Attachments

 

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Programme Title

 

B.Sc. Health and Social Care

 

Faculty of Education and Society

 

Department of Social Sciences

 

 

PROGRAMME SPECIFICATION

2019-20

 

Date of Validation Event:

23/11/2010

Date Approved by QMSC:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Version History

 

Please complete each time a new version is drafted e.g.

 

Version

Occasion of Change

Change Author

Last Modified

 

 

 

 

1.0

Version presented for approval

Dr. Stephen Macdonald Programme leader

Created 10/06/10

2.0

Amendments following institutional approval

Dr. Stephen Macdonald

 

3.0

Revisions at annual review after first year of operation

Dr. Stephen Macdonald

 

4.0

Version presented

Jacqueline Merchant

1/12/15

5.0

General update with new template

Neil Evans

5/07/16

6.0

London campus added as a full time mode

Neil Evans

03/10/16

6.1

Amendments following Periodic Review and Module changes

Neil Evans

11/7/17

6.2

Amendments following minor module changes

Neil Evans

27/11/17

6.3

Amendments following changes to core and optional modules

Neil Evans

16/5/19

6.4

Amendments following new Programme Leader and new Module Leaders

Dr Lesley Deacon

10/9/19

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

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Quality Handbook

 

 

AQH-B2-3a Undergraduate Programme Specification 2018-19

 

 

 

 

AQH-B2-3a Undergraduate Programme Specification Template

 

Please note:

  • Standard text is in grey highlight;
  • Guidance notes for staff or suggestions for the design and functionality of the database are in italics.  Guidance notes should be deleted in the final version.

 

SECTION A: CORE INFORMATION

 

  1. Name of programme: Health and Social Care

 

  1. Award title: B.Sc.  Honours

 

  1. Programme linkage

Is this part of group of linked programmes between which students can transfer at agreed points?

 

 

 

  1. Is the programme a top-up only?

 

 

 

 

  1. Does the programme have a Foundation Year (level 3) associated with it so that students enter for a four-year programme and progress directly from the Foundation Year to Stage 1 without having to re-apply?

 

 

 

If yes:

You can take a Foundation Year (level 3) as an integral part of this programme of study. For details of the Foundation Year see the programme specification for the FdSc Health and Social Care

 

 

  1. Level of award (eg Level 6 for BA/BSc)

 

 

 

  1. Awarding body: University of Sunderland

 

  1. Which department is it in? Social Sciences

 

  1. Programme Studies Board? Health and Social Care

 

  1. Programme Leader: Dr Lesley Deacon

 

  1. How and where can I study the programme?

 

At Sunderland:

 

Full-time on campus

Part-time on campus

As work-based learning full-time

 

As work-based learning part-time

 

As a full-time sandwich course

 

As a part-time sandwich course

 

By distance learning

 

 

At the University of Sunderland London campus: 

 

Full-time on campus

* Level 6 only

Part-time on campus

 

As work-based learning full-time

 

As work-based learning part-time

 

As a full-time sandwich course

 

As a part-time sandwich course

 

By distance learning

 

 

  1. How long does the programme take?

 

 

Min number of years / months

Max number of years / months

Full-time

3 Years

6 Years

Part-time

6 Years?

9 Years

Distance learning

 

 

Work-based learning

 

 

 

For start-dates please see the current edition of the Prospectus or contact the relevant department at the University. For start-dates for programmes delivered in a partner college, please contact the college.

 

SECTION B – FURTHER CORE INFORMATION 

 

Use Outline Programme Proposal Form for ADC (AQH-B2-2), for questions 13 to 25

 

Aims of the Programme

 

Students have the opportunity to undertake a full time or part time programme of study, which is vocationally relevant in that it will give them the opportunity to gain a critical understanding of integrated health and social care welfare structures and processes. As well as advanced theoretical knowledge and skills in the practice/management of the health and social care sector.  The focus upon multi-agency approaches currently most relevant to government initiatives within the health and social care sector provides an excellent preparation for the world of work.   Furthermore, our successful students are prepared for further academic development, that is, post qualifying professional training or further post graduate study offered by Sunderland University and at other institutions. Specifically the intended student learning experiences are informed by the relevant Subject Bench Statements that is, Health Studies, Psychology, Sociology, Social Policy and Administration and Social Work, QAA frameworks for Higher Education Qualifications and the University Learning, Teaching and Assessment Strategy. 

 

Programme Learning Outcomes are:

 

a)              To enable students to understand the bio-psycho-social framework within which health and social care operates, at a theoretical and practical level

 

b)              To enable students the skills to generate, analyse and critique health and social care statistics in order to develop micro and macro  knowledge that is transferable to the care industry

 

c)              To provide students with knowledge and a critical understanding of key policies and non- statutory provision and initiatives that apply to health and social care in the UK

 

d)              To provide a foundation for further academic study and/or professional training in the field of health and social care by developing graduate, transferable and interdisciplinary skills

 

d) To enable students to understand multi-disciplinary working practices in multi-`agency settings.

 

 

  1. Learning and teaching strategy.

The diversity of teaching, learning and assessment methods used on the Programme enables students to develop as autonomous learners able to pursue areas of health and social care specialism (including social entrepreneurship, care management/practice, health promotion/education, health and social research), and to increase skills of group work and co-operation. The teaching and learning strategy and the content of the core modules are structured to ensure that the student takes progressively more responsibility for their own learning, a process which culminates in them completing the BSc Health and Social Care Dissertation. No modules are taught through one approach. Lectures and Canvas are used to introduce students to key theories or to impart essential factual knowledge at all levels. These are then followed by opportunities for students to explore their learning through workshops or seminars, the content and nature of which are determined by the nature of individual modules.

 

The general approach to learning and teaching strategies in this Programme reflects both the University Learning and Teaching Strategy and the model set out within the Faculty of Education and Society.  These are:-

  • The development of employability and enterprise, recognising vocation as a major motivation in relation to learning.
  • The provision for the diverse and differentiated learning needs of all our students, especially those attracted through widening participation.
  • To ensure that all students have the opportunity to achieve their maximum potential.
  • The support of innovation in learning, teaching and assessment.
  • The support of the integration of learning and teaching, research and reach-out.
  • The provision of a high quality learning environment.
  • The provision of frameworks that will ensure independence of learning and encourage students to value a continuing engagement with learning.
  • To prepare students for the complexities of the contemporary workforce.

 

Based on existing good practice, this programme is aimed at a diverse student body, and to this end seeks to be accessible both in terms of content and delivery.  Thus, the programme team aim to offer diverse, innovative and flexible learning and teaching methods, and continuing appropriate and timely formative feedback in order that all students can develop and demonstrate the required knowledge and skills in the programme learning outcomes.  This is achieved through lectures and seminar/workshops, also group and individual tutorials are included in the learning methods and participatory learning methods are specifically encouraged, such as, small group and individual presentations.  A substantial amount of individual module learning and teaching material is now available on Canvas, and, further enhances learning opportunities for part time students and those with learning disabilities.

