Attachments

 

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BA (Hons.) Childhood  Studies

 

Faculty of Education and Society

 

School of Social Sciences.

 

 

PROGRAMME SPECIFICATION

 

 

Date of Validation Event:

 

Date Approved by QMSC:

 

 

 

 

 

 


Version History

 

Version

Occasion of Change

Change Author

Last Modified

1.0

Version presented for approval

Dr. Bruce Marjoribanks

7/1/2016

2.0

The word ‘critically’ removed from the stage 1 knowledge learning outcome in response to the periodic review requirement

Dr. Bruce Marjoribanks

22/05/16

3.0

Insertion of “current entry requirement for this programme are as specified in the Fees and Entry Requirements” section on the programme page on the University’s website.

Dr. Bruce Marjoribanks

25/05/16

4.0

 

Minor Modifications to Modules CHS159, CHS162, CHS204, CHS205, CHS270  and CHS 302.  Replacing Module (Programme Modification ) LAW215 with new Module CHS280

Dr. Bruce Marjoribanks

10/07/2017

5.0

Changes to SITS Form – Module Leadership

Dr. Bruce Marjoribanks

08/09/2017

6.0

Changes to SITS Form – Module Leadership

Dr. Bruce Marjoribanks

29/11/2017

7.0

Minor Modifications to Modules.  CHS144, CHS159, CHS162, CS163, CHS205,CHS244,CHS248,

CHS264,CHS265,Chs266

CHS267,CHS268,CHS269

CHS270,CHS302,CHS346

CHS350,CHS376.  Replacing Modules CHS157, CHS158,CHS160,CHS161, CHS349, CHS375 with CHS170, CHS171, CHS382, CHS383

Changes to SITS Form – Module Leadership

Dr. Bruce Marjoribanks

16/03/208

8.0

Minor Modifications to replace Option Module CHS248 with CHS283

Dr. Bruce Marjoribanks

July 2019

9.0

Changes to SITS Form – Module Leadership

Dr. Bruce Marjoribanks

19/08/2019

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

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Quality Handbook

 

 

AQH-B2-3a Undergraduate Programme Specification Template

August 2015

 

 

AQH-B2-3a Undergraduate Programme Specification Template

 

 

SECTION A: CORE INFORMATION

 

  1. Name  of programme: Childhood Studies

 

  1. Award title: BA Honours

 

  1. Programme linkage

Is this part of group of linked programmes between which students can transfer at agreed points?

 

 

 

  1. Is the programme a top-up only?

 

 

 

  1. Does the programme have a Foundation Year (level 3) associated with it so that students enter for a four-year programme and progress directly from the Foundation Year to Stage 1 without having to re-apply?

 

 

 

 

  1. Level of award

 

 

 

  1. Awarding body: University of Sunderland

 

  1. Which department is it in? Department of Social Sciences

 

  1. Programme Studies Board? Childhood Studies

 

  1. Programme Leader: Dr. Bruce Marjoribanks

 

  1. How and where can I study the programme?

 

At Sunderland:

 

Full-time on campus

Part-time on campus

As work-based learning full-time

 

As work-based learning part-time

 

As a full-time sandwich course

 

As a part-time sandwich course

 

By distance learning

 

 

  1. How long does the programme take?

 

 

Min number of years / months

Max number of years / months

Full-time

3

3

Part-time

6

6

Distance learning

 

 

Work-based learning

 

 

 

For start-dates please see the current edition of the Prospectus or contact the relevant department at the University.

 

September

 

SECTION B – FURTHER CORE INFORMATION 

 

Use Outline Programme Proposal Form for ADC (AQH-B2-2), for questions 13 to 25

 

  1. Learning and teaching strategy

 

The Childhood Studies programme is theoretical by design, however many students do enter the BA (Hons) Childhood Studies programme with a view to progressing into a career working with children. At present, the programme enables students to consider a range of professional post-graduate options including primary phase teaching, social work or health related disciplines. The CS team also recognise and acknowledge many students have limited experience of working with children prior to entering the programme.

 

Placement shadowing opportunities, across a wider range of specialisms, enables students to become reflective and realistic with regard to their future aspirations and helps students to decide on future career pathways, which in turn will inform their specialist option choices. Furthermore, placement opportunities inform and are informed by student knowledge, skills and attributes providing enrichment and experiential learning within the programme overall. The programme team believe this provides students the potential to put theory into action and consider wider issues relating to childcare service provision including equality and diversity.

 

 

  1. Retention strategy

The first module in the first term has been designed and written to allow students to become wholly familiar with the level of work expected The staff team as also built in mechanisms for independent and collaborative work so that student will have to initiate and participate in discussion, presentations and group work.  The students will also benefit from the small tasks that require independent thinking and writing which is reviewed and supported by the tutors by the provision of formative feedback.  This module is taught intensively at the beginning of the programme and by the close of the module students should be familiar with a range of support mechanisms, guidance and named contacts available to them.

  1. Any other information

Students enter the CS programme from a variety of backgrounds as school or college progressors or return to learn students. As such, they have a wide and varied experiential background of working with children. Some students have gained one or two weeks experience whilst at school whilst others have received substantial experience over a two year period following a college programme of study, others have their life experiences informing their choice of programme. The placement opportunity enables all students to equally gain experience and equally be informed of the variety of progression possibilities available to them. Some students have entered the current CS programme with a view to progress as post-graduates into teaching for a career option. Over the period of the current three-year programme some students change their perspective in relation to future careers; much of this decision changing is influenced by placement experience, whereby students become aware of the wide range of options available of  which they previously had little or no knowledge.

