Attachments

 

1.gif

 

 

BSc (HONS) MANAGEMENT

 

PROGRAMME SPECIFICATION

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Version History

 

Version

Occasion of Change

Change Author

Last Modified

1.0

Approval Event

 

March 2019

2.0

Response to Panel Requirements

R. Hall

July 2019

 


SECTION A:CORE INFORMATION

 

  1.  

Name of programme:

Management

 

  1.  

Award title:

BSc Honours

 

  1.  

Programme linkage:

 

Is this part of group of linked programmes between which students can transfer at agreed points?

Yes

If yes:

This programme is one of a group of related programmes which also includes :

BA Business and Management

 

It is possible to transfer between these programmes at certain points. This may be subject to particular requirements.

 

  1.  

Is the programme a top-up only?

 

No

  1.  

Does the programme have a Foundation Year (Level 3) associated with it so that students enter for a four-year programme and progress directly from the Foundation Year to Stage 1 without having to re-apply?

 

No

 

  1.  

Level of award:

 

Level 6

  1.  

Awarding Body:

University of Sunderland

 

  1.  

Department:

Business

 

  1.  

Programme Studies Board:

Undergraduate Business and Management

 

  1.  

Programme Leader:

 

TBC

 


  1. How and where can I study the programme?

At Sunderland:

 

Full-time on campus

X

Part-time on campus

 

As work-based learning full-time

 

As work-based learning part-time

 

As a full-time sandwich course

 

As a part-time sandwich course

 

By distance learning

 

 

At the University of Sunderland London campus: 

 

Full-time on campus

X

Part-time on campus

 

As work-based learning full-time

 

As work-based learning part-time

 

As a full-time sandwich course

 

As a part-time sandwich course

 

By distance learning

 

 

At a partner college:

 

Full-time in the UK 

 

Part-time in the UK

 

Full-time overseas

 

Part-time overseas

 

By distance learning

 

As a full-time sandwich course in the UK

 

As a part-time sandwich course in the UK

 

As a full-time sandwich course overseas

 

As a part-time sandwich course overseas

 

As work-based learning full-time in the UK 

 

As work-based learning part-time overseas

 

Other (please specify)

 

 

  1. How long does the programme take?

 

 

Min number of years / months

Max number of years / months

Full-time

2 Years

6 Years

Part-time

 

 

Distance learning

 

 

Work-based learning

 

 

 

For start-dates please see the current edition of the Prospectus or contact the relevant department at the University. For start-dates for programmes delivered in a partner college, please contact the relevant college.

 

 

SECTION B:FURTHER CORE INFORMATION 

 

Use Outline Programme Proposal Form for ADC for questions 13 to 25

 

  1. Learning and teaching strategy

The introduction of a BSc Management degree with accelerated delivery is seen as an opportunity to appeal to high quality students who can dedicate the full calendar year to the achievement of their degree and as such complete the requirements of a degree programme within two years.

 

The design of the programme is such that it includes key elements of management while incorporating two 60 credit work projects allowing the students to graduate with strong academic and practical experience. The BSc award reflects the applied and technical nature of the programme which is intended to lead towards a career in the management profession and also responds to perceived market expectations. This is reflected best in the two 60 credit work based learning modules where the application of knowledge and the learning outcomes are geared towards practical and professional enhancement. The technical elements of the programme can be seen throughout the finance and accounting strand, which is largely quantitative, and other areas including the management thought and practice element , which is based upon “systems and processes for planning, organising, controlling and decision making” and the digital marketing element, which has the technology of marketing at its heart.

 

Our aim is to ensure the approach to teaching and learning on the programmes is ‘engaging’ for students. This means that the learning journey is taken beyond consultation or participation and is instead, a rich and active partnership where students work alongside staff and other students as partners.  Our philosophy is to ensure Sunderland Business School provides an environment within which students and staff engage in ongoing narrative that aims to bring about demonstratable enhancement of the educational experience and student learning journey. This requires that we continuously improve our learning environment based on personal engagement with students, collaboration between students and academic staff and where students are seen as an active part of the system because they are ‘experts’ in their student experience.  It is an explicit intention to ensure students are encouraged, inspired and motivated by their learning and they see the relevance of what they have learned so they are able to better apply that in the module assessment process and across the programme holistically, all of which we know can impact positively on student achievement (QAA, 2012) and enhance learning gain. 

 

We have of course been engaged in some excellent work in this area thus far, however, feedback from the International Student Barometer (IBS), National Student Survey (NSS) and information gathered as part of the Student Achievement Task and Finish Group Report indicates that there are opportunities for further enhancement.  Specific areas include; programme identity, learning and assessment alignment and greater student-student and student-academic engagement. The approach set out in this document aims to support improvement in these and additional areas e.g. creating engagement ready students and staff; embedding student engagement; changing the conversation; celebrating and innovating; encouraging, listening to and responding to the student voice; transition and induction; curriculum design, delivery and organisation; curriculum content; teaching delivery; learning opportunities and student support and guidance

 

Encouraging Student Engagement

In order to achieve this as an inclusive curriculum, we will provide the opportunity for all learners to co-construct new knowledge, in an environment where individual levels of intellectual development become a tangible part of learning outcomes. Our philosophical vision is to ensure Sunderland Business School provides an environment within which all social interaction and dialogue informs and encourages students to make meaning of their context, their learning needs and a capacity for reflection on their learning ability, which means they can be proactive about the concept of individual achievement.

