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Programme Specification

 

SECTION A: CORE INFORMATION

  1. Name  of programme

Business and Management (Extended Programme)

Events Management (Extended Programme)

International Tourism and Hospitality Management (Extended Programme)

Tourism Management (Extended Programme)

 

  1. Award title

(a)     BA (Hons)

Business and Management (Extended Programme)

Events Management (Extended Programme)

 

(b)    BSc (Hons)

International Tourism and Hospitality Management (Extended Programme)

Tourism Management (Extended Programme)

 

  1. Programme linkage

Is this part of group of linked programmes between which students can transfer at agreed points?

 

 

 

If yes:

This programme is one of a group of related programmes which also includes (add titles):

 

BA (Hons) Business and Applied Management

BA (Hons) Business and Marketing Management

BA (Hons) Business and Applied Marketing Management

BA (Hons) Business and Financial Management

BA (Hons) Business and Applied Financial Management

BA Hons Business and Human Resources Management

BA Hons Business and Applied Human Resources Management

BA (Hons) Events Management (with Placement)

BSc (Hons) International Tourism and Hospitality Management (with Placement)

BSc (Hons) Tourism Management (with Placement)

 

It is possible to transfer between these programmes at certain points. This may be subject to particular requirements.

 

  1. Is the programme a top-up only?

 

 

 

  1. Does the programme have a Foundation Year (level 3) associated with it so that students enter for a four-year programme and progress directly from the Foundation Year to Stage 1 without having to re-apply?

 

 

 

If yes:

You can take a Foundation Year (level 3) as an integral part of this programme of study. For details of the Foundation Year see the programme specification for Extended Business and Management, Extended Events Management, Extended International Tourism and Hospitality Management and Extended Tourism Management.

 

  1. Level of award (eg Level 6 for BA/BSc)

 

 

 

  1. Awarding body:

University of Sunderland

 

  1. Which department is it in?

a)       Business (for Business and Management)

b)       Tourism Hospitality and Events (for Events Management, International Tourism and Hospitality Management and Tourism Management)

 

  1. Programme Studies Board?

a)       Undergraduate Business and Management (for Business and Management)

b)       Undergraduate Tourism Hospitality and Events (for Events Management, International Tourism and Hospitality Management and Tourism Management)

 

  1. Programme Leader

Kevin Gallagher

 

  1. How and where can I study the programme?

 

At Sunderland:

X

Full-time on campus

X

Part-time on campus

 

As work-based learning full-time

 

As work-based learning part-time

 

As a full-time sandwich course

 

As a part-time sandwich course

 

By distance learning

 

 

  1. How long does the programme take?

 

 

Min number of years / months

Max number of years/ months

Full-time

4

12

Part-time

 

 

Distance learning

 

 

Work-based learning

 

 

 

For start-dates please see the current edition of the Prospectus or contact the relevant department at the University. For start-dates for programmes delivered in a partner college, please contact the college.

 

 

SECTION B – FURTHER CORE INFORMATION 

Use Outline Programme Proposal Form for ADC (AQH-B2-2), for questions 13 to 25

 

  1. Learning and teaching strategy.

The underlying pedagogy of the programme with its emphasis on learning by doing, reflective practice and personal development is described more fully in the Programme Specification for the validated 3 year and 4 year programmes (as listed in sections 1 and 3), It is considered crucial to the 4 year extended programme that right from the outset you are supported to develop the skills of enquiry, reflection and self-evaluation that this requires. 

 

The Level 3 year is full time and of 30 weeks duration. It commences with a one week induction period of activities to introduce you to the University and its facilities.

 

The main tuition is organised into two 15 week semesters usually with a reading week in between each semester. For most of the year it is usual for there to be at least one complete day a week when no formal lectures, seminars or tutorials are organised. These days have been designed to allow for personal tutoring, self directed private study, visits and extra curricular activity.

 

All Level 3 modules are core to provide a common platform for progression onto level 4 of the Faculty’s Business and Management, Events Management, International Tourism and Hospitality Management and Tourism Management programmes.  20 credits is equivalent to 200 hours of total study time with average contact time being not less than 48 hours. Contact time will be front loaded, however, so that you receive more contact during Semester 1 than Semester 2. This is to recognise the fact that at the start of Semester 1 you may need additional support to help you reach the independence normally required of a level 4 student.

 

Recognising that you may need additional support to develop the necessary skills required at Level 4, we have built in two modules, ”Higher Education Skills and Competencies”  and  “Introduction to Critical Academic Thinking” which are designed to assist you to make the transition from Further Education to the more independent learning style required at Level 4. A further two modules at Level 3, “Contemporary Business Issues in a Globalised Environment” and the “Business Management Project” will provide further opportunities for you to apply these skills actively in a broad business context. The remaining modules at Level 3 introduce you to some of the basic business and management concepts which you will study in greater depth at Levels 4 – 6.

