Attachments

 

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BA (Hons) Community and Youth Work Studies

 

 

Faculty of Education and Society

 

Department of Social Sciences

 

 

PROGRAMME SPECIFICATION

2019-0

 

 

Date of Validation Event:

26/27.01.2010

Revalidated by the NYA October 2017

Date Approved by QMSC:

 

 

 

 

 

 


Version History

 

Please complete each time a new version is drafted e.g.

 

Version

Occasion of Change

Change Author

Last Modified

1.0

Version presented for revalidation

Ilona Buchroth (Programme leader)

May 2008

2.0

Amendments following institutional approval

Ilona Buchroth

September 2008

4.0

Cluster Review

Ilona Buchroth

26/27.01.2010

5.0

NYA Validation

Chris Parkin

3/5/2012

6.0

NYA Validation

Ilona Buchroth

26/0/9/12

7.0

SWK318 amended to CYW321

Ilona Buchroth

05/06/15

8.0

Amendments to admissions requirements

Chris Parkin

14/09/15

9.0

Updated to new programme specification template

Ilona Buchroth

04/03/16

10.0

Addition of approved programme specific regulations

Ilona Buchroth

26/05/16

 

11.0

Addition of assessment tasks and updating of Appendix 3 and 4

Chris Parkin

23/08/2017

12.0

Amendment to programme specific regulation

Ilona Buchroth

24/09/2018

13.0

Minor modification to CYW 128 and CYW 321

Rick Bowler

24/09/2018


 

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Quality Handbook

 

 

 

AQH-B2-3a Undergraduate Programme Specification 2018-19

 

 

AQH-B2-3a Undergraduate Programme Specification

 

SECTION A: CORE INFORMATION

 

  1. Name of programme

Community and Youth Work Studies

 

  1. Award title

BA (Hons)

 

  1. Programme linkage

Is this part of group of linked programmes between which students can transfer at agreed points?

 

 

 

 

  1. Is the programme a top-up only?

 

 

 

 

  1. Does the programme have a Foundation Year (level 3) associated with it so that students enter for a four-year programme and progress directly from the Foundation Year to Stage 1 without having to re-apply? (ie an ‘Extended Studies’ programme)

 

 

 

  1. Level of award

 

 

 

  1. Awarding body: University of Sunderland

 

  1. Which department is it in?

 Department of Social Sciences

 

  1. Programme Studies Board?

Community and Youth Work

 

  1. Programme Leader

Dr Ilona Buchroth

 

 

  1. How and where can I study the programme?

 

At Sunderland:

 

Full-time on campus

Part-time on campus

As work-based learning full-time

 

As work-based learning part-time

 

As a full-time sandwich course

 

As a part-time sandwich course

 

By distance learning

 

 

  1. How long does the programme take?

 

 

Min number of years / months

Max number of years / months

Full-time

3

9

Part-time

5

9

Distance learning

 

 

Work-based learning

 

 

 

For start-dates please see the current edition of the Prospectus or contact the relevant department at the University.

 

SECTION B – FURTHER CORE INFORMATION 

 

Use Outline Programme Proposal Form for ADC (AQH-B2-2), for questions 13 to 25

 

  1. Learning and teaching strategy

The course is based on a model of training where the integration of theory and practice is achieved by a process of personal and professional development. You therefore need to explore the meanings and realities of education, empowerment, participation and develop knowledge, understandings and skills focused on individual, organisational and societal change. It is implicit in this model that the starting point for your learning is a recognition and reflection on previous experience of both a personal and professional nature. This will be developed through structured theoretical inputs and new opportunities in fieldwork practice.

 

Issues of power and equal opportunities are central to the course and are integrated into every aspect of it. You will need to reflect on use of language and issues such as sexism, racism, heterosexism, ageism and disability. Issues of equality and power and their relationship to professional practice are incorporated into the assessment of all elements of the course.

 

  1. Retention strategy

The nature of the student cohort requires us to ensure that students are supported with both academic development and pastoral issues. In particular, many students are anxious and unconfident about their abilities to study whilst dealing with a range of difficult personal circumstances. We ensure that we use the tutorial system described in section 41 to provide the required support. In addition, tutors, at each regular (normally fortnightly) staff meeting, discuss and share any students’ issue that may affect their completion of each year. The programme recognises that some students may face combinations of circumstances that mean that they will not be able to progress through the course in the standard way and we will be able to offer advice about how to adjust your mode of study or defer your studies within the University regulations in order to ensure that you complete the programme.

 

  1. Any other information

 

 

SECTION C - TEACHING AND LEARNING

 

  1. What is the programme about?

The overall aim of the programme, is to help you prepare for professional practice in community and youth work.  The degree programme incorporates a professional qualification validated by the National Youth Agency (NYA). It connects academic quality to professional occupational standards within the JNC framework for professional practice, and the QAA Community and Youth Work Benchmark Statement. On completion of the course you will have acquired the theoretical knowledge and practical skills required to perform effectively in different professional contexts.

 

 

  1. What will I know or be able to do at each Stage of the programme?

 

Learning Outcomes Stage 1 – Skills  

By the end of this Stage of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

 

  • SO1 Demonstrate an ability to interpret the KO1 within the context in which professional practice occurs

 

  • SO2  Demonstrate an ability to recognise different approaches to identifying and solving problems related to young people and their support networks

 

  • SO3 Communicate the results of their practice accurately and reliably with structured and coherent arguments. Students will be expected to organise their arguments in a systematic and informed manner, drawing on relevant texts and examples from their practice.

 

  • SO4 Identify their learning needs as part of their commitment to continuous improvement. Students will be expected to use the Professional development plan to reflect upon their own learning and make connections relevant to professional practice.

 

  • SO5 Attain the requisite skills to conduct themselves as competent practitioners in line with occupational standards relevant to work with young people at level one.

 

Learning Outcomes Stage 1 – Knowledge

By the end of this Stage of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

 

  • KO1 Understand the underlying concepts and principles associated with working with young people

 

  • KO2 Describe and define different approaches to identifying and solving problems related to young people and their support networks.