 

  1. Retention strategy.

In addition to the support provided for students outlined elsewhere in this document, in an attempt to further encourage student retention, the programme staff team regularly meet to discuss student progress. As a consequence of these meetings the appropriate level tutor may contact a student to offer additional support and guidance or refer on to more specialist support. 

 

  1. Any other information.

 

SECTION C - TEACHING AND LEARNING

 

  1. What is the programme about?

This programme provides students with the opportunity to undertake a programme of study, which is vocationally relevant and enables the student to gain a critical understanding of integrated health and social care welfare structures and processes. Additionally, students will gain advanced theoretical knowledge and skills in the practice/management of the health and social care sector.  The focus upon multi-agency approaches currently most relevant to government initiatives within the health and social care sector provides an excellent preparation for the world of work.   Furthermore, our successful students are prepared for further academic development, that is, post qualifying professional training or further post graduate study offered by Sunderland University and at other institutions. 

 

 

Programme Structure and Content

The B.Sc. (Hons) Health and Social Care Programme is offered in both a full time and part time mode. There are three interim awards and one main award:

 

  • Certificate in Higher Education (Stage 1)
  • Diploma in Higher Education (Stage 2)
  • B.Sc.  Ordinary
  • B.Sc. (Honours) Degree (Stage 3)

 

The programme operates under the current University of Sunderland regulations for undergraduate programmes.  Interim awards are available to students who wish to leave the programme having gained 120 stage one credits (Certificate); or 240 credits -120 at stage one plus 120 at stage two- (Diploma) respectively.

 

Students who achieve 360 credits are awarded a B.Sc. Health and Social Care (Hon) or with 300 credits, an ordinary degree, B.Sc. Health and Social Care.

 

Thus to gain:-

  • An Honours degree, students are required to achieve 360 credits, with 120 at each of the three stages (see table 1 for details) All stage three students must complete a dissertation (40 credits) a Practical Application module (20 credits) and three Health and options worth 20 credits each, totalling 360 credits in all. 
  • An Ordinary degree, the student must have gained a minimum of 300 credits, with at least 180 of these at stagess two and three, and with 60 credits at stage three[1].  It is also not necessary for students to have completed the core modules at stage three.
  • A Diploma, students must have the aforementioned 120 credits at stage one and a further 120 credits at stage two to include core modules (SSC202; SSC230; SSC223 and SSC227;) and three options totalling 240 credits in all.
  • A Certificate, students are required to complete all stage one core modules (SSC102; SSC106; SSC113; SSC114; SSC110; SSC120), totalling 120 credits in all.

 

Relationship between Modules, Stages, Interim wards, Number and Nature of Credits Accumulated

 

Programme Structure Table 1:

 

LEVEL FOUR – CERTIFICATE IN HEALTH AND SOCIAL CARE 

  • Students must complete 6 core modules – Social Problems (SSC102) Understanding Health and Social Care (SSC106), Dimensions of Health and Social Care (SSC120), Developing Independent Learning and Professionalism in the Social Sciences (SSC114), Exploring Psychosocial theory (SSC110) & Applied Qualitative Research in the Social Sciences (SSC113).

 

 

Social Problems

 

 

 

(SSC102)

CORE

20 credits

 

 

Understanding Health and Social Care

 

 

(SSC106)

CORE

20 credits

Dimensions of Health and Social Care

 

(SSC120)

CORE

20 credits

Exploring psychosocial theory

 

 

(SSC110)

CORE

20 credits

Developing Independent Learning and Professionalism in the Social Sciences

(SSC 114)

CORE

20 credits

Applied Qualitative Research Methods

 

(SSC 113)

CORE

20 credits

 

LEVEL FIVE – DIPLOMA IN HEALTH AND SOCIAL CARE

  • Students must complete 3 core modules –Applied Quantitative Methods in the Social Sciences (SSC 223), Working Together to Safeguard Vulnerable Children, Young People and Adults (SSC227), Early Life Courses in Health and Social Care (SSC230).

 

  • Students continue by choosing three option modules. SUBJECT A, Health Improvement and Healthy Lifestyles (SSC202), SUBJECT B Counselling Approaches in Practice settings (SSC212); SUBJECT C, Sex, Families and the Construction of Personal Lives (SSC216), SUBJECT D, Medicalisation, Normality and the Body (SSC220), SUBJECT E Gender, Diversity and Human Rights: Global Perspectives (SSC231)

 

Applied Quantitative Methods in the Social Sciences

 

(SSC223)

CORE

20 credits

Working Together to Safeguard Vulnerable Children, Young People and Adults

 

(SSC227)

CORE

20 Credits

Early Life Courses in Health and Social Care

 

 

(SSC230)

CORE

20 Credits

Subject Option

A, B, C, D or E

 

 

 

Option

20 credits

Subject Option

A, B, C, D or E

 

 

 

Option

20 credits

Subject Option

A, B, C, D or E

 

 

 

Option

20 credits

 

 

LEVEL SIX – ORDINARY DEGREE*

  • Students must gain any further 60 credits at level three to be awarded an ordinary degree. Students can choose 60 credits with options from SUBJECT A Health and Social Care Dissertation (SSC302); SUBJECT B, Practical Applications (SSC310); SUBJECT C, Life course Approaches to Health and Ageing(SSC330); SUBJECT D, Substance Use and Society (SSC312); SUBJECT E, The Clinical Gaze: Medicine, Disability and Confinement (SSC319); SUBJECT F, Contemporary Issues in Social Welfare (SWK 320).; SUBJECT G,  Entrepreneurship and Project Management (CYW319); SUBJECT H, Violence, Gender and Society (SSC317). SUBJECT I, Global Health (SSC335)

 

Subject Option

A, C, D, E or F, G, H or I

(see above for module title)

Option

20 credits

 

*Option A is 40 credits

Subject Option

A, C, D, E or F, G, H or I

(see above for module title)

Option

20 credits

Subject Option

A, C, D, E or F, G, H or I

(see above for module title)

Option

20 credits

 

LEVEL SIX HONS DGREE IN HEALTH AND SOCIAL CARE

  • Students must complete three core modules –Dissertation (SSC302), Practical Applications (SSC310) and Life Course Approaches to Health, Social Care and Ageing (SSC330). The dissertation must for example reflect a health or a ‘social care’ issue using a structured methodology. The methodology must incorporate skills and knowledge from the level one and two research methods models (SSC113; SSC223) using analytical technology if appropriate.

