Attachments

 

 

Quality Handbook

 

 

 

SECTION A:CORE INFORMATION

 

  1.  

Name of programme:

Psychology

  1.  

Award titles:

BSc Honours Psychology

BSc Honours Psychology with Clinical Skills

BSc Honours Psychology with Counselling

BSc Honours Forensic Psychology

BSc Honours Psychology with Health and Wellbeing

 

  1.  

Programme linkage:

 

Is this part of group of linked programmes between which students can transfer at agreed points?

Yes (transfer possible at the end of Stage 1/Level4)

If yes:

This programme is one of a group of related programmes which also includes :

BSc Honours Psychology with Clinical Skills

BSc Honours Psychology with Counselling

BSc Honours Forensic Psychology

BSc Honours Psychology with Health and Wellbeing

 

It is possible to transfer between these programmes at certain points. This may be subject to particular requirements.

  1.  

Is the programme a top-up only?

 

No

  1.  

Does the programme have a Foundation Year (Level 3) associated with it so that students enter for a four-year programme and progress directly from the Foundation Year to Stage 1 without having to re-apply?

 

Yes

If yes:

You can take a Foundation Year (Level 3) as an integral part of this programme of study. For details of the Foundation Year see the programme specification for Health Sciences and Wellbeing Integrated Foundation Year.

  1.  

Level of award:

 

Level 6

  1.  

Awarding Body:

University of Sunderland

  1.  

Department:

School of Psychology

  1.  

Programme Studies Board:

Psychology UG

  1.  

Programme Leader:

Psychology

Psychology with Clinical Skills

Psychology with Counselling

Forensic Psychology

Psychology with Health and Wellbeing

 

 

Helen Knight

Stephen Dunne

Chris Keech

Laura Farrugia

Nicola Davinson

 

 

  1. How and where can I study the programme?

 

At Sunderland:

 

Full-time on campus

Part-time on campus

As work-based learning full-time

 

As work-based learning part-time

 

As a full-time sandwich course

 

As a part-time sandwich course

 

By distance learning

 

 

At the University of Sunderland London campus: 

 

Full-time on campus

 

Part-time on campus

 

As work-based learning full-time

 

As work-based learning part-time

 

As a full-time sandwich course

 

As a part-time sandwich course

 

By distance learning

 

 

At a partner college:

 

Full-time in the UK 

 

Part-time in the UK

 

Full-time overseas

 

Part-time overseas

 

By distance learning

 

As a full-time sandwich course in the UK

 

As a part-time sandwich course in the UK

 

As a full-time sandwich course overseas

 

As a part-time sandwich course overseas

 

As work-based learning full-time in the UK 

 

As work-based learning part-time overseas

 

Other (please specify)

 

 

 

 

 

  1. How long does the programme take?

 

 

Min number of years / months

Max number of years / months

Full-time

3

9

Part-time

5

9

Distance learning

 

 

Work-based learning

 

 

 

For start-dates please see the current edition of the Prospectus or contact the relevant department at the University. For start-dates for programmes delivered in a partner college, please contact the relevant college.

 

SECTION B:FURTHER CORE INFORMATION 

 

26.     Learning and teaching strategy. 

The School of Psychology’s learning and teaching strategy is designed to provide you with an outstanding learning experience. The School includes a Principal Lecturer for Teaching and Learning who is also a National Teaching Fellow and Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy (HEA). Two further staff are Senior Fellows of the Higher Education Academy and the majority of our staff possess a teaching qualification or are members of the HEA. This has informed a pluralistic approach to teaching and learning helping accommodate the diverse nature of our student body where you will be taught using a variety of methods from traditional lectures and seminars to more student-centric approaches such as problem and enquiry based learning.

 

These student-centric approaches will encourage you to develop an independent and curious approach to solving realistic problems using your growing psychological knowledge. For example, many modules use problem based learning where you may be asked to develop an intervention for tackling stigma surrounding mental health, or design an artefact applying psychological theory and research to teenage pregnancy. Similarly you will be developing your own research ideas and collecting and presenting the findings of that from an early stage of the programme. For example, at Stage 1 you will work on student-led practicals, where you contribute to the design of a psychology study and collect real data.

 

This diverse approach to teaching and learning is mirrored in the style of assessments that you will undertake. The majority of assessment is coursework based (though there are some exams) reflecting our commitment to assessment for learning rather than solely for testing. Though you will complete traditional essays, you will also complete research reports, media pieces for non-experts, expert witness reports, and in some modules develop your own negotiated assessments. The importance of this variety is that the diversity of students is accounted for and you  will develop many different skills, but most importantly the completion of innovative and engaging forms of assessment is keeps you motivated and therefore the assessment becomes part of learning.

 

Unlike many psychology programmes in the UK we have adopted an integrated approach to delivering psychology. Rather than taking modules addressing only a single area of the British Psychological Society (BPS) curriculum you will take modules such as Mind to World that present topics in psychology from all perspectives giving you a 360 degree psychological lens on the topic. This will help you develop a wide-ranging psychological literacy that meets the recommendations of recent HEA and BPS consultations, but most importantly helps you understand the links between the different areas of psychology. Our learning and teaching strategy aims to:

  • Enable you to acquire excellent knowledge and understanding of a range of topics and methodologies as specified in the BPS curriculum and the QAA Subject Benchmark Statement for Psychology in a progressive way across Stages 1 to 3 of the programme.
  • Embrace the recommendations of the HEA report on the future of undergraduate psychology in the UK, and thereby offer you a ‘futureproof’ course of study which reflects the changing nature of the field, predominantly by:

 

  • enabling you to apply a 360 degree psychological lens to a range of psychologically relevant topics, approaching them from integrated multiple perspectives;
  • contextualising study of psychological theory and research in terms of its real world applications;
  • incorporating current and exciting developments in the field into our psychology programme, for example, neuroscience, evolutionary psychology and environmental psychology;
  • provide you with opportunities to develop and recognise graduate skills which will be valued by a wide range of employers, and which also provide a sound basis for postgraduate study.

 

  • Provide you with an outstanding learning experience by engaging with the aims of the University’s Learning and Teaching plan to:

 

  • enable you to develop as an independent, active and reflective learner;
  • create learning environments where teaching approaches and learning technologies foster learning;
  • promote learning partnerships in which innovative, supportive and challenging practice inspires you to approach your course and career with curiosity, enthusiasm and creativity.

 

Finally, but not least importantly, key to our learning strategy is the development of a community of learners. Our staff are all research active and their research informs the teaching on your modules. However, our strategy is to go beyond this and you will not just be a student at the School of Psychology, but a key member of it. You will meet and interact with all of our staff and if you wish you can be part of the research the School conducts and there are many recent examples of our students co-authoring published research with staff.

 

27.     Retention strategy.

Key to our retention strategy is an inclusive community of learners accommodating students from diverse backgrounds that helps students integrate with the School and University. This is partly achieved through the excellent support you will receive through the personal tutor system, but also the other ways that interaction between staff, students and the wider academy is achieved.

 

Personal tutors

In our view your personal tutor is there to support you when needed, but primarily should be there to help you to, offering you one-to-one advice on how you can achieve your best. Our personal tutor system is embedded into one of the modules you will take at each stage of your programme. This ensures that you get stage appropriate support from one of the academics teaching you each year. In Stage 1 there is a focus on making the transition to higher education from whatever your background or experience. In Stage 2 there is a shift to a focus on helping you recognise and make the most of the graduate attributes you are developing with a consideration for your future career. Finally, in Stage 3 the focus will be on you achieving the best possible degree and then using your skills to obtain a position in graduate employment or postgraduate study.

 

You will meet with your personal tutor three times each year individually and also once as a group with your fellow tutees. Your personal tutor will set and mark some of your assessments, enabling them to closely monitor and guide your progression, but most importantly you can discuss with your personal tutor your own goals and aims enabling your personal tutor to provide a bespoke learning experience for you.

 

Community of Learners

The creation of Facebook groups for Stages 1, 2 and 3 has helped to provide our students with a supportive online environment using a medium most already use on a daily basis. These groups allow for useful information, announcements and supporting commentary to be posted by staff (and fellow students), and also provide you with a forum to pose questions to your peers that is overseen by staff, who can offer advice and input on student queries. The School of Psychology has a snapchat (uospsychology), a twitter feed (@PsychUni_of_Sun), and an Instagram feed (UoSPsychology) where we post details of interesting research, events and opportunities We also have an Alumni Facebook group so that we can keep in touch when you graduate, and give you details of great opportunities.

 

In the School of Psychology, we all work together to develop a community feel for staff and students. One way in which we approach this is by monthly Journal Club meetings (during term time), where staff and students are sent an academic paper to read, then meet to discuss this. Students have found it very useful to be able to speak with staff in an informal setting to discuss an article not relating to any of their modules. Finally, the Shackleton House Pie ‘n’ Cake Club offers students an arena to meet and discuss with staff in a very informal setting, to cook or judge a variety of pies or cakes. While this seems a step away from academia, the locale in which staff and students engage in the competition helps to foster the student-academic relationship. This allows for students to be able to approach and talk to staff more readily about any issues they may be facing thus aiding staff to direct students to the necessary help within the university.

Our emphasis on developing a community of learners is supported by the learning and social spaces we have in the School, in Shackleton House. We have learning spaces here including a seminar room and Skillslab dedicated to students on our psychology programmes, which facilitate group work. We also have the Sandbox, a bespoke space for all of our students to use, fitted with a TV, games consoles, sofas, and home to a wide range of psychology-relevant media, including books and films. You can relax with other students here, or brainstorm some ideas on the writeable walls.

 

28.     Any other information

 

Development weeks/days

Development days or weeks offer a number of exciting opportunities designed to enhance learning, develop skills and promote interaction with staff and other students. The development weeks differ for each stage, with each year building on the success of the development weeks in previous years (which is developed alongside student feedback and input). The School of Psychology continues to provide engaging and stimulating content that relates and enhances taught content within the curriculum. Development Week 1 is for Stage one students and focuses on gamification and learning through play along with the provision of masterclasses (e.g. how to structure written arguments, how to work on verbal arguments, data analysis and research masterclasses). These sessions are also recorded and made available for students who cannot attend. Development Week 2 is for all stages. Stage one receive the second part of gamification and learning through play, and all stages are encouraged to attend masterclasses and guest lectures.

The activities scheduled in Development Weeks may include, for example:

 

  • Talks from professional psychologists and super alumni

These have included, for example, an interview with a clinical psychologist, a talk from a forensic psychologist and inspiring talks from recent graduates.

  • Themed, integrated lectures

Lecturers will demonstrate how you can apply theory and research from across the discipline to a novel question. Themed lectures have examined why we love vampires and why we believe in ghosts, for example.

  • Masterclasses

Masterclasses will develop key skills needed to succeed on the programme and enhance employability, for example, masterclasses in report writing or use of Excel.

  • Formative assessment

Designed to test your knowledge, understanding and skills which not only allows you to see how well you are doing, but helps you to learn and to succeed in summative assessments.

 

SECTION C:TEACHING AND LEARNING

 

29.     What is the programme about?

 

BSc Psychology

  • Foster scientific understanding of mind, brain, behaviour and the complex interactions between these in a critical and evaluative manner, with a particular focus on integrating multiple perspectives;
  • Understand the role of empirical evidence and conduct research into the areas above, culminating in an independent research project;
  • Encourage understanding and application of the importance of psychological literacy, and recognise real-world challenges to which a psychological lens is relevant;
  • Inspire independent, active and reflective lifelong learning through innovative, diverse, effective and aligned teaching, learning and assessment; 
  • Provide opportunities to recognise and develop personal qualities and skills relevant to employment and postgraduate study.