 

  • KO3  Attain the requisite knowledge and understanding to conduct themselves as competent practitioners in line with occupational standards relevant to work with young people at level one

 

Learning Outcomes Stage 2 – Skills

By the end of this Stage of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

 

  • SO6 Demonstrate an ability to evaluate underlying concepts and principles in work with young people within the context in which professional practice occurs.

 

  • SO7 Demonstrate an ability to evaluate the appropriateness of different approaches to identifying and solving problems related to work with young people in community settings. The minimum requirement for students at this level is to apply theory to practice.

 

  • SO8 Communicate the results of their practice accurately and reliably at this level. Students will be expected to discuss a range of arguments, grounding practice within a developing theoretical framework, in a systematic and informed manner, drawing on relevant texts.

 

  • SO9 Identify and reflect upon their learning needs. This is part of their commitment to continuous improvement. Students will be expected to use the professional development plan to reflect upon their own learning and illuminate their practice with relevant theory in line with occupational standards relevant to work with young people at level 2

 

Learning Outcomes Stage 2 – Knowledge

By the end of this Stage of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

 

  • KO4 Analyse the underlying concepts and principles in work with young people.

 

  • KO5 Understand and evaluate theoretical frameworks for identifying and solving problems.

 

  • KO6 Understand and evaluate the theory which relates to work with young people.

 

  • KO7 Attain the requisite knowledge and understanding to conduct themselves as competent practitioners, in line with occupational standards relevant to work with young people at level two.

 

Learning Outcomes Stage 3 – Skills

By the end of this Stage of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

 

  • S10 Identify, reflect and review their learning needs. This is part of their commitment to continuous improvement using the professional development process. Students will be expected to reflect on their theoretical and practice learning in line with all sections of the occupational standards.

 

  • S11 Effectively use action-learning to manage their own development and illuminate their practice with relevant theory.

 

  • S12 Attain the requisite skills and demonstrate their competence in conducting themselves as ethically sound professional practitioners, in line with JNC level three standards.

 

  • S13 Critically review in a systematic and coherent manner the concepts and principles associated with anti-oppressive community and youth work practice.

 

Learning Outcomes Stage 3 – Knowledge

By the end of this Stage of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

 

  • K09 Build and sustain relevant knowledge and understanding to further develop the concepts and principles of an independent, informed and reflective practitioner.

 

  • K10 Demonstrate an ability to apply practitioner research techniques and methodologies to the process of identifying and solving problems in community and youth work practice.

 

  • K11 Communicate and critique the results of their research practice accurately and reliably, with structured, coherent and analytic arguments. Students will be expected to discuss a range of arguments, grounding research within a developing theoretical framework in a systematic and informed manner, drawing on relevant texts

 

Learning Outcomes – Ordinary degree

If you are awarded an Ordinary degree you will have achieved the majority of the learning outcomes for the programme studied. However you will have gained fewer credits at Stage 3  (60 credits or more) than students awarded an Honours degree, your knowledge will typically be less broad and you will typically be less proficient in higher-level skills such as independent learning.

 

To gain the professional qualification you need to complete the Honours Degree.

 

  1. What will the programme consist of?

Each undergraduate programme consists of a number of Stages from a minimum of 1 to a maximum of 4, each of which is equivalent to a year’s full-time study. The summary below describes briefly what is contained in each Stage. Most programmes have a mixture of core (ie compulsory) modules and optional ones, often with increasing choice as you move through the programme and gain in experience. In some programmes the choice of optional modules gives you particular ‘routes’ through the programme. The programme structure including a detailed list of modules can be found in the programme regulations.

 

Stage 1

Stage one modules provide you with a broad introduction to the major themes and perspectives that underpin work with young people. The modules address an understanding of individuals, their social context and the professional contexts in which practice takes place. It is expected that you will recognise the links between subjects and integrate your learning across modules and between levels. Thus in gaining an understanding of youth transitions in context (CYW 128) you will make links with your understanding of social theory which considers the relationship of individuals to society. You can then link the professional context where you will identify the range of professional solutions, which have been used to support young people through transitions. The Informal Education module (CYW 130) introduces you to the concept of informal education as a body of theory underpinning work with young people and further your understanding of the relationship between theory and practice. You identify case studies, drawn from your work experience, that illustrate your application of theory. All modules require you to link theory to practice and to use your work based learning to carry out practice based assignments. This is achieved by having a practice-based assignment in each module. For example, in the Learning from Lives (CYW128) module you are expected to undertake a biographical approach to an aspect of youth transition and do this, wherever possible, in partnership with a young person you are working alongside; in Understanding Society (CYW 129) you are required to carry out a community audit which will require you to consider how the concept of community applies to your work with young people.

 

The two placement modules are an integral element of the university based teaching and learning modules. You will use your practice placement experience to explore, examine and therefore develop your skills and knowledge. This will be assessed through a reflective process including the use of the Professional Development Plan (PDP). This PDP process focuses on occupational standards for working with young people. It is a process designed for continuous improvement and reflection and is embedded throughout the course. At the beginning of the year you will be required to identify existing skills, knowledge and understandings in order to identify learning needs and opportunities during your studies. Progress in relation to your PDP will be reviewed at least twice during the course of an academic year, mirroring an appraisal system. This, alongside your reflective diaries, will allow you an opportunity to formally reflect on your learning to date. Your portfolio will be assessed as part of your practice placement module. You will also be required to demonstrate evidence of your professional competence by submitting a record of attendance and details of placement tasks.

 

Stage 2

Stage two modules build upon the foundation established at stage one and are broadly concerned with significant contextual issues associated with professional practice. The focus at stage 2 is on developing your reflective and analytical skills. The programme has been designed so that the modules build on stage one modules, for example, Policy Context (CYW 222) builds on your understanding of social theory to develop your understanding of policy issues which directly impact on the practice of working with young people. The policy module will also draw on understanding of youth transitions and professional contexts so that you begin to appreciate the holistic approach of the programme design. Stage two modules also develop significant practice skills; this is particularly the case in Organisational Management and Group Work where you are expected to gain an understanding of relevant theory and demonstrate your ability to relate this to practice. The design of the programme at stage two mirrors that at stage one in that you are required to complete a practice based assignment for each theory module.