 

  • Students continue to choose 2 option modules. SUBJECT D, Substance Use and Society (SSC312); SUBJECT E, The Clinical Gaze: Medicine, Disability and Confinement (SSC319); SUBJECT F, Contemporary Issues in Social Welfare (SWK 320); SUBJECT G, Social Entrepreneurship and Project Management (CYW 319); SUBJECT G

SUBJECT H Violence, Gender and Society (SSC317) or SUBJECT 1 Global Health (SSC335)

 

 

 

Health and Social Care Dissertation

 

(SSC302)

CORE

 

40 credits

Practical Applications

 

(SSC310)

CORE

 

20 credits

Life Course Approaches to Health, Social Care and Ageing (SSC330)

CORE

20 credits

Subject Option

A, B, C, D, E, F or G

 

Option

 

20 credits

Subject Option

A, B, C, D, E, For G

 

Option

 

20 credits

 

  1. What will I know or be able to do at each Stage of the programme? 

 

Learning Outcomes Stage 1 – Knowledge

By the end of this Stage of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

 

  • K1      A broad knowledge and understanding of the specialised areas of health and social

          care in a multi-agency context

  • K2      A comprehension of health and social care welfare structures and processes.

K3 An ability to demonstrate an understanding of appropriate methodological   frameworks, approaches, and tools necessary to undertake research in  social care settings.

 

Learning Outcomes Stage 1 – Skills  

By the end of this Stage of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

 

  • S1 To develop introductory information technology skills that are of direct relevance to 

           their studies/future employment including the ability to use research technology

  • S2       Be able to reflect upon their own values and beliefs in relation to health and social 

           care

  • S3 The ability to understand basic models of practice exercised in the multi-agency

            field of health and social care

 

Learning Outcomes Stage 2 – Knowledge

By the end of this Stage of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

 

  • K4An understanding of the concepts, models and theories underpinning health  and illness, including health improvement and lifestyle behaviour change
  • K5An ability to demonstrate and evaluate appropriate statistical methodological frameworks, and tools necessary to undertake research in a health and social care setting

K6The ability to understand complex models of management of multi-agency working in the health and social care industry

 

Learning Outcomes Stage 2 – Skills

By the end of this Stage of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

 

  • S4  An increased confidence in developing an independent and responsible   approach to learning
  • S5   The ability to analyse and apply models of practice to health and social welfare provisions
  • S6  The ability to use statistical technologies to analyse health and social  provisions and inequalities

 

Learning Outcomes Stage 3 – Knowledge

By the end of this Stage of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

 

  • K7  To appraise and assimilate multi-agency professional values and ethical  issues relating to health and social care
  • K8To demonstrate and evaluate specialist research knowledge of a specific   topic within the field of health and social care

K9The ability to critically apply bio-psycho-social approaches to all areas of  health and social welfare

 

Learning Outcomes Stage 3 – Skills

By the end of this Stage of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

  • S7Advanced analytical and critical skills in written form

          S8Skills of presentation and discussion in oral work

  • S9An ability to apply some key concepts, to the theory and practice of health and social care
  • S10The ability to critically apply a bio-psycho-social approach to health and social care industries  

 

 

 

Learning Outcomes – Ordinary degree

If you are awarded an Ordinary degree you will have achieved the majority of the learning outcomes for the programme studied. However you will have gained fewer credits at Stage 3 than students awarded an Honours degree, your knowledge will typically be less broad and you will typically be less proficient in higher-level skills such as independent learning.

 

  1. What will the programme consist of?

Each undergraduate programme consists of a number of Stages from a minimum of 1 to a maximum of 4, each of which is equivalent to a year’s full-time study. The summary below describes briefly what is contained in each Stage. Most programmes have a mixture of core (ie compulsory) modules and optional ones, often with increasing choice as you move through the programme and gain in experience. In some programmes the choice of optional modules gives you particular ‘routes’ through the programme. The programme structure including a detailed list of modules can be found in the programme regulations.

 

Stage 1

Students are introduced to a wide range of multi – disciplinary and subject specific and transferable skills.  At this level emphasis is placed upon the development of awareness and an acknowledgement of:

 

  • Understanding of the background to the health and social care context.
  • Awareness of the diversity of approaches and variety of resource materials
  • Appreciation of the uncertainty of knowledge and the variety of methodologies used
  • Presentation and evaluation of the demands of research, organising and synthesizing material and data.
  • Consideration of appropriateness and range of communications skills required over a variety of broad issues.
  • Familiarity with the scope of health and social care settings

 

 

 

Stage 2

Students are required to develop a wider range of skills and understanding within the context of thematic and issue related studies.  This is particularly relevant within the four core modules at level two, but all modules offered will further develop the learning outcomes introduced at level one.  At this level emphasis is placed upon an understanding of the range of approaches within health and social care and to be able to deploy:

 

  • Knowledge and understanding of the long term processes and trends.
  • Appreciation of the changing practices and context of health and social care.
  • Develop a variety of appropriate communications skills.
  • Identify and use appropriate research methodologies

 

Stage 3

Students are required to develop a range of understanding and skills within the context of specified and in-depth case studies. These learning outcomes are specifically related to the core modules and further build upon the foundations set in place at level one and developed in level two.  At this level emphasis is placed upon an ability to use personal initiative and be able to formulate judgements regarding both knowledge-based and practical health and social care contexts.  That is to:

 

  • Identify and solve problems related to subject specific and practical criteria.
  • Initiate, retrieve and organise appropriate and reasonable range of data and current resources and present it in an effectual way.
  • Critically reflect on practical work experience using theoretical and analytical tools in order to understand the relationship between the work and the organisational context or the work and the broader social policy and political context
  • Be aware of the challenges and difficulties of making an original contribution to an issue within health and social care discourse

 

  1. How will I be taught?

Scheduled teaching activities

Independent study

Placement

 

  • Lectures provide the factual information, current thinking in the subject and a framework for thinking and researching.  Content is generally innovative and questions during the sessions are encouraged.
  • Seminars/workshops involve a wide range of learning and teaching delivery. Often group work discussion, independent study and staff formative feedback provides a mechanism for increased understanding and enables students to reflect further into the issues covered. Both formative and summative assessment criteria are also covered during these sessions.
  • Tutorial support is offered on both a group and individual basis throughout the programme.  Generally organised as a prearranged time-tabled session, but often in some circumstances on a ‘needs basis’ or casual drop-in arrangement.
  • Experiential learning is used as the focus of the level three ‘Practical Application’, but also incorporates knowledge based analytical and theoretical understanding, along with generic transferable skills.
  • Self-directed learning including reading or research based exercises, use of Canvas employ a student centred emphasis, encouraging skills of self-management, project management, and research  and generic skills such as IT, oral and written communication.
  • The inclusion of computer lab work, where students use a number of analytical software throughout each level of study through means of directed and independent learning methods.
  • PDP’s encouraging self-reflection and organisational skills.

 

A list of the modules in each Stage of the programme can be found in the Programme Regulations.

 

A summary of the types of teaching, learning and assessment in each module of the programme can be found in the Matrix of Modes of Teaching.

 

  1. How will I be assessed and given feedback?

 

Written examinations

Coursework

Practical assessments

 

A summary of the types of teaching, learning and assessment in each module of the programme can be found in the Matrix of Modes of Teaching.

 

The generic assessment criteria which we use can be found here. Some programmes use subject-specific assessment criteria which are based on the generic ones.

 

This programme uses the Generic University Assessment Criteria

YES

 

This programme uses the Subject Specific Assessment Criteria

 

NO

 

The University regulations can be found here.