 

 

In addition to BSc Psychology for BSc Psychology with Clinical Skills

  • Development of a scientific understanding of the causes of mental health problems. This will involve an ability to critically evaluate biological, psychological, and social models of mental health problems.
  • Development of a scientific understanding of interventions for mental health problems. This will involve gaining an understanding of the rationale for different types of interventions, based on models of mental health problems, as well as an ability to critically evaluate biological, psychological, and social interventions for mental health problems.
  • Development of a set of skills for effective service user engagement
  • Experience of the use, scoring and administering of psychometric instruments that may be used in a clinical setting.
  • Development of reflective skills that will support your learning and development as a psychologist
  • An understanding of the evidence-base that supports the importance of the skills the course aims to develop in students.
  • understanding the role of empirical evidence in the discipline of clinical psychology, culminating in an independent research project relevant to the area;
  • An understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of different types of evidence bases. For example, students will learn about the common short-comings of randomized controlled trials, and how this influences routine clinical practice.

 

 

In addition to BSc Psychology for BSc Psychology with Counselling

  • Establishing a broad basis of knowledge and understanding about the professional practice of counselling and associated contemporary issues
  • Developing self-awareness and the ability to engage in self-reflection. 
  • Developing counselling and listening skills that can be embedded into a range of workplace settings to effectively enhance existing job roles.
  • Developing skills and knowledge in the theories, concepts and practice of counselling that will aid entry onto professional training in psychological therapies and related disciplines.

 

 

In addition to BSc Psychology for BSc Forensic Psychology:  

  • Gaining a good knowledge base in the discipline of forensic psychology;
  • Understanding the role of empirical evidence in the discipline of forensic psychology, culminating in an independent research project relevant to the area;
  • Critically evaluate theories and debates in forensic psychology;
  • Provide an introduction to psychological theories, methods and processes within the context of the legal, criminal and civil justice systems.

 

 

In addition to BSc Psychology for BSc Psychology for Health and Wellbeing:

  • Develop scientific understanding of a range of health and wellbeing areas, and the intersection between health and wellbeing, psychology, and other allied disciplines
  • Establish knowledge of the role of health and wellbeing, psychology, and other allied disciplines to the explanation of health, and the promotion of healthy behaviours.
  • Encourage the application of empirical evidence grounded in psychology and allied disciplines to the understanding health and wellbeing, and health-related behaviours.
  • Understanding the role of empirical evidence in the health and wellbeing, culminating in an independent research project relevant to the area.

 

 

30.     What will I know or be able to do at each Stage of the programme?

 

Learning Outcomes Stage 1 – Skills  

By the end of this Stage of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

SS1Apply limited multiple perspectives to defined psychological issues, recognising that psychology involves a range of research methods, theories, evidence and applications;

SS2Integrate ideas and findings across limited multiple perspectives in psychology, recognising distinctive psychological approaches to relevant issues;

SS3Identify general patterns in behaviour, psychological functioning and experience, recognising the subjective and variable nature of individual experience;

SS4Evaluate psychological theory and research;

SS5Pose and operationalise basic hypotheses and research questions drawing on relevant theory and research;

SS6Conduct and participate in basic empirical studies involving a variety of methods of data collection including experiments, observational studies and questionnaires;

SS7Analyse, present, evaluate and interpret basic quantitative and qualitative data and research findings in order to develop arguments and make sound judgements in accordance with basic theories and concepts in psychology;

SS8Use evidence-based reasoning and identify practical, theoretical and ethical issues associated with the use of different methodologies;

SS9Use appropriate ethical frameworks and principles to identify the ethical implications of psychological research;

SS10Use, under supervision, a variety of psychological tools, including specialist software, laboratory equipment and psychometric instruments;

SS11Communicate psychological theories, concepts and empirical findings accurately and reliably and with structured and coherent arguments; and

SS12Reflect on their own development of the qualities and transferable skills necessary for employment to identify appropriate ways in which they can be further developed.

 

 

In addition to SS1 to SS12 BSc Psychology with Clinical Skills students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

SSCS1 Develop basic skills required when working in a clinical psychology setting.

SSCS2 Reflect on the progress of the development of your clinical skills and how this will benefit further development.

 

In addition to SS1 to SS12 BSc. Psychology with Counselling students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

SSC1Compare and contrast key concepts and theories from across the major schools of counselling theory

 

 

In addition to SS1 to SS12 BSc Forensic Psychology students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

SSF1 Relate psychological theories to well-defined criminal and legal problems with an awareness of the complexities involved in this; and

SSF2 Examine practical, theoretical and ethical issues relevant to forensic psychology

 

 

In addition to SS1 to SS12 BSc Psychology with Health and Wellbeing students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

SSHW1 Identify appropriate methods of presenting information related to health and wellbeing to a variety of audiences

 

 

Learning Outcomes Stage 1 – Knowledge

By the end of this Stage of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

K1Describe a variety of influences on psychological functioning and explain how they are conceptualised across the core domains of biological psychology, cognitive psychology, developmental psychology, individual differences and social psychology;

K2Explain the scientific underpinnings of psychology as a discipline and its historical origins;

K3Explain the inherent variability and diversity of psychological functioning; and

K4Describe and explain a range of research paradigms, and basic research methods and measurement techniques, including statistics and probability.

 

 

In addition to K1 to K4 BSc Psychology with Clinical Skills students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

KCS1Explain the value of different approaches to the understanding and treatment of mental health problems.

 

 

In addition to K1 to K4 BSc. Psychology with Counselling students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

KC1Describe and discuss key aspects of the practice of counselling.

 

 

In addition to K1 to K4 BSc Forensic Psychology students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

KF1Describe the key issues and role of psychology within the forensic sciences, legal, and justice system;

KF2Explain the historical development of the discipline of forensic psychology;

 

 

In addition to K1 to K4 BSc Psychology with Health and Wellbeing students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

KHW1   Explain the contribution of empirical evidence and theoretical insights to the understanding of a range of illnesses and behaviours

 

 

Learning Outcomes Stage 2 – Skills

By the end of this Stage of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

SS13Apply multiple perspectives to psychological issues including real-world problems and employment contexts, recognising that psychology involves a range of research methods, theories, evidence and applications;

SS14Integrate ideas and findings across multiple perspectives in psychology, recognising distinctive psychological approaches to relevant issues;

SS15Identify, interpret and evaluate patterns in behaviour, psychological functioning and experience, recognising the subjective and variable nature of individual experience;

SS16Critically evaluate psychological theory and research;

SS17Generate, operationalise, and explore hypotheses and/or research questions drawing on relevant theory and research;

SS18Design, conduct and participate in empirical studies involving a variety of methods of data collection, including experiments, observational studies, questionnaires, interviews and focus groups;

SS19Analyse, present, evaluate and interpret complex quantitative and qualitative data and research findings in order to develop arguments and make sound judgements in accordance with theories and concepts in psychology;

SS20Use evidence-based reasoning and explore practical, theoretical and ethical issues associated with the use of different methodologies;

SS21Apply psychological knowledge ethically and safely to real-world problems, and use appropriate ethical frameworks and principles to identify, evaluate and address the ethical implications of psychological research;

SS22Effectively use a variety of psychological tools, including specialist software, laboratory equipment and psychometric instruments;

SS23Reflect on the limits of their knowledge, and how this influences analyses and interpretations based on that knowledge;

SS24Effectively communicate psychological information, arguments and analysis in a variety of forms to specialist and non-specialist audiences; and

SS25Utilise qualities and transferable skills necessary for employment (including the exercise of personal responsibility, effective team-working, and decision-making), and critically reflect on their own development of graduate attributes to identify appropriate ways in which they can be developed.

 

 

In addition to SS13 to SS25 BSc Psychology with Clinical Skills students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

SSCS3 Interpret the results of a range of psychological assessments.

SSCS4 Evaluate the effectiveness of clinical interventions.

 

 

In addition to SS13 to SS25 BSc. Psychology with Counselling students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

SSC2Apply recognised listening skills to help others manage personal problems.

 

 

In addition to SS13 to SS25 BSc Forensic Psychology students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

SSF3Apply psychological theories and research to forensic and legal contexts

 

 

In addition to SS13 to SS25 BSc Psychology with Health and Wellbeing students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

SSHW2 Use and apply principles and conceptual tools to analyse issues relevant to health and wellbeing

 

 

Learning Outcomes Stage 2 – Knowledge

By the end of this Stage of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

K5Critically discuss a range of influences on psychological functioning, how they are capitalised across the core domains of biological psychology, cognitive psychology, developmental psychology, individual differences and social psychology, and how these influences interrelate;

K6Critically discuss the scientific underpinnings of psychology as a discipline, its historical origins, development and limitations;

K7Identify and evaluate the inherent variability and diversity of psychological functioning and its significance; and

K8Identify and systematically explain a range of intermediate to advanced research paradigms, research methods and measurement techniques, including statistics and probability, and discuss their limitations.

K9 Critically discuss a range of research paradigms and conceptual and historical issues relevant to psychology;

 

 

In addition to K5 to K9 BSc Psychology with Clinical Skills students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

KCS2Explain good practice in psychological formulation and assessment

KCS3 Evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of different forms of evidence concerning the efficacy of interventions for mental health problems.

 

 

In addition to K5 to K9 BSc Psychology with Counselling students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

KC2Recognise links between counselling skills practice and appropriate theory.

 

 

In addition to K5 to K9 BSc Forensic Psychology students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

KF3Evaluate a range of psychological theories and research relevant to the process of detecting criminals and appraising criminal evidence in legal settings

 

 

In addition to K5 to K9 BSc Psychology with Health and Wellbeing students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

KHW2 Explain and analyse a range of influences grounded in psychology and allied disciplines on health and wellbeing

 

 

Learning Outcomes Stage 3 – Skills

By the end of this Stage of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

SS26Apply multiple perspectives to complex and real-world psychological issues and systematically analyse the relationships between these multiple perspectives, recognising that psychology involves a range of research methods, theories, evidence and applications;

SS27integrate ideas and findings across the multiple perspectives in psychology in relation to issues at the forefront of the discipline, recognising distinctive psychological approaches to these issues;

SS28identify, interpret and critically evaluate patterns in behaviour, psychological functioning and experience, and evaluate their significance;

SS29critically and systematically evaluate psychological theory and research;

SS30generate, operationalise, explore and critique hypotheses and/or research questions drawing on relevant theory and research;

SS31devise and sustain arguments and solve problems using psychological theory and research, some of which is at the forefront of the discipline;

SS32use appropriate ethical frameworks and principles to identify, evaluate and address the ethical implications of psychological research, and to obtain ethical approval for research;

SS33competently initiate, design and conduct an extensive piece of independent empirical research using appropriate psychological tools, demonstrating a range of research skills, including planning, and analysis, and evaluation and dissemination of findings, and evaluating its theoretical, practical and methodological implications and limitations; and

SS34communicate the application of psychological theory and research to problems and their solutions to both specialist and non-specialist audiences.

 

 

In addition to SS26 to SS34 BSc Psychology with Clinical Skills students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

SSCS5 Reflect on the development of an empathic relationship formed with people who use mental health services.

SSCS6 Conduct an extensive piece of independent empirical research relevant to clinical psychology using appropriate psychological tools, present and evaluate research findings employing evidence-based reasoning and examining practical, theoretical and ethical issues relevant to research.

SSCS7 Critical reflection on the factors important for effective relationships between service users and practioners in a clinical context

 

In addition to SS26 to SS34 BSc Psychology with Counselling students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

SSC3Apply a range of listening and counselling skills to help others explore personal issues.