 

Practice Placement at stage two is again based on the professional development process and you are required to ensure that you demonstrate that you meet the relevant occupational standards as well as submitting evidence of your professional competence. You are also expected to demonstrate your ability to take responsibility for an area of practice in order to demonstrate skills in planning and evaluation.

 

The Ethical Practice module (CYW 235) , provides you with opportunities to reflect on all aspects of your learning and to analyse the underlying value base and its impact on practice.  Ethics, empowerment and equality are key concepts in this module and you are required to relate these concepts to practice. This enables you to understand and actively engage in current debates within practice and demonstrate that you recognise ways in which you continue to develop your skills, knowledge and understanding as a professional worker.

 

Stage 3

The stage three curriculum continues the theme of encouraging you to develop your own professional interests and undertake independent study in all core modules: CYW 320 Equality, Diversity and Social Justice module; CYW 318 Education for Transformation Module; CYW 319 Entrepreneurship and Project Management; the 10 credit CYW 313 Supervision module and finally the 30 credit CYW 321 Research for Practice module, including a dissertation. These modules represent 80% of the stage 3 curriculum and ensure that you focus on issues that are specifically associated with the theory and practice of community and youth work. The remaining module at stage 3 is an elective and you can draw upon modules from within the University. Some of these electives are part of the portfolio of modules offered by Community and Youth Work Studies team including an advanced practice module; others are part of the broad range of modules that are offered within the university.

 

Generic Skills

Alongside the discipline-specific knowledge and skills that the curriculum covers, we aim to develop generic skills, such as initiative, time-management, group work and critical reflection. These elements are interwoven throughout the course, during student course meetings and peer assessed group work exercises. In addition, the student professional development handbook allows you to monitor and evaluate your own development in these key skills.

 

 

  1. How will I be taught?

Scheduled teaching activities

Independent study

Placement

 

The lecture / seminar model of teaching is used in all modules to introduce the major themes and concepts that are explored, using participatory learning activities. Consequently the main emphasis throughout the programme is upon applied group work and collective learning. This enables you to take increasing responsibility for your own learning and to support their colleagues’ learning. These are key skills that you need to develop and are central to you becoming a reflective practitioner. Because you are required to demonstrate your ability to apply your learning, you will be given a variety of learning experience, including life stories, case study analysis, student-led presentations and activities that involve you in applying research methods in local communities. There is an emphasis on you understanding the principles and values associated with professional practice and this theme runs throughout all of the modules within community and Youth Work Studies. Concepts such as participation, equality, empowerment and reflective practice are studied and critically examined, not purely as theoretical subjects, but also how they apply to the process of your own learning. Coursework as a method of our assessment strategy is also designed to allow you to display your abilities through a variety of tasks.

 

Fieldwork is integrated throughout the programme and most modules include an element of fieldwork that is assessed. In addition, there are two assessed placement/work-based learning module at stage one and two (400 hours each).  At least 88 additional hours of practice will be carried out within core theory modules.

 

Placements are drawn from a pool of agencies and projects across the region that can demonstrate the availability of appropriate learning opportunities At stage 2 students might also have the opportunity to undertake their placement with an appropriate agency arranged by our ERASMUS partner in Stuttgart / Germany.

 

A list of the modules in each Stage of the programme can be found in the Programme Regulations. (Appendix 2)

 

A summary of the types of teaching, learning and assessment in each module of the programme can be found in the Matrix of Modes of Teaching.( Appendix 4)

 

 

  1. How will I be assessed and given feedback? 

Written examinations

 

Coursework

Practical assessments

 

A summary of the types of teaching, learning and assessment in each module of the programme can be found in the Matrix of Modes of Teaching. (Appendix 4)

 

The generic assessment criteria which we use can be found here. Some programmes use subject-specific assessment criteria which are based on the generic ones.

 

 

This programme uses the Generic University Assessment Criteria

YES

 

This programme uses the Subject Specific Assessment Criteria

NO

 

 

The University regulations can be found here.

 

All modules, part modules or groups of modules will be assessed during the semester in which they take place.

 

A variety of assessment methods are used throughout the programme according to the particular learning outcomes of the module, the level of academic learning and whether it is a whole or part module.

 

Clear marking / assessment criteria and guidance will be given for all assignments in the respective module guides. These are also usually further clarified within taught sessions and module tutorials.

 

 

All assignments, including practice based assignments, will be graded.. The criteria for marking all assignments will include:

 

  • Construction and Presentation
  • Level of Analysis
  • Critical reflection on Equality / Power Issues
  • Evidence of Reading and Research

 

 

Deadlines for all assignments will be set at the start of the module, to help you avoid unnecessary pressure and gain valuable professional experience in meeting deadlines. Students with specific learning difficulties or other disabilities may be eligible for flexibility in relation to deadlines.

 

Programme tutors will have responsibility for marking assignments and assisting you to develop your learning, except during fieldwork placements, where the latter role is shared with the placement supervisor. Your assignments will be marked according to the assessment criteria outlined in the module guides and you will be given feedback to what extend you have met these as well as suggestions how you can improve your work. Tutors are available to discuss assignment feedback with you. You are encouraged to develop your own skills in evaluating your work using the marking criteria. These skills provide the basis for peer assessment, particularly in relation to group presentations.

 

All coursework is internally moderated. Coursework that is first marked by a new visiting lecturer is second marked by a full-time member of staff. External examiners then receive a representative sample of coursework, covering all grades and also all course work that is deemed to have failed or be of first class standard.

 

Grades are not confirmed until they have been considered by the Module Assessment Board, which meets at the end of each semester. The Module Assessment Board also agrees the terms and conditions for redeeming any failure of any coursework elements. Decisions about progression of students to the next level of study or for the allocation of awards are made by the Programme Assessment Board which is chaired by the head of Department.