 

SECTION C - TEACHING AND LEARNING

 

  1. What is the programme about?

The programme provides the base for professional education and training for new professional roles in the expanding provision of integrated care and education for children from birth, as well as introducing research opportunities and skills.  There are several opportunities for students to consider social inequalities in the modules in order to provide better lives for children and families with the potential to be advocates for the rights of young children, recognising children's needs, developmental tasks, diversity and differences.  The students develop skills for research, presentation, role-play, teamwork and problem solving, and these attributes are valued highly by employers. The modules offer students opportunities to study children and a range of theories and practical experiences related to learning; knowledge of specialist support for children with special needs and conditions; factors influencing children and staff including diversity in various forms: cultural, religious, ethnic, social (including social support), language and cognition and English as an additional language; current and comprehensive and historical legislative and policy developments, and developmental factors surrounding children research projects and giving personal presentations as part of a team.

 

  1. What will I know or be able to do at each Stage of the programme?  

 

Learning Outcomes Stage 1 – Skills  

By the end of this Stage of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

 

  • combine information from a number of sources in order to understand theory and practice
  • observe, record and report on experiential learning within a childhood context

 

 

 

 

Learning Outcomes Stage 1 – Knowledge

By the end of this Stage of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

 

  • understand and evaluate different theories of child development and their influence on policy and practice
  • relate appropriate theory to childhood practice
  • understand the diversity of children’s needs and analyse responses to these diverse needs;

 

Learning Outcomes Stage 2 – Skills

By the end of this Stage of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following: as above plus:

 

  • search and select information from a range of sources to research and analyse aspects of childhood studies
  • evaluate childhood provision in a knowledgeable and systematic way

 

Learning Outcomes Stage 2 – Knowledge

By the end of this Stage of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

 

  • demonstrate how the family, social, economic, environmental, political and cultural factors influence the construction of childhood
  • describe and critically analyse a range of childhood provision
  • understand and analyse legislation relating to young children and their families;

 

Learning Outcomes Stage 3 – Skills

By the end of this Stage of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following

 

  • demonstrate skills in planning, carrying out and reporting on an independent study
  • plan and carry out a small scale independent research project in the area of Childhood Studies
  • analyse critically research information and other kinds of evidence

 

Learning Outcomes Stage 3 – Knowledge

By the end of this Stage of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

 

  • engage in investigation and research in the area of childhood practice and critically evaluate the outcomes
  • review cultural and social diversity and inequality in society and evaluate how these are expressed and addressed

 

Learning Outcomes – Ordinary degree

If you are awarded an Ordinary degree you will have achieved the majority of the learning outcomes for the programme studied. However you will have gained fewer credits at Stage 3 than students awarded an Honours degree, your knowledge will typically be less broad and you will typically be less proficient in higher-level skills such as independent learning.

 

 

  1. What will the programme consist of?

Each undergraduate programme consists of a number of Stages from a minimum of 1 to a maximum of 3, each of which is equivalent to a year’s full-time study. The summary below describes briefly what is contained in each Stage. Most programmes have a mixture of core (i.e. compulsory) modules and optional ones, often with increasing choice as you move through the programme and gain in experience. In some programmes the choice of optional modules gives you particular ‘routes’ through the programme. The programme structure including a detailed list of modules can be found in the programme regulations.

 

The curriculum provides skills, knowledge and understanding in a range of subject areas that combine to form a field of knowledge in Childhood Studies. This is done through provision of a grounding in higher level learning and criticality, child development and needs and the historical and social nature of childhood. Within these fields and the associated disciplines of law, education and care the student is able to build a significant expertise in a chosen area of specialist study. This area of study will be identified from the introduction of the core elements of the degree and a core module that allows identification and exploration of the three specialist areas. An important focus in this is the teaching of observational and assessment techniques that will be used later in the student’s course of study. In addition the student will consider historical and social issues that allow analysis of cultural, gender and class issues. The child as individual and the child within society are core issues for all students that are developed through specific modules in stage two and the application of these issues in a range of personal and applied contexts at level 6.

 

 

Stage 1

CHS 144 Nature and culture of childhood

(20 credits)

CORE

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

P/T Y1

 

 

CHS 159

Values for the professional childhood practitioner (20 credits)

CORE

 

 

 

 

 

P/T Y1

CHS 162

An introduction to child development (20 credits)

CORE

 

 

 

 

 

 

P/T Y2

CHS 163

Child development: theory into practice

(20 credits)

CORE

 

 

 

 

 

 

P/T Y2

CHS170 Inclusion, Integration and Exclusion

(20 credits)

CORE

 

 

 

 

 

P/T Y2

CHS171

Building Graduate Skills for the Professional and Reflective Childhood Practitioner

(20 credits)

CORE

 

P/T Y1

 

 

 

 

P/T Y1 – Part-Time Year 1

 

P/T Y2 – Part-Time Year 2

 

 

 

 

Stage 2

Programme structure at level 2

CHS204

The Child and Economic and Social Environment

(20 Credits)

CORE

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

P/T Y1

CHS284

Researching Childhood  (20 Credits)

CORE

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

P/T Y1

CHS205

Health and

Childhood

(20 Credits)

CORE

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

P/T Y1

SPECIALISM 

CHS244 Developing Learning in the Curriculum through Story

CHS283 Children and Young People in Global Contexts :CHS 268 The context of young children’s learning and development

(20 CREDITS)

SPECIALISM

 

 

P/T Y2

SPECIALISM 

CHS  266 The nature of the primary curriculum

CHS 264 Contextualising children’s position within society

CHS 269 Play and learning in the early years

(20 CREDITS)

SPECIALISM

 

 

 

 

 

P/T Y2

SPECIALISM 

CHS 267 Local Study Project

New module: CHS 270 Observing, assessing and reporting young children’s learning and development

CHS  265 Contextualising family units and diversity

(20 CREDITS)

