Attachments

 

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BSc Criminology

 

 

Faculty of Education and Society

 

Department of Social Sciences

 

 

PROGRAMME SPECIFICATION

 

2019-20

 

Date of Validation Event:

28 November 2016

Date Approved by QMSC:

 

 

 

 

 

 


Version History

 

Version

Occasion of Change

Change Author

Last Modified

1.0

Version presented for approval and at PSB.

Dr N Roberts

New Template (old template July 2016)

2.0

Version presented for Periodic review

 

 

3.0

Version presented after Periodic review

Dr N Roberts

July 2017

4.0

 

Version altered post amendments to SSC 317

Dr N Roberts

November 2017

5.0

Version altered post amendments to SSC 220

Dr N Roberts

January 2018

6.0

Version altered to reflect SSC 219 replaced with SSC 231

Dr N Roberts

March 2018

7.0

Version altered to update staff research, pathways of the programme, and fit with the curriculum.

Dr N Roberts

September 2018

8.0

Version altered following approval of curriculum changes. This regards: SSC121; SSC124; and SSC114.

Dr P Dresser

May 2019

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

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Quality Handbook

 

 

AQH-B2-3a Undergraduate Programme Specification Template

August 2015

 

 

 

AQH-B2-3a Undergraduate Programme Specification Template

 

 

SECTION A: CORE INFORMATION

 

  1. Name  of programme

 

Criminology

 

  1. Award title

 

BSc Honours

 

  1. Programme linkage

Is this part of group of linked programmes between which students can transfer at agreed points?

 

 

 

 

  1. Is the programme a top-up only?

 

 

 

 

  1. Does the programme have a Foundation Year (level 3) associated with it so that students enter for a four-year programme and progress directly from the Foundation Year to Stage 1 without having to re-apply? (ie an ‘Extended Studies’ programme)

 

 

 

 

  1. Level of award (eg Level 6 for BA/BSc)

 

 

 

  1. Awarding body: University of Sunderland

 

  1. Which department is it in?

Social Sciences

 

  1. Programme Studies Board?

Criminology

 

  1. Programme Leader

Dr Paul Dresser

 

  1. How and where can I study the programme?

 

At Sunderland:

 

Full-time on campus

X

Part-time on campus

X

As work-based learning full-time

 

As work-based learning part-time

 

As a full-time sandwich course

 

As a part-time sandwich course

 

By distance learning

 

 

At the University of Sunderland London campus: 

 

Full-time on campus

 

Part-time on campus

 

As work-based learning full-time

 

As work-based learning part-time

 

As a full-time sandwich course

 

As a part-time sandwich course

 

By distance learning

 

 

At a partner college:

 

Full-time in the UK 

X

Part-time in the UK

 

Full-time overseas

 

Part-time overseas

 

By distance learning

 

As a full-time sandwich course in the UK

 

As a part-time sandwich course in the UK

 

As a full-time sandwich course overseas

 

As a part-time sandwich course overseas

 

As work-based learning full-time in the UK 

 

As work-based learning part-time overseas

 

Other (please specify)

 

 

 

The partner college teaches stages 1 and 2, after which students progress to Sunderland for stage 3 study.

 

  1. How long does the programme take?

 

 

Min number of years / months

Max number of years / months

Full-time

3

6

Part-time

6

9

Distance learning

 

 

Work-based learning

 

 

 

For start-dates please see the current edition of the Prospectus or contact the relevant department at the University. For start-dates for programmes delivered in a partner college, please contact the college.

 

 

SECTION B – FURTHER CORE INFORMATION 

 

Use Outline Programme Proposal Form for ADC (AQH-B2-2), for questions 13 to 25

 

  1. Learning and teaching strategy. 

 

The pedagogical principles that underpin the programme are those aligned with student-centred approaches because they produce better quality learning outcomes in students (Trigwell, Prosser and Waterhouse, 1999).  Such approaches focus on students’ acquiring, developing and changing their conceptions (Trigwell and Prosser, 1996; Trigwell et al., 1999), using facilitative techniques or active learning methods that ‘focus on the direct involvement of the student with the learning material’ (Lammers and Murphy, 2002:62).  Student-centred approaches are embedded in constructivist perspectives on teaching and learning.  Such views suggest that learners actively construct their own understandings of the world (Cowan, 2006), assimilating new knowledge by drawing on prior learning and existing knowledge (Vygotsky, 1978; Shuck, Albornoz and Winberg, 2007).  A constructive developmental pedagogy purposefully involves students in an ‘inquiry-based and dialogical process of learning’ (Kreber, 2010:189) ‘where knowledge claims are routinely contested and ideas deliberated, and where each and every student is recognised (or validated) so that he or she has the opportunity to flourish’ (Baxter Magolda, 1999 cited in Kreber, 2010:191).  In such an environment, meaning is mutually constructed (Baxter Magolda, 1999 cited in Kreber, 2010:173). 