 

  1. Teaching, learning and assessment matrix -see Appendix 4

 

  1. How does research influence the programme? 

Research and practice informed teaching

All staff have extensive practice experience in the field and most hold relevant professional qualifications. All community and youth work tutors have sustained, voluntary and long-term commitments within community based and / or voluntary organisations locally, regionally and nationally. These include directorship of a community development project, Refugee  /BME projects, a local advice project, community associations, organisations dealing with sexual violence, serving on the committee of a LGBT youth project / regional federation as well as being the trustee of local grant giving trusts.

 

This close link to relevant professional practice has a direct relationship to the practice based modules of the programme. For instance the experience of initiating, supporting and managing voluntary projects has a direct link to the social policy module or organisational management and project / management modules of the programme.

 

All members of staff are engaged in outreach activities including managing projects, project evaluations and research, feasibility studies and designing bespoke in-service training. Our research activities are primarily focused on improving local and regional services to communities and young people. All of these activities inform the teaching and enable the team to offer modules that reflect current issues in professional practice. The active involvement also supports scholarly activities Tutors have contributed to wider debates within the profession through contributing papers at conferences of the Training Agencies Group as well as joint work with colleagues from other Universities.

 

The theme of social justice runs through the above involvements and thus mirrors the focus of the community and youth work programme overall.. Specifically it contributes to the explicitly equality focused modules of the programme, such as CYW 320 (Equality, Diversity and Social Justice) or the informal education module.(CYW 130).

 

Tutors’ on-going research, has a direct link to modules on the programme and research interests of the community and youth work team contribute to the Equalities and Social Justice Seminar series.

 

We have a small, but growing, number of post-graduate research students who are supervised by CYW staff, both on the PhD route and the professional doctorate route. Their research interests have a direct link to community and youth work theory and practice and will, in turn, contribute to teaching and learning on the programme.

 

 

 

 

 

SECTION D EMPLOYABILITY

 

  1. How will the programme prepare me for employment?

The programme gives you the opportunity to develop skills which you can use in the future. Some skills are more specific than others to the subject area, or to a particular type of activity, but all skills can be applied in a range of employment situations, sometimes in quite unexpected ways.

 

The Community and Youth Work Studies programme is professionally validated by the National Youth Agency (NYA) and thus confers a nationally recognised professional qualification to those students completing the honours degree.  Sunderland is currently the only University in the region offering a professionally validated undergraduate programme in community and youth work.

 

The National Youth Agency  have commended us for our commitment to continual development, our well-developed support system resulting in good success rates and our strong links with the field that help us ensure that the programme remains relevant and contemporary in a changing environment..

 

External Examiners, especially those responsible for the practice base elements of the programme, have commented positively on the close relationship between course work and the demands of the field. We employ a wide range of assessment methods that mirror many of the tasks that community and youth workers would be expected to perform in practice, such as undertaking action research, presenting information to a range of audiences, project management and supervision. ‘Professional discussions’ at the end of each year require students to reflect on their skills and abilities and offer practice for interview situations.

 

Our closer working relationship with aligned courses such as and social work career guidance has led to some shared teaching sessions which mirror the integrated working environment that you will be entering into.

 

We benefit from local employers’ and stakeholders’ involvement on our Programme Boards of Studies and also maintain a close working relationship with agencies regionally to provide placement opportunities for our students. Many of our students obtain part-time sessional work as a direct result of their placement work during their studies.

 

First destination data suggest that our students gain employment in wide range of related fields, as the generic skills of working with young people and communities can be applied to other settings.

 

There are also opportunities for on-campus students outside your programme of study. For information about other opportunities available to our students who study on campus, click here.

 

 

  1. Particular features of the qualification

This programme offers you both an academic degree and a professional qualification in community and youth work, equipping you for a career in this exciting field. The national accrediting body, the National Youth Agency made a monitoring visit in 2014 and commended the programme for the currency and relevance of its teaching and the level of support offered to students.

 

Graduates of the programme will have undertaken at least 888 hours in professional practice where they will develop their understanding of the current employment context and make connections which prove to be useful for future employment. Each year there is also an opportunity for students to apply to undertake their practice placement in Stuttgart, Germany, under the University’s Erasmus scheme.

 

 

  1. Professional statutory or regulatory body (PSRB) accreditation.

 

PSRB accreditation is not relevant to this programme 

 

PSRB accreditation is currently being sought for this programme

 

This programme currently has PSRB accreditation

 

The programme is currently accredited until: 2018

The relevant PSRBs are: JNC / National Youth Agency

 

The programme is recognised as: offering a professional qualification in community and youth work

 

Accreditation gives graduates the status of a professionally qualified community and youth worker

 

This depends upon successful completion of the programme.

 

There are programme-specific regulations relating to the following. Details are given in the programme regulations:

 

The modules to be studied

Pass-marks for some or all modules and/or parts

(elements) of modules 

Requirements for progression between one Stage and another

Placement requirements

Attendance requirements

Professional practice requirements

Degree classification  

Other 

 

 

 

 

Interim or exit awards are not accredited. 


SECTION E PROGRAMME STRUCTURE AND REGULATIONS

 

See Programme Regulations Form, for questions 39 and 40 -see Apppendix 2

 

SECTION F ADMISSIONS, LEARNING ENVIRONMENT AND SUPPORT

 

  1. What are the admissions requirements?

The University’s standard admissions requirements can be found in the university regulations. Programme-specific requirements which are in addition to those regulations are given below. 

 

Applicants are offered an interview if they fulfil the minimum entry requirements and are then selected on the basis on the extent to which they meet the following criteria:

 

  • An ability to describe their involvement in community and youth work practice
  • An identification of the skills and knowledge they currently utilise in their practice and/or from past formal and informal educational experiences
  •      An awareness of the purpose of community and youth work practice
  •      Evidence of educational achievement
  • Steps they have taken to prepare for professional training
  • An ability to identify examples of discrimination in their own or other people’s lives
  • Evidence of active listening, reflection and an ability to recognise the viewpoints of others

An offer of a place is only made after a satisfactory DBS check. Where a criminal conviction is declared a decision will be made in the context of the University’s Equal Opportunities Policy and the University’s policy of extending opportunities for Higher Education, whilst adhering to the duty of ensuring that students do not have a criminal record that would prevent them from working with children, young people and vulnerable adults. The University has an identified, transparent procedure for dealing with these cases and the programme team’s involvement is informed by the National Youth Agency’s guidance on good practice in criminal records disclosure.       