SSC4Evaluate current evidence relating to contemporary challenges and debates in counselling.

 

 

In addition to SS26 to SS34 BSc Forensic Psychology students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

SSF4Analyse, integrate, and apply a range of psychological perspectives to understanding criminal behaviour;

SSF5Identify and analyse risk factors of criminal behaviour in individual cases; and

SSF6Apply key methods of offender assessment and the processes involved in making judgements and recommendations for offender treatment

SSF7Conduct an extensive piece of independent empirical research relevant to forensic psychology using appropriate psychological tools, present and evaluate research findings employing evidence-based reasoning and examining practical, theoretical and ethical issues relevant to research.

 

 

In addition to SS26 to SS34 BSc Psychology with Health and Wellbeing students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

SSHW3 Select and critically evaluate concepts, principles, and theories in psychology and allied disciplines to promote and change behaviour relevant to health and wellbeing

 

SSHW4 Conduct an extensive piece of independent empirical research relevant to psychology and health and wellbeing using appropriate psychological tools, present and evaluate research findings employing evidence-based reasoning and examining practical, theoretical and ethical issues relevant to research.

 

Learning Outcomes Stage 3 – Knowledge

By the end of this Stage of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

K10Critically discuss several specialised areas in and applications of psychology, some of which are at the forefront of the discipline;

K11Critically explore the uncertainty, ambiguity and limits of knowledge within psychology and discuss the implications of this.

 

 

In addition to K10 and K11 BSc Psychology with Clinical Skills students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

KCS4 Critically apply a range of ethical and legal issues that clinical psychologists encounter.

KCS5 Critically evaluate models of, and interventions for, mental health problems.

 

 

In addition to K10and K11 BSc Psychology with Counselling students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

KC3Integrate counselling theory with own use of counselling skills.

KC4Identify and critique contemporary issues in the counselling profession.

 

 

In addition to K10 and K11 BSc Forensic Psychology students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

KF4Critical evaluation of cutting edge theories and evidence regarding criminal behaviours; and

KF5Critically appraise the complexities involved in offender assessment, including cutting edge debates about the measures and methods involved and the subsequent judgements and recommendations made

 

 

In addition to K10 and K11 BSc Psychology with Health and Wellbeing students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

KHW3  Synthesise and critically appraise concepts, principles, and theories in health psychology and allied disciplines

 

 

Learning Outcomes – Ordinary degree

If you are awarded an Ordinary degree you will have achieved the majority of the learning outcomes for the programme studied. However you will have gained fewer credits at Stage 3 than students awarded an Honours degree, your knowledge will typically be less broad and you will typically be less proficient in higher-level skills such as independent learning.

 

31.     What will the programme consist of?

 

Each undergraduate programme consists of a number of Stages from a minimum of 1 to a maximum of 4, each of which is equivalent to a year’s full-time study. The summary below describes briefly what is contained in each Stage. Most programmes have a mixture of core (i.e. compulsory) modules and optional ones, often with increasing choice as you move through the programme and gain in experience. In some programmes the choice of optional modules gives you particular ‘routes’ through the programme. The programme structure including a detailed list of modules can be found in the programme regulations.

 

 

Stage 1

Stage 1 is designed to provide sound knowledge of the basic concepts, principles, theories and methodologies associated with the five BPS core areas of psychology plus research methods in an integrated fashion. The core areas are introduced in two 20 credit modules, Genes to Mind and Mind to World. Each module has a particular narrative which is designed to facilitate integration in an engaging and coherent manner. The integrative style of the modules means that you will not learn about each core area in isolation, rather you will learn about different topics and how each core area addresses them. This gives a 360 degree realistic view of the subject and improves your psychological literacy.

 

The narrative structure of Genes to Mind is the story of the relationship between biology and the human mind. It poses a fundamental question; how do genes give rise to thinking, conscious, sentient human beings? The module covers genetics, evolution and natural selection, core biological psychology knowledge (e.g. neurons and neurophysiology), cognitive psychology (e.g. attention and memory, and consciousness) and, in addition, includes behavioural genetics, introducing core content relating to individual differences, intelligence and the structure of personality.

 

The narrative guiding Mind to World is the story of how single units of personhood (or ‘minds’) interact with one another and come together to create societies. The focus is on the way in which humans communicate and operate in their social world. You will be introduced to behaviourist and cognitive approaches to the human mind and study how psychology has developed as a discipline from the late 19th century to present. The topics covered on the module include attachment, perception, language, emotion, theory of mind, conformity and group processes.

 

Being a Psychologist is a 40 credit core research methods and study skills module, integrating the twin themes of research methods/statistics and professional development, where you will learn the essential skills needed to undertake university study in psychology including academic skills, personal development and the skills needed to design, perform and report research studies. The module will provide you with an appreciation of how research and statistics are designed, performed and interpreted in light of the complex theories that are created by the researcher with an emphasis on the process of becoming an ethical co-creator of knowledge alongside academic staff.Our personal tutor system is incorporated into Being a Psychologist, and psychology related skills (such as essay writing and referencing) as well as graduate attributes, crucial to employment, such as interpersonal skills will be developed within this module, Genes to Mind and Mind to World.

 

Finally, in Introduction to Mental Health, you will be introduced to a range of different mental health problems, to the models that attempt to explain these, and to the interventions that attempt to treat them. The module also covers whether it is possible to improve public mental health, and will discuss the ways in which researchers have attempted to do this.

 

Students on different routes will then take the following different modules

 

If you are a BSc Psychology student you will be offered a 20 credit option module Psychology in the Media. The public perception of psychology is vital to the value and success of the discipline and therefore psychologists need to promote and communicate the subject to the public, policy makers and business. Content includes common misconceptions of psychology (e.g. the MMR vaccine and autism scandal), how the media influences behaviour, and the application of psychological theories to understanding why people believe false and sensational claims. This module encourages you to think about psychological issues in real world contexts and learn how to communicate complex psychological information in a format that is appropriate for a non-expert audience. If you do not wish to take this module then you can select an elective from the University module catalogue, for example you may wish to take a language module.

 

If you are a BSc Psychology with Clinical Skills programme student you will complete the 20 credit core module Introduction to Clinical Skills. In this module you will be introduced to a set of skills professionals working in mental health care need to acquire (e.g., patient engagement, multi-disciplinary team-working, assessment, and formulation). The module will encourage you to reflect on your ability to develop these skills over the course of the module.

 

If you are a BSc. Psychology with Counselling student you will take the 20 credit module Introduction to Theories and Concepts in Counselling.  The module is broadly divided into two main areas, the first of which centres on the three main schools of counselling theory.  The second area covers central concepts alongside the key aspects associated with delivering counselling practice, such as professional ethical standards.

 

If you are a BSc Forensic Psychology route student you will take the 20 credit core module, Introduction to Forensic Psychology, which introduces you to key concepts in the context of criminal and legal proceedings, focussing on developing a sound breadth of knowledge. Content includes the historical conceptualisation of crime, law, and criminal treatment, and their development over time; the role of a forensic psychologist and their place within an investigative team, as well as key theoretical approaches to criminal behaviour and the impact on victims of crime.

 

If you are a BSc Psychology with Health and Wellbeing student you will take the 20 credit core module, Psychology, Health and Wellbeing.  This module provides an introduction to the role that psychology and allied disciplines play in our understanding of health and wellbeing, and how such experiences can be managed and enhanced. 

 

Stage 2

The programme content at Stage 2 is designed to develop and expand your knowledge and understanding of the basic concepts, principles, theories and methodologies associated with the core areas of psychology. There is a greater focus on the application of psychology to real world issues.

 

The 20 credit core module Cradle to Grave: Integrated Perspectives on Development examines the development of individuals across the lifespan, from conception to death. The module applies multiple psychological perspectives to the study of development in a number of domains, drawing on approaches, principles and theories from core areas of psychology and from evolutionary psychology. The module has been designed around one extended family, ‘The Smiths’ and throughout this module we examine how psychology seeks to understand, predict and intervene in their lives.

 

The 20 credit core module Twenty-Four, Seven: Everyday Motivations and Biases examines core biological, social and cognitive topics how they intersect, looking at the influences individuals face on a daily basis. Topics include the biological bases of behaviour, hormones, neuroimaging, socio-biology, social cognition, attitudes, group processes and intergroup relations, attention, perception, memory and thinking. Topics studied from an integrated perspective may include attention, aggression, prosocial behaviour, motivation, self-regulation, and decision-making.

 

The Stage 2 research methods module Research and Data Analysis in Psychology is a 20 credit module which will develop the skills needed to design and conduct psychological research ethically, to analyse the resulting data, and to report research in line with appropriate conventions. The module takes an integrated approach, incorporating learning about new topics from core areas of psychology with work on research projects and data analysis skills. You will undertake empirical work using quantitative methodologies which will be written into research reports, and you will produce evidence of your research methods skills through a portfolio of research method competencies that you will be guided on throughout the year.

 

Finally, Future Selves is a core 20 credit module for BSc Psychology. This module will guide students on recognising yourself after university, and shall include employability but embedded within psychological content under an individual differences/occupational psychology theme and including a research practical around psychometrics. A qualitative research report shall also be written, alongside a portfolio of engagement with the module.

 

 

 

Students on different routes will then take the following different programmes:

 

In addition to the core modules at Stage 2, if you are a BSc Psychology student you have 40 credits worth of option modules to choose. Selecting from modules including: Anomalous Psychology: A Critical Introduction which examines the science and psychology of paranormal events; Meet the Relatives: Evolutionary Psychology and Animal Behaviour in which current theories and evidence within evolutionary psychology from both a human and non-human perspective such as health and happiness, mate preferences, cultural evolution and hormones and behaviour; and choices from the modules listed below that are core on the other routes. In this way BSc Psychology offers you the greatest choice and flexibility as a programme.

 

If you are a BSc Psychology with Clinical Skills student you will complete the 20 credit core module Assessment, Formulation, and Evidence Bases. You will learn in more detail how to conduct assessments with people who have mental health problems, and how to develop formulations to explain a person’s mental health problems, through role-playing and case-study examples. In addition, you will develop the ability to critically evaluate evidence, and will consider how to improve services, based on their evaluations of current evidence. On this route you will also complete the 20 credit core module Investigating Complex Issues in Psychology (See final paragraph before Stage 3 for details).

 

If you are a BSc Psychology with Counselling student you will take the 20 credit module, Foundations of Embedded Counselling Skills.  This module is practical and experiential in emphasis and relies heavily on workshops to help students practise how to use basic counselling and listening skills to help people with personal problems.  The module underpins the practical skills learned by students, by covering theories that relate to basic counselling skills practice and the notion of embedding skills in everyday settings. In addition you will choose 20 credits of option modules from the other routes or the modules offered to BSc Psychology students.

 

If you are a BSc Forensic Psychology student you will take a 20 credit module at stage 2, Psychology of Detection, Interviewing, and the Criminal Trial. With reference to different areas of psychology, this module encourages the application of psychological knowledge to forensic and legal contexts. You will consider how psychological biases can influence the examination and appraisal of criminal evidence and how we can ascertain its credibility, as well as the application of psychology to understanding the decision-making process and courtroom behaviour. On this route you will also complete the 20 credit core module Investigating Complex Issues in Psychology (See final paragraph before Stage 3 for details).