 

Students’ learning will be enhanced by contributions from guest speakers.

 

  1. Retention strategy

Retention is a key priority of the Faculty of Business, Law and Tourism and students are supported with a robust personal tutor strategy plus close links between module and programme leaders and the students on their learning journey.

The Faculty also has a dedicated retention and progression team who are based in the faculty and who proactively engage with students where there are felt to be concerns over retention.

Today’s students have to juggle a number of priorities in their lives, both inside and outside the University. To ensure the student has the best possible environment in which to academically flourish we would make full use of the university support functions where needed in such areas as financial advice and student counselling. Where circumstance are impacting on the students ability to perform at their best the Exceptional Circumstances Panel will review any issue which has adversely, through no fault of their own, impacted upon the student and inform the assessment boards of their opinion. Students will be counselled by their programme leader with regard to their progress after each semester and where it is felt necessary guided towards the three year Business and Management programme should the pace of the programme be causing progression issues. 

 

  1. Any other information

Candidates will be taught within the usual academic cycle for two trimesters (aligning with the current semesterised delivery of programmes) within each year of study, ensuring cohesion with the usual University cycle and integration with the overall student experience. Within the third trimester they undertake work-based experience and project activity, having been intensely prepared with specialist input in the preceding trimester. As the programme runs on a different cycle to the normal delivery of a three year degree, Assessment Boards will be as follows:

Module Assessment Boards will take place at the end of each semester as per standard University practice.

Programme Assessment Boards: Progression will take place after 180 credits as described within the programme specific regulations. The final (award) board will take place after completion all modules. For a student enrolling on a September intake this will mean the Programme Assessment Board will usually take place after twelve and twenty four months. This reflects the two year/three semesters per year rather than three year/two semesters per year delivery cycle. Students judged to be in poor academic standing, i.e. to have failed module(s), will be considered exceptionally by a Programme Assessment Board at the end of level 4 and level 5 of the programme.

 


SECTION C:TEACHING AND LEARNING

 

  1. What is the programme about?

 

  1. The role of management and how its’ functions (Marketing, HRM and Finance) are managed and integrated to respond and reflect society and the business community (local, national and global).
  2. How business is structured including the practices and processes which support problem solving and evidence based decision making which influence and has an impact upon the management of the business.
  3. The integration of management policies and strategies which promote corporate social responsibility which are ethical and lead to sustainable business.
  4. The policies, strategies and practices which enable and support the management of change and innovation which influence the management of resources
  5. Develop as practitioners who act and behave as an academically informed management professional.

 

  1. What will I know or be able to do at each Level of the programme?

 

Learning Outcomes Level 4 – Skills  

By the end of this Level of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

S1.Display the ability to motivate, communicate, and work in management teams from a range of cultural backgrounds and as an individual in a range of scenarios.

S2. Explain and apply a range of problem-solving practices and techniques for making management decisions.

S3. Display and demonstrate self-awareness of what is needed by future managers and leaders to build relationships with a diverse range of people.

 

Learning Outcomes Level 4 – Knowledge

By the end of this Level of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

K1. Demonstrate an introductory knowledge and understanding of the major theories, practices and concepts in the organizational and functional areas of finance, marketing, organizational               behaviour, human resource management and business management.

K2.  Identify and describe the ethical, legal, social, and economic environments of business, from a domestic and international perspective.

K3. Demonstrate an introductory level of knowledge and understanding of the inter and intra personal skills, attitudes and behaviours that create an inter-culturally competent, career-               ready business graduate.

 

Learning Outcomes Level 5 – Skills

By the end of this Level of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

S4. Construct and evaluate information to generate ideas to make decisions for a range of scenarios.

S5.Develop and organise both self and others, within a management setting and in academia, to achieve successful business and personal outcomes.

 

 

 

Learning Outcomes Level 5 – Knowledge

By the end of this Level of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

K4. Demonstrate an analytical understanding of a wide range of theories and conceptual frameworks from appropriate disciplines relevant to Management.

K5. Engage in a detailed and critical understanding of the issues and problems in which management theories and concepts may be applied to management in practice.              

K6. Discuss and debate the impact of the external environment (domestic and international), including economic, ethical, legal, political, sociological and technological influences.

K7. Develop knowledge and understanding of the inter and intra personal skills, attitudes and behaviours that create an inter-culturally competent, career-ready management graduate.

 

Learning Outcomes Level 6 – Skills

By the end of this Level of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

S6. Build a range of routines for self-analysis and an awareness and/or sensitivity to diversity in terms of people and cultures.

S7.  Construct and critically evaluate a range of business data, sources of information and appropriate methodologies, including the use and application of digital platforms for               evidence-based research and decision-making.

S8. Innovate, conceptualise, synthesize, and evaluate a range of ideas and solutions for contemporary management scenarios.