SPECIALISM

 

 

P/T Y2

 

 

Stage 3

 

Programme structure at level 3

CHS302

Child and Family Transitions

(20 credits)

CORE

 

 

 

 

P/T Y1

CHS346 Equality and Diversity in Contemporary Society

(20 credits)

CORE

 

 

P/T Y1

CHS350 Childhood Studies Project

(40 credits)

CORE

 

 

 

P/T Y2

CHS383

Leading Practice for Children and Young People

(20 credits)

CORE

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

P/T Y2

SPECIALISM MODULE

CHS357 Supporting Family Units and protecting Children’s Rights

CHS 376

Effective Teaching and Learning in the Primary Classroom

The First Three Years of Childhood (20 CREDITS)

SPECIALISM

 

P/T Y1

60 credits for BA  degree

Plus additional 60 credits for Honours degree

 

 

 

  1. How will I be taught?

Scheduled teaching activities

Independent study

Placement

 

A list of the modules in each Stage of the programme can be found in the Programme Regulations.

 

A summary of the types of teaching, learning and assessment in each module of the programme can be found in the Matrix of Modes of Teaching.

 

  1. How will I be assessed and given feedback? 

 

Written examinations

Coursework

Practical assessments

 

A summary of the types of teaching, learning and assessment in each module of the programme can be found in the Matrix of Modes of Teaching.

 

The generic assessment criteria which we use can be found here. Some programmes use subject-specific assessment criteria which are based on the generic ones.

 

This programme uses the Generic University Assessment Criteria

YES

 

This programme uses the Subject Specific Assessment Criteria

 

NO

 

The University regulations can be found here.

 

Assessment is used both formatively to develop and summatively to assess students’ key skills, subject specific knowledge, understanding and skills, and intellectual skills. Students are assessed through assignments and reports and preparing these assessments helps students to develop their skills in writing and structuring an argument and their ability to integrate and synthesise data. Additionally practical forms of assessment give students the opportunity to develop skills in self management, communication, oral presentation and the use of ICT to support presentation. A mixture of individual and group work allows students to develop and be assessed in working independently and collaboratively. Students are encouraged to be self motivated and to have a positive attitude to their personal learning

 

Providing a high level of interaction during the contact teaching hours with students provides important formative and summative feedback about the quality of their work.  The programme team considers formative feedback to be important in enhancing student motivation and developing progress.  The assessment techniques employed are varied  to ensure range and balance within and between modules. The overall assessment scheme aims to achieve a balanced and varied distribution across the academic year.

 

The assessment of work undertaken in the modules offered within the programme will involve a range of tasks, reflecting the range of teaching and learning styles. These will include:

 

  •                  Formal written tasks
  •                  Collaborative group presentations
  •                  Independent presentations
  •                  Poster presentation
  •                  Report on research and enquiry
  •                  Portfolio building
  •                  Reflective Diary
  •                  Debated Issue

 

Moderation of standards occurs before and after the first marking of assessment. Work is moderated within the programme team to ensure rigour and fairness. In line with School policy written feedback is related to generic level descriptors as well as assignment specific criteria. Students are given clear guidance on strategies to improve their marks in future.

 

  1. Teaching, learning and assessment matrix

 

  1. How does research influence the programme? 

 

Members of the programme team are actively engaged in research and consultancy activities that relate to the programme. These include:

  • Child development and provision
  • Consultancy with local authorities
  • Collaboration and research with other universities in early childhood issues
  • The development of provision and qualification in new  vocational structures

 

 

SECTION D EMPLOYABILITY

 

  1. How will the programme prepare me for employment?

The programme gives you the opportunity to develop skills which you can use in the future. Some skills are more specific than others to the subject area, or to a particular type of activity, but all skills can be applied in a range of employment situations, sometimes in quite unexpected ways. The skills which this programme is designed to develop are listed below.

 

 The main goal of the programme is to provide an academically challenging course in the area of Childhood Studies that equips students to contribute to the provision of services for children and in other areas of employment. This is not a vocational programme but will prepare students directly for employment and for further education and training at post graduate and occupational levels.  The programme will aim to produce informed and reflective students who will be aware of current academic understanding and debate and will continue to be engaged professionals following completion of the programme.  They will have specific:

 

Employability Skills: Intellectual Skills

 

Successful students will be able to:

1)      combine information from a number of sources in order to understand theory and practice;

2)      analyse critically research information and other kinds of evidence;

3)      demonstrate skills in planning, carrying out and reporting on an independent study.

 

Employability Skills: Subject Skills

 

Successful students will be able to:

1)      observe, record and report on experiential learning within a childhood context;

2)      search and select information from a range of sources to research and analyse aspects of childhood studies;

3)      evaluate Childhood provision in a knowledgeable and systematic way;

4)      plan and carry out a small scale independent research project in the area of Childhood Studies.

 

Key Skills

 

Successful students will be able to:

develop transferable skills in:

1)      communication,

2)      ICT

3)      Application of numbers

4)      Working with others;

5)      Improving own learning;

6)      Problem solving;

 

There are also opportunities for on-campus students outside your programme of study.

 

The students have been involved in fundraising activities. This continues to develop a sense of community and cohesion among the Childhood Studies students.   The team is actively expanding the fundraising activities to strengthen the profile of the Childhood Studies students and indirectly, expanding the outreach opportunities for the students.   Some students who have been involved in the fundraising activities have been able to use this experience in the SUPA application and are actively contributing to the Sunderland Futures programme.

 

For information about other opportunities available to our students who study on campus, click here.

 

Additional opportunities to develop your experiences more widely will vary if you study at one of our partner colleges. For information about the extra-curricular activities available in any of our colleges please contact the college direct. 