 

BSc Psychology with Health and Wellbeing includes a further 20 credit core module, Community, Culture and EnvironmentThis module explores issues and problems relevant to people-context relationships. Themes will include marginalisation and poverty; immigration and refugees; gender and power; liberation; ableism and self-determination; mental health; families and disadvantage; our relationship with natural and urban environments. On this route you will also complete the 20 credit core module Investigating Complex Issues in Psychology (See final paragraph before Stage 3 for details).

 

All students on the routes BSc Psychology with Clinical Skills, BSc Forensic Psychology, and BSc Psychology with Health and Wellbeing will take the 20 credit core module, Investigating Complex Issues in Psychology. This module uses a problem based learning to integrating multiple perspectives. Students on the specialist routes come together to identify, define, and discuss realistic psychological problems from different perspectives, working together to integrate and apply their knowledge.

 

Stage 3

At Stage 3, you will have obtained core knowledge, understanding, and skills in critical analysis, integration and research methods, providing the foundation for Stage 3, and developed further in the core modules here. At Stage you can continue to build your programme around your areas of interest, choosing 60 credits of option modules.  If you are a student on the route BSc Psychology with Clinical Skills however will only have 20 credits of option modules due to the number of core modules you will take.  

The Stage 3 Empirical Project module is a 40 credit core module. On this module, you design a new and independent research project working with a supervisor, who is a member of the psychology staff. The findings are reported in an extensive research report, and an academic poster (presented at our annual poster conference). This module is the culmination of all the learning outcomes of the degree. The quality of our studentsprojects and the range of topics studied has been commended by our external examiners.

NOTE: Students on each of the routes BSc Psychology with Clinical Skills, BSc Forensic Psychology, and BSc Psychology with Health and Wellbeing must complete their project on a topic related to their route specialism.

 

If you are a BSc Psychology student From Research to Reality is your 20 credit core module, representing the pinnacle of your ability to apply multiple perspectives and psychological literacy from across the undergraduate curriculum. You will engage with some of the ‘big issues’ at the cutting edge of the discipline, for example, the place of psychology within the wider field of science, the role of psychology in the legal system, and ethical issues raised by gene sequencing of individuals.

In addition to the core modules at Stage 3, if you are a BSc Psychology student you have 60 credits worth of option modules to choose. We offer a range of option modules including: Clinical Neuropsychology, Addictions, Development and Neurodiversity, Environmental Psychology, Psychology and Story, Digital Humans: The Psychology of Online Behaviour, and Applied Memory Research in addition to choices from core modules on the route. Please note not all option modules may run each year and new option modules will be created reflecting staff and student subject interest (all of these option modules are also available to you if you are a student on another route). 

We also offer a Professional Placement (available to students on all routes) module to further develop students’ work-based skills. You are able to apply for a place on this module with acceptance being competitive based on academic engagement and staff references. If successfully accepted onto the module you will complete a 140 hour placement with a professional organisation, possibly, but not necessarily, related to psychology. Past placements have included conducting research and analysing data for NHS trusts and private clinical organisations or working as psychology teaching and research assistants.

If you are a BSc Psychology with Clinical Skills student you will complete three 20 credit core modules and choose a further 20 credit option module (which can be selected from Level 5 option modules). In Mental Health and Illness, you will expand on your knowledge of the models that attempt to explain these mental health problems and of the interventions that attempt to treat these mental health problems. The module encourages you to consider how well interventions work in practice, to consider in more detail service-users’ views of mental health services, and requires you to apply your knowledge to case examples. In Patient Engagement and Reflective Practice, you will be required to develop an empathic relationship with someone in contact with clinical services through voluntary work. You will critically consider the importance of patient engagement in determining the efficacy of psychotherapy, and also the importance of service-user and carer views when designing a service. Finally, in Professional Practice, you will be introduced to a range of conceptual, ethical, and legal issues relevant to contemporary clinical psychology. For example, the module you will debate issues such as the lack of (ethnic, gender, and socio-economic) diversity in clinical psychology, contexts in which problems relating to capacity to consent to treatment arise, and the difficulties managing risk and safe-guarding concerns. You will be encouraged to consider how these issues affect routine clinical practice.

If you are a BSc. Psychology with Counselling student you will undertake two 20 credit modules and chose two further 20 credit option modules (20 credits of which can be selected from Level 5 option modules). You will develop counselling skills further by undertaking The Developing Listener.  This module helps students to develop the confidence to sustain longer skills sessions and help them focus on exploration of issues by the listener.  You are encouraged to develop your practice not only by developing discrete skills, but also through developing self-awareness and recognising the impact they have on the listening process. Then in Contemporary Counselling in Context you will critically examine the debates surrounding the provision of counselling in the twenty-first century. A main feature of the module is the use of specialist speakers that give you the opportunity to learn directly from specialist workers in the field, and providing an understanding of real-world issues such as homelessness, eating disorders, domestic violence and alcoholism.

If you are a BSc Forensic psychology student you take a 20 credit core module that encourages the application of an integrated perspective to criminality and in addition choose three further 20 credit option modules (20 credits of which can be selected from Level 5 option modules). The Psychology of Serious and Violent Offending will explicitly prepare you for further work within forensic settings by introducing you to serious crimes you may encounter in such settings, and also to the methodologies used by forensic psychologists in offender assessment and treatment.

If you are a BSc Psychology with Health and Wellbeing student you take a 20 credit core module, Health Psychology and Behaviour Change plus choose three further 20 credit option modules (20 credits of which can be selected from Level 5 option modules). This module explores how relevant concepts, principles, and theories can be applied to understand and alleviate problems associated with health and health-related behaviours. Keys models and theories grounded in health psychology are considered and applied to the development of interventions to promote behaviour change.

Stage 4: N/A

 

The tables below show the structure for each route of the programme.

 

 

 

 

 

 

32.     How will I be taught?

 

Scheduled teaching activities

Lectures provide a stimulating, thought provoking framework to guide further study. Lectures also make use of new technology. For example, the PRS system which allows responses to multiple choice questions creating an interactive, dynamic lecture experience.

Seminars and workshops provide opportunities for small group discussions and activities. They will often allow you to explore lecture content in more depth, or perhaps to discuss real world applications of psychological theory and research.

You will also attend individual tutorials and small group tutorials with your personal tutor. In individual tutorials, you will have the opportunity to discuss your progress with Stage appropriate advice. You can also discuss with your personal tutor what would most help you and so tailor a bespoke learning experience.

Within your seminars and workshops, you will engage in Problem Based Learning, where you will use your psychological knowledge to address a realistic problem, for example, how psychology can help improve user interfaces of aircraft. Workshops leading to the creation of a video essay with supporting storyboard. Field trips leading to an exhibition in which students will present a psychology-related artefact or exhibit that is suitable for exploring and explaining a topic in psychology to the general public to promote psychological literacy in a creative or engaging way. Finally, there are opportunities for Inter-Professional Learning where students from psychology work with students from pharmacy, nursing and public health in a variety of settings (such as role-play using their innovative patient suits), where the students from each discipline help to inform and teach each other, showing how various health-related professions are integrated, relate to each other and how this can work in various situations upon graduation.

Independent study

Your work in class will often be supported by directed reading and directed study, which requires you to, for example, read a particular book chapter or journal article, or produce written work. As you progress through the programme, you will be encouraged to move towards more independent study. This requires you to use contact time with staff as a basis for your own further study, whereby you identify, read and analyse relevant journal articles and book chapters, for example.

Other forms of independent study include requirements for students to engage in volunteering work, which is part of a core personal-tutor based module. Students also have to take part in research engagement, taking part in a variety of studies for both staff and Stage 3 students collecting data for their final year projects. Data collection and research is required by students at all stages, giving all students the opportunity to analyse real-word data and apply it to a particular context. The studies are designed in workshops but the collection of this data is carried out independently. For some option modules, group discussions and debates are conducted in class. The preparation for discussions and debates is conducted by students as directed study to be completed independently.

Placement

In the Professional Placement module, there is the opportunity to apply to gain around 140 hours work-based experience within an organisation. These include working with local NHS trusts, organisations helping individuals access a range of therapies and organisations working with offenders.

 

A list of the modules in each Stage of the programme can be found in the Programme Regulations.

 

A summary of the types of teaching, learning and assessment in each module of the programme can be found in the Matrix of Modes of Teaching.

 

33.     How will I be assessed and given feedback?

 

Written examinations

The majority of assessment on the programmes is coursework based, but there are some exams.

In the main exams are used at Stage 1 to assess your breadth of knowledge across the core areas. For example, in Genes to Mind, Mind to World and Introduction to Mental Health you will take exams in a multiple choice, short answer and essay format

 

However, you will also take an exam at Stage 3, in the module From Research to Reality. This exam is designed to test your psychological literacy and ability to use what you have learnt from across the discipline and beyond to support an argument you use to answer a question.

Coursework

There is a range of different coursework assessments across all stages of study. This ranges from traditional essay assessments on the modules such Genes to Mind and Mind to World to assessments that involve building a psychology exhibit that communicates an aspect of the field to a non-expert audience.

 

At all stages you will complete assessments that require writing research reports in the convention of scientific journal articles. This will culminate in your empirical project, which is an extended piece of empirical work where design research, collect data, perform analysis and write an extended piece of work. All with the supervision of on of your lecturers. In the process of completing these assessments your ability to conduct quantitative and qualitative research and analyse the data is assessed.

 

There are further examples of innovative assessment at all stages that will develop skills new to you, but also enhance your psychological literacy. These include many that involve communication to non-expert audiences such as writing a blog post or evaluating the way psychology is communicated in the media. There are core and option modules that where you will apply your psychological knowledge to develop an ‘artefact’ for example, an information poster, an advice leaflet and or set of evidence based guidelines (amongst others) to promote healthwhich will demonstrate your ability to select and evaluate appropriate psychological literature on a specific topic.

 

A further innovative assessment you will encounter is the patchwork text. This is an integrated piece of work made up of a number of elements or patches. Patches are structured, short pieces of work and will include pieces on individual module topics, a group artefact, and an integrated piece which includes reflection on your own perspective and its relationship to the wider discipline of psychology.

 

You will receive feedback in a variety of ways and in both formative (i.e. not associated with marked assessment) and summative (i.e. that associtated with a marked assessment). Many modules include scheduled time to discuss and gain feedback on work you are completing. Particularly on modules where there is an assessment that is completed throughout the course of the module e.g. Cradle to Grave: Integrated Perspectives on Development we work to give opportunities to get feedback on work before submission with spaces are built into the curriculum specifically for you to obtain one-to-one formative feedback on the artefacts you are creating. Similarly many modules such as Applied Memory Research have an explicit formative feedback structure built into class time where you receive feedback on your research for assessments and are able to see work from previous students. In addition you will be assigned a personal tutor who you meet with at least three times each year to discuss your academic progress and all lecturers have weekly office hours (many with two) that are often placed immediately after a class you may have with them.

 

With an emphasis on using presentations to assist your learning and development you will conduct group and individual presentations to help you present arguments in a oral format. Presentations are required at most stages of the programme, depending upon your choice of option modules, and enables you to learn develop and get feedback on what is a vital skill for your success.

 

Much of your feedback will be summative and we have a track record of 98% of assessments marked and returned within four weeks so that you can make the most of the extensive in text and general comments plus the two feedforward comments that will identify the major issues you need to address and how you can do that. The feedforward system has been in operation for several years and evidence shows that it has had a positive impact on grades when used in full.

 

Practical assessments

Practical activities are a large part of psychology and you will be completing data collection, data analysis, volunteering, use of psychometric tests and specialist equipment. Though you will do these practical activities during class and the outcomes will feed into your written assessments you will not be directly assessed on practical activity. For example, though you may design an experiment and collect data from participants you will not be assessed on this activity, rather you will be assessed on your reporting of the method, results and interpretation.