 

Learning Outcomes Level 6 – Knowledge

By the end of this Level of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

K8. Critically evaluate and synthesise ideas, concepts and practices from management disciplines.

K9. Evaluate and assess the obligations and responsibilities of business for the purpose of responsible and sustainable management having due regard for the environments in which they function.

K10.Interpret, analyse, evaluate and apply options that contribute to management policies, strategies and innovative practices in management.

K11. Show detailed knowledge and understanding of the inter and intra personal skills, attitudes and behaviours that create an inter-culturally competent, career-ready management graduate

 

Learning Outcomes – Ordinary degree

If you are awarded an Ordinary degree you will have achieved the majority of the learning outcomes for the programme studied. However you will have gained fewer credits at Level 6 than students awarded an Honours degree, your knowledge will typically be less broad and you will typically be less proficient in higher-level skills such as independent learning.

 

  1. What will the programme consist of?

Level 4 The aim of level 4 is to present an introduction and foundations of the study of Management. To achieve this, this level has been structured around six themes; Personal and Professional development; Management; Operational Aspects of Management; Pillars of Business – Marketing; Pillars of Business – HRM and Talent Development; Pillars of Business – Accounting and Finance. This level has six 20 credit modules which develop students’ knowledge and understanding in terms of the contemporary challenges facing managers. Theme 1: Personal and Professional Development through ‘Essential Study and Employment Skills’, this module aims to develop the students’ ability to ‘learning to learn’ and to consider the starts of their personal and professional development as potential managers and leaders. Theme 2: Pillars of Business – Marketing through ‘Introduction to Marketing’, the aim of this module is to present the core concepts of marketing including the marketing concept, marketing research, market segmentation and targeting, marketing mix – 4P’s to 7P’s and marketing planning. Theme 3: Pillars of Business – HRM and Talent Development ‘Introduction to HRM and Talent Development’, this module aims to present the notion that the effective organisation and deployment of human resources is essential to its survival and growth. The module will introduce students to the cornerstones of HRM cycle. Theme 4: Pillars of Business – Accounting and Finance through ‘Introduction to Accounting and Finance’, this module aims to introduction to three key areas within the field of accounting and finance; financial accounting, management accounting, and the management of finance. Main areas of study addressing financial accounting include the fundamental accounting concepts and conventions, and understanding, interpretation, and preparation of key financial statements. Theme 5: Management through ‘Introduction to Managing and Leading People’, this module aims to develop an understanding of the foundations for the study of management and leadership by presenting the dimensions of the study of management. Theme 6: Operational Aspects of Management through ‘Introduction to Business Operations and Services’, this module aims to present the processes, techniques and practices which allow a manager to ‘function’ including decision making and service management.

 

Level 4 is the foundations for the study of Management and the six themes are developed in level 5 and 6 of the Programme.

 

Level 5 This level develops on the themes presented in Level 4 with three core taught modules; Management Thought and Practice, this module presents the functional and process perspective of management and develops on the ideas presented in Managing and Leading Change from level 4. The next core module is Personal and Professional Development, this develops on the Introduction to Business Operations and Services from level 4, with a focus on quality management systems and processes. Finally Fundamentals of Business Finance which builds upon Introduction to Accounting & Finance from level 4 and introduces large company financial management and the workings of the stocks and debt markets.

In addition the student will undertake an applied operations module which will be linked to work experience designed to give insight into the actuality of modern management at operational level and assessed through a work based project.

 

Level 6 This level will develop your ability to critically evaluate and apply key knowledge and skills gained in the previous Levels. At this level, you have the opportunity to maximise knowledge of Management through three core taught modules which develop on the previous two levels. The taught modules on this Level are as follows; Managing and Leading Change which focuses on the processes and the role of managers and leaders in the implementation of change in terms of processes and or people; Marketing in a Digital World focuses on the increasing influence of digital in managing the marketing processes; and Global Entrepreneurship and Innovation which focuses on the innovative ideas, process and products required to be competitive in a global marketplace.

In addition the student will undertake an applied strategic module which will be linked to work experience designed to give insight into the higher level decision making imperatives of modern management at strategic level and assessed through a work based project.

 

  1. How will I be taught?

 

Scheduled teaching activities

Independent study

Work Based Learning

 

This programme is taught over a twenty four months period. The schedule of teaching is as follows:

 

Year one/Stage 1:

September - June: Six taught modules (120 level 4 credits).

June - August: UGB275 Applied Operations Project (60 level 5 credits).

 

Year two/Stage 2:

September - January: three taught modules (60 level 5 credits).

February - June: three taught modules (60 level 6 credits).

June - August: UGB384 Applied Strategy Project (60 level 6 credits).

 

Progression will be considered at the end of stage 1.

 

The taught modules are all currently taught in the business school and have a track record of success in delivering high quality and engaging education with a variety delivery modes and assessment styles. All modules have a module leader who will act as the focal point of contact for students. The modules are supported by a virtual learning platform which contains all essential material for the module and in addition allows interaction to take place between tutors and students.

 

The two applied projects are designed exclusively for this programme but are based on many years successful experience in delivering work based education and internship experiences to students across a range of industrial and service sectors. Prior to embarking on the work based element students will attend research methods and contextualisation of module sessions to prepare for both the experiential element of the module and for the written assessment to be undertaken. All students will be allocated a named tutor as support while on work experience.