 

The use of relatively short assessments, timed early in the processes of individual modules, provides an indication to staff of the levels of prior knowledge and skill of the individual students.  It also gives some reassurance and guidance for the students themselves.  Across the modules summative assessment is used to assess students’ subject specific knowledge, understanding and skills. Summative assessment during and at the end of modules is largely focussed on coursework and exams tend to be in the form of seen time-constrained tests or multiple choice questionnaires. This approach allows students to demonstrate their deeper understanding of issues and also encourages skills such as time management, planning and self-organisation. Written coursework also enables students to gain experience in different genres of writing, and preparing these assessments helps them to develop their skills in structuring an argument and their ability to integrate and synthesise data. These are all skills and aptitudes that will serve graduates well in the types of employment that they may enter in the field of health and social care. In addition, more practical forms of assessment give students the opportunity to develop skills in communication, oral presentation and the use of ICT to support presentations. A mixture of individual and group work allows students to develop and be assessed in working independently and collaboratively. Written feedback is given, including clear guidance on strategies to improve marks in future.

 

Assessment methods are determined by module leaders in relation to the module learning outcomes.  Assessment throughout the programme uses a diverse range of methods that are appropriate to the learning outcomes of the modules. Assessment methods are designed not only to grade performance and to allow judgements relating to progression, but to motivate learners and influence their learning strategies. The methods include multiple choice question tests (MCQ), written coursework, posters and oral presentations, time constrained tests and examinations. Assessment methods by module can be seen in appendix 2.  Written coursework may involve essays, literature reviews, critical analyses of literature, a reflective journal and the production of case studies and research projects.  Employers value students who can work independently and as part of a team. Group work is explicitly assessed in a number of modules, including core modules, using several types of assignment (posters, presentations and written reports).

 

The programme curriculum offers opportunities for developing and assessing subject specific or transferable/ generic skills

 

  • Knowledge is developed through lectures, seminars and directed study and is assessed through a variety of methods including essays, individual and group presentations and seen and unseen TCTs/examinations.  At all levels assessment preparation and feedback are also incorporated as an important developmental tool. 
  • Understanding and analysis is developed through lectures, seminars and directed study and is both formatively and summatively assessed through a variety of methods including portfolios, reports, essays, presentations and seen and unseen TCTs/examinations.
  • Independent learning abilities are developed by encouraging students to research and study outside of organised sessions.  This is both formatively and summatively assessed by workshop feedback, reports, essays, presentations and seen and unseen TCTs/examination performance, dissertation at level three.
  • Experiential learning combining analysis and practice, group interaction and team working skills are assessed during the Practical Application at level three.

Values, motivation and attitude to learning are encouraged through a pro-active approach, rather than as merely recipients of information.  This is also measured by student achievement in the various forms of both formative and summative assessment as set out above.

 

  1. Teaching, learning and assessment matrix  - see appendix 2

 

  1. How does research influence the programme? 

All teaching staff on the programme are active researchers and between them cover a wide and varied range of research topics with a health and social care focus including dyslexia, domestic violence, the impact of austerity measures on mental health and the provision of care in the community. Some of this research activity has national and international recognition. In addition to the access to this research activity through the normal curriculum students are also invited and encouraged to attend the CASS (Centre for Applied Social Sciences) monthly seminars held at the university.

 

There are two distinct research modules (Applied Quantitative Research in the Social Sciences  and Applied Qualitative Research in the Social Sciences) taught in levels 4 and 5 and students complete a final year dissertation building upon the research skills learnt in these modules. Where possible students are allocated a supervisor actively engaged in the area of research that they themselves have expressed an interest.

 

SECTION D EMPLOYABILITY

 

  1. How will the programme prepare me for employment?

The programme gives you the opportunity to develop skills which you can use in the future. Some skills are more specific than others to the subject area, or to a particular type of activity, but all skills can be applied in a range of employment situations, sometimes in quite unexpected ways. The skills which this programme is designed to develop are listed below.

 

Current government policy continues to encourage collaboration and multi-agency partnerships within the fields of health and social care.  This has created new job opportunities within all organisations involved.  Thus both the development of professional posts of the highest calibre together with the need for multidisciplinary training across all levels and all agencies has given rise to increased employment opportunities in line with the steady growth in governmental health and social care legislation and policy,[2] for example, Health Trainers from local communities, also the creation of new posts such as Department of Health and Public Health Consultant joint appointments; public health assistants; community project work, in areas such as healthy lifestyle, drug and alcohol, health evaluation, smoking cessation, obesity management and research projects; health promotion officers and care assistants.  Similarly, local authority appointments require knowledge and practice of multi-professional and multi-agency partnerships. The introduction of the new Care Act (2014) integrates health and social care and Choice in health and social care which similarly focus on multi-agency and inter-agency partnerships.

 

With this focus on multi-disciplinary working students are encouraged specifically to develop their team working skills and overall communication skills highly sought after by employers. For those students who wish to develop one to one interpersonal skills further there is a second year optional counselling module which reflects the growing need of health and social care providers for students with these skills.

 

From the very beginning of the programme students are introduced to and encouraged to consider how the skills, knowledge and experiences gained on the programme will benefit them when looking for employment. An example of this is attendance at an employer volunteering fair early in semester one where students have the opportunity to research the skills looked for by employers and to present these to fellow students in a presentation exercise thus demonstrating both their knowledge and application of the skills and qualities employers are looking for.

 

This programme is also suitable for students currently employed in health and social care, such as primary and secondary health care, community health and care, public health, health promotion, specialist practitioner roles and local authorities.  This will not only enhance their professional career prospects but leads and directs the practical integration of health and social care.  It also provides a progression route for students in Further Education, such as those studying:

  • Health & Social Care Foundation Degree Students can enter level six
  • Pre-nursing/social care courses (as an optional/further choice, would enter level 1 of the programme)
  • Graduate – nursing and social work students can enter levels four/five depending upon APEL agreed.

Overall the programme is very aware of the need to support students who may be disadvantaged in the labour market.

 

There are also opportunities for on-campus students outside your programme of study.

 

For information about other opportunities available to our students who study on campus, click here.

 

Additional opportunities to develop your experiences more widely will vary if you study at one of our partner colleges. For information about the extra-curricular activities available in any of our colleges please contact the college direct. 

 

  1. Particular features of the qualification (optional)

 

  1. Professional statutory or regulatory body (PSRB) accreditation. 

 

PSRB accreditation is not relevant to this programme 

PSRB accreditation is currently being sought for this programme

 

This programme currently has PSRB accreditation

 

 

SECTION E PROGRAMME STRUCTURE AND REGULATIONS

 

Use Programme Regulations Form, for questions 39 and 40

SECTION F ADMISSIONS, LEARNING ENVIRONMENT AND SUPPORT

 

  1. What are the admissions requirements?

The University’s standard admissions requirements can be found in the university regulations. Programme-specific requirements which are in addition to those regulations are given below. 