 

The modes of teaching, learning and assessing students on the criminology programme are reflective of these constructivist views of how students learn.  The teaching and learning modes of interactive lectures, workshops, seminars, tutorials, individual supervision, ICT, and the range of assessments used on the programme, e.g., essays, case studies, policy reviews, research reports, investigative reports, presentations, group-work, provide space for students to actively co-construct and re-construct their own learning about criminology in powerful learning environments, with fellow students and academic staff, and in some cases, practitioners. 

 

Such teaching and learning are good practices in higher education because the literature overwhelmingly suggests that such pedagogies are i) powerful learning environments and ii) important integration-contexts for students (Schulte, Thompson, Hayes, Noble, and Jacobs, 2001; Read, Archer and Leathwood, 2003; Yorke and Thomas, 2003; Matusov and Smith, 2007). 

 

  1. Retention strategy

 

The Criminology Retention Project is a three-year longitudinal research study that monitors and examines the retention of the students on the programme.  Findings from the study, so far, have led to the re-designing of the first-year curriculum to enhance student integration, strategic timetabling of the first-year cohort in classes, and heightened support for students who move to study at the university.  See also section 42 below about the personal tutorial system and how this enhances the retention strategy. 

 

  1. Any other information

 

SECTION C - TEACHING AND LEARNING

 

  1. What is the programme about?

 

The BSc (Hons) Criminology programme aims to give students a comprehensive and critical understanding of crime and punishment.  It does this by offering students an education to think criminologically, and in doing so, to critically assess the concepts of crime and victim, and societies’ response to crimes and victims, especially that of the criminal justice system (CJS) (e.g., policing, courts, prisons).   Whilst the programme does not seek to train practitioners, it does enhance employability by offering students many opportunities to study, work and volunteer within a relevant workplace, and in doing so, merges theory with practice.  

 

 

  1. What will I know or be able to do at each Stage of the programme?  

 

Learning Outcomes Stage 1 – Skills  

 

By the end of this Stage of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

 

S1Demonstrate information technology skills that are of relevance to their studies/future employment including the use of scientific research technology.

 

S2Demonstrate the skills necessary to understand the nature and nuances of criminological questions.

 

S3 Communicate the results of their research accurately and reliably with structured and coherent arguments presented in a systematic and informed manner, drawing on relevant texts and examples from their studies.

 

 

Learning Outcomes Stage 1 – Knowledge

 

By the end of this Stage of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

 

K1Demonstrate an understanding of the key concepts and theoretical approaches that have developed and are developing in relation to crime, victimisation, criminalisation, crime control, policing, criminal justice, penal practice, and punishment.

 

K2Exhibit knowledge on the relationships between social class, gender, age, ‘race’ and ethnicity and other salient aspects of diversity in relation to offending, victimisation, crime control, policing, criminal justice, penal practice and punishment.

 

K3Illustrate an understanding of appropriate methodological frameworks, approaches, and tools necessary to undertake scientific and theoretical research in criminology.

 

 

Learning Outcomes Stage 2 – Skills

 

By the end of this Stage of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

 

S4The skills to compare and contrast theory and practice, with reference to crime, criminal behaviour, criminalisation, victimisation, crime control, policing, penal practice and punishment.

 

S5The ability to use advanced statistical technologies to analyse crime and punishment.

 

S6Demonstrate the competence and skills to analyse, assess, and to communicate information and empirical research findings about crime, criminal behaviour, criminalisation, victimisation, crime control, penal practice and punishment.

 

 

Learning Outcomes Stage 2 – Knowledge

 

By the end of this Stage of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

 

K4Analyse and debate the social and historical developments of crime, and criminological and penological theory.

 

K5Interpret the social, political and historical development of the criminal justice system with reference to the principal institutions involved in criminal justice.

 

K6The ability to demonstrate and evaluate appropriate statistical methodological frameworks, and tools necessary to undertake scientific and theoretical research in criminology.

 

 

Learning Outcomes Stage 3 – Skills

 

By the end of this Stage of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

 

S7The critical skills to identify the ethical issues and problems in criminological research and take appropriate action within the guidelines of ethical practice.

 

S8Employ advanced critical skills in the analysis of crime, criminal behaviour, criminalisation, victimisation, crime control, policing, criminal justice, penal practice and punishment to issues of social, public and civic policy at a national, international and global level.

 

S9The critical skills to design, conduct and manage a systematic significant piece of independent criminological research.

 

 

Learning Outcomes Stage 3 – Knowledge

 

By the end of this Stage of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

 

K7Show advanced critical knowledge of a range and appropriate use of information sources, research strategies, and methods to understand issues of crime, criminal behaviour, criminalisation, victimisation, crime control, penal practice and punishment.

 

K8Critically analyse complex social problems, locally, nationally and globally, and the relationships between them and criminological, victimological and penological theories.

 

K9Demonstrate and critically evaluate specialist scientific and/or theoretical research knowledge of a specific topic within the field of criminology.