 

You will be introduced to and engage with a research active curriculum throughout the four year programme. By research active we mean that the curriculum is supported by research undertaken by our academic staff (see paragraph 35) and also that we seek to foster a spirit of inquiry which encourages you to develop your own independent research skills. An example of this is the core Stage 2/Level 5 module,  “Developing Career Prospects”, which extends the theory and practice of personal development planning, by encouraging you to explore how you fit into the world of employment and to investigate work environments, job roles and cultures which are compatible with your own needs and abilities.

 

You will be supported in your studies by your personal tutor who will encourage you to set academic and personal goals for your first year, and to explore strategies to pursue these. Your personal tutor will help you to review both your plans and your short and long-term aims in relation to learning and careers, as appropriate to your needs and the stage of your course. These discussions will take place within the context of your programme and the value added opportunities available.

 

Throughout the extended programme, we recognise the diverse range of abilities of our students and seek to offer you the opportunity to demonstrate that you have achieved the learning outcomes at each level in a variety of ways, suited to your individual learning needs and style. These include some written essays, but also learning logs, professional development plans, exhibition posters, presentations, case studies, and reports.

 

Entrants to Level 3 have particular needs and both the content and the teaching and learning methods have been devised to lead to the development of:-

a)Interest and enjoyment of study in previously unfamiliar disciplines

b)Systematic study habits

c)The ability and confidence to participate in group projects

d)Effective communication skills in oral, written and diagrammatic forms.

e)The ability to collect and analyse information from a variety of sources including literature, oral presentations and experimentation

f)Confidence in dealing with complex ideas and theories and their application into the real world of business

g)Awareness of the roles of computers in supporting business and confidence in their use in a range of disciplines

h)  The ability to give and receive feedback

 

By using this approach the special requirements of Level 3 students are properly covered. This combination of support to develop independent learning skills, introduction of core content and the fostering of a spirit of challenge and inquiry from the start will mean that if you take the extended programme you will be able to progress seamlessly to level 4 having been well prepared from the beginning.

 

  1. Retention strategy

Please see Para 42.

 

The combination of personal tutoring, academic advisor support, and guidance by programme and module leaders should ensure students on the extended programme feel highly supported, thereby increasing retention.

 

  1. Any other information

 

 

SECTION C - TEACHING AND LEARNING

 

  1. What is the programme about?

The aim of Level 3 of the extended programme is to prepare you for higher education and Level 4 of the 3 and 4 Year BA (Hons) Business and Management, BA (Hons) Events Management, BSc (Hons) International Tourism and Hospitality Management and BSc (Hons) Tourism Management programmes (as listed in section 1 and 3). All other learning outcomes at levels 4-6 are identical to the learning outcomes for the 3 and 4 year programmes (as listed in section 1 and 3). With this in mind, the learning outcomes at Level 3 are essentially synonymous with Key Skills 1-6. The key skills are taught and developed throughout Level 3 of the programme in a contextual setting suitable for the progression route. Therefore, the overall learning aims for Level 3 are for you:

  • To be equipped with the basic knowledge and understanding of fundamental principles of business and
  • To be enabled to successfully make the transition to level 4 of the programmes listed above by developing Key Skills (KS) 1-6

 

  1. What will I know or be able to do at each Stage of the programme?

 

Learning Outcomes Stage 0 – Skills  

By the end of this Stage of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

S1: Carry out independent research and analytical thinking

S2: Collect, manipulate and report data to assist decision making

S3: Prepare evaluative management reports and give business advice on a range of

functional and management problems  

S4: Demonstrate basic organisational skills of business communication and teamwork 

 

These skills are synonymous with the key skills 1-6 i.e.

  • Ks1 communication: be able to present complex issues in a variety of ways including oral, written and visual means of communication.
  • Ks2 manage and develop own self: should have demonstrated a commitment to learning and self motivation, and should be able to identify objectives and deadlines.
  • Ks3 team working: be able to participate effectively in joint discussion, decision making, planning, allocation and production of work, setting objectives, providing and responding to peer feedback.
  • Ks4 it: including use of word processing and other it packages appropriate to the subjects being studied, students should also be able to communicate using e-mail, and should be familiar with internet usage.
  • Ks5 numeracy: be able to apply basic levels of numeracy, though many will achieve a much higher level depending upon subjects being studied.
  • Ks6 handle information: should be able to identify and use appropriate information sources, gather appropriate material, sort, collate, abstract and summarize information, and use it appropriately.

 

Learning Outcomes Stage 0 – Knowledge

By the end of this Stage of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

 

K1Demonstrate an understanding of and be able to explain the complex global political, social and environmental factors influencing the business world and its organisational responses to these factors

K2  Understand and deploy knowledge of IT in a business and management context

K3   Understand and evaluate the various contemporary functions of business and management in a contemporary context

K4  Know how to manage a project derived from independent research in the business and management context

 

Learning Outcomes Stage 1 – Skills

By the end of this Stage of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

See Stage 1 Learning Outcomes for 3 and 4 year BA (Hons) Business and Management, BA (Hons) Events Management, BSc (Hons) International Tourism and Hospitality Management and BSc (Hons) Tourism Management programmes (as listed in section 1 and 3).