 

  1. Particular features of the qualification (optional)

The majority of students undertaking the programme are seeking full employment within the primary education sector and the majority wish to become a primary teacher. The team provides information on ‘what and where next’ to students of progression routes, should they wish to continue. Many students who have applied for further post graduate study have successfully progressed to their chosen route and pathway.  Some of the students are doing a Master of Social Work.  Some students prefer to remain in their current occupation and have undertaken the programme to develop their own practice, student feedback suggests the methods employed are successful and provide timely information for them individually and as a cohort. Individual student advice is provided as part of studies supervision.  The DLHE report published in January 2014 for the previous year indicated that just over 93% of our students were in continuing education or employment six months after completion of their programme.

 

  1. Professional statutory or regulatory body (PSRB) accreditation. 

PSRB accreditation is not relevant to this programme 

PSRB accreditation is currently being sought for this programme

 

This programme currently has PSRB accreditation

 

 

SECTION E PROGRAMME STRUCTURE AND REGULATIONS

 

Use Programme Regulations Form, for questions 39 and 40

 

 

 

SECTION F ADMISSIONS, LEARNING ENVIRONMENT AND SUPPORT

 

  1. What are the admissions requirements?

The current entry requirement for this programme is as specified in the “Fees and Entry Requirements” section on the programme page on the University’s website.

 

The University’s standard admissions requirements can be found in the university regulations. Programme-specific requirements which are in addition to those regulations are given below. 

 

Can students enter with advanced standing?

Yes

 

 

If yes, to which Stages?

Stage 1

 

Stage 2

Stage 3

Stage 4

 

 

If yes, with what qualifications?

 

Advanced entry into level two will be considered where the applicant has a relevant Diploma (HNC/HND) or a Certificate of Higher Learning that has been accredited or can be accredited through the APL process.

 

Admission to the programme for students studying in other countries will be governed by University regulations governing equivalence.

 

Students with a relevant Foundation Degree from other Universities will be considered through the APL process.

 

Other:

All students require a DBS clearance to be registered on this programme.

 

The University has a process by which applicants whose experience to date already covers one or more modules of the programme they are applying for may seek Accreditation of Prior Learning (APL). Full details can be found here but if you think that this may be relevant to you, please contact the department which offers the programme you are interested in.

 

  1. What kind of support and help will there be?

The University operates a personal tutorial system across the programme for both personal and academic issues that students may have.  The tutors involved in the system see students at least 3 times per year for example during the Autumn Term, Spring Term and Summer Term.  Students can also seek additional slots with their personal tutor or the programme leader if they have any issues they need to resolve.  All tutorial staff are familiar with the support services of the University and if appropriate they recommend that student to refer themselves to key services for example student support or counselling.  Likewise if staff have any concerns over individual students they may seek additional tutorial meetings.  The students are encouraged to share the highs and lows, their personal achievement, interests, personal target setting with their named tutors, this is particularly important as it provides the tutor with an illustration of students academic ability, growth and development.  Additionally, it is the personal tutor who will be responsible for writing references throughout and at the close of study when students are seeking places for further HE study or employment.

 

The Programme Leader is easily approached for any academic or pastoral issues; the staff team are also willing and available to assist where possible when students approach them for support and or guidance.

 

Support for placements is indicated on the appropriate module descriptors and guides.

 

The nature of the support may vary but will include a clear brief for the setting. . Support within the placement setting will be provided via liaison with the placement office.  Issues arising from and/or during placement referred to the placement office by student or setting may be then dealt with by module/programme leader depending on level of concern.

 

 

Whilst the student is on placement,  they will be provided formative guidance and assistance as appropriate to the student via the placement office and if warranted the childhood studies team/member(s) . It is anticipated that the placement office will continue in this role..

 

Where problems may arise within the placement for students this will be dealt with by the allocated administrator, module leader and/ or programme leader as appropriate to the nature of the problem arising.

 

Students are advised on a programme and individual basis through career advice and guidance on application, entry and during the programme. This includes generic advice and support through the University careers unit and discussion and application support from studies advisors and the introduction of specialist talks from a range of practitioners.

 

Many students are expected to advance to further study for professional and academic qualifications. The University of Sunderland and other regional and national institutions provide and accept our students. The programme team and the University careers staff are able to advise and support students who wish to undertake further study either on graduation or at a later date.

 

All on-campus students have access to the University’s central support services including Counselling, Disability Service, Health and Well-being, Chaplaincy, financial support and advice, International Office and Careers and Employability Service. The Students’ Union provides an independent service which offers advice and support across the full range of personal and academic problems which students may encounter. Students wishing to lodge a complaint or an appeal can seek advice from the Students’ Union or from Academic Services. Full details of all these services can be found on the University’s web-site. Where appropriate, academic or support staff in the Faculty will sign-post students to these specialist services.

 

At the beginning of the first term, students attend an Induction week. Students are introduced to an outline of their programme of study within the University and where possible speakers will be brought in to explain how they can become volunteers, student representatives, sports teams and generally participate in University life to the full.    Students are also introduced to the core subjects and the possibility of choosing discrete strands for their specialist study at level two and level three. By the close of the year students should be familiar with all of the programme team as the core modules introduce key staff as well as key concepts of study.

 

As part of the event students are also made aware of the range of pastoral, academic and support available to them  through the Student Services, The Student Charter, Learning and Development Services, The Student’s Union as well as the Resource Centres and Library facilities favoured by staff teaching on the programme of study.  The students are all provided with a campus map and do use this in terms orientation and negotiation across the campus to register as students, and to seek post registration library cards.

 

 

The University provides a range of professional support services including health and well-being, counselling, disability support, and a Chaplaincy. Click on the links for further information.