 

 

Learning Outcomes – Ordinary degree

 

If you are awarded an Ordinary degree you will have achieved the majority of the learning outcomes for the programme studied. However you will have gained fewer credits at Stage 3 than students awarded an Honours degree, your knowledge will typically be less broad and you will typically be less proficient in higher-level skills such as independent learning.

 

 

  1. What will the programme consist of?

Each undergraduate programme consists of a number of Stages from a minimum of 1 to a maximum of 4, each of which is equivalent to a year’s full-time study. The summary below describes briefly what is contained in each Stage. Most programmes have a mixture of core (ie compulsory) modules and optional ones, often with increasing choice as you move through the programme and gain in experience. In some programmes the choice of optional modules gives you particular ‘routes’ through the programme. The programme structure including a detailed list of modules can be found in the programme regulations.

 

Stage 1

Students are introduced to a wide range of multi – disciplinary and subject specific and transferable skills.  At this level, emphasis is placed upon the development of awareness and an acknowledgement of:

 

  • The debates involved in understanding crime, criminal behaviour, criminalisation, and victimisation.
  • Consideration of social divisions and contested concepts of crime, criminality, criminalisation and victimisation.
  • Understanding of the background and working of the criminal justice system.
  • Familiarity with the scope of criminal justice settings
  • Awareness of the diversity of approaches and variety of resource materials.
  • Appreciation of the uncertainty of knowledge and the variety of methodologies used.
  • Presentation and evaluation of the demands of research, organising and synthesising material and data.
  • Consideration of appropriateness and range of communications skills required over a variety of broad issues.

 

The core pathways of the programme begin in stage 1 and continue throughout the stages.  They are:

  • Theoretical Criminology.
  • Criminal Justice and Punishment.
  • Applied Research Methods.

 

At this stage, students begin to focus on specialist optional pathways within the programme and they can opt to continue these throughout the stages:

 

i)                     psychology, [mental] health and offending,

ii)                   policing, surveillance and crime prevention,

iii)                 inequality, diversity and gender-based violence,

iv)                 young people, crime and justice,

v)                   ‘race’, racism and criminal justice,

vi)                 applied criminology.

 

These pathways are also supported by the core pathways.

 

Stage 2

 

Students are required to develop a wider range of skills and understanding within the context of thematic and issue related studies.  This is particularly relevant within the core modules at stage two, but all modules offered will further develop the learning outcomes introduced at stage one.  At stage two, emphasis is placed upon an understanding of the range of approaches within criminology and to be able to deploy.

 

  • Knowledge and understanding of the long term processes and trends of crime, criminal behaviour, criminalisation, and victimisation.
  • Appreciation of the changing philosophies, practices and contexts of the criminal justice system and supporting agencies.
  • Develop a variety of appropriate communications skills.
  • Identify and use appropriate research methodologies.
  • Proceed in a focused pathway (see stage 1).  For example, students at stage two can opt to undertake a placement in a relevant organisation as part of the ‘applied criminology’ pathway.

 

Stage 3

 

Students are required to develop a range of understanding and skills within the context of specified and in-depth research/case studies. These learning outcomes are specifically related to the core modules and further build upon the foundations set in place at stage one and developed in stage two.  At stage three, emphasis is placed upon an ability to use personal initiative and be able to formulate judgements regarding both knowledge based and practical criminology contexts.  That is to:

 

  • Identify and solve problems related to subject specific and practical criteria in criminology/criminal justice/penology.
  • Initiate, retrieve and organise appropriate and reasonable range of data and current resources, and present it in an effectual way.
  • Be aware of the challenges and difficulties when applying evidence based practices within the criminal justice system and to the wider field of criminology.
  • Critically reflect on relevant practical work/volunteer experience using theoretical and analytical tools in order to understand the relationship between crime /punishment and society, including the influence of the broader social policy and political context.

 

  1. How will I be taught? Modes of teaching and learning aligned with KIS – choose one or more

Scheduled teaching activities

X

Independent study

X

Placement

X

 

Based on existing good practice, this programme is aimed at a diverse student body, and to this end seeks to be accessible both in terms of content and delivery.  Thus, the programme team aim to offer diverse, innovative and flexible learning and teaching methods, and continuing appropriate and timely formative feedback in order that all students can develop and demonstrate the required knowledge and skills in the programme learning outcomes.  This is achieved through lectures and seminar/workshops, also group and individual tutorials are included in the learning methods and participatory learning methods are specifically encouraged, such as, small group and individual presentations.  A substantial amount of individual module learning and teaching material is available on Canvas, and, further enhances learning opportunities for part time students and those with learning disabilities.  Here is a breakdown of the format of the teaching and learning methods:

 