 

The student journey on a two year degree is an onerous one however this is recognised by the teaching team and at no point in the programme will a student be without contact, support and guidance.

 

A list of the modules in each Level of the programme can be found in the Programme Regulations.

 

A summary of the types of teaching, learning and assessment in each module of the programme can be found in the Matrix of Modes of Teaching.

 

  1. How will I be assessed and given feedback?

 

Written examinations

Coursework

Practical assessments

 

The assessment strategy is integral to the teaching and learning philosophy. The assessment strategy aims to allow you to demonstrate knowledge, understanding and application of management principles and concepts. It also allows you to demonstrate skills of criticality and evaluation within a management context. The use of formative assessment allows you to take risks and test theories with the aim of extending knowledge and confidence without fear of failure, thus encouraging a deep approach to learning. Assessment methods aim to allow you to demonstrate breadth and depth of directed and independent research. The assessment strategy at Level 4 is based on an approach which allows for formative feedback throughout the modules. The process of formative assessment will be supported by detailed feedback to increase confidence and complement the summative assessment tasks. A range of feedback methods will be used across the programme including peer-to-peer, group, class and sample based, as well as individual tutor to learner. Detailed assessment criteria will support each assessment to guide both students and tutors.  At Level 4 additional resource will be devoted to this in order for students to build confidence and benchmark their achievements. At level 5 and 6 assessments will involve you synthesising and applying a number of concepts. There will be an increase in the amount of research-based coursework as you progress through the programme. As well as including academic research based on reading, analysis and evaluation of academic papers, you will research in the general sense of finding out and then applying, evaluating, analysing, comparing and recommending. A combination of individual and group work will be used in level 4 and 5. At level 6 the emphasis will be on individual summative assessment strategies. There is a diversity of assessment methods across our programmes with different assessments being tailored and utilised according to the specific requirements of each module and each programme, for example the three core personal and professional development modules make use of professional assessment methods such as learning logs and professional development plans.

 

The generic assessment criteria that we use can be found here.

 

The University regulations can be found here.

 

A summary of the types of teaching, learning and assessment in each module of the programme can be found in the Matrix of Modes of Teaching.

 

As can be seen from the matrix, the programme consists of a range of assessment types, enhancing the problem solving skills of the students and providing variety and depth in meeting the programme learning outcomes.

 

The generic assessment criteria which we use can be found here. Some programmes use subject-specific assessment criteria which are based on the generic ones.

 

This programme uses the Generic University Assessment Criteria

YES

 

This programme uses the Subject Specific Assessment Criteria

 

NO

 

The University regulations can be found here.

 

The University aims to return marked assessments and feedback within 4 working weeks of the assignment submission date after internal moderation processes have been completed. If this is not possible, students will be notified by the Module Leaders when the feedback is available and how it can be obtained.

 

The Academic Misconduct Regulations and associated guidance can be found here. It is the responsibility of students to ensure they are familiar with their responsibilities in regards to assessments and the implications of an allegation of academic misconduct.

 

Students should refer to the University Regulations for information on degree classifications and compensation between modules.

 


  1. Teaching, learning and assessment matrix

 

Level 4

Module

Code

Core / Option

Modes of T&L

Modes of Assessment

S1

S2

S3

K1

K2

K3

Essential Study and Employment Skills

UGB160

Core

Lectures, Workshops, Learning enhancement seminars, Virtual Learning, Self-directed/Independent study

Evaluation and Development Planning Report

 

Introduction to Marketing

UGB161

Core

Report

 

 

 

Introduction to Accounting and Finance

UGB163

Core

Case Study/ Developed Scenario

Introduction to Managing and Leading People

UGB164

Core

Academic Poster

 

 

Introduction to Human Resource Management and Talent Development

UGB162

Core

Group Presentation

Individual Report

 

 

Introduction to Business Operations and Services

UGB165

Core

Individual written assignment (3000 words)

 

Level 5

 

Module

Code

Core / Option

Modes of T&L

Modes of Assessment

S4

S5

K4

K5

K6

K7

Personal and Professional Development

 

UGB260

Core

Lectures, Workshops, Learning enhancement seminars, Virtual Learning, Self-directed/Independent study

 

Portfolio of Evidence and Reflective Essay

 

 

Fundamentals of Business Finance

 

UGB254

Core

Individual Coursework

 

 

Management Thought and Practice

 

UGB261

Core

MCQ

 

Applied Operations Project

UGB275

Core

Independent Study, Work Based Learning

Project Report/Portfolio

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Level 6

 

Module

Code

Core / Option

Modes of T&L

Modes of Assessment

S6

S7

S8

K8

K9

 

K10

K11

Global Entrepreneurship and Innovation

 

UGB362

Core

Lectures, Workshops, Learning enhancement seminars, Virtual Learning, Self-directed/Independent study

 

Portfolio of Evidence and Reflective Essay

 

 

 

 

Managing and Leading Change

 

UGB371

Core

Individual Coursework

 

 

 

Marketing in a Digital World

 

UGB372

Core

MCQ

 

 

 

 

 

 

Applied Strategy Project

UGB384

Core

Independent Study, Work Based Learning

Project Report/Portfolio

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


  1. How does research influence the programme? 

The programme is designed to be research-led, research-oriented, research-tutored and research-based. Fundamental to the programme is that research is made meaningful to students so they understand the personal, professional, intellectual and importantly, the practical relevance of research.