 

Learning Outcomes Stage 1 – Knowledge

By the end of this Stage of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

See Stage 1 Learning Outcomes for 3 and 4 year BA (Hons) Business and Management, BA (Hons) Events Management, BSc (Hons) International Tourism and Hospitality Management and BSc (Hons) Tourism Management programmes (as listed in section 1 and 3).

 

Learning Outcomes Stage 2 – Skills

By the end of this Stage of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

See Stage 2 Learning Outcomes for 3 and 4 year BA (Hons) Business and Management, BA (Hons) Events Management, BSc (Hons) International Tourism and Hospitality Management and BSc (Hons) Tourism Management programmes (as listed in section 1 and 3).

 

Learning Outcomes Stage 2 – Knowledge

By the end of this Stage of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

See Stage 2 Learning Outcomes for 3 and 4 year BA (Hons) Business and Management, BA (Hons) Events Management, BSc (Hons) International Tourism and Hospitality Management and BSc (Hons) Tourism Management programmes (as listed in section 1 and 3).

 

Learning Outcomes Stage 3 – Skills

By the end of this Stage of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

See Stage 3 Learning Outcomes for 3 and 4 year BA (Hons) Business and Management, BA (Hons) Events Management, BSc (Hons) International Tourism and Hospitality Management and BSc (Hons) Tourism Management programmes (as listed at para1 and 3).

 

Learning Outcomes Stage 3 – Knowledge

By the end of this Stage of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

See Stage 3 Learning Outcomes for 3 and 4 year BA (Hons) Business and Management, BA (Hons) Events Management, BSc (Hons) International Tourism and Hospitality Management and BSc (Hons) Tourism Management programmes (as listed at para1 and 3).

 

Learning Outcomes – Ordinary degree

If you are awarded an Ordinary degree you will have achieved the majority of the learning outcomes for the programme studied. However you will have gained fewer credits at Stage 3 than students awarded an Honours degree, your knowledge will typically be less broad and you will typically be less proficient in higher-level skills such as independent learning.

 

  1. What will the programme consist of?

Each undergraduate programme consists of a number of Stages from a minimum of 1 to a maximum of 4, each of which is equivalent to a year’s full-time study. The summary below describes briefly what is contained in each Stage. Most programmes have a mixture of core (i.e. compulsory) modules and optional ones, often with increasing choice as you move through the programme and gain in experience. In some programmes the choice of optional modules gives you particular ‘routes’ through the programme. The programme structure including a detailed list of modules can be found in the programme regulations.

 

  1. Stage 0 Programme Structure and Content

Semester 1: September - January

Level

Code

Title

Credits

3

UGB003

Higher Education Skills and Competencies

10

3

UGB005

Contemporary Business Issues in a Globalised Environment

30

3

UGB004

Information Technology for Business Use

10

UGB006

Introduction to Critical Academic  Thinking

10

Semester 2: February - June

Level

Code

Title

Credits

3

UGB007

Organisational Behaviour and the Management of People

20

3

UGB008

Introduction to Organisational Management

20

3

UGB009

Business Management Project

20

 

 

  1. Stage 1

Same as Stage 1 for 3 and 4 year BA (Hons) Business and Management, BA (Hons) Events Management, BSc (Hons) International Tourism and Hospitality Management and BSc (Hons) Tourism Management programmes (as listed in section 1 and 3).

 

  1. Stage 2

Same as Stage 2 for 3 and 4 year BA (Hons) Business and Management, BA (Hons) Events Management, BSc (Hons) International Tourism and Hospitality Management and BSc (Hons) Tourism Management programmes (as listed in section 1 and 3).

 

  1. Stage 3/4

Same as Stage 3/4 for 3 and 4 year BA (Hons) Business and Management, BA (Hons) Events Management, BSc (Hons) International Tourism and Hospitality Management and BSc (Hons) Tourism Management programmes (as listed in section 1 and 3).

 

  1. Generic Skills

Alongside the discipline-specific knowledge and skills that the curriculum covers, you will develop generic skills, such as initiative, time-management, group work and critical reflection. These elements are interwoven throughout the course, during student meetings and peer assessed group work exercises. The modules draw on a blended learning approach where you will be asked to engage in aspects of online learning through the University’s virtual learning environment, Sunspace, as well as to engage in on campus lectures and seminars. 

 

The term Blended Learning covers the diversity of teaching and learning approaches  designed to impart knowledge, to encourage understanding and to provide opportunity for the application of that knowledge to actual or hypothetical situations. It is also intended to foster enthusiasm within the student body. All modules will employ to varying degrees the following features:

 

Knowledge transfer : although this will vary from module to module, and indeed from tutor to tutor, all modules will take advantage of the opportunity for the tutor to explain to the whole class, a concept, to take questions, to outline areas of knowledge, indicate methods of tackling a problem and demonstrate methods of analysis and synthesis of materials. Audio-visual aids will be used as appropriate, such as the use of ‘PowerPoint ‘and digital media. Key points will normally be outlined in handouts.