  • Lectures provide the factual information, current thinking in the subject and a framework for thinking and researching.  Content is generally innovative and questions during the sessions are encouraged.
  • Seminars/workshops involve a wide range of learning and teaching delivery. Often group work discussion, independent study and staff formative feedback provides a mechanism for increased understanding and enables students to reflect further into the issues covered. Both formative and summative assessment criteria are also covered during these sessions.
  • Tutorial support is offered on both a group and individual basis throughout the programme.  Generally organised as a prearranged time-tabled session, but often in some circumstances on a ‘needs basis’ or casual drop-in arrangement.
  • Experiential learning is used as the focus of the level five ‘Practical Application in Criminology’ module, but also incorporates knowledge based analytical and theoretical understanding, along with generic transferable skills.
  • Self-directed learning including reading or research based exercises, use of Canvas employ a student centred emphasis, encouraging skills of self-management, project management, and research and generic skills such as IT, oral and written communication.
  • The inclusion of computer lab work, where students use a number of analytical software throughout each level of study through means of directed and independent learning methods.
  • PDP’s encouraging self-reflection and organisational skills. 

 

Teaching and learning methods are designed in such a way to increase autonomy of learners so that they develop into more independent thinkers, readers and writers throughout their programme of study.

 

A list of the modules in each Stage of the programme can be found in the Programme Regulations.

 

A summary of the types of teaching, learning and assessment in each module of the programme can be found in the Matrix of Modes of Teaching.

 

  1. How will I be assessed and given feedback?  Modes of assessment aligned with KIS: choose one or more.

 

Written examinations

X

Coursework

X

Practical assessments

X

 

A summary of the types of teaching, learning and assessment in each module of the programme can be found in the Matrix of Modes of Teaching.

 

The generic assessment criteria which we use can be found here. Some programmes use subject-specific assessment criteria which are based on the generic ones.

 

This programme uses the Generic University Assessment Criteria

YES

NO

This programme uses the Subject Specific Assessment Criteria

YES

NO

 

The University regulations can be found here.

 

The criminology programme uses a range of varied and innovative assessment methods to develop students’ knowledge and skills throughout the stages.  Assessment methods are determined by module leaders in relation to the module learning outcomes.  The module learning outcomes map to the programme learning outcomes (see matrixes in Appendix 2).  Assessment throughout the programme uses a diverse range of methods that are appropriate to the learning outcomes of the modules and to the level of study in the programme.  Stage one assessments are shorter in word counts, whereas stage three are longer in word counts. 

 

The use of relatively short assessments, timed early in the processes of individual modules, provides an indication to staff of the levels of prior knowledge and skill of the individual students.  It also gives some reassurance and guidance for the students themselves.  Across the modules summative assessment is used to assess students’ subject specific knowledge and skills. Summative assessment during and at the end of modules is largely focussed on coursework, and exams tend to be in the form of seen time-constrained tests, computer-exam or multiple choice questionnaires but these are used infrequently as a mode of assessment. The predominant approach of coursework allows students to demonstrate their deeper understanding of issues and also encourages skills such as time management, planning and self-organisation. Written coursework also enables students to gain experience in different genres of writing, and preparing these assessments helps them to develop their skills in structuring an argument and their ability to integrate and synthesise data. 

 

Assessment methods include multiple choice question tests (MCQ), written coursework, posters and oral presentations, and time constrained tests.  Written coursework may involve essays, literature reviews, article review, critical analyses of literature, a reflective journal and the production of case studies, and research projects.  In addition, more practical forms of assessment give students the opportunity to develop skills in communication, oral presentation and the use of ICT to support presentations. A mixture of individual and group work allows students to develop and be assessed in working independently and collaboratively.  Employers value students who can work independently and as part of a team.  Group work is explicitly assessed in a number of modules particularly using posters and presentations.  These are all skills and aptitudes that will serve graduates well in the types of employment that they may enter into the field of criminology and criminal justice.

 

Moderation of standards is rigorous. Work is moderated within the programme team to ensure consistency and fairness before samples (from stages two and three) are sent to external examiners. In line with faculty policy, written feedback is given, including clear written guidance on strategies to improve their marks in future and students are also given an indication of the quality of their written English.

 

  1. Teaching, learning and assessment matrix

 

  1. How does research influence the programme? 

 

  • The pedagogical research of the Criminology Retention Project has led to the re-development of the first-year curriculum to enhance the reintegration and retention of students.

 

  • Staff research on policing, terrorism, risk and social control develop the curriculum at stage one, by beginning the specialist pathway of ‘policing, surveillance and crime prevention’.  Staff research on policing, policing domestic violence, and the role of Police Community Support Officers continues this pathway of ‘policing, surveillance and crime prevention’ by underpinning the curriculum at years two and three.   Staff research examining cybercrime, ethics and morality develops the ‘policing, surveillance and crime prevention’ strand, particularly at stage 3, when students can critically analyse ‘cybercrime’.

 

  • Generally, staff research on race and disproportionate targeting of BME groups feeds into the specialist pathway of ‘‘race’, racism and criminal justice’, throughout the stages of study.