 

  • Research-led:  the curriculum emphasises the teaching of the subject content from an academically robust stance i.e. students learn about the latest research in the subject field where the emphasis is on understanding research findings, rather than the research process, and research is presented as information content. Academic depth and rigour is achieved through ensuring the design incorporates current research literature in the field of study. It includes embedding current research both faculty and beyond. Students will be engaged in locating, collecting, referencing, critiquing, applying evidence, challenging assumptions, questioning and interpreting contemporary research articles, conference papers and case studies. Research active Faculty will also deliver guest speaker sessions at each Level of the programme. 
  • Research-oriented:  the curriculum emphasises the process of knowledge construction in the subject. In research-oriented mode, students learn about the research process by which knowledge is produced. This will be embedded through: the teaching of research methods together with embedding context specific research knowledge construction in specific modules.
  • Research-tutored: The programme and curriculum emphasises learning focused on students writing and discussing research papers or essays. Students are actively engaged in evaluating and critiquing the research of others. This will be a focus in all modules across the programme.
  • Research-based:  The programme and curriculum emphasises students undertaking inquiry-based and problem based learning. The learning division between lecturer and student is minimised and the teaching mode is based on cooperation/dialogue. This research may involve primary research within an organisation. 

 

 

Programme Philosophy and Research

Critical inquiry underpins the basis of all question-led research, yet acknowledges the value of tacit knowledge in practice. We are keen to instil values of ethical and professional practice in all our research activity to ensure that students can not only apply their intellectual skills but also understand the wider implications of them in practice.

A research led, research oriented, research tutored and research based curriculum will be strategically aligned with the curriculum.

 

 

SECTION D:EMPLOYABILITY

 

  1. How will the programme prepare me for employment?

The programme gives you the opportunity to develop skills which you can use in the future. Some skills are more specific than others to the subject area, or to a particular type of activity, but all skills can be applied in a range of employment situations, sometimes in quite unexpected ways. The skills which this programme is designed to develop are outlined in the learning outcomes of the programme. This programme provides high levels of knowledge and skills related to the world of management.  It has a strong emphasis management practice through work based learning with the applied modules at Level 5 and 6 providing invaluable experience to carry on to the world of employment. These help you strengthen the six key attributes of being capable, enquiring, creative, enterprising, ethical and global in outlook. The rapidly changing world environment requires focused, highly-skilled, professionals who are adaptable and committed to their ongoing development; proving to current and potential employers that you are serious about your future in this diverse setting and about maintaining your knowledge and skills. Some of your modules help you identify your strengths and aspirations, and plan for personal development. The skills gained will help you when applying for graduate jobs and those who have engaged fully in the programme will be far more competitive in the job market.

 

For information about other opportunities available to our students who study on campus, click here.

 

Additional opportunities to develop your experiences more widely will vary if you study at one of our partner colleges. For information about the extra-curricular activities available in any of our colleges please contact the college direct. 

 

  1. Particular features of the qualification

 

The notable feature of this programme is the length of time a student needs to take to complete the 360 credits required for an undergraduate honours degree award. The programme is delivered over forty eight months rather than the standard three year cycle. In doing so the student will continue to in credit bearing academic studies over the summer period, normally taken as non-attendance time by three year degree students. This will require the student on the BSc Management to engage in work based activities with academic assessment attached and by so doing gain valuable insight into the world of work while building up the necessary modular credits needed to graduate. This programme will be particularly attractive to students with the drive and ambition to graduate earlier than the norm.

 

  1. Professional statutory or regulatory body (PSRB) accreditation.

 

PSRB accreditation is not relevant to this programme 

X

PSRB accreditation is currently being sought for this programme

 

This programme currently has PSRB accreditation

 

 

SECTION E:PROGRAMME STRUCTURE AND REGULATIONS

 

Complete and insert Part B of the Programme Regulations Form, for question 39

 

Name of programme:Management

Title of final award:BSc with Honours

Interim awards[1]: Certificate in Business

Diploma in Management

Accreditation: None

 

Stage 1

 

Core modules:

 

Code

Title

Credits

UGB160

Essential Study and Employment Skills

20

UGB161

Introduction to Marketing

20

UGB162

Introduction to Human Resource Management and Talent Development

20

UGB163

Introduction to Accounting and Finance

20

UGB164

Introduction to Managing and Leading People

20

UGB165

Introduction to Business Operations and Services

20

UGB275

Applied Operations Project

60

 

Stage 2

 

Core modules:

 

Code

Title

Credits

UGB254

Fundamentals of Business Finance

20

UGB260

Personal and Professional Development

20

UGB261

Management Thought and Practice

20

UGB362

Global Entrepreneurship and Innovation

20

UGB371

Managing and Leading People

20

UGB372

Marketing in a Digital World

20

UGB384

Applied Strategy Project

60

 

Regulation 2.1.3 para C


Existing Regulation:

“Credit: a measure of the volume of student learning time required to achieve defined learning outcomes at a given level. A full time undergraduate workload is 120 credits per year representing 1200 hours of notional learning time.”