 

Interactive sessions: whether during seminars or whole group teaching sessions, students will be expected in the course of all modules to interact with each other and/or with the tutor to develop ideas, work on tasks, practice skills or explain material.

 

Research: During induction and the programme in general, students will be introduced to research techniques. The induction programme contains activities which introduce students to the library (including practical exercises) and to the available electronic sources of information e.g. Discover; My Module Resources etc. All modules, throughout the Programme, require students to engage in the research of both primary and secondary sources of management information. The level and depth of research required for the completion of modules will then increase as the student progresses throughout their Programme culminating in the final year of study.

 

Directed Private Study: This will include reading, preparation for class or for assessment, group activity, revision, and carrying out assessment work. All module guides will provide students with advice in respect of this, and as a minimum will provide details of required reading (for preparation of timetabled sessions and/or for the completion of assessments).

 

Self reflection and skills diagnostics: students will be introduced to a range of capability and competence diagnostics and will become skilled in self and peer reflection and personal planning through the support of coaching style support.  Students will be skilled and confident in developing independent thinking.

 

Whilst these methods will form the backbone of much of the teaching and learning strategy, the programme will utilize a much wider, more eclectic combination of approaches.

 

Case studies are extremely common throughout the Programme and are intended to enable students to develop, inter alia, the ability to;

  • Identify the issues in need of research;
  • Apply subject specific knowledge to a realistic and/or practical context;
  • Make critical judgments of the merits of a particular argument; and
  • Present and make reasoned choices between alternative solutions.

 

This approach is designed to enable you to develop as an independent learner which is a competency which needs to be demonstrated throughout the Degree programme.

 

  1. How will I be taught?

Scheduled teaching activities

x

Independent study

x

Placement

 

 

The teaching methods at level 3 (and indeed at level 4 and beyond) are designed to support students to make the step from School and College into a higher education environment (or alternatively to support students who are wishing to engage in HE as a mature entrant) but who have not yet met the standard entry requirements of the 3 and 4 year BA (Hons) Business and Management, BA (Hons) Events Management, BSc (Hons) International Tourism and Hospitality Management and BSc (Hons) Tourism Management programmes (as listed in section 1 and 3).

 

As a result both the teaching methodology and the modules studied at Level 3 are designed to equip you with both the basic level of knowledge and understanding of business and related issues required, and to enhance your thinking and communication skills.

 

Teaching and learning time is divided between lectures and seminars or workshops/tutorials. In addition to lectures and tutorials, there will be activities directed at further developing self learning skills including practical, individual and group projects and use of the virtual learning environment. In some modules you are expected to present seminars based on individual and team studies.

 

Entrants to Level 3 have particular needs and both the content and the teaching and learning methods have been devised to lead to the development of:-

a)Interest and enjoyment of study in previously unfamiliar disciplines.

b)Systematic study habits.

c)Ability and confidence to participate in group projects.

d)Effective communication skills in oral, written and diagrammatic forms.

e)Ability to collect and analyse information from a variety of sources including literature, oral presentations and experimentation.

f)Confidence in dealing with complex ideas and theories and their application into the real world of business.

g)Awareness of the roles of computers in supporting business and confidence in their use in a range of disciplines

h)  Enhanced communication skills: the ability to give and receive feedback, and develop their written and verbal communications.

By using this approach the special requirements of these students are properly covered.

 

In addition to the timetabled contact time, you are expected and encouraged to undertake self-managed study periods which include directed reading and preparation for assessments. Each individual module descriptor explains how much time could be expected for this activity. This will depend upon the nature of the subject and the mode of teaching, but as stated in para 26 above there will be more direct contact time at the start of level 3 than at the end to reflect the need for closer direction at the start of the programme. Student centred learning materials are used to support the taught elements of each module. Throughout Level 3 you will be taught study and communication skills to help you to achieve maximum benefit in all self learning activities. These continue to be enhanced through specific modules at Level 4 and beyond. The Faculty will use various opportunities such as employer visits and business speakers to expand your wider awareness of the business and management world. Your understanding of taught and self learned material is supported and informed by practical experience in workshops and seminars.

 

A list of the modules in each Stage of the programme can be found in the Programme Regulations.

A summary of the types of teaching, learning and assessment in each module of the programme can be found in the Matrix of Modes of Teaching.

 

  1. How will I be assessed and given feedback? 

The assessment strategy is in line with University policy. A wide variety of assessment methods will be used at Level 3 and throughout the programme including essays, mini-projects, oral presentations, data analyses, and portfolios.  In particular, assessments are designed to be fit for a particular purpose and so assess the development of skills and understanding of knowledge as outlined in the module descriptors

Written examinations

x

Coursework

x

Practical assessments

x

 

A summary of the types of teaching, learning and assessment in each module of the programme can be found in the Matrix of Modes of Teaching.