 

In addition to the types of assessment above, BSc Psychology with Clinical Skills includes:

 

Coursework

At Stage 1 on Introduction to Clinical Skills you will complete a portfolio reflecting on the way in which your skills have developed over the module. At Stage 2, on Assessment, Formulation, and Evidence Bases, you will complete an essay where you provide a psychological assessment based on a case-study and a portfolio that describes a formulation based on a case-study, an evaluation of current evidence based on the formulation, and a protocol of an intervention based on the formulation. At Stage 3, on Mental Health and Illness, you will complete an exam and an essay. On Patient Engagement and Reflective Practice, you will write an essay describing the re-design of a service based on the evidence of patient/carer preferences, and a portfolio that evaluates the importance of the therapeutic alliance and requires you to reflect on your development of an empathic relationship with a service-user. Finally, on Professional Practice, you will complete an essay discussing a conceptual issue in clinical psychology, and  will complete a portfolio that comprises of a written report discussing regulatory, legal, and ethical issues raised by a case-study and a ‘case review’ presentation in which these issues are discussed as they would be at a case conference.

 

 

In addition to the types of assessment above, BSc Psychology with Counselling includes:

 

Coursework

At stage 2 on Foundations of Embedded Counselling Skills, you are asked to record a demonstration of your counselling skills practice which is submitted as part of the final assessment.  At stage 3 on the The Developing Listener, you will make a video or audio recording of your skills work which is assessed.

 

In addition to the types of assessment included in BSc Psychology, BSc Forensic Psychology includes:

Coursework

You will do coursework at all stages of the Forensic Psychology programme. The Stage 1 module Introduction to Forensic Psychology includes an essay and a case study report as methods of assessment. At stage two, on the module The Psycholgoy of Detection Interviewing and the Criminal Trial you are assessed via the production of an expert witness report, a multimedia web presentation, and a patchwork text. At stage three, students are asked to produce a case study formulation and a parole report on the module The Psychology of Serious and Violent Offending.

 

In addition to the above, BSc Psychology with Health and Wellbeing includes:

 

Written examinations

At Stage 1, Psychology, Health and Wellbeing is partly assessed by written examination, with questions addressing a case study.

Coursework

At Stage 1, Psychology, Health and Wellbeing students are asked to create an artefact relevant to health communication alongside an academic justification.   At Stage 2, Community, Culture and Environment asks students to undertake a portfolio based assessment, and Investigating Complex Issues in Psychology asks you to produce a patchwork text.

Practical assessments

At Stage 3, Health Psychology and Behaviour Change, students are asked to design an intervention to tackle a health behaviour of their choice, and provide all relevant materials for the delivery of the intervention, alongside an academic justification to support the intervention design. 

 

 

 

A summary of the types of teaching, learning and assessment in each module of the programme can be found in the Matrix of Modes of Teaching.

 

The generic assessment criteria which we use can be found here. Some programmes use subject-specific assessment criteria which are based on the generic ones.

 

This programme uses the Generic University Assessment Criteria

YES

 

This programme uses the Subject Specific Assessment Criteria

YES

 

 

The University regulations can be found here.

 

The principles guiding our assessment and feedback strategy are (500 words):

 

Diversity of assessment methods, innovation and challenge. Whilst the foundation of the assessment strategy continues to value traditional forms of assessments such as examinations, essays and research reports (because they develop and measure the key skills required by the university, the BPS and the Quality Assurance Agency, and they are essential for a career in psychology) we have a diverse intake of students with varying backgrounds. Therefore our programmes are based on a variety of new and innovative assessments that can improve learning, increase engagement, and develop new skills. For example, media pieces, patchwork texts, case studies, psychological artefacts to name a few. This diversity and innovation of assessment is supported by the HEA report, which encourages ‘more interesting and challenging forms of assessment’ (p. 15) and the assessments we use are a key part of the learning process. Many of the skills you will learn from these assessments will enhance your employability.

 

One of our most successful assessments is the academic poster (part of the Stage 3 Empirical Project module). All students produce a professional poster which communicates the aims and outcomes of their empirical project. These posters are presented at a conference in the School. This conference has always been extremely successful, and staff and external examiners have commented that that standard of the posters is equivalent to that at academic conferences.

 

Progression. Our assessment strategy is designed to provide clear progression through the programme. Assessment tasks build on those from lower levels, and level of challenge increases. Assessments at each stage will help to prepare you for assessments at the subsequent stage. For example, research reports at Stage 1 will provide the basic skills you need to succeed in writing more challenging reports at Stage 2, and these in turn will prepare you for your more substantial piece of work, the Stage 3 empirical project.   

 

Learning through assessment. Assessment is as much about learning as it is about testing. Although assessments provide very important information about your progress and achievement, many of the assessments you do will give you the opportunity to gain much more than a mark. For example, research projects are designed to enable you to acquire the skills of a professional psychologist. You will be learning how to design effective studies, measure psychological variables, collect and analyse data, and write professional research reports. Each time you go through this process, you will learn new research design and data analysis techniques, and you will gradually improve your report writing skills.

 

Learning through feedback. Just as we believe in learning through working on assessments, we also believe that learning does not end when you submit a piece of work. When we return your assessment, you will receive not only a mark, feedback, and feedforward. Markers will explain how well you did on the assessment criteria, highlighting strengths and weaknesses. This feedback not only explains your mark, it also helps you to improve your work the next time (feedforward). Our external examiners have commended us for t he quantity and quality of our feedback to students. The majority of assessments are now submitted and marked electronically, with clear typed comments on-screen.  Additionally, we provide a number of opportunities for formative feedback throughout the programme.

 

 

The University aims to return marked assessments and feedback within 4 working weeks of the assignment submission date after internal moderation processes have been completed. If this is not possible, students will be notified by the Module Leaders when the feedback is available and how it can be obtained.

 

The Academic Misconduct Regulations and associated guidance can be found here. It is the responsibility of students to ensure they are familiar with their responsibilities in regards to assessments and the implications of an allegation of academic misconduct.

 

Students should refer to the University Regulations for information on degree classifications and compensation between modules.

 

 

 

 


 

34.     Teaching, learning and assessment matrix

 

NB. Not all option modules may be offered in any one academic year and will depend on the availability of staff and the priorities of the school. In addition, modules will usually need to be selected by a minimum number of students. Option modules may be available on more than one programme and the Programme Leaders will liaise with the Faculty Management Team to ensure there is a reasonable amount of choice in any given year.

 

Stage 1 BSc Psychology (including BPS core modules)

 

These tables show route specific modules as options in the main tables to map to the BSc Psychology programme learning outcomes then are shown as cores with mappings to route specific learning outcomes (with the excpetion of Counselling modules, which do not map to the psychology learning outcomes and are therefore omitted from the main tables).

 

 

Module

Code

Core / option

Modes of T&L

Modes of Assessment

SS1

SS2

SS3

SS4

SS5

SS6

SS7

SS8

SS9

SS10

SS11

SS12

K1

K2

K3

K4

Genes to Mind*

 

 

PSY122

Core

L, W, DS, IS, GW

E, Ex

T, D, A

T, D, A

T, D, A

T, D, A

 

 

 

T, D, A

T, D, A

 

T, D, A

 

T, D, A

 

T, D, A

 

Mind to World*

 

 

PSY123

Core

L, PBL, DS, IS

Ex, E

T, D, A

T, D, A

T, D, A

T, D, A

 

 

 

T, D, A

T, D, A

 

T, D, A

 

T, D, A

T, D, A

T, D, A

 

Being a Psychologist*

PSY140

Core

L, GW, DS, IS

RR, CP

T, D, A

T, D, A

T, D, A

T, D, A

T, D, A

T, D, A

T, D, A

T, D, A

T, D, A

T, D, A

T, D, A

T, D, A

T, D, A

T, D, A

T, D, A

T, D, A

Introduction to Mental Health

PSY141

Core

L, IS

E, Ex

T, D, A

T, D, A

T, D, A

T, D, A

 

 

 

 

 

 

T, D, A

 

 

 

T, D, A

 

Psychology in the Media

PSY125

Option

L, EBL, DS, IS

MP, MR

 

 

T, D, A

T, D, A

 

 

 

 

T, D, A

 

T, D, A

 

 

T, D, A

T, D, A

T, D, A

Introduction to Clinical Skills

PSY143

Option (core for clinical)

L, W, DS

C, CR

T, D, A

T, D, A

T, D, A

T, D, A

 

 

 

 

 

 

T, D, A

T, D, A

T, D, A

 

T, D, A

 

Introduction to Forensic Psychology

PSY144

Option (core for forensic)

L, W, PBL, DS, IS

E, CSR

T, D, A

T, D, A

T, D, A

T, D, A

 

 

 

 

 

 

T, D, A

 

T, D, A

T, D, A

T, D, A

 

Psychology, Health and Wellbeing

PSY142

Option (Core for HWB)

L, W, DS, IS, GW

A, E, Ex

T, D, A

T, D, A

T, D, A

T, D, A

 

 

 

 

 

 

T, D, A

 

T, D, A

 

T, D, A

 

 

Modes of T&L: DS = Directed Study, EBL = Enquiry Based Learning, GT = Group Tutorial, GW = Group Work, IT = Individual Tutorial,  IS = Independent Study, L = Lecture, RE = Research Engagement, PBL = Problem Based Learning, W = Workshop,

 

Modes of Assessment: CP = Coursework Portfolio, CSR = Case Study Report, CR = Critical Reflection, E = Essay, Ex = Examination, ICT = In-Class Test, MP = Media Piece, MR = Media Report, Pr = Presentation, RR = Research Report, WE = Written Exercise

 

T = Taught, D = Developed, A = Assessed

 

*Indicates a compulsory module which must be successfully passed for progression to further modules or to the next academic year of study.