 

Entry from a University of Sunderland Foundation Year

Students who have successfully completed a Foundation degree at one of our partner colleges can top this up by direct entry into stage three of the Degree Programme

 

Can students enter with advanced standing?

Yes

 

 

If yes, to which Stages?

Stage 1

Stage 2

Stage 3

Stage 4

 

 

The University has a process by which applicants whose experience to date already covers one or more modules of the programme they are applying for may seek Accreditation of Prior Learning (APL). Full details can be found here but if you think that this may be relevant to you, please contact the department which offers the programme you are interested in.

 

  1. What kind of support and help will there be? 

Students are offered a range of academic and personal support that includes:

  • Induction
  • Personal level tutors
  • Personal development profiling (PDPs)
  • Programme handbook
  • Module guides
  • Library skills induction
  • Extensive library facilities, journal and book stocks
  • Computing facilities induction
  • Learning resource centre
  • Computer laboratories
  • Email
  • Access to Sunspace
  • Access to electronic databases
  • Access to professional personal counsellors in Student Support and Welfare Services including personal and financial advice
  • Disability Support
  • Access to the resources and staff of the Learning Development Service

 

Induction: All new students are given an induction programme during which time they are introduced to various aspects of student academic life and provided with information on the University and its services, the Faculty, and their chosen programme of study.  Students are provided with programme information, talks by programme and module staff, library visits, talks by representatives from the Students' Union, from student support, including careers guidance, disability support and information services.

 

The Programme Leader, level tutors and the programme team are the initial point of contact for student support.  This programme also makes use of electronic notice boards and e-mail communication. 

 

Personal Tutoring: Each year of study has a personal tutor responsible for ensuring the University’s tutoring policy. In addition to this, each student begins their studies by starting to build up a personal development profile (PDP) which is guided by the level tutor with meetings during each year. This process encourages the student to develop skills in assessing and valuing experiential learning and evaluating and reflecting upon the relevance and impact of that learning on his/her career.  It also ensures that students and tutors meet regularly and allows the forum to build up a relationship. For support that is of a more critical nature then an appointment is arranged with the University's Student Services who provide a wide range of support and advice. See below for links to these services.

 

Placement Support

Students undertake work based practice in the core module SSC310. Each student is supported by the placement module leader. The team has had considerable experience of placement work and have contacts via the Placement Support Assistant.  The Programme has therefore built up a number of useful networks and contacts locally within various statutory and voluntary community health initiatives.

 

Support to work placements occurs in two formats one related to the students and one to the work placement partners in the area of health and social care. Firstly, students receive support in choosing their level 3 placements during their level 2 in order to prepare them for their placement. The support includes group meetings, tutorials and support material on relevant topics, such as making the most of a placement, writing a reflexive diary and evaluation of a project in an organisation. The Faculty of Education and Society provide a Placement Support Assistant to assist the module leader in the effective administration of the placements. Secondly, there are close working relationships with the workplaces that offer placements and this provides an opportunity for students to meet prospective workplace managers.

 

 

Career Advice and Guidance

There is a strong partnership between programme staff and the Careers and Employability Service to provide support to students regarding their long term employment goals. Students can request an individual appointment with a careers adviser but there are also planned events focused on Health and Social Care career options built into the programme to encourage and stimulate students’ ideas and plans for the future. Specifically, students can receive help with the following:

  • CV’s and applications
  • Employer information
  • Post graduate and undergraduate course
  • Vacation work
  • Company and Career presentations
  • Computer aided guidance

 

The programme link Careers Adviser is Melanie Tyson who is introduced to students during the induction week and has inputs into the programme at all stages including preparation for the placement.

 

  1. in the university as a whole:

The University provides a range of professional support services including health and well-being, counselling, disability support, and a Chaplaincy. Click on the links for further information.

 

  1. What resources will I have access to?

On campus

In a partner college

 

By distance learning

 

 

On campus

General Teaching and Learning Space

IT

Library

VLE

Laboratory

 

Studio

 

Performance space

 

Other specialist

 

Technical resources 

 

 

Reg Vardy Building: All of the staff team, for Health and Social Care are based in Reg Vardy Building on the St. Peter’s Campus with teaching taking place both here, Prospect and David Goldman Buildings. providing an excellent teaching environment.   There are PC dedicated IT suites available in David Goldman.  They are available for timetabled teaching and at other times for open access student use.

 

Administrative and Technical staff: The Programme is supported by IT and administrative staff based in Reg Vardy Building.  They are easily accessible during office hours and have regular contact with both the staff and students of the Programme.  The administrative staff are an essential resource in directing students with queries or problems to the appropriate source of help.

 

Library, Information and Canvas Resources: The Prospect Library, which is located conveniently near to where students receive most of their teaching, houses an extensive library of material relevant to the study of Health and Social Care. Students have access via the library Discover system to a range of electronic resources relevant to Health and the Social Sciences, for example Sage Journals Online. Students all receive an initial induction into the library on commencing their studies including an induction to Canvas. Furthermore, a substantial amount of individual module learning and teaching material is now available on Canvas, and, further enhances learning opportunities for part time students and those with learning disabilities. All essays are now submitted on Canvas (turn-it-in) and each module now has on-line module guides, posted lectures, time-tables, etc. Health and Social Care Lecturers can also contact students by posting group announcements relating to information and programme changes.


The availability of books for teaching and learning is enhanced in a variety of ways:

Short Loan: a collection of books and videos in heavy demand, that are available for 4 hourly and overnight loan, making them more accessible for students, with the facility to reserve items.

The provision of weekly loan items, particularly duplicate copies of key texts, to improve availability for part-time students.

E-Book collection: the library will purchase an E-Book version of titles on recommended reading lists if available.

The library has addressed the issue of journal stock and with the introduction of the Social Sciences Index and the Ebsco package on-line journal consultation is very good.

Production of online reading lists which may include digitised book chapters and journal articles, (copyright permitting).

 

Electronic Information

Staff and students can access library resources either on campus or off campus via the web. University Library Services maintains a web site www.library.sunderland.ac.uk which provides a gateway to information resources and services (internal and external provision). Athens authentication is used to allow staff and student access to extensive subscribed electronic resources regardless of location.

 

All students have access to the interlibrary loans service, which will normally obtain required documents that the service does not hold, well within ten working days.

 

Information Skills

As part of induction, students are registered with University Library Services and automatically receive their Athens password at the beginning of the academic year. In addition, University Library Services provides specialist information skills sessions to develop their knowledge of electronic resources appropriate to their subject area. Information skills sessions include the skills necessary for searching for quality academic information on the Internet.

 

Help and support

The library provides support to users in a number of ways:

Face to face in the libraries via staffed helpdesks, roving support from library staff and group or one to one    information surgeries

The “Ask a Librarian” email service where users may contact the library with any queries and will receive a reply with 24 hours

“Live Chat”- Synchronous online help available at various periods throughout the day, enabling users to chat with library staff and receive instant support

FAQ – An online database containing answers to frequently asked questions

 

Information about the University’s facilities can be found here.