 

  • Staff research examining dominant discourses of risk and rehabilitation of intimately violent men in the probation service has developed the curriculum at years two and three.  In year two, dominant philosophies of punishment are juxtaposed to make sense of contemporary criminal justice and the impact on the punishment agencies, thus underpinning the core pathway in the curriculum of ‘criminal justice and punishment’.  In year three, these dominant discourses are critically analysed when responding to ending gender-based violence, the culmination of the specialist pathway of ‘inequality, diversity and gender-based violence’.  Other staff’s ongoing research on making sense, exploring and critically analysing domestic violence and abuse develops this specialist pathway at year three.

 

  • Academic staff research and out-reach links with youth offending teams underpins and develops the specialist pathway of ‘youth people, crime and justice’, in years two and three.

 

  • Staff specialist research into disabilities continues the pathway of ‘psychology, [mental] health and offending’, particularly feeding into the curriculum in year three.

 

  • Staff research into the role and impact of punishment across societies, national and transnational contexts, and historically through time, to explain why different types of society punish in different ways, underpins the core pathway of ‘criminal justice and punishment’ in the curriculum at year three.

 

  • Staff’s reach-out into the criminal justice system develops and underpins ultimately the ‘applied criminology’ pathway throughout all stages of the programme, by students observing the criminal courts in year one, visiting prisons, and volunteering and/or a placement in a relevant organisation in year two, and potentially carrying-out research in the field, subject to ethics committee review, in year three.

 

  • Many examples of staff research methodologies are drawn-on to develop the ‘applied research methods’ pathway of the programme, from stages one to three, to illustrate how research links to theory and practice.  In a similar vein, staff’s research that focused on policy analysis has developed the curriculum to enhance students’ own skills of policy analysis. 

 

  • All academic staff’s specialist research areas feed ultimately into the ‘applied research methods’ pathway, as staff are assigned students to supervise in their dissertations, in accordance with their specialist teaching and research areas, whether that is gender-based violence, young people, crime and justice, policing, surveillance and crime prevention, and so on.

 

  • Throughout the programme students engage in research-led learning and apply their research skills to a number of projects at every level.  Student led research begins in year one of undergraduate study and develops through to year three. It is in year one when students undertake their first qualitative research project. Research skills are added to in year two when students examine the effectiveness of using quantitative research methods to gather information on social and cultural environments.  In year three, students must undertake an in-depth investigation of a key theoretical or policy question of their choice from within a well-defined field in criminology in the form of a dissertation.

 

SECTION D EMPLOYABILITY

 

  1. How will the programme prepare me for employment?

 

The programme gives you the opportunity to develop skills which you can use in the future. Some skills are more specific than others to the subject area, or to a particular type of activity, but all skills can be applied in a range of employment situations, sometimes in quite unexpected ways. The skills which this programme is designed to develop are listed below.

 

A key aim of the programme is to increase the employability of students studying criminology at the University of Sunderland. This has led to the development of a number of optional pathways in criminology to improve roots into employment.  For example, the theoretical pathways of the programme, such as inequalities, diversity and gender-based violence primes students well for working in a statutory or non-government organisation that seeks to tackle violence against women, whereas the ‘policing, surveillance and crime prevention’ might well prepare students for working in a policing and security context, for example, in the police force.  The pathway of ‘psychology, [mental health] and offenders’ theoretically prepares students for working with a significant proportion of the population of the criminal justice system.  The ‘applied criminology’ pathway physically places students in the criminal justice system by them observing criminal cases (year one), visits to prisons (year two), placement in a relevant organisation (year two), and volunteering in a relevant organisation (years one to three).  Hence, the objective of the programme is to provide a secure academic foundation in criminology which will merge theory and practice equipping students with the skills and knowledge needed for the workforce (and/or further academic study/research).  

 

Given academic staff’s link to reach-out, particularly in the criminal justice system, potential employers of graduates, such as the police, the probation service who are now linked to private Community Rehabilitation Companies (CRCs), youth offending teams, and the prison service are often asked for feedback on how students can enhance their knowledge and skills to obtain such careers, by both academic staff and students.  For example, many of our students volunteer within criminal justice organisations (such as the police, youth justice) and in non-government organisations (such as the CRCs, Changing Lives).  Some of our students have carried-out a placement in a relevant organisation (such as HMP Deerbolt, HMP Durham).  Our links with these organisations that we have made by putting forward our students for volunteering roles and placements ensures a timely on-going discussion about the needs of such agencies and how our students can best fulfil these needs by education and training on the BSc Criminology Programme.  The programme is thus constantly evolving in line with these changing needs of employers.  For example, the probation service has undergone further significant changes in recent years, and this has altered the recruitment of probation officers, once again.  The criteria for candidates to apply to become a Probation Officer completely maps onto our Criminology Programme (see link: https://www.prospects.ac.uk/job-profiles/probation-officer), and as such, our students are well-placed to apply for such a position, particularly if they have fully immersed themselves in the ‘applied criminology and criminal justice’ pathway.  We monitor these changes in employers in order to enhance the employability of our students.