 

Please see the relevant college prospectus or website for details of student support if you are planning to study in one of our partner colleges.

 

  1. What resources will I have access to?

 

On campus

In a partner college

 

By distance learning

 

 

On campus

Tick all that apply

General Teaching and Learning Space

IT

Library

VLE

Laboratory

 

Studio

 

Performance space

 

Other specialist

 

Technical resources 

 

Text for details listed above:

 

The main teaching area will be at City Campus although it utilises accommodation and learning resources at other sites as required for the delivery of the programme.
 

The Childhood Studies programme has enjoyed good provision of learning resources as it has expanded in numbers. Whole cohort lectures are held in the large lecture theatres available at both of the main university sites. Although there is a healthy demand for teaching space at times during the academic year the accommodation has been always adequate and normally good.

 

ICT resources are available at all the sites students normally use as well as in the libraries and learning resource units provided by the university.

 

Library resources are available on a 24 hour base during term time. Students use both the main libraries at Chester Road and St. Peter’s. The library stocks the resources necessary for the programme. The library provides extensive access to electronic resources.

 

Information about the University’s facilities can be found here.

 

Please see the relevant college prospectus or website for details of college learning resources if you are planning to study in one of our partner colleges.

 

  1. Are there any additional costs on top of the fees?

 

No, but all students buy some study materials such as books and provide their own basic study materials.

 

Yes (optional) All students buy some study materials such as books and provide their own basic study materials. In addition there are some are additional costs for optional activities associated with the programme (see below)

Yes (essential) All students buy some study materials such as books and provide their own basic study materials. In addition there are some are essential additional costs associated with the programme (see below)

 

 

There is an optional field trip in the first year.

 

  1. How are student views represented?

 

All taught programmes in the University have student representatives for each Stage (year-group) of each programme who meet in a Student-Staff Liaison Committee (SSLC) where they can raise students’ views and concerns. The Students’ Union and the faculties together provide training for student representatives. SSLCs and focus groups are also used to obtain student feedback on plans for developing existing programmes and designing new ones. Feedback on your programme is obtained every year through module questionnaires and informs the annual review of your programme. Student representatives are also invited to attend Programme and Module Studies Boards which manage the delivery and development of programmes and modules.  Various Faculty committees, particularly Faculty Academic Experience Committee, Academic Development Committee and Quality Management Sub-Committee also have student representation. This allows students to be involved in higher-level plans for teaching and learning. There is a parallel structure at university level on which students are represented by sabbatical officers who are the elected leaders of the Students’ Union.

 

The University’s student representation and feedback policy can be found here.

 

Undergraduate programmes only: Final-year students are also invited to complete a National Student Survey (NSS) which asks a standard set of questions across the whole country. The results of this are discussed at Programme Studies Boards and at Faculty Academic Experience Committee to identify good practice which can be shared and problems which need to be addressed. We rely heavily on student input to interpret the results of the NSS and ensure that we make the most appropriate changes.

 

Programmes offered in partner colleges: If you are studying in one of our partner colleges the college will have its own mechanisms for obtaining student feedback. Some of these may be the same as those on-campus at the University but others may be different. You should ask your college for further information.

 

For distance learning operated from Sunderland: if you are studying by distance learning you will have slightly different arrangements from those used on campus. In particular you  are likely to have virtual rather than physical meetings and discussions. However these arrangements  should provide comparable opportunities for you to give feedback. Details are given below.  

 

The tutors have an open door policies as well as a Facebook page to facilitate the discussion about modules and programme issues and a forum to debate childhood issues.

 

 

 

 

 

 

SECTION G QUALITY MANAGEMENT 

 

  1. National subject benchmarks

 

The Quality Assurance Agency for Higher Education publishes benchmark statements which give guidance as to the skills and knowledge which graduates in various subjects and in certain types of degree are expected to have. These can be found here.

 

Are there any benchmark statements for this programme?

 

NO

 

 

There are no benchmarks for this programme.

 

The QAA also publishes a Framework for Higher Education Qualifications (FHEQ) which defines the generic skills and abilities expected of students who have achieved awards at a given level and with which our programmes align. The FHEQ can be found here.

 

  1. How are the quality and standards of the programme assured?

The programme is managed and quality assured through the University’s standard processes. Programmes are overseen by Module and Programme Studies Boards which include student representatives. Each year each module leader provides a brief report on the delivery of the module, identifying strengths and areas for development, and the programme team reviews the programme as a whole.  The purpose of this is to ensure that the programme is coherent and up-to-date, with suitable progression from one Stage to another, and a good fit (alignment)  between what is taught and how students learn and are assessed - the learning outcomes, content and types of teaching, learning and assessment. Student achievement, including progress between Stages of the programme and degree classification, is kept under review. The programme review report is sent to the Faculty Quality Management Sub-Committee which in turn reports issues to the University’s Quality Management Sub-Committee (QMSC) and Academic Development Committee (ADC).

 

External examiners are appointed to oversee and advise on the assessment of the programme. They ensure that the standards of the programme are comparable with those of similar programmes elsewhere in the UK and are also involved in the assessment process to make sure that it is fair. They are invited to comment on proposed developments to the programme. Their reports are sent to the Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Academic) as well as to the Faculty so that issues of concern can be addressed.

 

All programmes are reviewed by the University on a six-yearly cycle to identify good practice and areas for enhancement. Programmes are revalidated through this review process. These reviews include at least one academic specialist in the subject area concerned from another UK university. The University is subject to external review by the Quality Assurance Agency for Higher Education on a six-year cycle. Their review reports for Sunderland can be found here.

 

Further information about our quality processes can be found here.

 

Please also complete the SITS form.