 

Students who have successfully completed the University of Sunderland Extended Programme in Social Sciences can progress straight on to the full three year BA Community and Youth Work Studies programme.

 

Can students enter with advanced standing?

Yes *

 

 

 

 

 

*Students who wish to apply for advanced standing follow the University’s Accreditation of Prior Learning procedure. To safe-guard the professional validation, students can only be accepted from an institution with a similar professionally accredited programme, or from programmes that meet all the programme learning outcomes including assessed fieldwork practice.

 

Full details of the University’s APL procedures can be found here but if you think that this may be relevant to you, please contact the programme leader directly.

 

  1. What kind of support and help will there be?

 

The university has recognised that induction is a vital part of the student experience and organises a comprehensive ‘welcome week’ to the university for new students, including drop in sessions where advice can be provided on almost any aspect of university life. We also provide a subject specific induction programme.

 

An important part of our induction process is the distribution of the ‘Community and Youth Work Studies Student Handbook’ to each student. This document sets out our policies and approaches to learning and gives guidance on effective study. It is intended to act as a reference tool for you throughout your years of study and has been much appreciated, receiving commendations directly from students and from external examiners.

 

The Professional Development Handbook is given to all students during the induction fortnight.  You begin the initial self-assessment exercises in week one and are then supported by their personal tutor during a detailed professional development focused tutorial in week two prior to their engagement in formal module teaching and learning.  You are then requested to keep a detailed reflective diary throughout each semester.  This allows you to build personal and professional information to be raised during their module and year tutorials.  The whole process is repeated at the end of each year where a full annual appraisal of each student’s learning can be completed as the benchmark for future action. The PDH links closely with the requirements of the National Youth Agency’s guidelines for professional practitioners and the National Occupational Standards for work with young people.

 

During the last few years tutors have found that the level of personal support that students need has increased considerably. We have therefore adopted a dual tutorial system of personal tutorials and module tutorials.  Both cater for students individually or in small groups. On joining the programme all students are allocated a personal tutor who will support them throughout their time at University. Personal tutorials, which focus on pastoral issues, are timetabled initially, with follow-up arrangements negotiated by students or tutors. Module tutorials are timetabled into all level one, two and three modules. These ensure that specific attention is given to students’ academic development by providing an opportunity to raise questions, to critique different theoretical approaches and to clarify points raised during lectures and seminars. Each student has a personal tutor who supports them throughout their 3 years on the course, holding regular meetings and being available for general queries and crisis issues. All students are also able to access their module tutors and a delegated overall year tutor. Tutors, at each regular (normally fortnightly) staff meeting, discuss and share any students’ issue that may affect their completion of each year, including equity issues.  

 

While students are on placement their learning is supported by a placement supervisor with an appropriate level of experience and/or qualification.  The student’s placement tutor meets with the student and placement supervisor at the beginning of the placement to ensure that appropriate learning opportunities and support are available to the student; and at the end of the placement to review progress.  Students attend University for at least one day per week during their placement and are thus able to access any additional support required from their placement tutor, who also maintains telephone and email contact with the placement supervisor.

 

We have excellent relationships with the wider support systems in the University and support students to access these. These include: health and well-being, counselling, disability support, and a Chaplaincy. Click on the links for further information.

 

 

  1. What resources will I have access to?

 

On campus

x

In a partner college

 

By distance learning

 

 

On campus

General Teaching and Learning Space

X

IT

x

Library

x

VLE

x

Laboratory

 

Studio

 

Performance space

 

Other specialist technical resources 

 

Practice placements

x

 

Information about the University’s facilities can be found here.

 

  1. Are there any additional costs on top of the fees?

 

No, but all students buy some study materials such as books and provide their own basic study materials.

x

Yes (optional) All students buy some study materials such as books and provide their own basic study materials. In addition there are some are additional costs for optional activities associated with the programme (see below)

 

Yes (essential) All students buy some study materials such as books and provide their own basic study materials. In addition there are some are essential additional costs associated with the programme (see below)

 

 

 

  1. How are student views represented?

All taught programmes in the University have student representatives for each Stage (year-group) of each programme who meet in a Student-Staff Liaison Committee (SSLC) where they can raise students’ views and concerns. The Students’ Union and the faculties together provide training for student representatives. SSLCs and focus groups are also used to obtain student feedback on plans for developing existing programmes and designing new ones. Feedback on your programme is obtained every year through module questionnaires and informs the annual review of your programme. Student representatives are also invited to attend Programme and Module Studies Boards which manage the delivery and development of programmes and modules.  Various Faculty committees, particularly Faculty Academic Experience Committee, Academic Development Committee and Quality Management Sub-Committee also have student representation. This allows students to be involved in higher-level plans for teaching and learning. There is a parallel structure at university level on which students are represented by sabbatical officers who are the elected leaders of the Students’ Union.

 

The University’s student representation and feedback policy can be found here.

 

Final-year students are also invited to complete a National Student Survey (NSS) which asks a standard set of questions across the whole country. The results of this are discussed at Programme Studies Boards and at Faculty Academic Experience Committee to identify good practice which can be shared and problems which need to be addressed. We rely heavily on student input to interpret the results of the NSS and ensure that we make the most appropriate changes.

 

SECTION G QUALITY MANAGEMENT 

 

  1. National subject benchmarks

The Quality Assurance Agency for Higher Education publishes benchmark statements which give guidance as to the skills and knowledge which graduates in various subjects and in certain types of degree are expected to have. These can be found here.

 

Are there any benchmark statements for this programme?