 

Students are well-placed for employment in the police, probation and prison services, CRCs and other non-government organisations that work with offenders or victims, or other vulnerable populations.  Given the pathway ‘applied research methods’ incorporates training in computer assisted data analysis software, our students are well-placed for jobs in research in a wide range of organisations.

 

The BSc Criminology Programme can also lead to a range of related professions by students continuing further post-graduate study related to Social Work, Teacher-Training,  Law, and specific higher-degrees for a profession in academia.

 

 

There are also opportunities for on-campus students outside your programme of study.

 

Students are invited to the monthly Centre for Applied Social Sciences (CASS) research seminar series, where academic staff internal and external to the university, present research papers based on their current theoretical and/or empirical research they are working-on.  This serves to keep students and staff abreast of current academic thinking in the field, which further enhances students’ employability in related professions by forging theory and practice, contemporarily.

 

For information about other opportunities available to our students who study on campus, click here.

 

Additional opportunities to develop your experiences more widely will vary if you study at one of our partner colleges. For information about the extra-curricular activities available in any of our colleges please contact the college direct. 

 

  1. Particular features of the qualification (optional)

 

  1. Professional statutory or regulatory body (PSRB) accreditation. 

 

PSRB accreditation is not relevant to this programme 

X

PSRB accreditation is currently being sought for this programme

 

This programme currently has PSRB accreditation

 

 

Interim or exit awards are not accredited. 

 

SECTION E PROGRAMME STRUCTURE AND REGULATIONS

 

Use Programme Regulations Form, for questions 39 and 40

 

SECTION F ADMISSIONS, LEARNING ENVIRONMENT AND SUPPORT

 

  1. What are the admissions requirements?

 

The University’s standard admissions requirements can be found in the university regulations. Programme-specific requirements which are in addition to those regulations are given below. 

 

 

Entry from a University of Sunderland Foundation Year

 

Can students enter with advanced standing?

Yes

No

 

If yes, to which Stages?

Stage 1

 

Stage 2

 

Stage 3

X

Stage 4

 

 

If yes, with what qualifications?

 

Foundation Degree in Criminal Justice from South Tyneside College.

Foundation Degree in Public Services from Sunderland College.

 

Other:

 

The University has a process by which applicants whose experience to date already covers one or more modules of the programme they are applying for may seek Accreditation of Prior Learning (APL). Full details can be found here but if you think that this may be relevant to you, please contact the department which offers the programme you are interested in.

 

  1. What kind of support and help will there be?

 

Ultimately, the programme leader is responsible and cares for the student in terms of their academic progression throughout the programme.  In addition to this, at each stage, students are assigned a personal tutor to care for their academic, personal, social and welfare needs, and to refer students on to other more specialist support mechanisms throughout the university, as and when needed, such as disability support, counselling, skills for learning, careers and employability service, student support, and so on.  At each stage, the personal tutor’s focus varies.  For example, in year one the focus is on settling, retaining, motivating and progressing students; in year two, the focus is on progressing students and enhancing employability by providing opportunities and encouraging students to engage in volunteering roles in relevant organisations; and in year three, the personal tutor focuses on progressing students, raising attainment, and enhancing employability by focusing on career and further study/research, plans.  Personal tutors carry-out their role in accordance with the University Policy on Personal Tutoring, e.g., offering students via e-mail, ordinarily, at least four appointments/drop-ins during ‘office hours’ throughout the year, strategically placed at the start of the academic year, towards the end of the first semester, the start of the second semester, and at the end of the academic year.  Personal tutors will also offer appointments/drop-ins outside these structured times to respond to their personal tutees’ needs.  Details of personal tutors can be found in the Programme Handbook.  All students, from all levels, meet their personal tutor during induction week.  All module leaders/tutors are ultimately responsible for students’ learning on modules, and supervisors are similarly responsible for their supervisees learning on the dissertation module, and these provide an added layer of support, over and above the programme leader and personal tutor, although at times in a student’s academic study, the programme leader, module leader and personal tutor, may well be the same person.  During students’ second year, if they are carrying-out a placement, they are also supported by the placement officer.

 

  1. in the university as a whole:

The University provides a range of professional support services including health and well-being, counselling, disability support, and a Chaplaincy. Click on the links for further information.

 

  1. in a partner college:

Please see the relevant college prospectus or website for details of student support if you are planning to study in one of our partner colleges.

 

  1. What resources will I have access to?

 

On campus

X

In a partner college

 

By distance learning

 

 

On campus

Tick all that apply

General Teaching and Learning Space

X

IT

X

Library

X

VLE

X

Laboratory

 

Studio

 

Performance space

 

Other specialist

 

Technical resources 

 

 

 

Students will have access to lecture theatres, classrooms, computer and printing resources, online virtual learning environment, and the libraries on both campuses.

 

 

Information about the University’s facilities can be found here.

 

Please see the relevant college prospectus or website for details of college learning resources if you are planning to study in one of our partner colleges.

 

  1. Are there any additional costs on top of the fees?

 

No, but all students buy some study materials such as books and provide their own basic study materials.