 

Please see the relevant college prospectus or website for details of college learning resources if you are planning to study in one of our partner colleges.

 

  1. Are there any additional costs on top of the fees?

 

No, but all students buy some study materials such as books and provide their own basic study materials.

 

Yes (optional) All students buy some study materials such as books and provide their own basic study materials. In addition there are some are additional costs for optional activities associated with the programme (see below)

 

Yes (essential) All students buy some study materials such as books and provide their own basic study materials. In addition there are some are essential additional costs associated with the programme (see below)

 

There may be some additional costs associated with the placement e.g. travel expenses and the cost of a DBS certificate. Details on hoe to apply for a DBS will be provided as part of the Placement module (SSC310 Practical Application. There may also be additional travel costs for any study visit organised.

 

  1. How are student views represented?

All taught programmes in the University have student representatives for each Stage (year-group) of each programme who meet in a Student-Staff Liaison Committee (SSLC) where they can raise students’ views and concerns. The Students’ Union and the faculties together provide training for student representatives. SSLCs and focus groups are also used to obtain student feedback on plans for developing existing programmes and designing new ones. Feedback on your programme is obtained every year through module questionnaires and informs the annual review of your programme. Student representatives are also invited to attend Programme and Module Studies Boards which manage the delivery and development of programmes and modules.  Various Faculty committees, particularly Faculty Academic Experience Committee, Academic Development Committee and Quality Management Sub-Committee also have student representation. This allows students to be involved in higher-level plans for teaching and learning. There is a parallel structure at university level on which students are represented by sabbatical officers who are the elected leaders of the Students’ Union.

 

The University’s student representation and feedback policy can be found here.

 

Final-year students are also invited to complete a National Student Survey (NSS) which asks a standard set of questions across the whole country. The results of this are discussed at Programme Studies Boards and at Faculty Academic Experience Committee to identify good practice which can be shared and problems which need to be addressed. We rely heavily on student input to interpret the results of the NSS and ensure that we make the most appropriate changes.  

 

In addition to formal arrangements for gathering student feedback outlined above the programme team encourage and welcome students comments at any time throughout their time on the programme. This can be done through email or one to one and group meetings.

 

SECTION G QUALITY MANAGEMENT 

 

 

 

  1. National subject benchmarks

The Quality Assurance Agency for Higher Education publishes benchmark statements which give guidance as to the skills and knowledge which graduates in various subjects and in certain types of degree are expected to have. These can be found here.

 

Are there any benchmark statements for this programme?

YES

 

 

The subject benchmark(s) for this programme is/are:

 

Introduction to the QAA benchmark Statement for Health and Social Care

 

The QAA benchmark statement for Health and Social Care states that “the education and training of health and social care professionals draws from a range of academic disciplines which provide the underpinning knowledge and understanding for sound practice. There are areas of knowledge and understanding that are common to all health and social care professionals, which include;

  • ethical principles, values and moral concepts inherent in health and social care practice
  • legislation and professional and statutory codes of conduct relevant to their practice, and understanding of health and social care delivery configurations
  • research and evidence-based concepts and explanations from law, psychology, social policy and sociology
  • physical and psychological human growth and development.
  •  

In addition, and to an extent determined by the nature of their practice, health and social professionals will be familiar with:

  • public health principles
  • health education in their practice” (QAA, 2006, p6).

 

The B.Sc. in Health and Social Care programme meets the areas of knowledge and understanding as outlined above and will provide students with an insight into the multi-agency approaches currently most relevant to government initiatives in this sector. The new modules reflect an integrated approach for students to gather knowledge from the related disciplines of sociology, psychology, social policy, social work, and health (drawing on a bio-psycho-social framework). In the light of recent staff changes in the department, the team have taken the opportunity to revise the health and social care programme to reflect changes in the subject area. Not only has the programme adopted an intergraded approach to care, there has been a further expansion developing a science based methodology that underpins the learning strategies similar to that of the psycho-sciences.  Hence applied research methods, statistics, health and social models of practice and management theory now underpin this programme where originally the degree used a sociological approach. The modules will therefore aim to provide the student with an integrated knowledge and understanding of the key principles, which lie at the heart of health and social care. They will provide an academically challenging programme of study which will equip students to contribute to provision of services in the health and social care arena and to other areas of employment.

 

A draft common purpose statement for Health and Social Care can be found below:

 

http://www.qaa.ac.uk/en/Publications/Documents/Subject-Benchmark-Statements-Common-purpose-Consultation-draft-Health-and-Social-Care.pdf

 

The QAA also publishes a Framework for Higher Education Qualifications (FHEQ) which defines the generic skills and abilities expected of students who have achieved awards at a given level and with which our programmes align. The FHEQ can be found here.

 

  1. How are the quality and standards of the programme assured?

The programme is managed and quality assured through the University’s standard processes. Programmes are overseen by Module and Programme Studies Boards which include student representatives. Each year each module leader provides a brief report on the delivery of the module, identifying strengths and areas for development, and the programme team reviews the programme as a whole.  The purpose of this is to ensure that the programme is coherent and up-to-date, with suitable progression from one Stage to another, and a good fit (alignment)  between what is taught and how students learn and are assessed - the learning outcomes, content and types of teaching, learning and assessment. Student achievement, including progress between Stages of the programme and degree classification, is kept under review. The programme review report is sent to the Faculty Quality Management Sub-Committee which in turn reports issues to the University’s Quality Management Sub-Committee (QMSC) and Academic Development Committee (ADC).

 

External examiners are appointed to oversee and advise on the assessment of the programme. They ensure that the standards of the programme are comparable with those of similar programmes elsewhere in the UK and are also involved in the assessment process to make sure that it is fair. They are invited to comment on proposed developments to the programme. Their reports are sent to the Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Academic) as well as to the Faculty so that issues of concern can be addressed.

 

All programmes are reviewed by the University on a six-yearly cycle to identify good practice and areas for enhancement. Programmes are revalidated through this review process. These reviews include at least one academic specialist in the subject area concerned from another UK university. The University is subject to external review by the Quality Assurance Agency for Higher Education on a six-year cycle. Their review reports for Sunderland can be found here.

 

Further information about our quality processes can be found here.

 

Please also complete the SITS form.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Appendix 1

 

PART B   -  Programme  Regulation/s

 

Name of programme: Health and Social Care

Title of final award: B.Sc. (Hons)

 

There are no programme specific regulations

 

University Regulation : N/A

 

Stage 1

Core modules:

Code

Title

Credits

SSC102

Social Problems

20

SSC106

Understanding Health and Social Care

20

SSC114

Developing Independent Learning and Professionalism in the Social Sciences

20

SSC110

Exploring Psycho Social Theory

20

SSC113

Applied Qualitative Research in the Social Sciences

20

SSC120

Dimensions of Health and Social Care

20

 

Optional Modules

There is no provision for option modules at Stage 1.

 

Elective Modules

There is no provision for an elective module at Stage 1.