 

Appendix 1

 

PART B   -  Programme  Regulation/s

 

Name of programme: BA Childhood Studies

Title of final award: BA with Honours

Interim awards

 

Stage 1

 

Core modules:

 

Code

Title

Credits

CHS144

The Nature and Culture of Childhood

20

CHS159

Values for the professional childhood practitioner

20

CHS162

An introduction to child development

20

CHS163

Child development: theory into practice

20

CHS170

Inclusion, Integration and Exclusion

20

CHS171

Building Graduate Skills for the Professional and Reflective Practioner

20

 

Progression Regulations

 

There are no programme-specific progression regulations[1]

 

Stage 2

 

Core modules

Code

Title

Credits

CHS204

Childhood  and the social and economic environment

20

CHS205

Health and Childhood

20

CHS284

Researching Childhood

20

 

Optional modules

 

Choose modules to the value of 60 credits from the following list

 

 

Code

Title

Credits

CHS244

Developing Learning in the Curriculum through Story

20

 

CHS266

The nature of the primary curriculum

20

 

CHS267

Local Study Project

20

CHS283

Children and Young People in Global Contexts

20

CHS264

Contextualising children’s position within society

20

CHS265

Contextualising Family Units and Diversity

20

CHS268

The context of young children’s learning and development

20

CHS269

Play and learning in the early years

20

CHS270

Observing, assessing and reporting young children’s learning and development

20

 

 

Progression Regulations

 

There are no programme-specific progression regulations[2]

 

Students must take either:

  1. CHS244, CHS266, CHS267 or
  2. CHS283, CHS264, CHS265 or
  3. CHS268, CHS269, CHS270

 

Stage 3

 

Core modules

 

Code

Title

Credits

CHS302

Child and Family Transitions

20

 

CHS346

Equality and Diversity in Contemporary Society

20

 

CHS350

Childhood Studies Research project

40

CHS383

Leading Practice for Children and Young People

20

 

 

Optional modules

 

Choose modules to the value of 20 credits from the following list

 

Code

Title

Credits

CHS357

Supporting family units and protecting children’s rights

20

CHS376

Learning and progression in primary core subjects

20

CHS382

The First Three Years of Childhood

20

 

Progression Regulations

 

 

There are no programme-specific progression regulations[3]

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Appendix 2

 

Matrix of modes of teaching, learning and assessment

 

Teaching Methods across Core Modules of the Programme

 

Module

 

lecture

Workshop/seminar

Tutorial

Group work

Indep.

Study

Guided study

Directed tasks

Visits/Placement/

experiential learning/

fieldwork

 

 

learning

E learning

CHS144

*

*

 

*

*

*

*

*

*

CHS159 Values for the professional childhood practitioner

*

*

 

 

*

*

*

 

*

CHS162 An introduction to child development

*

*

 

*

*

*

*

*

*

CHS163 Child development: theory into practice

 

*

*

 

*

*

*

*

*

*

CHS170 Inclusion, Integration, and Exclusion

*

*

 

 

*

*

*

 

*

CHS171 Building Graduate Skills for the Professional and Reflective Practioner

*

*

 

 

*

*

*

 

*

 

CHS205 Health & Childhood

*

*

 

 

*

*

*

*

*

 

CHS284 Researching Childhood

*

*

*

 

*

*

 

 

*

CHS302 Child and Family Transitions

*

*

*

*

*

 

 

 

*

 

CHS346 Equality and Diversity

*

*

 

*

*

*

*

 

*

 

CHS350 Childhood Studies Research project

*

*

*

*

*

 

*

*

*

CHS382 Leading Practice for Children and Young People

*

*

 

 

*

*

*

*

*

 

 

Teaching and Learning Methods across option modules at Stage two and three of the programme

 

Module

 

lecture

Work-shop/

Semin-ar

tutorial

Group work

Indep.

Study

Guided study

Direct-ed tasks

Visits/

Place-ment

E learn-ing

CHS244 Developing Learning in the Curriculum through Story

*

*

 

*

*

*

*

*

*

CHS266 The nature of the primary curriculum

 

*

*

 

*

*

*

*

 

*

CHS267 Local Study Project

*

*

 

*

*

*

*

*

*

CHS283 Children and Young People in Global Contexts

*

*

 

*

*

*

*

 

*

CHS264 Contextualising children’s position within society

*

*

 

*

*

*

*

 

*

CHS265 Contextualising Family Units and Diversity

*

*

 

*

*

*

*

*

*

CHS 270 Observing, assessing and reporting young children’s learning and development

*

*

 

*

*

*

*

 

*

CHS268 The context of young children’s learning and development

*

*

 

*

*

*

*

 

*

CHS 269 Play and learning in the early years

*

*

 

*

*

*

*

 

*

CHS357 Supporting family units and protecting children’s rights

 

*

*

 

*

*

*

*

*

*

CHS376 Effective Teaching and Learning in the Primary Classroom

*

*

 

*

*

*

*

 

*

CHS383 The First Three Years of Childhood

*

*

 

*

*

*

*

 

*

 

 

Learning Outcomes

 

Stage 1

 

 

 

Learning outcomes – Knowledge and skills:

CHS144

CHS 159

CHS 162

CHS 163

CHS170

CHS171

K1

understand and critically evaluate different theories of child development and their influence on policy and practice;

 

*

*

*

*

*

*

K2

relate appropriate theory to childhood practice

*

 

*

*

*

*

K3

understand the diversity of children’s needs and analyse responses to these diverse needs;

 

*

*

*

*

*

*

S1

combine information from a number of sources in order to understand theory and practice;

 

*

*

*

*

*

*

S2

observe, record and report on experiential learning within a childhood context;

 

 

 

 

 

*

 

 

 

 

Stage 2

 

 

 

Learning outcomes – Knowledge and skills:

