made, is kept under review. The programme review report is sent to the Programme Studies Board and the Faculty in turn reports issues to the University’s Quality Management Sub-Committee (QMSC).

 

External examiners are appointed to oversee and advise on the assessment of the programme. They ensure that the standards of the programme are comparable with those of similar programmes elsewhere in the UK and are also involved in the assessment process to make sure that it is fair. They are invited to comment on proposed developments to the programme. Their reports are sent to the Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Academic) as well as to the Faculty so that issues of concern can be addressed.

 

All programmes are reviewed by the University on a six-yearly cycle to identify good practice and areas for enhancement. Programmes are revalidated through this review process. These reviews include at least one academic specialist in the subject area concerned from another UK university. Quality Assurance Agency (QAA) review reports for Sunderland can be found here.

 

Further information about our quality processes can be found here.

 

Please also complete and insert the SITS form.