 

Progression Regulations

There are no programme-specific progression regulations[3]

 

Stage 2

Core modules

Code

Title

Credits

SSC230

Early Life Course Approaches in Health and Social  Care

20

 

SSC223

Applied Quantitative Research in the Social Sciences

20

SSC227

Working Together to Safeguard Vulnerable  Children, Young People and Adults

20

 

Optional modules

 

Choose modules to the value of 40 credits from the following list:

 

Code

Title

Credits

SSC202

Health Improvement and Healthy Lifestyles

20

SSC212

Counselling Approaches in Practice Settings

20

 

SSC216

Sex, Families and the Construction of Personalised Lives

20

SSC220

Medicalisation, Normality and the Body

20

SSC231

Gender, Diversity and Human Rights: Global Perspectives

20

 

Elective modules

There is no provision for an elective module at Stage 2.

 

Progression Regulations

There are no programme-specific progression regulations[4]

 

Stage 3

Core modules

Code

Title

Credits

SSC302

Health and Social Care Dissertation

40

 

SSC310

Practical Applications

20

 

SSC330

Life Course Approaches in Health, Social Care and Ageing

20

 

Optional modules

Choose modules to the value of 40 credits from the following list:

 

Code

Title

Credits

SSC312

Substance Use and Society

20

SSC317

Violence, Gender and Society

20

SSC319

The Clinical Gaze: Medicine, Disability and Confinement

20

CYW319

Entrepreneurship and Project Management

20

SWK320

Contemporary Issues in Social Welfare

20

SSC335

Global Health

20

 

Elective modules

There is no provision for an elective module at Stage 3.

 

Progression Regulations

There are no programme-specific progression regulations[5]

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Appendix 2

Matrix of modes of teaching, learning and assessment

 

Module

Code

Core/

optional

Modes of T&L

Modes of Assessment

K1

K2

K3

K4

K5

K6

K7

K8

K9

S1

S2

S3

S4

S5

S6

S7

S8

S9

S10

Stage 1

Social Problems

SSC102

Core

L/PS/GW

CW/P

 

TDA

TD

A

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TDA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Understanding Health & Social Care

SSC106

Core

L/PS/GW

CW/P

TDA

TDA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TDA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Exploring Psycho-Social Theory

SSC110

Care

L/PS/GW

P/CW

TD

A

TD

A

TD

A

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TDA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Applied Qualitative Research in the Social Sciences

SSC113

Core

L/PS/GW

CW

 

 

TDA

 

 

 

 

 

 

TDA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Developing Independent Learning and Professionalism in the Social Sciences

SSC114

Core

L/PS/GW

CW

TDA

 

TD

A

 

 

 

 

 

 

TDA

TDA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dimensions of Health and Social Care

SSC120

Core

L/PS/GW

CW/TCT

TDA

TDA

TD

A

 

 

 

 

 

 

T D A

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stage 2

 

Health Improvement & Healthy lifestyles

SSC202

Option

L/PS/GW

CW

 

 

 

 

TD

A

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TDA

TDA

 

 

Counselling Approaches in Practice Settings

SSC212

Option

WS/PS

CW

 

 

 

 

 

 

TDA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TDA

TDA

 

 

 

 

Sex, Families and the Construction of Personalised Lives

SSC216

Option

L/WS/GW

CW

 

 

 

TDA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TDA

 

 

 

 

 

Medicalisation, Normality & the Body

SSC220

Option

WS/PS/GW

CW/P

 

 

 

TDA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

DA

TDA

 

 

 

 

 

Applied Quantitative Research Methods in the Social Sciences

SSC223

Core

GW/PS

P/CW

 

 

 

 

 

TDA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Working Together to Safeguard Vulnerable Children, Young People and Adults

SSC227

Core

L/PS/GW

P/TCT

 

 

 

 

 

TDA

 

 

 

 

 

 

TDA

TDA

 

 

 

 

 

Early life course approaches in health and social care

SSC230

Core

L/PS/GW

CW/P

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TDA

TDA

 

 

 

 

 

 

Gender, Diversity and Human Rights: Global Perspectives

SSC231

Option

L/PS/WS

CW

 

 

 

 

TD

A

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TD

A

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stage 3

 

Dissertation

SSC302

Core

L/Tutorial

CW

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TDA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TDA

 

TDA

 

Practical Applications

SSC310

Core

L/PS/EL

CW

 

 

 

 

 

 

TDA

TDA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TDA

 

TDA

 

Substance Use & Society

SSC312

Option

L/PS/GW

CW/EX

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TDA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TDA

 

TDA

TDA

Lifecourse approaches to health social care & ageing

SSC330

Core

L/PS/GW

CW/TCT

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TDA

TDA

 

 

 

 

 

 

TDA

 

TDA

TDA

Violence , Gender and Society

SSC317

Option

L/PS

CW

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TDA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

DA

DA

DA

 

The Clinical Gaze: Medicine, Disability and Confinement

SSC319

Option

L/PS/GW

CW

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TDA

TDA

 

 

 

 

 

 

TDA

 

TDA

TDA

Contemporary Issues in Social Welfare

SWK320

Option

L/PS/GW

CW

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TDA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

DA

DA

TDA

 

Entrepreneurship and Project Management

CYW 319

Option

L/PS/GW

CW

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TDA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

DA

DA

DA

 

Global Health

SSC335

Option

L/PS/GW

CW

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TDA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

DA

 

TDA

 

A key for all types of Teaching, Learning and Assessment

L – Lectures, WS – Workshop, PS – Private study, GW- Group Work, P-Presentation, TCT time constrained test, EL -experiential learning)

SE-Self Evaluation, D-Developed, T-taught, A-Assessed etc. 

 

 


 

 

SITS SUMMARY PROGRAMME/SHORT COURSE DETAILS

(Form to be completed electronically by the Faculty and forwarded to the Quality Assurance and Enhancement (QAE) Quality Officer supporting the Approval event, or sent to Management Information and Systems Development (MISD) for faculty devolved processes before sending to QAE)

PROGRAMME/SUBJECT/SHORT COURSE DETAILS

 

Exit Award: Title of programme/award

B.Sc. (Hons) Health and Social Care

If replacement for existing, specify title of old

 

Faculty(ies):

Education and Society

Department:

Social Sciences

SITS Programme/Short Course code[6]

L510

Programme Studies Board[7]

Health and Social Care

UCAS code[8] (if applicable).  If other please state method.

L510

JACS code[9]

L300

Qualification Level / Qualification Aim

Level 6 BSc Hons

 

Modes of delivery and duration:

 

(delete yes/no as necessary)

Full time       yes  3 years

Sandwich     no  

Part time      yes   6 years

Work Based Learning  no

On-campus  yes

Off-campus  no 

CSP Only. Other subject combinations not allowed with this subject:

 

Programme/Subject/Short Course Leader:

Dr Lesley Deacon

Date of Approval /Modification/Review

2016

Date of next review (QAE to complete)

 

Start date of programme/Short Course

September 2017

Number of intakes per annum and likely month(s) intake(s) starts.