 

Yes (optional) All students buy some study materials such as books and provide their own basic study materials. In addition there are some are additional costs for optional activities associated with the programme (see below)

X

Yes (essential) All students buy some study materials such as books and provide their own basic study materials. In addition there are some are essential additional costs associated with the programme (see below)

 

 

 

For SSC 210 Practical Application in Criminology, option module, students have to pay for an enhanced Disclosure and Barring Service check cost £44.

 

 

  1. How are student views represented?

All taught programmes in the University have student representatives for each Stage (year-group) of each programme who meet in a Student-Staff Liaison Committee (SSLC) where they can raise students’ views and concerns. The Students’ Union and the faculties together provide training for student representatives. SSLCs and focus groups are also used to obtain student feedback on plans for developing existing programmes and designing new ones. Feedback on your programme is obtained every year through module questionnaires and informs the annual review of your programme. Student representatives are also invited to attend Programme and Module Studies Boards which manage the delivery and development of programmes and modules.  Various Faculty committees, particularly Faculty Academic Experience Committee, Academic Development Committee and Quality Management Sub-Committee also have student representation. This allows students to be involved in higher-level plans for teaching and learning. There is a parallel structure at university level on which students are represented by sabbatical officers who are the elected leaders of the Students’ Union.

 

The University’s student representation and feedback policy can be found here.

 

Undergraduate programmes only: Final-year students are also invited to complete a National Student Survey (NSS) which asks a standard set of questions across the whole country. The results of this are discussed at Programme Studies Boards and at Faculty Academic Experience Committee to identify good practice which can be shared and problems which need to be addressed. We rely heavily on student input to interpret the results of the NSS and ensure that we make the most appropriate changes.

 

Programmes offered in partner colleges: If you are studying in one of our partner colleges the college will have its own mechanisms for obtaining student feedback. Some of these may be the same as those on-campus at the University but others may be different. You should ask your college for further information.

 

For distance learning operated from Sunderland: if you are studying by distance learning you will have slightly different arrangements from those used on campus. In particular you  are likely to have virtual rather than physical meetings and discussions. However these arrangements  should provide comparable opportunities for you to give feedback. Details are given below.  

 

Many academic staff will advertise office hours and/or operate open door policies, or will book students into individual appointments so their views can be shared with academic staff.  Many students also air their views informally, e.g., at the end of lectures/classes, one-to-one with staff.

 

 

SECTION G QUALITY MANAGEMENT 

 

  1. National subject benchmarks

 

The Quality Assurance Agency for Higher Education publishes benchmark statements which give guidance as to the skills and knowledge which graduates in various subjects and in certain types of degree are expected to have. These can be found here.

 

Are there any benchmark statements for this programme?

YES

NO

 

The subject benchmark(s) for this programme is/are:

 

QAA subject benchmark(s) applicable to this programme are:

http://www.qaa.ac.uk/en/Publications/Documents/SBS-criminology-14.pdf

 

 

The QAA also publishes a Framework for Higher Education Qualifications (FHEQ) which defines the generic skills and abilities expected of students who have achieved awards at a given level and with which our programmes align. The FHEQ can be found here.

 

  1. How are the quality and standards of the programme assured?

The programme is managed and quality assured through the University’s standard processes. Programmes are overseen by Module and Programme Studies Boards which include student representatives. Each year each module leader provides a brief report on the delivery of the module, identifying strengths and areas for development, and the programme team reviews the programme as a whole.  The purpose of this is to ensure that the programme is coherent and up-to-date, with suitable progression from one Stage to another, and a good fit (alignment)  between what is taught and how students learn and are assessed - the learning outcomes, content and types of teaching, learning and assessment. Student achievement, including progress between Stages of the programme and degree classification, is kept under review. The programme review report is sent to the Faculty Quality Management Sub-Committee which in turn reports issues to the University’s Quality Management Sub-Committee (QMSC) and Academic Development Committee (ADC).

 

External examiners are appointed to oversee and advise on the assessment of the programme. They ensure that the standards of the programme are comparable with those of similar programmes elsewhere in the UK and are also involved in the assessment process to make sure that it is fair. They are invited to comment on proposed developments to the programme. Their reports are sent to the Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Academic) as well as to the Faculty so that issues of concern can be addressed.

 

All programmes are reviewed by the University on a six-yearly cycle to identify good practice and areas for enhancement. Programmes are revalidated through this review process. These reviews include at least one academic specialist in the subject area concerned from another UK university. The University is subject to external review by the Quality Assurance Agency for Higher Education on a six-year cycle. Their review reports for Sunderland can be found here.

 

Further information about our quality processes can be found here.

 

Please also complete the SITS form.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Appendix 1

 

PART B   -  Programme  Regulation/s

 

Name of programme: Criminology

Title of final award:  BSc with Honours

Interim awards[1]: Certificate in Higher Education; Diploma in Higher Education. 

Accreditation:  None.