 

The generic assessment criteria which we use can be found here. Some programmes use subject-specific assessment criteria which are based on the generic ones.

 

This programme uses the Generic University Assessment Criteria

YES

 

This programme uses the Subject Specific Assessment Criteria

 

NO

 

The University regulations can be found here.

 


  1. Teaching, learning and assessment matrix

 

Matrix of Modes of Teaching, Learning and Assessment and Assessment of Learning Outcomes: Stage 0 (for Stages 1-3/4 See Programme Specification for 3 and 4 year BA (Hons) Business and Management, BA (Hons) Events Management, BSc (Hons) International Tourism and Hospitality Management and BSc (Hons) Tourism Management programmes (as listed in section 1 and 3)

 

 

Module

Code

Core / Optional

Modes of T&L

Modes of Assessment

LO

S1

LO

S2

LO

S3

LO

S4

LO

K1

LO

K2

LO

K3

LO

K4

Higher Education Skills and Competencies

UGB003

Core

Lecture, seminar/ workshop, online learning/VLE private study,

Reflective Report

TDA

TDA

 

TDA

 

TDA

 

 

Contemporary Business Issues in a Globalised Environment

UGB005

Core

Lectures, seminar/  workshop online learning/VLE private study

Report and Reflective Log

 

TDA

TDA

TDA

TDA

TDA

TDA

TDA

TDA

Information Technology for Business Use

UGB004

Core

Lectures, seminar/  workshop, online learning/VLE private study

Portfolio / Coursework

TDA

TDA

 

TDA

 

TDA

 

 

Introduction to Critical Academic Thinking

UGB006

Core

Lectures, seminar/ workshop, online learning/VLE private study

Coursework

TDA

TDA

TDA

TDA

 

TDA

 

TDA

Organisational Behaviour and the Management of People

UGB007

Core

Lectures, seminar/ workshop, online learning/VLE private study

Portfolio / Coursework

TDA

TDA

TDA

TDA

TDA

TDA

TDA

TDA

Introduction to Organisational Management 

UGB008

Core

Lectures, seminar/ workshop, online learning/VLE private study,

Report and Presentation

TDA

TDA

TDA

TDA

TDA

TDA

TDA

TDA

Business Management Project

UGB009

Core

Lectures, seminar/  workshop, online learning/VLE private study,

Management Project Report

TDA

TDA

TDA

TDA

TDA

TDA

TDA

TDA

 

 

 



 

  1. How does research influence the programme? 

Academics teaching on the programme are all research active and many contribute to the International Centre for Research into Innovation, Sustainability and Entrepreneurship (RISE), which is the research centre of the Faculty of Business and Law. RISE has five research clusters in Leadership and Professional Practice, Enterprise, Tourism, Law and Marketing. The research active curriculum is central to the University and Faculty Learning and Teaching Plan which aims to help students become actively engaged in current debates and leading edge research as part of their curriculum. The research produced by RISE feeds directly into the teaching of business and tourism and research informed teaching is key to the success of the programmes.  The expertise within RISE feeds directly into module teaching and learning on the business and tourism programmes. For example, the Head of the Enterprise research cluster has written an article on innovation in a knowledge-based economy for the Institute of Directors: ‘Core competence of a firm and its role in a firm’s growth process: Some implications for the SMEs’ growth and for regional innovation policy.’ (Seddighi, 2014). The Leadership and Professional practice cluster team has produced research on team working and storytelling in the NHS and the police service: ‘Dealing with the Hidden Side of Organisational Life:  Supporting NHS Teams and Clinicians in Difficulty’ (Sanders G and Craig M, 2013), British Academy of Management Conference; ‘The Use of Storytelling as a Research Method:  The Case of the Police Service of England and Wales’ (Lawson R, Shaw G, Sanders G, and Smith P, 2013) ECRM Annual Conference, Guimares, Portugal.  The Head of the Tourism cluster has published on decolonisation issues relating to tourism; ‘Tourism and decolonisation; locating research and self’ (Chambers D and Buzinde, 2015) Annals of Tourism Research. This work is a good indicator of academics within the faculty being proactive as producers of knowledge providing a model for the students and ensuring that the curriculum is vibrant and current.

 

 

SECTION D EMPLOYABILITY

 

  1. How will the programme prepare me for employment?

The programme gives you the opportunity to develop skills which you can use in the future. Some skills are more specific than others to the subject area, or to a particular type of activity, but all skills can be applied in a range of employment situations, sometimes in quite unexpected ways. The skills which this programme is designed to develop are listed below.