1, September

 

FUNDING DETAILS

 

Confirm funding arrangements for programme e.g. HEFCE/TDA/NHS/Other[10]

HEFCE

If it is TDA, is it primary/secondary/F.E./Other (please state)

N/A

Is the programme Open or Closed[11]:

Open

 

ACCREDITING BODY

No

If yes please attach completed form AQH-Ciii2

 

PROGRAMME SPECIFIC REGULATIONS

Are there to be programme specific regulations?

No

If yes, please attach completed form AQH-B3 Appendix 2 or AQH-B8.

 

COLLABORATIVE:

Please complete details

UK                     no

 

Overseas           no

Institution                                      Collaborative model[12]         Funding arrangements[13]

 

…………………………………………..            ………………………………         ………………………..

 

 

  INTERIM AWARD SCHEDULE

 

Interim award title

Credits required

Interim structure

Please show mandatory requirements if applicable e.g. core module codes

Certificate in Higher Education

120

Students are required to complete all level one core modules (SSC102; SSC106; SSC120; SSC114; SSC110; SSC113), totalling 120 credits in all.

Diploma in Higher Education

 

240

Students must have the aforementioned 120 credits at level one and a further 120 credits at level two to include core modules (SSC230; SSC223;SSC227) and three options totalling 240 credits in all.

B.Sc.  Ordinary

 

300

The student must have gained a minimum of 300 credits, with at least 180 of these at levels two and three, and with 60 credits at level three[14].  It is also not necessary for students to have completed the core modules at level three.

 

 

   DETAILS SUPPLIED BY: Dr Lesley Deacon DATE: 10/09/19


Appendix 4 Module List

 

Award, Route (if applicable) and Level

New/Existing/ Modified  Module (N/E/MM)

Module Title

Module Code

Module Credit Value

Whether core or option

Must choose (ie designated option):

Assessment weighting – give % weight for each assessment item

Pre /Co requisites

Module leader

Date of Entry

JACS code

Cert.H.E.

E

Social Problems

SSC102

20

C

C

PR 50%

CW 50%

N/A

Wendy Podd

 

L300

Cert.H.E.

E

Understanding Health & Social Care

SSC106

20

C

C

PR 40%

CW 60%

N/A

Anneliesa Butler

 

L300

Cert H.E

E

Exploring Psycho-Social Theory

SSC110

20

C

C

PR 40%

CW 60%

N/A

Vicky Trueman

 

 

Cert.H.E.

E

Applied Qualitative Research Methods in the Social Sciences

SSC113

20

C

C

PR 35%

CW 65%

N/A

Wendy Podd

2009

L300

Cert.H.E.

E

Developing Independent Learning and Professionalism in the Social Sciences

SSC114

20

C

C

CW1 40%

CW2 60%

N/A

Neil Evans

2016

L300

Cert.H.E.

E

Dimensions of Health and Social Care

SSC120

20

C

C

CW 50%

MCQ 50%

N/A

Jacqui Merchant

2010

L300

Dip. H.E

E

Health Improvement & Healthy Lifestyles

SSC202

20

O

O

CW1 50%

CW2 50%

N/A

Anneliesa Butler

2010

L300

Dip. H.E

E

Early Life Course Approaches in Health and Social Care

SSC230

20

C

DO

CW 50%

TCT 50%

N/A

Jacqui Merchant

2010

L300

Dip.H.E

E

Counselling Approaches in Practice Settings

SSC212

20

O

DO

CW 1 50%

CW 2 50%

N/A

Neil Evans

2012

L300

Dip H.E

E

Sex, Families and the Construction of Personalised Lives

SSC216

20

O

DO

CW 1 40%

CW 2 60%

N/A

Sheila Quaid

 

L300

Dip. H.E

E

Medicalisation, Normality  & the Body

SSC220

20

O

DO

CW 1 50%

CW 2 50%

 

N/A

Drew Dalton

 

L300

Dip. H.E

E

Applied Quantitative Research Methods in the Social Sciences

SSC223

20

C

C

PR 30%

CW 70%

N/A

Matt Durey

2009

L300

Dip. H.E

E

Working Together to Safeguard Vulnerable Children, Young People and Adults

SSC227

20

C

DO

PR 40%

TCT 60%

N/A

Lesley Deacon

2010

L300

Dip. H.E

N

Gender, Diversity and Human Rights: Global Perspectives

SSC231

20

O

DO

CW1 40%

CW2 60%

N/A

Sheila Quaid

2019

L300

BSc (Hons)

E

Dissertation

SSC302

40

C

C

CWx100%

N/A

Lesley Deacon

2010

L300

BSc (Hons)

E

Practical Applications

SSC310

20

C

C

CWx100%

N/A

Neil Evans

 

L300

BSc (Hons)

E

Substance Use & Society

SSC312

20

O

DO

CW 1 30%

CW2 70%

N/A

Jacqui Merchant

2010

L300

BSc (Hons)

E

Life-course approaches to Health, Social Care & Ageing

SSC330

20

O

DO

TCT 50%

CW 50%

N/A

Jacqui Merchant

2010

L300

BSc (Hons)

E

Violence, Gender and Society

SSC317

20

O

DO

CW1 35%

CW2  65%

N/A

Nicola Roberts

 

 

BSc (Hons)

E

The Clinical Gaze: Medicine, Disability and Confinement

SSC319

20

O

DO

CW 1 50%

CW 2 50%

N/A

Steve Macdonald

2015

L300

BSc (Hons)

E

Contemporary Issues in Social Welfare

SWK320

20

O

DO

PR 30%

CW 70%

N/A

Jane Scutt

 

L300

BSc (Hons)

E

Entrepreneurship & Project Management

CYW319

20

O

DO

PR 30%

CW70%

N/A

Dan Connolly

2018

L300

BSc (Hons)

N

Global Health

SSC335

20

O

DO

CW1 40%

CW2 60%

 

N/A

Drew Dalton

2017

L300

 

Key: CW = Course work TCT= Time Controlled Test PR =Presentation MSQ =Multiple Choice Questionnaire  


[1] See University regulations.

[2] See White Paper ‘Our health, our care, our say: a new direction for community services’ Jan 2006

[3] University regulations apply

[4] University regulations apply

[5] University regulations apply

[6] To be allocated in consultation with MISD team in Planning and Finance

[7] Programme Studies/Assessment Board that will have management responsibilities for the programme.

[8] Please contact Admissions Manager for code

[9] JACS code = e.g. (V1) History, (G5) Computing Science, etc. for information contact relevant Faculty Associate Dean (See QAA Website http://www.qaa.ac.uk/WorkWithUs/Documents/jacs_codes.pdf)

[10] Please confer with Amanda Watson for funding status for programme

[11] An Open programme constitutes an open admissions policy.  A Closed programme is normally specific to one client only.  If in doubt please consult Academic Services or Planning and Finance.

 

[12] As per QAE guidelines

[13] Please contact Amanda Watson for confirmation of funding details

[14] See University regulations.