 

 

Stage 2 BSc Psychology (including BPS core modules)

 

Module

Code

Core / optional

Modes of T&L

Modes of Assessment

SS13

SS14

SS15

SS16

SS17

SS18

SS19

SS20

SS21

SS22

SS23

SS24

SS25

K5

K6

K7

K8

K9

Twenty-Four, Seven: Everyday Motivations and Biases*

 

PSY247

Core

L, S, W, DS, IS

RP, RR

T, D, A

T, D, A

T, D, A

T, D, A

T, D, A

T, D, A

T, D, A

T, D, A

T, D, A

T, D, A

 

T, D, A

 

T, D, A

 

T, D, A

T, D, A

 

Research Methods and DataAnalysis in Psychology*

 

PSY260

Core

L, W, DS, IS

RR, PC

 

 

 

T, D, A

T, D, A

T, D, A

T, D, A

T, D, A

T, D, A

T, D, A

T, D, A

T, D, A

 

T, D, A

TD

T, D, A

T, D, A

T, D

Future Selves*

 

 

 

 

PSY261

Core

L, W, WE, PT, DS, IS

PT, RR

T, D, A

T, D, A

T, D, A

T, D, A

T, D, A

T, D, A

T, D, A

T, D, A

T, D, A

 

T, D, A

T, D, A

T, D, A

T, D, A

 

 

T, D, A

 

Cradle to Grave*

 

 

 

PSY267

Core

L, PBL, DS, IS

PF, Pr

T, D, A

T, D, A

T, D, A

T, D, A

 

 

T, D, A

T, D, A

T, D, A

 

 

T, D, A

 

T, D, A

T, D, A

T, D, A

 

T,D,A

Anomalous Psychology: a critical introduction

PSY265

Option

L, S, DS, IS

RR, CRe

T, D, A

T, D, A

T, D, A

T, D, A

T, D, A

T, D, A

T, D, A

T, D, A

T, D, A

 

 

T, D, A

 

T, D, A

 

T, D, A

T, D, A

 

Investigating Complex Issues in Psychology

PSY266

Option for Psy and Psy w/Cou (Core for other routes)

PBL, GW, DS

PT

T, D, A

T, D, A

 

T, D, A

 

 

T, D, A

 

 

 

T, D, A

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Meet the Relatives: Evolutionary Psychology and Animal Behaviour

268

Option

L, S, DS, IS

WE, E

T, D, A

T, D, A

T, D, A

T, D, A

 

 

 

T, D, A

T, D, A

 

 

T, D, A

 

T, D, A

 

T, D, A

 

 

Assessment and Formulation

PSY263

Option (Core for clinical skills)

L, W, IS, DS

E, C

 

 

 

T, D, A

 

 

T, D, A

T, D, A

T, D, A

T, D, A

T, D, A

 

 

 

T, D, A

T, D, A

 

T, D, A

Psychology of detection, interviewing and the criminal trial

PSY264

Option (core for forensic)

L, W, DS, IS

MWP, EWR

T, D, A

T, D, A

 

T, D, A

 

 

 

T, D, A

T, D, A

 

T, D, A

 

 

 

T, D, A

T, D, A

 

T, D, A

Community, Culture and Environment

PSY262

Option (Core for HWB)

L, W, DS, IS,

CP

T, D, A

T, D, A

 

T, D, A

 

 

 

T, D, A

T, D, A

 

 

 

 

 

T, D, A

T, D, A

 

 

 

Modes of T&L: DS = Directed Study, EBL = Enquiry Based Learning, GT = Group Tutorial, GW = Group Work, IT = Individual Tutorial,  IS = Independent Study, L = Lecture, RE = Research Engagement, PBL = Problem Based Learning, W = Workshop, WE = Work Experience, PT = Patchwork Text

 

Modes of Assessment: CP = Coursework Portfolio, CR = Critical Reflection, E = Essay, EWR = Expert Witness Report, Ex = Examination, ICT = In-Class Test, MP = Media Piece, MR = Media Report, MWP = Multimedia Web Presentation, Pr = Presentation, RR = Research Report, WE = Written Exercise, PT = Patchwork Text, RP = Research Proposal, PC = Portfolio of Competencies, CRe = Critical Review

 

T = Taught, D = Developed, A = Assessed

*Indicates a compulsory module which must be successfully passed for progression to further modules or to the next academic year of study.

 

 

Stage 3 Bsc Psychology (including BPS core modules)

 

 

Module

Code

Core / optional

Modes of T&L

Modes of Assessment

SS26

SS27

SS28

SS29

SS30

SS31

SS32

SS33

SS34

K10

K11

Empirical Project

 

PSY332

Core

L, S, IS, Sup

RR, Po

T, D, A

T, D, A

T, D, A

T, D, A

T, D, A

T, D, A

T, D, A

T, D, A

T, D, A

T, D, A

T, D, A

From Research to Reality

PSY380

Core for BSc Psychology

L, S, IS

Ex, exhibit

T, D, A

T, D, A

T, D, A

T, D, A

 

T, D, A

 

 

T, D, A

T, D, A

T, D, A

Occupational Psychology

PSY335

Option

L, S, IS

CW, WE

T, D, A

T, D, A

T, D, A

T, D, A

 

 

 

 

T, D, A

T, D, A

T, D, A

Mental Health and Illness

PSY340

Option

L, S, GW, IS

WE, Ex

T, D, A

T, D, A

T, D, A

T, D, A

 

T, D, A

 

 

T, D, A

T, D, A

T, D, A

Environmental Psychology

PSY356

Option

L, S, GW, IS

Pr, WE

T, D, A

T, D, A

T, D, A

T, D, A

 

 

 

 

T, D, A

T, D, A

T, D, A

Dissertation in Psychology

PSY358

Option

Sup, IS

WE

T, D, A

T, D, A

T, D, A

T, D, A

 

 

 

 

T, D, A

T, D, A

T, D, A

Psychology of Addiction

PSY378

Option

L, S, DS, IS

WE, Ex

T, D, A

T, D, A

T, D, A

T, D, A

 

T, D, A

 

 

T, D, A

T, D, A

T, D, A

Psychology and Story

PSY383

Option

W, IS

VSB

T, D, A

 

 

T, D, A

 

T, D, A

 

 

 

T, D, A

 

Digital Humans: The Psychology of Online Behaviour

PSY385

Option

L, W, IS

WE, Ex

T, D, A

T, D, A

T, D, A

T, D, A

 

 

 

 

T, D, A

T, D, A

T, D, A

Development and Neurodiversity

PSY386

Option

L, S, IS

CA, WE

 

T, D, A

T, D, A

T, D, A

 

 

 

 

T, D, A

T, D, A

 

Applied Memory Research

PSY387

Option

L, PBL, IS

CP

T, D, A

T, D, A

 

T, D, A

 

T, D, A

 

 

T, D, A

T, D, A

 

Professional Placement

PSY388

Option

L, W, Pl, IS

Pr, WE,CPl

 

T, D, A

 

T, D, A

 

T, D, A

 

 

T, D, A

T, D, A

T, D, A

Art Psychology

 

Option

W

CR

 

T, D, A

 

T, D, A

 

 

 

 

T, D, A

T, D, A

 

Professional Practice

PSY381

Option

(Core for Clinical Skills)

L, W, IS, WBL

E, CP

 

 

 

 

 

 

T, D, A

 

 

T, D, A

T, D, A

Patient Engagement and Reflective Practice

PSY382

Option (Core for Clinical Skills)

L, W, IS, DS

E, CP

 

 

 

T, D, A

 

 

T, D, A

 

T, D, A

T, D, A

T, D, A

The Psychology of Serious and Violent Offending

PSY384

Option (core for forensic)

L, W, DS, IS

CSF, PR

T, D, A

T, D, A

T, D, A

T, D, A

 

T, D, A

 

 

T, D, A

T, D, A

T, D, A

Health Psychology and Behaviour Change

PSY373

Option (Core for HWB)

L, W, DS, IS, GW

A, E

T, D, A

T, D, A

T, D, A

T, D, A

 

T, D, A

 

 

T, D, A

T, D, A

T, D, A

 

 

Modes of T&L: DS = Directed Study, EBL = Enquiry Based Learning, GT = Group Tutorial, GW = Group Work, IT = Individual Tutorial,  IS = Independent Study, L = Lecture, RE = Research Engagement, PBL = Problem Based Learning, W = Workshop Sup – Supervision, Pl = Placement Activity, CR = Critical Reflection

 

Modes of Assessment: CP = Coursework Portfolio, CR = Critical Reflection, CSF = Case Study Formulation, E = Essay, Ex = Examination, ICT = In-Class Test, MP = Media Piece, MR = Media Report, PR = Parole Report, Pr = Presentation, RR = Research Report, WE = Written Exercise, CPl = Completion of Placement, CA =  Comparative Analysis, VSB = Video with supporting storyboard

 

T = Taught, D = Developed, A = Assessed

 

 

 

All Stages BSc Psychology with Clinical Skills

 

 

Module

Code

Core / optional

Modes of T&L

Modes of Assessment

SSCS1

SSCS2

SSCS3

SSCS4

SSCS5

SSCS6

SSC7

KCS1

KCS2

KCS3

KCS4

KCS5

Introduction to Clinical Skills

PSY143

Core

L, W, DS

C, CR

T, D, A

T, D, A

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Introduction to Mental Health

PSY141

Core

L, IS, DS

E, Ex

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

T, D, A

 

 

 

 

Investigating Complex Issues in Psychology

PSY266

Core

PBL, GW, DS

PT

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Assessment and Formulation

PSY263

Core

L, W, IS, DS

E, C

 

 

T, D, A

T, D, A

 

 

 

 

T, D, A

T, D, A

 

 

Empirical Project

PSY332

Core

L, S, IS, Sup

RR, Po

 

 

 

 

 

T, D, A

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mental Health and Illness

PSY340

Core

L, W, IS, DS

E, Ex

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

T, D, A

T, D, A

Professional Practice

PSY381

Core

L, W, IS, WBL

E, CP

 

 

 

 

 

 

T, D, A

 

 

 

T, D, A

 

Patient Engagement and Reflective Practice

PSY382

Core

L, W, IS, DS

E, CP

 

 

 

 

T, D, A

 

T, D, A

 

 

 

T, D, A

 

 

Modes of T&L: DS = Directed Study, GW = Group Work, ,  IS = Independent Study, L = Lecture, PBL = Problem Based Learning, W = Workshop, WBL = Work Based Learning

 

Modes of Assessment: C = Coursework, PT = Patchwork Text, Ex = Examination, E = Essay, CR = Critical Reflection

 

 

All Stages BSc Psychology with Counselling

 

 

Module

Code

Core / optional

Modes of T&L

Modes of Assessment

SSC1

SSC2

SSC3

SSC4

KC1

KC2

KC3

KC4

Introduction to Theories and Concepts in Counselling

CNS103

Core

L, IS

E

T, D, A

 

 

 

T, D, A

 

 

 

Foundation of Embedded Counselling Skills

CNS206

Core

DS, W, L, IS, GW

E, CP

 

T, D A

 

 

 

T, D, A

 

 

The Developing Listener

CNS311

Core

DS, W, L, IS, GW

CP

 

 

T, D, A

 

 

 

T, D, A

 

Contemporary Counselling in Context

CNS310

Core

L, IS

E

 

 

 

T, D, A

 

 

 

T, D, A

 

 

 

Modes of T&L: DS = Directed Study, GW = Group Work, ,  IS = Independent Study, L = Lecture, PBL = Problem Based Learning, W = Workshop, WBL = Work Based Learning

 

Modes of Assessment: CP = Coursework Portfolio, PT = Patchwork Text, Ex = Examination, E = Essay

 

 

All Stages BSc Forensic Psychology

 

 

Module

Code

Core / optional

Modes of T&L

Modes of Assessment

SSF1

SSF2

SSF3

SSF4

SSF5

SSF6

SSF7

KF1

KF2

KF3

KF4

KF5

Introduction to Forensic Psychology

PSY144

Core

L, W, PBL, DS, IS

E, CSR

T, D, A

T, D, A

 

 

 

 

 

T, D, A

T, D, A

 

 

 

Psychology of detection, interviewing and the criminal trial

PSY264

Core

L, W, DS, IS

MWP, EWR

 

 

T, D, A

 

 

 

 

 

 

T, D, A

 

 

Investigating Complex Issues in Psychology

PSY266

Core

PBL, GW, DS

PT

 

 

T, D, A

 

 

 

 

 

 

T, D, A

 

 

Empirical Project

PSY332

Core

L, S, IS, Sup

RR, Po

 

 

 

 

 

 

T,D,A

 

 

 

 

 

The Psychology of Serious and Violent Offending

PSY384

Core

L, W, DS, IS

CSF, PR

 

 

 

T, D, A

T, D, A

T, D, A

 

 

 

 

T, D, A

T, D, A

 

Modes of T&L: DS = Directed Study, EBL = Enquiry Based Learning, EWR = Expert Witness Report, GT = Group Tutorial, GW = Group Work, IT = Individual Tutorial,  IS = Independent Study, L = Lecture, MWP = Multimedia Web Presentation, RE = Research Engagement, PBL = Problem Based Learning, W = Workshop.