 

Amendment (addition):

For an accelerated degree programme, the full time undergraduate workload is 180 credits per calendar year representing 1800 hours of notional learning time.

 

Regulation 2.1.3 para G

 

Existing Regulation

“Stage: an indication of the structure of a programme such that each Stage equates to one year of full-time study irrespective of the Level(s) of the modules taken within that Stage. A typical Bachelor’s degree with Honours has three Stages.”

 

Amendment (addition):

For an accelerated degree programme, there will normally be two stages. Stage 1 will equate to 120 credit at Level 4 credits and 60 Level 5 credits; Stage 2 will equate to 60 Level 5 credits and 120 Level 6 credits.

 

Regulation 2.3.1

 

Existing Regulation:

“The study load for a full-time student is 120 credits per year. The maximum load is 140 credits per year, including any failed module trailed under 4.3.3. The maximum study load for a part-time student is 90 credits per year.”

 

Amendment (Replacement)

The study load for a full-time student on an accelerated programme (on BSc Management] is 180 credits per year.

 

NB There is no reference to the failed module trailed under 4.3.3 because students on the BSc Management programme will not be permitted to trail failed modules.

 

Regulation 3.2

 

Existing Regulation

“Each student must be registered in each year of study for the programme to which he/she has been admitted and for the modules within that programme which he/she is to take. Full-time students must be registered for 120 credits per academic year. Part-time students may register for up to 90 credits.”

 

Amendment (Replacement)

Students registered on the BSc Management must be registered for 180 credits per calendar year.

 

Regulation 3.3

 

Existing Regulation

“A student may not register on an undergraduate programme for more than 120 credits in one academic year unless he/she is trailing a failed module in which case he/she may register for 140 credits.”

 

Amendment – Delete

 

Regulation 3.4

 

Existing Regulation

A student who wishes to take additional modules must do so by registering for them separately. This includes registration for a short course or a further programme. Such registration requires the approval of the programme/course/module leader(s) of the student’s original programme and of the student’s additional course of study before he/she may be allowed to register. The assessment of such additional study will not contribute to the assessment of the student’s initial programme of study. A separate fee is charged for any additional study.

 

Amendment – Delete

 

Regulation 3.5

 

Existing Regulation

“At each Stage students must register for modules in line with the programme-specific regulations which specify compulsory modules, optional modules and, where applicable, the provision for a student to take a module of choice from elsewhere in the University. The table below shows the minimum and maximum number of credits which programme-specific regulations may allow students to take from modules at each Level within a given Stage of study. So, for example, at Stage 2 a programme must consist of at least 100 credits of Level 5 modules and not more than 120 credits of Level 5 modules, and may include up to 20 credits of Level 4 modules to make a total of 120 credits for the Stage. Modules from Level 6 or 7 may not be included within a Stage 2 programme of study. Students whose programme-specific regulations do not allow them to take modules from the Level below that at which they are studying may not do so.”

 

Amendment – Delete

 

Regulation 4.3.2

Existing Regulation

When a student has failed a module at both the first attempt and when subsequently reassessed under 4.3.1, he or she may, at the discretion of the Programme Assessment Board and taking into account the recommendations of the Module Assessment Board, attempt that module again, once only, with attendance or in an alternative mode of study as deemed by the Board to be appropriate. In this case the student must remain at the same Stage and may not register to study modules for the next Stage. Up to 120 credits may be repeated in this way. Where applicable students may therefore be studying a full-time programme in part-time mode for one year.  The standard applicable fee is charged.

 

Amendment – Delete

 

Regulation 4.3.3 (a)

 

Existing Regulation

When a student has failed a module at both the first attempt and when subsequently reassessed under 4.3.1, he or she may, at the discretion of the Programme Assessment Board, be permitted to progress to the next Stage of study and to trail a failed module to the value of up to 20 credits in order to attempt that module again, once only, during the next academic year at the next normal occasion of assessment for the module. If timetabling permits, the student may attend lectures and other classes associated with the module during this period.

 

Amendment – Delete

 

Regulation 5.1.1

 

Existing Regulation

A student may not progress to the next Stage of study until he/she has satisfied the requirements of the Stage for which he/she has been registered and he/she may not register for modules from the next Stage until he/she has progressed. Progression must be agreed by the Programme Assessment Board. This includes the provision to allow a student to trail a failed module to the next Stage: such a student must be progressed notwithstanding the trailed fail. 

 

Amendment (Replacement)

The first progression decision for students entering from the start of Stage/Year 1 will be on the completion of the first stage i.e. after the student has had the opportunity to complete 120 Level 4 credits and 60 Level 5 Credits. In light of the number of credits being taken in any one calendar year, students will not be permitted to continue on the BSc Management programme having failed a module. Students will be required to transfer onto the BA Business and Management 3YFT programme to complete their degree and the standard academic regulations will apply from that point. In order to allow students the opportunity to undertake re-assessment in all modules, students will be exceptionally permitted to progress from stage 1 to stage 2, trailing re-assessment in module WBL275 (60 credits) for completion at the next available opportunity.