CHS

204

CHS

205

CHS284

CHS

244

CHS

283

CHS 268

CHS

266

CHS

264

CHS

269

CHS

267

CHS

270

CHS

265

K1

demonstrate how the family, social, economic, environmental, political and cultural factors influence the construction of childhood

 

*

*

*

 

*

*

*

 

*

*

*

*

K2

describe and critically analyse a range of childhood provision

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

K3

understand and analyse legislation relating to young children and their families;

 

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

S1

search and select information from a range of sources to research and analyse aspects of childhood studies;

 

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

S2

evaluate childhood provision in a knowledgeable and systematic way

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*


Stage 3

 

 

 

Learning outcomes – Knowledge and skills:

CHS302

CHS346

CHS349

CHS350

CHS376

CHS357

CHS382

CHS383

K1

engage in investigation and research in the area of childhood practice and critically evaluate the outcomes

 

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

K2

review cultural and social diversity and inequality in society and evaluate how these are expressed and addressed;

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

S1

demonstrate skills in planning, carrying out and reporting on an independent study.

 

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

S2

plan and carry out a small scale independent research project in the area of Childhood Studies

 

 

 

*

*

 

 

 

 

S3

analyse critically research information and other kinds of evidence;

 

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

 

 

Assessment Criteria at the level of the target award

 

 

Key to abbreviated assessment codes

EX – Exams

OR- Oral Report

R- Report

FWA – Formative written Assignment

FA – Formative Assessment

SWA – Summative Written Assignment

CJ –  Critical Journal

SA – Summative Account

ISF – Studies File

DB – Debated Issue(s)

RL – Reflective Log

 

WA – Written Assignment

SP – Seminar Presentation

WSE Written Seen Exam

P – Presentation

PP – Poster Presentation

GP – Group Presentation

R- Reports

CS – Case Study

TCT – Time Constrained Test

Port – Portfolio

VR – Visual representation

 


Stage 1 – Assessment Criteria

 

Core Modules

 

CHS 144

The Nature and Culture of Childhood

GP pass/fail

WA 100%

CHS 158

Building graduate attributes for the professional and reflective childhood practitioner

Port 100%

CHS 159

Values for the professional childhood practitioner

WA 50%

Port  50%

CHS 162

 

An introduction to child development

CS 10%

WA90%

CHS 163

Child development: theory into practice

 

Port. Pass/fail

WA 100%

CHS

170

Inclusion, Integration, and Exclusion

PP 50%

WA 50%

CHS

171

Building graduate Skills  for the professional and reflective childhood practitioner

Port. 30%

WA 70 %

 

Stage 2 – Assessment Criteria

Code

Module

Assessment weighting

 

Core Modules

 

CHS 204

The Child and the Economic and Social Environment

WA 30%

Port 70%

CHS205

Health and Childhood

P 30%

WSE 70%

CHS284

Researching Childhood

WA 100%

 

 

Strand Modules

 

CHS 244

Developing Learning through Story

GP pass/fail

VR 30%

WA 70%

CHS 283

Resilience, Warfare and Conflict

WA 100%

 

 

CHS 264

Contextualising children’s position within society

R 100%

 

CHS265

Contextualising Family Units and Diversity

VR 100%

CHS 266

The nature of the primary curriculum

 

GP 30%

WA 70%

CHS 267

Local Study Project

GP 50%

WA 50%

CHS 268

The context of young children’s learning and development

WA 100%

 

CHS 269

Play and learning in the early years

P 40%

WA 60%

CHS 270

Observing, assessing and reporting young children’s learning and development

CJ/Port. 100%

 

 


Stage 3 – Assessment Criteria

Code

Module

Assessment weighting

 

Core Modules

 

CHS 302

Child and Family Transitions

 

WA 100%

CHS 346

Equality and Diversity

WA 100%

CHS 350

Childhood Studies Project

WA 100%

CHS383

Leading Practice for Children and Young People

WA 100%

 

Option Modules

 

CHS 376

Effective Teaching and Learning in the Primary Classroon

WA 100%

CHS 357

Supporting Family Units and Protecting Children’s Rights

WA 100%

CHS 383

The First Three Years of Childhood

P 40%

WA 60 %

 


 

 

 

 

SITS SUMMARY PROGRAMME/SHORT COURSE DETAILS

(Form to be completed electronically by the Faculty and  forwarded to the QAE Quality Officer supporting the Approval event, or sent to MISD for faculty devolved processes before sending to QAE)

PROGRAMME/SUBJECT/SHORT COURSE DETAILS

 

Exit Award: Title of programme/award

B. A. (Hon.) Childhood Studies

If replacement for existing, specify title of old

 

Faculty:

Education and Society

Department:

Social Sciences

SITS Programme/Short Course code[4]

 

Programme Studies Board[5]

Childhood Studies

UCAS code[6] (if applicable).  If other please state method.

X310

JACS code[7]

 

Qualification Level / Qualification Aim

 

 

Modes of delivery and duration:

 

Full time       yes 6 years

Sandwich    

Part time     Yes 6 years

Work Based Learning  no

On-campus  yes

Off-campus  no 

CSP Only. Other subject combinations not allowed with this subject:

 

Programme/Subject/Short Course Leader:

Bruce Marjoribanks

Date of Approval /Modification/Review

 

Date of next review (QAE to complete)

 

Start date of programme/Short Course

 

Number of intakes per annum and likely month(s) intake(s) starts.

 

1, September

 

FUNDING DETAILS

 

Confirm funding arrangements for programme e.g. HEFCE/TDA/NHS/Other[8]

HEFCE

If it is TDA, is it primary/secondary/F.E./Other (please state)

 

Is the programme Open or Closed[9]:

Open

 

ACCREDITING BODY

/No

If yes please attach completed form AQH-Ciii2

 

PROGRAMME SPECIFIC REGULATIONS

No

If yes, please attach completed form AQH-B3 Appendix 2 or AQH-B8.