 

Modes of Assessment: CP = Coursework Portfolio, CSF = Case Study Formulation, CSR = Case Study Report, CR = Critical Reflection, E = Essay, Ex = Examination, ICT = In-Class Test, MP = Media Piece, MR = Media Report, PR = Parole Report, Pr = Presentation, PT = Patchwork Text, RR = Research Report, WE = Written Exercise

 

T = Taught, D = Developed, A = Assessed

 

 

All Stages BSc Psychology with Health and Wellbeing

 

 

Module

Code

Core / optional

Modes of T&L

Modes of Assessment

SSHW1

SSHW2

SSHW3

SSHW4

KHW1

KHW2

KHW3

Psychology, Health and Wellbeing

PSY142

Core

L, W, DS, IS, GW

A, E, Ex

T, D, A

 

 

 

T, D, A

 

 

Investigating Complex Issues in Psychology

PSY266

Core

PBL, GW, DS

PT

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Community, Culture and Environment

PSY262

Core

L, W, DS, IS,

CP

 

T, D, A

 

 

 

T, D, A

 

Empirical Project

PSY332

Core

L, S, IS, Sup

 

 

 

 

T, D, A

 

 

 

Health Psychology and Behaviour Change

PSY373

Core

L, W, DS, IS, GW

A, E

 

 

T, D, A

 

 

 

T, D, A

 

Modes of T&L: DS = Directed Study, EBL = Enquiry Based Learning, GT = Group Tutorial, GW = Group Work, IT = Individual Tutorial,  IS = Independent Study, L = Lecture, RE = Research Engagement, PBL = Problem Based Learning, W = Workshop.

 

Modes of Assessment: A = Artefact, CP = Coursework Portfolio, CR = Critical Reflection, CSF = Case Study Formulation, E = Essay, Ex = Examination, ICT = In-Class Test, MP = Media Piece, MR = Media Report, PR = Parole Report, Pr = Presentation, RR = Research Report, WE = Written Exercise

 

T = Taught, D = Developed, A = Assessed


35.     How does research influence the programme? 

The School of Psychology considers research to be central to its activities and ethos. Many of the staff in the school of psychology are research active, and engaged in research projects at the cutting edge of the discipline. The majority of permanent staff are PhD qualified and the department currently supervises several PhD students.

 

The psychology programme is underpinned by a research active curriculum. This means that the research which staff are engaged in is integrated into the curriculum, so that teaching is supported by examples grounded in our own research work. You will learn about the work we do as researchers, and in doing so, develop your own research skills. The Empirical Project module in Stage 3 and the voluntary research assistant scheme provide fantastic opportunities for you to work in partnership with us on exciting and contemporary research projects.  Additionally, many of the Stage 2 and 3 option modules draw on staff research interests, providing you with a learning and teaching experience that is guided by expertise and enthusiasm. Staff research interests are diverse, and include, for example, environmental psychology, mindfulness, domestic violence, autobiographical memory, computational neuroscience, evolutionary psychology (e.g. attractiveness and mate choice, male competitiveness), bilingualism, dark personalities, psycholinguistics, neurodiversity, cyberpsychology, visual perception and play.

 

 

SECTION D:EMPLOYABILITY

 

36.     How will the programme prepare me for employment?

 

Graduating from any of our psychology programmes will provide you with a varied set of skills and attributes, valued by employers. It is true to say psychology is useful and relevant in almost all walks of life. For example, through presentation skills, understanding and use of evidence or good knowledge of teamwork, leadership and group dynamics. Our graduates have gone on to pursue further postgraduate study and a wide range of careers and further study, including:

 

  • Therapist for autistic children
  • Project Officer, Social Services
  • Assistant psychologist
  • PhD Student
  • Education Welfare Officer
  • Personal fitness coach
  • Recruitment Officer
  • Clinical Psychologist
  • Forensic Psychologist
  • Masters student (Occupational Psychology)
  • Postgraduate teaching qualification
  • Therapy support worker (brain injury)
  • Substance misuse worker
  • Small business owner

Employability is embedded into all programmes. In addition, we provide bespoke events within the department. We also offer workshops in partnership with Sunderland Futures.

 

Embedding employability skills. The HEA identifies graduate employability as a key challenge and focuses on the importance of acquisition and student awareness of graduate skills. The embedding of employability skills in core modules is designed to increase enhance the development of academic skills and introduce the career landscape. Our diverse range of assessments means you develop a wide range of employability skills and graduate attributes. When you successfully complete your psychology programme, you will (depending partly on what option modules you take) have IT literacy, the ability to handle complex datasets, oral and visual presentation skills, the ability to write professional academic reports as well as communicate complex concepts to a non-expert audience, the ability to design scientific research, critically evaluate scientific claims, construct evidence-based arguments, work effectively in a team, manage a number of deadlines effectively and apply a range of psychological theories to real world problems. Each module you take will make it clear via the descriptor and the module leader what transferable skills you will gain when you pass the module. These transferable skills can be applied to any career that you will pursue once you have graduated.

 

Our development weeks involve masterclasses for students not just on topics relating to their degree, but also focussing on transferable skills they may require for future employment (such as competencies in Microsoft Excel and presenting verbal arguments). Student volunteering is embedded in a core module taken by students on all programmes – the Stage 2 module Future Selves – and this volunteering aids in the CVs and practical experience that all graduates from the School of Psychology hold. The school expands this yet further with opportunities for student volunteer Research Assistants who work closely with a member of staff on a staff-driven research topic, allowing students to get practical experience working as a research assistant whilst also developing their skills as independent workers who show the initiative desirable by many future employers.

 

The Stage 2 core module Future Selves is a prime example of how the very psychological knowledge and skills you are learning as part of your degree can be applied to the workplace. In this module you will examine theories of leadership, resilience, ideal selves and also think about how psychology is used to motivate and select good candidates for a job. This will help you use your psychological knowledge in whatever career you pursue.

 

The Professional Placement module also provides you with practical experience working in an area of psychology, developing problem solving skills, independence, initiative and working closely with a team in a given scenario.

 

Currently the School of Psychology offers voluntary research placements, giving you the opportunity to work with a member of academic staff in the school of psychology, assisting with their research projects. These placements provide excellent training in research skills and are particularly useful to students who wish to pursue a higher research degree in psychology and an academic career. When research placements become available, they are advertised within the department and interested students must submit an application, Students at any stage of the programme are eligible to apply. There is often competition for placements and they are not guaranteed.

 

Finally, our yearly Futures Day for Stage 3 students to attend, which includes talks delivered by former graduates, career options discussions, a discussion of postgraduate opportunities, attendance and talks by the university Careers Service, Student Finance, and the Intern Factory discussing the range of paid internships available to University of Sunderland graduates. These initiatives in the School of Psychology are evident in the increase in the Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education (DLHE) survey, where the School of Psychology has seen a steady increase in the past three years of the percentage of students in work or further study (from 90.05 to 96 to 97.7).

 

 

There are also opportunities for on-campus students outside your programme of study.

 

Currently the school of psychology offers voluntary research placements, giving you the opportunity to work with a member of academic staff in the school of psychology, assisting with their research projects. These placements provide excellent training in research skills and are particularly useful to students who wish to pursue a higher research degree in psychology and an academic career. When research placements become available, they are advertised within the department and interested students must submit an application, Students at any stage of the programme are eligible to apply. There is often competition for placements and they are not guaranteed.

 

 

For information about other opportunities available to our students who study on campus, click here.

 

Additional opportunities to develop your experiences more widely will vary if you study at one of our partner colleges. For information about the extra-curricular activities available in any of our colleges please contact the college direct. 

 

37.     Particular features of the qualification

 

The British Psychological Society (the accrediting body) requires that the Empirical Project module (PSY332) must be passed. This module cannot be condoned or compensated. This programme specific regulation has been approved by Academic Board under the provisions of the university regulations.

 

BSc (Hons) Psychology, and BSc (Hons) Psychology with Counselling are accredited by the British Psychological Society and allows you to achieve chartered status as a Graduate Member of the BPS providing you achieve at least a 2.2 classification. If you achieve a 3rd class degree you will not be eligible for chartered status as a graduate member of the BPS. Accreditation for BSc (Hons) Psychology with Clinical Skills, BSc (Hons) Forensic Psychology and BSc (Hons) Psychology with Health and Wellbeing has been applied for.   


 

38.     Professional statutory or regulatory body (PSRB) accreditation.

 

PSRB accreditation is not relevant to this programme 

 

PSRB accreditation is currently being sought for this programme

 

This programme currently has PSRB accreditation

Yes (routes applied for)

 

The programme is currently accredited until: 2021

 

The implications of the accreditation not being renewed are: Graduates would not be eligible for graduate basis for chartership with the British Psychological Society. This would prevent them from pursuing a career in psychology and thus reduce the attractiveness of the programme to applicants considerably.

 

Please see PSRB Renewal Process for information on the renewal process.

The relevant PSRB(s) is/are:

 

British Psychological Society

 

The terms of the accreditation are as follows:

 

The programme is recognised as: Accredited by the British Psychological Society

 

The programme is accredited dependent on five yearly review visit from the British Psychological Society

 

Accreditation gives graduates: BSc (Hons) Psychology, and BSc (Hons) Psychology with Counselling are accredited by the British Psychological Society and allows you to achieve chartered status as a Graduate Member of the BPS providing you achieve at least a 2.2 classification. If you achieve a 3rd class degree you will NOT be eligible for chartered status as a graduate member of the BPS. Accreditation for BSc (Hons) Psychology with Clinical Skills, BSc (Hons) Forensic Psychology and BSc (Hons) Psychology with Health and Wellbeing has been applied for.   

 

Eligibility for Graduate Basis for Chartership with the British Psychological Society

 

This depends upon successful completion of the programme and achievement of at least a 2.2 classification.

 

The module PSY332 Empirical Project must be passed and cannot be compensated

 

Is membership of the PSRB dependent on further requirements? No

 

There are programme-specific regulations relating to the following. Details are given in the programme regulations:

 

The modules to be studied

 

Pass-marks for some or all modules and/or parts

(elements) of modules 

PSY332 Empirical Project must be passed and cannot be compensated

Requirements for progression between one Stage and another

 

Placement requirements

 

Attendance requirements

 

Professional practice requirements

 

Degree classification  

 

Other 

 

 

 

 

Interim or exit awards are not accredited. 

 

Free text for description which is not covered by the options above.

 

Graduates will only achieve graduate basis for chartership with the British Psychological Society if they achieve a 2.2 or above.

 

 

SECTION E:PROGRAMME STRUCTURE AND REGULATIONS

 

Complete and insert Part B of the Programme Regulations Form, for questions 39 and 40

 

SECTION F:ADMISSIONS, LEARNING ENVIRONMENT AND SUPPORT

 

  1. What are the admissions requirements?

 

The University’s standard admissions requirements can be found in the university regulations. Programme-specific requirements which are in addition to those regulations are given below.

 

The current entry requirements for this programme is as specified in the Fees and Entry Requirements section on the programme page on the University’s website.

 

Entry from a University of Sunderland Foundation Year

 

Students who complete the Integrated Foundation Year for Health Sciences will be eligible to start at Stage 1 of the programme.

 

Entry point (delete those not required)

Standard entry requirements1

Entry with advanced standing2

Other3

Stage 1 (u/g)

 

Typical offer of 112 UCAS points from a minimum of two A Levels/AVCEs or equivalent. We accept a maximum of 20 points from Level 3 Key Skills.

 

We also require three GCSEs at grade C or above, which must include mathematics and English Language or equivalent, e.g.