YES

 

QAA Youth and Community Work Benchmark Statement (2009 but currently being reviewed)

 

National Occupational Standards for Youth Work

http://www.nya.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2014/06/National-Occupation-Standards-for-Youth-Work.pdf

 

The QAA also publishes a Framework for Higher Education Qualifications (FHEQ) which defines the generic skills and abilities expected of students who have achieved awards at a given level and with which our programmes align. The FHEQ can be found here.

 

  1. How are the quality and standards of the programme assured?

The programme is managed and quality assured through the University’s standard processes. Programmes are overseen by Module and Programme Studies Boards which include student representatives. Each year each module leader provides a brief report on the delivery of the module, identifying strengths and areas for development, and the programme team reviews the programme as a whole.  The purpose of this is to ensure that the programme is coherent and up-to-date, with suitable progression from one Stage to another, and a good fit (alignment) between what is taught and how students learn and are assessed - the learning outcomes, content and types of teaching, learning and assessment. Student achievement, including progress between Stages of the programme and degree classification, is kept under review. The programme review report is sent to the Faculty Quality Management Sub-Committee which in turn reports issues to the University’s Quality Management Sub-Committee (QMSC) and Academic Development Committee (ADC).

 

External examiners are appointed to oversee and advise on the assessment of the programme. They ensure that the standards of the programme are comparable with those of similar programmes elsewhere in the UK and are also involved in the assessment process to make sure that it is fair. They are invited to comment on proposed developments to the programme. Their reports are sent to the Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Academic) as well as to the Faculty so that issues of concern can be addressed.

 

All programmes are reviewed by the University on a six-yearly cycle to identify good practice and areas for enhancement. Programmes are revalidated through this review process. These reviews include at least one academic specialist in the subject area concerned from another UK university. The University is subject to external review by the Quality Assurance Agency for Higher Education on a six-year cycle. Their review reports for Sunderland can be found here.

 

Further information about our quality processes can be found here

 

 

Appendix 1

 

 

 

SITS SUMMARY PROGRAMME/SHORT COURSE DETAILS

 

SITS SUMMARY PROGRAMME DETAILS

 

(Form to be completed electronically by School and forwarded to QAE Officer of  approval/review panel)

PROGRAMME DETAILS

 

Title of programme/award

BA (Hons) Community & Youth Work Studies

If replacement for existing, specify title of old

 

Faculty

Faculty of Education and Society

Department

Social Sciences

Academic SITS (subject) area[1]

 

Academic (SITS) code[2] (Programme Code)

 

PSB/PAB code[3]

 

Recruitment method i.e. UCAS (please provide code), if other please state method.

UCAS L 522

QAA/JACS code[4]

L540

Qualification Level / Qualification Aim

BA (Hons) Degree

 

Interim awards (please state)

(Please complete structure details in full below)

Certificate of Higher Education in Applied Social Studies

Diploma of Higher Education

Ordinary Degree in Applied Social Studies

 

Modes of delivery & duration:

 

Full time       Yes  3 years

Sandwich     No

Part time      Yes  5-9  years

Off-campus  No 

 

Programme Leader:

Dr Ilona Buchroth

Date of Approval Cluster Review

5/6th May 2016

Date of next review (QAE to complete)

 

Start date of Programme (QAE to complete)

 

Number of intakes per annum.

 

1 (September)

 

FUNDING DETAILS

 

Confirm funding arrangements for programme e.g. HEFCE/TTA/NHS/Other[5]

Student Fees/HEFCE

If it is TTA, is it primary/secondary/F.E./Other (please state)

 

Is the programme Open or Closed[6]:

Open

 

Accrediting Body(s):

National Youth Agency

 

PROGRAMME SPECIFIC REGULATIONS

 

Are there to be programme specific regulations?

Yes

 

COLLABORATIVE:

please complete details

UK                     No

 

Overseas          No

 

  INTERIM AWARD SCHEDULE

 

Interim award title

Credits required

Interim structure

Please show mandatory requirements if applicable e.g. core module codes

Certificate of Higher Education in Applied Social Studies

120

CYW127, CYW128, CYW129, CYW130, CYW131, CYW132

 

 

Diploma of Higher Education in Applied Social Studies

240

Above 120 credits plus CYW222, CYW233, CYW234, CYW235, CYW236, CYW237

 

 

Ordinary Degree in Applied Social Studies

 

Above 240 credits plus additional 60 credits from  CYW313, CYW318, CYW319, CYW320, CYW 321

BA Community & Youth Work Studies

 

 

360

Above 240 credits plus

CYW313, CYW318, CYW319, CYW320, CYW 321

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE/ASSESSMENT SCHEDULE

 

Please give details of the Programme Definition by Module and Assessment Schedule on the following page (as shown in Appendix D of preparation of document guidelines).  Show details of the co/pre requisites required for each module i.e. ‘1 of the following 8 modules to be taken also’ - show the codes of the module groupings’

 

 

   DETAILS SUPPLIED BY:Dr. Ilona Buchroth


Appendix 2

 

PART B   -  Programme  Regulations

 

Name of programme: Community and Youth Work Studies

Title of final award: BA with Honours in Community and Youth Work Studies

Interim awards[7]: Certificate in Higher Education in Applied Social Studies;

Diploma in Higher Education in Applied Social Studies;

Ordinary Degree in Applied Social Studies

Accreditation: BA with Honours is accredited from 2008-2009 by the National Youth Agency.

The other awards are not accredited.

 

University Regulation (please state the relevant University Regulation): 4.2.1, 5.2.1

 

Stage 1

 

Core modules:

 

Code

Title

Credits

CYW127

Skills for Practice

20

CYW128

Learning from Lives

20

CYW129

Understanding Society

20

CYW130

Principles of Informal Education

20

CYW131

Placement Applied Practice1 part one

20

CYW132

Placement Applied practice 1 part two

20

 

Optional Modules

There are no optional modules at Stage 1

 

Elective Modules

There is no provision for an elective module at Stage 1.