 

Regulation 6.1.3

 

Existing Regulation

Exit qualifications may be awarded for all Honours and Integrated Masters degrees as Certificates or Diplomas of Higher Education or Ordinary degrees, and for Foundation Degrees as Certificates of Higher Education. The name of the exit qualification shall be the same as that for the Honours degree unless an alternative name is approved at programme validation and recorded as a programme-specific regulation.

 

Proposed interim award title: Certificate of Higher Education in Business

 

Regulation 6.5.2

 

Existing Regulation

An Honours degree is awarded on the basis of a weighted mean average of:

• the marks for the best 100 credits obtained at Stage 2 and

• the marks for the best 100 credits obtained at Stage 3.

The mean average for the best 100 credits at each Stage is obtained and then weighted so that the Stage 2 marks are worth 20% and the Stage 3 marks are worth 80%. A final mean average is obtained on the basis of this weighting and this determines the degree classification.

 

Amendment (Replacement)

An honours degree is awarded on the basis of an average of all modules completed at Level 6.

 

SECTION F:ADMISSIONS, LEARNING ENVIRONMENT AND SUPPORT

 

  1. What are the admissions requirements?

 

Entry at stage one only. Entry points required: 120.

 

The University’s standard admissions requirements can be found in the university regulations. Programme-specific requirements which are in addition to those regulations are given below.

 

All applicants will be interviewed by the programme leader prior to admission to ensure full understanding of the commitment needed to complete the degree within the twenty four months and to ensure the students bring the necessary skills and drive to such an intense period of study.

 

The current entry requirements for this programme is as specified in the Fees and Entry Requirements section on the programme page on the University’s website.

 

Can students enter with advanced standing?

 

No

 

If yes, to which Stages?

Stage 1

 

Stage 2

 

 

The University has a process by which applicants whose experience to date already covers one or more modules of the programme they are applying for may seek Accreditation of Prior Learning (APL). Full details can be found here but if you think that this may be relevant to you, please contact the department which offers the programme you are interested in.

 

  1. What kind of support and help will there be?
    1. in the department: student support in place in the faculty comprises programme level support from a dedicated programme leader, module leaders for all modules, a personal tutor who will make contact at induction and be available throughout the two years on the programme, student support officer, tutor support for the work based element of the programme and careers guidance led by our principal lecturer in employability supported by an array of central projects and initiatives. Through the University wide library services there is a generic study skills programme located at library.sunderland.ac.uk/skills.

 

  1. in the university as a whole:

The University provides a range of professional support services including wellbeing, counselling, disability support, and a Chaplaincy. Click on the links for further information.

 

  1. in a partner college:

Please see the relevant college prospectus or website for details of student support if you are planning to study in one of our partner colleges.

 

  1. What resources will I have access to?

 

On campus

 

General Teaching and Learning Space

X

IT

X

Library

X

VLE

X

Laboratory

 

Studio

 

Performance space

 

Other specialist

 

Technical resources 

X

 

University Library & Study Skills support 

University Library & Study Skills, (UL&SS), supports students with the provision of a high quality learning environment, comprehensive print and online resource collections, 1400 study places, 300+ PCs, online module reading lists and study skills support.

 

All students have the full use of the University’s two libraries. The libraries are accessible during extensive opening hours and in core teaching weeks both Murray and St Peter’s libraries have provision for additional unstaffed access. The latest opening hours can be found on the library website at library.sunderland.ac.uk/about-us/opening-hours/

 

The UL&SS web site library.sunderland.ac.uk provides a gateway to information resources and services for students both on and off campus. A single search box enables searching across all print and digital resources. Tailored resources and support are available from specific subject areas of the UL&SS web site and a ‘Live Chat’ function enables student to access library support and help 24/7.

 

My Module Resources moduleresources.sunderland.ac.uk/

Module reading lists are live interactive resource lists available from within online module spaces on Canvas and the University’s library website.

 

What do you get?

          Real time library information, both availability and location of print books, and the ability to place reservations on books that are already on loan

          Direct links to E-resources such as ebooks, online journal articles and selected digitised texts

          Smartphone and tablet friendly – touch screen functionality and e-resource access

 

How does this help you?

          Getting the right resources easily from flexible access points

          Receive guidance from your tutor on what to read  at a point of need with the use of search filters

          Access to a wider range of resources to support learning.

 

Study Skills Support

University Library Services includes a robust study skills support offer, available to all our students across the University both on and off campus, contributing to students’ attainment and the quality of their experience.