 

Employability is embedded throughout the programme and as core modules at all levels. The programme is informed both explicitly and implicitly by the needs of employers and the expectations they have of the graduates that they recruit. Thus the modules you study are set wherever possible in a real life business context and you will work on many case studies and examples from business. To ensure currency and relevance, a Faculty Advisory Panel meets twice yearly to provide insight into business sectors. The Panel is made up of representatives from businesses such as Gentoo and Northumbrian Water, the public sector such as the NHS North East Leadership Academy, and business network representatives such as the Entrepreneurs Forum. The information obtained is used to inform our strategy and what is delivered in your curriculum.  Many of our teaching staff are active members of relevant professional associations such as CIPD or CIM. In addition many of your assessments throughout the programme will ask you to produce a piece of work (a report or a presentation, for example) which mirrors the sort of task you might be required to deliver in a work context. The employability agenda is also explicitly addressed through specific employability modules including at level 3 “Higher Education Skills and Competencies” (which starts the process of encouraging you to devise plans and goals and to think about your higher education and employment choices.)

 

There are also opportunities for on-campus students outside the programme of study

  • You will have access to support from the Careers and Employability Service and the wider Sunderland Futures provision including opportunities to:
    • Gain experience and develop skills through paid internships, student jobs, volunteering and the student ambassador scheme
    • Benefit from the expertise and support of experienced professionals through professional mentoring
    • Experience life and study in another country and culture through student exchanges
    • Participate in Leading Lights, a specialist training programme to develop leadership skills
    • Use careers guidance to reflect on how your skills and experiences relate to career choices.
    • Explore the graduate job market through employer presentations, an annual graduate recruitment fair and access to Opportunities Online, the Careers and Employability Service’s online vacancy service.
    • Explore starting a business through support from the Enterprise Place.
    • Prepare to articulate your skills and experiences convincingly in applications and at interviews through CV/application coaching and interview coaching.
    • Gain recognition for your achievements and skills through the Sunderland Professional Award.
  • Participation and involvement in the student led Business Society
  • A Guest Speaker Programme –speakers from regional, national and international businesses (e.g. Mike Johnson, Former CEO of Castrol BP; Neil Stephenson, CEO of Onyx; Maurice Duffy, CEO Black swan Consultancy). Each year a theme is selected around which speakers are asked to base their talks. This year’s theme is “The opportunities and challenges of Social Enterprise”.

 

For information about other opportunities available to our students who study on campus, click here. Additional opportunities to develop your experiences more widely will vary if you study at one of our partner colleges. For information about the extra-curricular activities available in any of our colleges please contact the college direct. 

 

  1. Particular features of the qualification (optional)

 

  1. Professional statutory or regulatory body (PSRB) accreditation

Although the students on the BA (Hons) Business and Management (extended programme) may choose to specialise at levels 5 and 6 of the Business and Management programme they will not do so at level 3. The programme is designed at level 3 to develop and improve the academic performance of the students to enable them to progress to level 4.  Level 4 of the programme has been designed to introduce the students to the field of business and management, in a very generic way.  It is hoped that this will allow them to consider various routes and possible career choices which would influence their options at level 5 and 6.  It is at levels 5 and 6 that the students can choose to specialise and become student members of relevant professional bodies.  At present students who choose to specialise in human resource management, for example, would be encouraged to join the CIPD as a student member.  If they successfully complete this route they will be able to become associate members of the CIPD which is the first stage in the professional membership of the Institute.  Once students have this and have gained employment in the field of HRM then they can progress through the various professional levels of membership.  The programme also allows students to specialise in marketing.  If students successfully complete the programme by choosing to specialise in marketing and complete a placement year they will be given exemption from the Chartered Institute of Marketing’s first two levels of study and certain modules at the professional Diploma level.

 

This does not apply to the BA (Hons) Events Management, BSc (Hons) International Tourism and Hospitality Management and BSc (Hons) Tourism Management programmes.

 

PSRB accreditation is not relevant to this programme 

X

PSRB accreditation is currently being sought for this programme

 

This programme currently has PSRB accreditation

 

 

 

SECTION E PROGRAMME STRUCTURE AND REGULATIONS

Use Programme Regulations Form, for questions 39 and 40

 

 

SECTION F ADMISSIONS, LEARNING ENVIRONMENT AND SUPPORT

 

  1. What are the admissions requirements?

The University’s standard admissions requirements can be found in the university regulations

 

The University’s standard admissions requirements will apply.

 

This programme is for students who typically narrowly fail to meet the normal entry requirements of the 3 and 4 year BA (Hons) Business and Management, BA (Hons) Events Management, BSc (Hons) International Tourism and Hospitality Management and BSc (Hons) Tourism Management programmes (as listed in section 1 and 3).

 

If English is not your first language, please see our English language requirements.

 

Normally, the minimum entry requirement for the Extended 4 year programme will be 180 points on the UCAS tariff. 