 

COLLABORATIVE:

Please complete details

UK                     No

 

Overseas           no

Institution                                      Collaborative model[10]         Funding arrangements[11]

 

…………………………………………..            ………………………………         ….……………………..

 

…………………………………………..            ………………………………         ………………………..

 

…………………………………………..            ………………………………         …………………………

 

 

  INTERIM AWARD SCHEDULE

 

Interim award title

Credits required

Interim structure

Please show mandatory requirements if applicable e.g. core module codes

Certificate of HE (Childhood Studies) HE Level 1

120

All Level One

 

 

HE Diploma  (Childhood Studies) HE Level 2

120

All Level Two

 

 

B. A. Ordinary Degree

300

60 Credits Level Three

 

 

   DETAILS SUPPLIED BY:………………………………………        DATE:………………………..

 

For QAE  use only:  Circulation list: Quality Assurance & Enhancement (files) MISD (J Ruffell), Admissions  (E Wilson), Recruitment (Les  Brown, Catryn Davies), Student Office (L Dixon), Examinations (B Muldowney), Planning (David Balme) Learning Development Services (Malcolm Creen) Central Timetabling (Lesley Scott)  + for collaborative programmes: SRBP Carole Green/Peter Elliott, marketing (Judith Green)

 

 


Module List

 

Award, Route (if applicable) and Level

New/Existing/ Modified  Module (N/E/MM)

Module Title

Module Code

Module Credit Value

Whether core or option

Must choose (ie designated option):

Pre-/co-requisites

Module leader

Other comment (if required)

Date of Entry on SITS.

N/MM only

( After event)

JACS Code

Stage 1

E

Values for the professional childhood practitioner

CHS 159

20

Core

 

None

Bruce Marjoribanks

 

 

 

Stage 1

E

Nature and culture of childhood

CHS 144

20

Core

 

None

Julian Kranz

 

 

 

Stage 1

E

An introduction to child development

CHS 162

 

20

Core

 

None

Lindey Cookson

 

 

 

Stage 1

E

Child development: theory into practice

 

CHS 163

20

Core

 

None

Gayle Blackburn

 

 

 

Stage 1

N

Inclusion, Integration and Exclusion

CHS

170

20

Core

 

None

Linda Graham

 

 

 

Stage 1

N

Building graduate skills for the professional and reflective childhood practitioner

CHS 171

20

Core

 

None

Linda Graham

 

 

 

Stage 2

E

Child and economic and social environment

CHS

204

 

20

Core

 

None

Bruce Marjoribanks

 

 

 

Stage 2

E

Health and childhood

 

CHS

205

20

Core

 

None

Julian Kranz

 

 

 

Stage 2

E

Researching Childhood

CHS

284

20

Core

 

None

Michael Elsy

 

 

 

Stage 2

E

Developing Learning in the Curriculum through Story

CHS

244

20

Option

YES

None

Julian Kranz

 

 

 

Stage 2

E

The nature of the primary curriculum

 

CHS  266

20

Option

YES

None

Athanasia Chatzifotiou

 

 

 

Stage 2

E

Local Study Project

CHS 267

20

Option

YES

None

Julian Kranz

 

 

 

Stage 2

E

Children and Young People in Global Contexts

CHS

283

20

Option

YES

None

Linda Graham

 

 

 

Stage 2

E

Contextualising children’s position within society

CHS 264

20

Option

YES

None

Julie Ovington

 

 

 

Stage 2

E

Contextualising Family Units and Diversity

CHS 265

 

20

 

YES

None

Julie Ovington

 

 

 

Stage 2

E

The context of young children’s learning and development

CHS 268

20

Option

YES

None

Karen Tait

 

 

 

Stage 2

E

Play and learning in the early years

CHS 269

20

Option

YES

None

Lindey Cookson

 

 

 

Stage 2

E

Observing, assessing and reporting young children’s learning and development

CHS 270

20

Option

YES

None

Gayle Blackburn

 

 

 

Stage 3

E

Child and Family Transitions

 

CHS302

20

Core

 

None

Athanasia Chatzifotiou

 

 

 

Stage 3

E

Equality and diversity

CHS346

 

20

Core

 

None

Bruce Marjoribanks

 

 

 

Stage 3

E

Dissertation/

project

CHS350

 

40

Core

 

None

Athanasia Chatzifotiou

 

 

 

Stage 3

N

Leading Practice for Children and Young People

CHS383

20

Core

 

None

Karen Tait

 

 

 

Stage 3

E

Supporting family units and protecting children’s rights

 

CHS357

20

Option

YES

None

Julie Ovington

 

 

 

Stage 3

E

Effective Teaching and Learning in the Primary Classroom

CHS 376

20

Option

YES

None

Athanasia Chatzifotiou

 

 

 

Stage 3

N

Leading practice in early years care and education

 

CHS 382

20

Option

YES

None

Karen Tait

 

 

 

 

 


[1] 

 

[2] 

 

[3] 

 

[4] To be allocated in consultation with MISD team in SRBP

[5] Programme Studies/Assessment Board that will have management responsibilities for the programme.

[6] Please contact Admissions Manager for code

[7] JACS code = e.g. (V1) History, (G5) Computing Science, etc. for information contact relevant AD

[8] Please confer with David Balme for funding status for programme

[9] An Open programme constitutes an open admissions policy.  A Closed programme is normally specific to one client only.  If in doubt please consult Academic Services or Planning and Finance.

 

[10] As per QAE guidelines

[11] Please contact David Balme for confirmation of funding details