 

Skills delivery options include:

  • Embedded skills sessions - Throughout teaching periods embedded skills sessions are a key element to support academic learning. Study skills support team and Liaison Librarians will work with your lecturers to provide the support necessary in your subject areas.
  • Digital Skills Support including:  videos, webinars and Skype sessions, digital assignment drop-ins using LibraryTalk will be held weekly to engage those students not on campus and provide additional support at the point of contact. Study skills guides and tutorials are available to download from: library.sunderland.ac.uk/services-and-support/skills/guides// and from a link on your Canvas module spaces.
  • On campus assignment skills drop-in events - Throughout key teaching weeks when students are encouraged to attend with any assignment queries.
  • Dissertation workshops - Dissertation skills support will be provided at appropriate times and levels of study to ‘Kickstart your Dissertation’. Bookable workshops will be held demonstrating how to begin a dissertation, using University library resources to support your work, and managing references for a substantial project. Sessions will be cross-subject focusing on the skills and resources required for completing a dissertation.
  • One to One - Study Skills Advisers will be on hand to support students in a range of study skills including: effective reading, reporting writing, academic writing and referencing, note taking, critical thinking, analysis and evaluation, reflective writing, group work and presentation skills. Sessions will be booked centrally and can include study groups and 1 to 1 advice.  Students who would like to request support from Study Skills Advisers can do so from:

library.sunderland.ac.uk/services-and-support/skills/one-to-one-support/

For those studying independently away from the university campus, 1 to 1 support is available via Skype.

 

Access to other libraries

There may be occasions when you find it useful to use other university libraries for your studies in addition to the resources available at the University of Sunderland. Students may be able to borrow items or to access collections on a reference basis at a number of institutions throughout the UK by joining the SCONUL access scheme. To find out more and apply to join the scheme, go to: www.access.sconul.ac.uk

 

Information about the University’s facilities can be found here.

 

Please see the relevant college prospectus or website for details of college learning resources if you are planning to study in one of our partner colleges.

 

  1. Are there any additional costs on top of the fees?

 

No, but all students buy some study materials such as books and provide their own basic study materials.

X

Yes (optional) All students buy some study materials such as books and provide their own basic study materials. In addition there are some are additional costs for optional activities associated with the programme (see below)

 

Yes (essential) All students buy some study materials such as books and provide their own basic study materials. In addition there are some are essential additional costs associated with the programme (see below)

 

 

 

  1. How are student views represented?

All taught programmes in the University have student representatives for each Stage (year-group) of each programme who meet in a Student-Staff Liaison Committee (SSLC) where they can raise students’ views and concerns. The Students’ Union and the faculties together provide training for student representatives. SSLCs and focus groups are also used to obtain student feedback on plans for developing existing programmes and designing new ones. Feedback on your programme is obtained every year through module questionnaires and informs the annual review of your programme. Student representatives are also invited to attend Programme and Module Studies Boards which manage the delivery and development of programmes and modules.  Faculty Academic Committee, also has student representation. This allows students to be involved in higher-level plans for teaching and learning. At university level Students are represented on University level Committees by sabbatical officers who are the elected leaders of the Students’ Union.

 

The University’s student representation and feedback policy can be found here.

 

Final-year students are also invited to complete a National Student Survey (NSS) which asks a standard set of questions across the whole country. The results of this are discussed at Programme Studies Boards and at Faculty Academic Committee to identify good practice which can be shared and problems which need to be addressed. We rely heavily on student input to interpret the results of the NSS and ensure that we make the most appropriate changes.

 

SECTION G:QUALITY MANAGEMENT 

 

  1. National subject benchmarks

The Quality Assurance Agency (QAA) for Higher Education publishes benchmark statements which give guidance as to the skills and knowledge which graduates in various subjects and in certain types of degree are expected to have. These can be found here.

 

Are there any benchmark statements for this programme?

YES

 

 

The subject benchmark(s) for this programme are: Business and Management 2015

 

The QAA also publishes a Framework for Higher Education Qualifications (FHEQ) which defines the generic skills and abilities expected of students who have achieved awards at a given level and with which our programmes align. The FHEQ can be found here.

 

  1. How are the quality and standards of the programme assured?

The programme is managed and quality assured through the University’s standard processes. Programmes are overseen by Module and Programme Studies Boards which include student representatives. Each year each module leader provides a brief report on the delivery of the module, identifying strengths and areas for development, and the programme team reviews the programme as a whole.  The purpose of this is to ensure that the programme is coherent and up-to-date, with suitable progression from one Stage to another, and a good fit (alignment) between what is taught and how students learn and are assessed - the learning outcomes, content and types of teaching, learning and assessment. Student achievement, including progress between Stages of the programme and degree classification, is kept under review. The programme review report is sent to the Programme Studies Board and the Faculty in turn reports issues to the University’s Quality Management Sub-Committee (QMSC).

 

External examiners are appointed to oversee and advise on the assessment of the programme. They ensure that the standards of the programme are comparable with those of similar programmes elsewhere in the UK and are also involved in the assessment process to make sure that it is fair. They are invited to comment on proposed developments to the programme. Their reports are sent to the Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Academic) as well as to the Faculty so that issues of concern can be addressed.

 

All programmes are reviewed by the University on a six-yearly cycle to identify good practice and areas for enhancement. Programmes are revalidated through this review process. These reviews include at least one academic specialist in the subject area concerned from another UK university. Quality Assurance Agency (QAA) review reports for Sunderland can be found here.

 

Further information about our quality processes can be found here.

 

 


[1] Same as main award unless agreed otherwise at validation – eg to meet PSRB requirements