 

Progression Regulations

To meet the requirements of the National Youth Agency, the following restrictions have been approved by Academic Board on the provisions of the University regulations.

You must achieve a pass of 40% in each of the elements of assessment in modules CYW127, CYW128, CYW129, CYW130, CYW131 and CYW132, in order to pass the module. In addition these modules cannot be compensated so you must achieve an overall pass of 40% in each module.

 

Stage 2

 

Core modules

 

Code

Title

Credits

CYW222

Policy Context

20

CYW233

Group Work and Integrated Practice

20

CYW234

Organisational Management

20

CYW235

Ethical Practice

20

CYW236

Placement Applied Practice 2 part one

20

CYW237

Placement Applied Practice 2 part two

20

 

Optional modules

There are no optional modules at Stage 2

 

 

Elective modules

There is no provision for an elective module at Stage 2

 

 

 

Progression Regulations

To meet the requirements of the National Youth Agency, the following restrictions have been approved by Academic Board on the provisions of the University regulations.

You must achieve a pass of 40% in each of the elements of assessment in modules CYW222, CYW233, CYW234, CYW235, CYW236 and CYW237 in order to pass the module. In addition these modules cannot be compensated so you must achieve an overall pass of 40% in each module.

 

Stage 3

 

Core modules

 

Code

Title

Credits

CWY 313

Supervision

10

CYW318

Education for Transformation

20

CYW 319

Entrepreneurship and Project management

20

CYW 320

Equality, Diversity and Social Justice

20

CYW321

Research for Practice

30

 

 

Optional modules

There are no optional modules at Stage 3.

 

Elective modules

You may choose any Level Three module from across the University to the value of 20 credits, subject to the approval of the Programme Leader and to timetable and content compatibility.

 

Progression Regulations

To meet the requirements of the National Youth Agency, the following restrictions have been approved by Academic Board on the provisions of the University regulations.

You must achieve a pass of 40% in each of the elements of assessment in modules CYW318, CYW319, CYW313 CYW320, and CYW321 in order to pass the module. In addition these modules cannot be compensated so you must achieve an overall pass of 40% in each module.

 

 

Attendance

 

The BA Community and Youth Work Studies programme leads to a professional qualification; therefore 100% attendance is expected. Any student whose attendance falls below 80% during one semester will not normally be permitted to undertake assessment in the relevant module(s).

 

Students without extenuating circumstances will be referred in the relevant module/s and / or may be required to withdraw from the programme. Students with extenuating circumstances will be deferred in the relevant module(s). The Programme Academic team will make a recommendation on how the minimum attendance requirement can be met.

 

 

 

 

 


 

Module List Appendix 3

 

Award Route (if applicable) and Level *

New/ Existing/ Modified Module

(N/E/MM)

Module code

Module Title

Credit value

Core/

Option

Assessment weighting

e.g. exam %

coursework %

Requisites

Co / Pre

Module Leader

Other comment

Date of entry on SITS

JACS Code

Cert HE in Applied Social Studies

E

CYW129

Understanding Society

20

C

Coursework 1 50%

Coursework 2 50%

None

Liz Woolley

 

 

L540

 

E

CYW

128

Learning from Lives

20

C

Coursework 1 100%

None

Rick Bowler

 

 

 

 

E

CYW

130

Principles of Informal Education

20

C

Coursework1  100%

None

Dan Connolly

 

 

 

 

E

CYW

127

Skills for Practice

20

C

Coursework 1 50%

Coursework 2 50%

None

Ilona Buchroth

 

 

 

 

E

CYW

131

Placement Applied Practice level1 part one

20

C

Coursework 1 100%

2 Pass/Fail

All level 1 CYW modules

Ilona Buchroth

Dan Connolly

 

 

 

 

E

CYW 132

Placement Applied Practice level1 part two

20

C

Coursework 1 100%

CYW131

Ilona Buchroth

Dan Connolly

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dip HE in Applied Social Studies

E

CYW

222

The Policy Context

20

C

Coursework 1 50%

Coursework 2 50%

All level 1 CYW modules

Dan Connolly

 

 

 

 

E

CYW

234

Organisational Management

20

C

Coursework 1 50%

Coursework 2 50%

All level 1 CYW modules

Ilona Buchroth

 

 

 

 

E

CYW

 

233

Group Work and Integrated Practice

20

C

Coursework 1 100%

All level 1 CYW modules

Liz Woolley

 

 

 

 

E

CYW235

Ethical Practice

20

C

Coursework 1

100%

All level 1 CYW modules

Rick Bowler

 

 

 

 

E

CYW236

Placement Applied Practice level 2 part one

20

C

Coursework 1 100%

2 Pass/Fail

All level 1 CYW modules

Liz Woolley

Rick Bowler

 

 

 

 

E

CYW 237

Placement Applied Practice level 2 part two

20

C

Coursework 1 100%

CYW 236

Liz

Woolley

Rick Bowler

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ordinary Degree

BA Applied Social Studies

E

CYW318

Education for Transformation

20

C

Coursework 1 60%

Coursework 2 40%

All level 2 CYW modules

Ilona Buchroth

 

 

 

 

E

CYW320

Equality, Diversity and Social Justice

20

C

Coursework 1 - 50%

Coursework 2 - 50%

All level 2 CYW modules

Rick Bowler

 

 

 

 

 

 

Elective

20

C

 

All level 2 CYW modules

 

 

 

 

 

E

CYW319

Entrepreneurship and Project Management

20

C

Coursework 1

30%

Coursework 2 70%

All level 2 CYW modules or BA HSC Level 2 modules

Dan Connolly

 

 

 

 

E

CYW313

Supervision

10

C

Coursework 1

100%

All level 2 CYW modules

Liz Woolley

 

 

 

 

E

CYW317

Advanced Practice

20

C

Coursework 1 40%

Coursework 2 60%

All level 2 CYW modules

Liz Woolley

 

 

 

BA Hons

Community and Youth Work Studies

E

CYW 321

Research for Practice

30

 

Coursework 1  100%

All level 2 CYW modules

Rick Bowler

 