 

Non-standard entry will be considered according to the University regulation A1.1.4 which states:

 

Applicants to Extended Programmes (Level 3)

Level 3 programmes are intended for those students who may not have the academic qualifications to enter a degree programme but may have relevant life experience or vocational training and who, after interview with the appropriate admissions tutor, display a likelihood of success”.

 

All applicants must have secured a minimum Grade C in both GCSE Maths and English or their equivalents in order to progress from Stage 1 to Stage 2 of the programme. All non-standard applicants will be interviewed.

 

Entry from a University of Sunderland Foundation Year

 

Can students enter with advanced standing?

 

No

 

Other:

The University has a process by which applicants whose experience to date already covers one or more modules of the programme they are applying for may seek Accreditation of Prior Learning (APL). Full details can be found here but if you think that this may be relevant to you, please contact the department which offers the programme you are interested in.

 

  1. What kind of support and help will there be?
    1. In the department: describe the student support in place in the department/ faculty

There are a wide range of support mechanisms which are in place for students throughout this programme. For example, there is a formal personal tutoring system which offers organised one to one sessions together with a number of small group meetings throughout the year.  Personal tutors are allocated in the first few weeks of the programme. This system runs alongside as well as being integrated with the role of the programme, stage and module leaders who are available to respond to students’ personal and academic concerns.  It is useful to highlight that as well as providing a programme leader each of the 4 stages is also allocated a leader.  This is an individual who will be able to build up a solid and supportive relationship with the students on a more personal basis as they will rotate with the stage.  For example, wherever possible, the stage 1 leader will move to stage 2 leader, then to stage 3 and to stage 4 as the students progress through the University.  The team believes this is a more effective way of building a supportive relationship with the students and enhances their student experience and ultimately their level of achievement.

 

If one of the members of staff highlighted above is unable to offer the appropriate support then the students can be directed to more specialised members of staff ranging from student academic advisors to the student support services.  The student support service offers a number of specialised staff who can offer services such as counselling and financial advice together with access to spiritual guidance.  The University also provides an excellent disability and learning support mechanism. 

 

As well as our academic teaching team the Faculty provides a robust student academic support team, the student academic advisors. These work closely with programme and module leaders to ensure students are offered the support they need to make the transition successfully to higher education learners.  This is also reinforced by specialist librarian staff who offer support and advice on the use of the library, online services such My Module resources, on-line journal resources and in locating appropriate books. Each module is also supported by a virtual learning platform which provides every student with a way of access to module information such as lecture slides, workshop material, assessment information and in some instances links to academic sources and web pages. A more formal outline of the responsibilities of some of these support mechanisms are outlined below:

 

Programme Leader: The Programme Leader’s responsibilities regarding student support, guidance and progression include:

  1. Advising you on which staff in the University will provide support and guidance on issues of a non-academic nature;
  2. Receiving and acting on feedback from staff/ student liaison committee meetings;
  3. Developing and implementing solutions to issues raised at staff/ student liaison meetings;
  4. Providing responses to any general queries you may have about your programme.

 

Module Leaders: Module leaders provide advice and guidance on academic issues specific to the module(s) they are responsible for. Examples of such advice and guidance include clarifying what is expected in assignments and the nature and extent of work to be undertaken as part of your self-directed studies between workshops.  

 

Module Tutors: These individuals will help, guide and advise you in the selection, research and compilation of the assignments and aid you in learning.

 

Personal Tutor: You will be allocated a personal tutor who will provide you with support in accordance with the University’s Tutorial Support Policy. The personal tutor will meet you at identified times in the academic year, and outside these in response to informal requests. These meetings are primarily concerned with ensuring that you have all of the information necessary to follow your programme and gain the most from it. The tutor makes referrals to other services to deal with personal or academic problems, and is available to support you with your course, to provide feedback/feedforward and to respond to particular concerns. The personal tutor is a source of personal, employability and academic support. The personal tutor and the programme leader will work closely with Sunderland Futures to ensure that career guidance is an integral part of the programme at each Stage. 

 

Student Academic Advisors: Students at the Faculty of Business and Law have access to three full-time Student Academic Advisors. The Student Academic Advisors provide a programme of study skills workshops using interactive and reflective approaches to develop key academic skills, embedded where possible within the business, tourism and law environments. In addition one to one support and guidance, building on from the workshops is available

 

  1. in the university as a whole:

The University provides a range of professional support services including health and well-being, counselling, disability support, and a Chaplaincy. Click on the links for further information.

 

  1. What resources will I have access to?

 

On campus

x

In a partner college

 

By distance learning

 

 

On campus

Tick all that apply

General Teaching and Learning Space

x

IT

x

Library

x

VLE

x

Laboratory

 

Studio

 

Performance space

 

Other specialist

 

Technical resources 

x

 

Detail as to the resources available to students on this programme are set out in more detail in the Programme Specifications for the 3 and 4 year BA (Hons) Business and Management, BA (Hons) Events Management, BSc (Hons) International Tourism and Hospitality Management and BSc (Hons) Tourism Management programmes (as listed in section 1 and 3).