Level 2 Key Skills in Communication and Application of Number

Not applicable

 

Stage 2 (u/g)

 

Not applicable

 

 

Stage 3 (u/g)

 

Not applicable

 

 

Stage 4 (u/g)

 

Not applicable

 

 

 

 

The University has a process by which applicants whose experience to date already covers one or more modules of the programme they are applying for may seek Accreditation of Prior Learning (APL). Full details can be found here but if you think that this may be relevant to you, please contact the department which offers the programme you are interested in.

 

  1. What kind of support and help will there be?
    1. in the department:

 

Welcome week

 

Your first experience on your psychology programme will be Welcome Week, our induction programme. Welcome Week helps to prepare you for beginning your undergraduate studies in psychology. We will also introduce you to the curriculum and skills involved in the study of psychology at university level. You will receive information about timetabling and how to access important information (such as the programme handbook). Additionally, we will introduce you to the support services available within the University. You will have the opportunity to meet members of staff and your fellow students, and we always arrange some fun activities and social events.

 

Many of the events will include students from all the different psychology programmes, however, you will also participate in events that specific to your programme. This allows you to get to know your cohort and also your programme leader in a smaller group. Your fellow students will be an important part of your university experience, a good source of support and likely lifelong friends. Meeting them, your programme leader and personal tutor at this stage means you will settle into School of Psychology as quickly as possible.

 

Personal tutors. All students will meet their personal tutor during Welcome week. We firmly believe the personal tutor should be a mentor and guide to you during your studies. So whilst personal tutors provide support and guidance in the event of any difficulties, their role is not simply reactive. They will discuss with you your aims and interests to help provide a bespoke individual learning experience. Throughout the programme you will have a personal tutor from the team of lecturers who will teach you on the stage you on. This ensures you receive stage specific support when you need it.   

 

All on-campus students have access to the University’s central support services including Counselling, Disability Services, Health and Well-being, Chaplaincy, financial support and advice, International Office and Careers and Employability Service. The Students’ Union provides an independent service which offers advice and support across the full range of personal and academic problems which students may encounter. Students wishing to lodge a complaint or an appeal can seek advice from the Students’ Union or from Academic Services. Full details of all these services can be found on the University’s web-site. Where appropriate, academic or support staff in the Faculty will signpost students to these specialist services.

 

Technical support for Psychology computers is provided by the dedicated psychology technician, and technical helps is provided for all on campus computing facilities by the technical support team located on City Campus. The psychology technician provides support for student projects and is able to develop specialist programs for experimental use. 

 

  1. in the university as a whole:

The University provides a range of professional support services including wellbeing, counselling, disability support, and a Chaplaincy. Click on the links for further information.

 

  1. in a partner college:

Please see the relevant college prospectus or website for details of student support if you are planning to study in one of our partner colleges.

 

  1. What resources will I have access to?

 

On campus

x

In a partner college

 

By distance learning

 

 

On campus

Tick all that apply

General Teaching and Learning Space

X

IT

X

Library

X

VLE

X

Laboratory

X

Studio

 

Performance space

 

Other specialist

 

Technical resources 

X

 

Text for details listed above:

 

Learning resources and IT facilities

The School of Psychology is part of the Faculty of Health Sciences and Wellbeing, and is based on the University’s City Campus, in Shackleton House.  This houses staff offices, a seminar room and an SkillsLab, a dedicated psychology laboratory containing PCs with specialist software for data collection and data analysis. SkillsLab PCs are networked, have SPSS, Open Sesame, G*Power, WinPCQ and the focus II Observation psychology teaching software and teaching and experimental software installed. It is also equipped with three interactive whiteboards for problem-based learning sessions. SkillsLab is equipped with BioPac nine Powerlab machines allowing computers to record and analyse physiological responses such as heart rate, galvanic skin response, respiration and EEG. It has a wide range of applications in biological psychology research. In addition we also have a transcranial direct-current brain stimulation machine (tDCS) for conducting brain stimulation experiments. .  

In the School of Psychology there are nine bookable silent research cubicles where you will carry out data collection. One of these is fully soundproofed. The cubicles contain netoworked PCs equipped with software to conduct a variety of psychological studies. You will also have access to six private interview booths. Currently the School has a visual psychophysics laboratory and work is also underway, scheduled for completion September 2018, to develop our facilities to include an Environmental Psychology Research Lab (with immersive technology), Behavioural Observation Suite as well as a Therapy and Community Room.  In addition to existing interview rooms, flexible IT teaching space, and suite of research cubicles, we will be creating a Gaming Lab, Perception Lab, Sound Proof Lab, Psychophysiology Lab (including EEG), Eye Tracker Lab and Cognitive Neuroscience Lab (with tDCS, CRS ViSaGe and Display++ LCD Touchscreen) and a simulated mental health / learning disabilities ward. 

The Sandbox is located in Shackleton House and contains a multimedia resource and computer games research room dedicated to the students on our programmes.  It includes a social space for use between classes, sofas, whiteboards for brainstorming, a library of books and multimedia resources, three flat screen TVs and two DVD players together with video game equipment (Nintendo Wii and Xbox). Our students really enjoy having this space to socialise, relax and share ideas.

 

Each psychology teaching room is equipped with whiteboards (including interactive versions), screen, OHP, video and data projection and internet connection. The School of Psychology has ten iPads, an iMac and Macbook together with voice and video editing software which will be used to enhance personal tuition (specifically, the ability to record reflective commentaries as part of the PDP process) and eleven multimedia laptops with BluRay facility and integrated webcam.   Other equipment, such as video cameras and laptops, are bookable via the technical helpdesk.

 

Additionally, there are further IT suites on City Campus. A further 250 PCs are available in the David Goldman Informatics Centre on St Peter’s Campus. Black-and-white and colour printing, scanning and photocopying facilities are available in both Murray library and St. Peters Library. The school of psychology has a colour large format printer (A0) for production of posters and a colour A3 printer for production of smaller posters and other materials. The Murray library on City Campus houses a 300 seat lecture theatre which has a full range of state-of-the-art audio-visual, video projection and presentation facilities including full video-conferencing facilities. 

 

Staff resources

 

The School of Psychology is led by Dr Helen Dudiak (Head of School) working with a management team of three other senior staff.  The psychology programme is staffed by Principal Lecturers, Senior Lecturers, Lecturers and a Reader. A recently retired Head of Department has Emeritus Professor status, and retains positive links with the school of psychology. Staff bring a wide range of expertise to the programme. The majority of our staff hold a PhD and have a teaching qualification or are fellows of the  Higher Education Academy, including, three Senior Fellows one of which is a National Teaching Fellow. We have experts in all of the core areas of psychology, as well as evolutionary psychology, research methods, and emerging areas of the discipline, such as environmental psychology and human-computer interaction. These experts make regular appearances on regional and national television and radio shows and also write for national and internation publications such as The Huffington Post.

 

Areas of research and consultancy/outreach which inform the programme

 

The school of psychology considers research to be central to its activities and ethos. Many of the staff in the school of psychology are research active, and engaged in research projects at the cutting edge of the discipline. The majority of permanent staff are PhD qualified and the department currently supervises several PhD students.

 

The psychology programme is underpinned by a research active curriculum. This means that the research which staff are engaged in is integrated into the curriculum, so that teaching is supported by examples grounded in our own research work. You will learn about the work we do as researchers, and in doing so, develop your own research skills. The Empirical Project module in Stage 3 and the voluntary research assistant scheme provide fantastic opportunities for you to work in partnership with us on exciting and contemporary research projects.  Additionally, many of the Stage 2 and 3 option modules draw on staff research interests, providing you with a learning and teaching experience that is guided by expertise and enthusiasm. Staff research interests are diverse, and include, for example, environmental psychology, mindfulness, domestic violence, autobiographical memory, computational neuroscience, evolutionary psychology (e.g. attractiveness and mate choice, male competitiveness), bilingualism, dark personalities, psycholinguistics, cyberpsychology, visual perception and play.

 

Staff are also engaged in reachout activities, applying their expertise to projects in the local community and local industry. Recent projects include:

 

  • Collaborative work with East Durham Trust on a men’s health project (‘Cree Projects’), providing community environments where older men who are socially isolated, unemployed, widowed and/or retired can meet and work together, improving their health and wellbeing. A number of volunteer opportunities for undergraduate students have arisen as a result of this work. Some of our students are now working in this project area with Hartlepool and Durham MIND.

 

  • A project working with Nissan to identify the psychological causes of accidents in the workplace. This has led to a sponsored PhD project within the department.

 

  • Members of staff in the department who have expertise in emotional intelligence are delivering a series of workshops to Nissan.

 

  • Members of staff are helping to deliver the NHS Emerging Leaders Programme. This involves providing training and development, and diagnostic services in the areas of emotional intelligence at work, the psychology of leadership and healthy organisations to four cohorts of NHS leaders in the northern region.

 

  • Staff working for Health Education England North East to deliver courses on sensory integration

 

 

Information about the University’s facilities can be found here.

 

Please see the relevant college prospectus or website for details of college learning resources if you are planning to study in one of our partner colleges.

 

  1. Are there any additional costs on top of the fees?

 

No, but all students buy some study materials such as books and provide their own basic study materials.

x

Yes (optional) All students buy some study materials such as books and provide their own basic study materials. In addition there are some are additional costs for optional activities associated with the programme (see below)

 

Yes (essential) All students buy some study materials such as books and provide their own basic study materials. In addition there are some are essential additional costs associated with the programme (see below)

 

 

 

  1. How are student views represented?

 

With our ethos of the School being a community of learners there is an excellent relationship between our staff and students. As such there are many opportunituies to provide feedback informally through personal tutor meetings, staff office hours, and social media on managed groups. You will interact with your lecturers on a daily basis because of the proximity between the dedicated psychology space and the staff offices. More formally, all taught programmes in the University have student representatives for each Stage (year-group) of each programme who meet in a Student-Staff Liaison Committee (SSLC) where they can raise students’ views and concerns. The Students’ Union and the faculties together provide training for student representatives. SSLCs and focus groups are also used to obtain student feedback on plans for developing existing programmes and designing new ones. Feedback on your programme is obtained every year through module questionnaires and informs the annual review of your programme. Student representatives are also invited to attend Programme and Module Studies Boards which manage the delivery and development of programmes and modules.  Faculty Academic Committee, also has student representation in the form of a Student co-ordinator. This is a paid role where for an experienced student that supports student representatives to perform their roles effectively. This allows students to be involved in higher-level plans for teaching and learning. At university level Students are represented on University level Committees by sabbatical officers who are the elected leaders of the Students’ Union.

 

 

The University’s student representation and feedback policy can be found here.

 

Undergraduate programmes only: Final-year students are also invited to complete a National Student Survey (NSS) which asks a standard set of questions across the whole country. The results of this are discussed at Programme Studies Boards and at Faculty Academic Committee to identify good practice which can be shared and problems which need to be addressed. We rely heavily on student input to interpret the results of the NSS and ensure that we make the most appropriate changes.

 

 

 

SECTION G:QUALITY MANAGEMENT 

 

  1. National subject benchmarks

 

The Quality Assurance Agency (QAA) for Higher Education publishes benchmark statements which give guidance as to the skills and knowledge which graduates in various subjects and in certain types of degree are expected to have. These can be found here.

 

Are there any benchmark statements for this programme?

YES

 

 

The subject benchmark(s) for this programme is/are: Psychology

 

The QAA also publishes a Framework for Higher Education Qualifications (FHEQ) which defines the generic skills and abilities expected of students who have achieved awards at a given level and with which our programmes align. The FHEQ can be found here.

 

  1. How are the