 

 

 


 

 

Appendix 4

Matrix of modes of teaching, learning and assessment

 

 

Stage 1

 

Module

Code

Core / optional

Modes of T&L

Modes of Assessment

KO1

KO2

KO3

SO1

SO2

SO3

SO4

SO5

Skills for Practice

CYW 127

Core

Lectures, private study, seminars Tutorials

Portfolio

Report

Taught, Developed

Assessed

Taught

 

Taught, Developed

Taught Developed Assessed

Taught

Taught Developed Assessed

 

Taught Developed

Understanding Society 

CYW 129

Core

Lectures, private study, group work,  seminars

Tutorials

Essay

Group presentation

Developed

 

Taught

Assessed

Taught

Assessed

Taught Developed Assessed

Taught

Developed

Taught Developed Assessed

 

Taught Developed

Learning from Lives 

CYW 128

Core

Lectures

Private Study

Group work, Seminars

Tutorials

Reflective Life Story

Taught Developed Assessed

 

Taught Developed Assessed

Taught Developed Assessed

 

 

Taught

Taught Developed Assessed

Principles of Informal education

CYW 130

Core

Lectures Private Study Group Work Seminars

Tutorials

Case Studies/ Essay

Taught Developed Assessed

Taught Developed Assessed

Taught Developed Assessed

Taught Developed Assessed

Taught Developed Assessed

Taught Developed

Taught Developed

Taught Developed Assessed

Placement Applied practice level1 part one

CYW 131

Core

Placement Learning

Agency Study

Evidence of professional competence

Developed

Assessed

Developed Assessed

Developed Assessed

Developed Assessed

Developed Assessed

Taught Developed Assessed

Developed Assessed

Developed Assessed

Placement Applied Practice level1 part 2

CYW 132

Core

Placement learning

Professional development Audit

Developed

Assessed

Developed Assessed

Developed Assessed

Developed Assessed

Developed Assessed

Taught Developed Assessed

Developed Assessed

Developed

Assessed

 

Stage 2

 

Module

Code

Core / optional

Modes of T&L

Modes of Assessment

KO4

KO5

KO6

SO6

SO7

SO8

SO9

Policy Context

CYW 222

Core

Lectures

Group Work

Private Study

Tutorials

Essay

Presentation

Taught Developed Assessed

Taught Developed Assessed

Taught Developed assessed

Developed

Developed Assessed

Developed

Developed

Organisational management

CYW 234

Core

Lectures Private Study

Seminars Tutorials

Essay  Organisational Evaluation

Developed

Developed

Taught Developed Assessed

Developed Assessed

Developed Assessed

Developed Assessed

Developed

Group Work and Integrated practice

CYW 233

Core

Lectures

Group Work

Private Study Tutorials

Report

Taught

Developed

Taught Developed

Taught Developed Assessed

Developed Assessed

Taught Developed Assessed

Taught Developed Assessed

Developed

Ethical practice

CYW 235

Core

Lectures Group Work Private Study Tutorials

Essay

Taught Developed Assessed

Taught Developed Assessed

Taught Developed Assessed

Developed Assessed

Developed

Developed

Developed

Placement Applied Practice 2 part one

CYW 236

Core

Placement learning

Evaluation

Evidence of professional competence

Developed

assessed

Developed

Assessed

Developed Assessed

Developed

Assessed

Developed Assessed

Developed Assessed

Developed

Assessed

Placement Applied Practice 2 part two

CYW 237

Core

On placement learning Tutorials

Professional development Report

Developed

Assessed

Developed Assessed

Developed Assessed

Developed Assessed

Developed assessed

Taught Developed Assessed

Taught Developed Assessed

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stage 3

 

Module

Code

Core / optional

Modes of T&L

Modes of Assessment

KO8

KO9

K1O

K11

S1O

S11

S12

Education  for Transformation

CYW

318

Core

Lectures

Group Work

Private Study

Tutorials

Essay

Teaching Session

Developed

Taught Assessed

Developed

Taught

Developed

Taught

Developed

Assessed

Development

Developed

Taught

Developed

Supervision:

CYW

313

Core

Lectures Private Study

Seminars Tutorials

Report

Developed

Taught

Assessed

Developed

Developed

Developed

Developed

Taught

Taught

Developed

Taught

Entrepreneurship and Project management

CYW

319

Core

Lectures

Group Work

Private Study Tutorials

Business Plan

Presentation

Developed

Taught Assessed

Developed

Developed

Developed

 

Developed

Taught

Taught

Developed

Taught

Research for Practice

CYW 321

Core

Lectures Group Work Private Study Tutorials

Research Proposal

Dissertation

Taught

Developed

Developed

Taught

Assessed

Developed

Taught

Assessed

Developed

Developed

Developed

Taught

Equality, Diversity and Social Justice

CYW

320

Core

Lectures Private Study

Seminars Tutorials

Presentation  

Case Study

Taught

Assessed

Developed

Developed

Taught

Developed

Developed

Assessed

Developed

Taught

Taught

Assessed

Advanced

Practice

CYW

317

Optional

Work based Learning Tutorials

PDP Audit

Placement Report

Developed

Developed

Developed t

Taught

Assessed

Development

Assessed

Taught

Assessed

Assessed

Taught

Developed

Assessed

 

 

 

 


[1] Please refer to the SITS academic subject areas held by the School Adminsitrator/Quality Director

[2] Postgraduate programmes are 5 characters.  ALL other programmes are 6 characters.  These are based upon the programme  title e.g. Art & Design = ARTDES

[3] Programme Studies/Assessment Board that will have management responsibilities for the programme.

[4] JACS code = e.g. (V1) History, (G5) Computing Science, etc.

[5] Please confer with AIS for funding status for programme

[6] An Open programme constitutes an open admissions policy.  A Closed programme is normally specific to one client only (and usually for a short course through U.S.E.).  If in doubt please consult Jean Ruffell at A.I.S.

 

[7] Same as main award unless agreed otherwise at validation – eg to meet PSRB requirements