 

Information about the University’s facilities can be found here.

 

 

  1. Are there any additional costs on top of the fees?

 

No, but all students buy some study materials such as books and provide their own basic study materials.

X

(Business)

Yes (optional) All students buy some study materials such as books and provide their own basic study materials. In addition there are some are additional costs for optional activities associated with the programme (see below)

There is an additional cost to students on the Events Management and Tourism Management programmes if they choose the optional fieldwork modules. At stage two of the programmes an optional European field visit costs in the region of £350. Students from any of the tourism or events management programmes listed can also opt to do an optional International field visit which costs in the region of £850.

X

(Tourism)

Yes (essential) All students buy some study materials such as books and provide their own basic study materials. In addition there are some are essential additional costs associated with the programme (see below)

 

 

  1. How are student views represented?

All taught programmes in the University have student representatives for each Stage (year-group) of each programme who meet in a Student-Staff Liaison Committee (SSLC) where they can raise students’ views and concerns. The Students’ Union and the faculties together provide training for student representatives. SSLCs and focus groups are also used to obtain student feedback on plans for developing existing programmes and designing new ones. Feedback on the programme is obtained every year through module questionnaires and informs the annual review of the programme. Student representatives are also invited to attend Programme and Module Studies Boards which manage the delivery and development of programmes and modules.  Various Faculty committees, particularly Faculty Academic Experience Committee, Academic Development Committee and Quality Management Sub-Committee also have student representation. This allows students to be involved in higher-level plans for teaching and learning. There is a parallel structure at university level on which students are represented by sabbatical officers who are the elected leaders of the Students’ Union.  The University’s student representation and feedback policy can be found here. Final-year students are also invited to complete a National Student Survey (NSS) which asks a standard set of questions across the whole country. The results of this are discussed at Programme Studies Boards and at Faculty Academic Experience Committee to identify good practice which can be shared and problems which need to be addressed. We rely heavily on student input to interpret the results of the NSS and ensure that we make the most appropriate changes.

 

Within the Faculty there is extensive use of Sunspace and all modules have a presence.  Through Sunspace you have access to module handbooks, module resources, copies of lecture slides and live synchronous discussion groups. Most assignments, where possible, are handed in through “Turnitin”. 

 

Tutors are encouraged to operate an open door policy and where this occurs you are able to drop in to see them on an ad hoc basis. In other cases you will be able to make an appointment at a mutually convenient time. Tutors will also often respond to emails outside of normal working hours.

 

 

SECTION G QUALITY MANAGEMENT 

 

  1. National subject benchmarks

The Quality Assurance Agency for Higher Education publishes benchmark statements which give guidance as to the skills and knowledge which graduates in various subjects and in certain types of degree are expected to have. These can be found here.

 

Are there any benchmark statements for this programme?

YES

 

 

The subject benchmark(s) for this programme is/are:

 

Business & Management Benchmark Statement 2015:

http://www.qaa.ac.uk/en/Publications/Documents/SBS-business-management-15.pdf

 

Hospitality, leisure, sport, tourism Benchmark Statement 2008: http://www.qaa.ac.uk/en/Publications/Documents/Subject-benchmark-statement-Hospitality-leisure-sport-tourism-2008.pdf

 

The QAA also publishes a Framework for Higher Education Qualifications (FHEQ) which defines the generic skills and abilities expected of students who have achieved awards at a given level and with which our programmes align. The FHEQ can be found here.

 

  1. How are the quality and standards of the programme assured?

The programme is managed and quality assured through the University’s standard processes. Programmes are overseen by Module and Programme Studies Boards which include student representatives. Each year each module leader provides a brief report on the delivery of the module, identifying strengths and areas for development, and the programme team reviews the programme as a whole.  The purpose of this is to ensure that the programme is coherent and up-to-date, with suitable progression from one Stage to another, and a good fit (alignment)  between what is taught and how students learn and are assessed - the learning outcomes, content and types of teaching, learning and assessment. Student achievement, including progress between Stages of the programme and degree classification, is kept under review. The programme review report is sent to the Faculty Quality Management Sub-Committee which in turn reports issues to the University’s Quality Management Sub-Committee (QMSC) and Academic Experience Committee (AEC).

 

External examiners are appointed to oversee and advise on the assessment of the programme. They ensure that the standards of the programme are comparable with those of similar programmes elsewhere in the UK and are also involved in the assessment process to make sure that it is fair. They are invited to comment on proposed developments to the programme. Their reports are sent to the Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Academic) as well as to the Faculty so that issues of concern can be addressed.

 

All programmes are reviewed by the University on a six-yearly cycle to identify good practice and areas for enhancement. Programmes are revalidated through this review process. These reviews include at least one academic specialist in the subject area concerned from another UK university. The University is subject to external review by the Quality Assurance Agency for Higher Education on a six-year cycle. Their review reports for Sunderland can be found here. Further information about our quality processes can be found here.