 

University Regulation (please state the relevant University Regulation): 4.2.1

 

Regulations apply to students commencing their studies from (please state the date / intake that these regulations will apply to students for each Stage):

 

Regulations apply to students

Date the regulations apply

Intakes affected

Stage 1

Current regulations

Current

Stage 2

Current regulations

Current

Stage 3

Current regulations

Current

 

 

Stage 1

 

Core modules:

 

Code

Title

Credits

SSC 102

Social Problems

20

SSC103

Introduction to Criminal Justice

20

SSC113

Applied Qualitative Research in the Social Sciences

20

SSC121

Classical Readings in Criminology

20

SSC124

Patterns and Trends in Crime and Victimisation

20

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Optional Modules

 

Choose modules to the value of 20 credits from the following list:

Code

Title

Credits

SSC110

Exploring Psycho-Social Theory

20

SSC111

Crime, Surveillance and Social Control

20

SSC112

Inequality, Diversity and Society

20

 

 

Elective Modules

There is no provision for an elective module at stage 1.

 

Progression Regulations

 

There are no programme-specific progression regulations[2].

 

Stage 2

 

Core modules

Code

Title

Credits

SSSC206

Theoretical Issues in Criminology

20

SSC 209

Policing Past, Present and Future(s)

20

SSC 222

Offender Management in Criminal Justice

20

SSC223

Applied Quantitative Research in the Social Sciences

20

 

Optional modules

 

Choose modules to the value of 40 credits from the following list:

 

Code

Title

Credits

SSC207

Youth, Crime and Criminology

20

SSC210

Practical Application in Criminology

20

SSC212

Counselling Approaches in Practice Settings

20

SSC 231

Gender, Diversity and Human Rights: Global Perspectives

20

SSC220

Medicalisation, Normality and the Body

20

SSC227

Working together to Safeguard Vulnerable Children, Young People and Adults.

20

 

Elective modules

 

There is no provision for an elective module at Stage 2.

 

Progression Regulations

 

There are no programme-specific progression regulations[3].

 

Stage 3

 

Core modules

 

Code

Title

Credits

SSC311

Re-Imagining Crime and Criminology

20

SSC314

Punishment and Society

20

SSC 315

Criminology Dissertation

40

 

 

Optional modules

 

Choose modules to the value of 40 credits from the following list:

 

Code

Title

Credits

SSC 305

‘Race’, Racialisation and the Criminal Justice System

20

SSC312

Substance Use & Society

20

SSC317

Violence, Gender and Society

20

SSC319

 

The Clinical Gaze: Medicine, Disability and Confinement

20

SSC 320

Justice for Young People

20

 

Elective modules

 

There is no provision for an elective module at Stage 3.

 

Progression Regulations

 

There are no programme-specific progression regulations[4].

 

 

 

 

 


Appendix 2

Matrix of modes of teaching, learning and assessment

 

Stage 1

 

Module

Code

Core/

optional

Modes of T&L

Modes of Assessment

S1

S2

S3

K1

K2

K3

Social Problems

 

SSC102

Core

L, S, GW, P, PS *

50% PR*

50% CW

 

TDA*

TDA

 

TDA

TDA

Introduction to Criminal Justice

SSC103

Core

L, S, GW, PS, FV

100% CW

 

TDA

TDA

TDA

TDA

TDA

Exploring Psycho-Social Theory

SSC110

Option

L, S, GW, P, PS,

40% PR, 60% CW

 

TDA

TDA

TDA

TDA

TDA

Crime, Surveillance and Social Control

SSC111

Option

L, S, GW, P, PS

40% PR, 60% CW

 

TDA

TDA

TDA

 

TDA

Inequality, Diversity and Society

SSC112

Option

L, S, GW, PS

100% CW

 

TDA

TDA

 

TDA

 

Applied Qualitative Research in the Social Sciences

SSC113

Core

L, S, WS, GW, P, PS

35% PR, 65% CW

TDA

TDA

TDA

TDA

TDA

TDA

Classical Readings in Criminology

SSC121

Core

L, S, GW, PS

100% CW

 

TDA

TDA

TDA

 

TDA

Patterns and Trends in Crime and Victimisation

SSC124

Core

L, S, GW, PS

40% CW

60% Exam

 

TDA

TDA

TDA

TDA

TDA

* Lectures, Seminars, Work Shops, Group work, Presentations, Private study, Field Visit, Tutorial

*Taught, Developed, Assessed

* Presentation, coursework, exam

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stage 2

 

Module

Code

Core/

optional

Modes of T&L

Modes of Assessment

K1

K2

K3

K4

K5

K6

K7

K8

K9

S1

S2

S3

S4

S5

S6

S7

S8

S9

Offender Management in Criminal Justice

SSC222

Core

WS/PS/GW/FV

CW 100%

 

 

 

TDA

TDA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TDA

 

TDA

 

 

 

 Theoretical Issues in Criminology

SSC206

Core

GW/PS

CW 100%

 

 

 

TDA

TDA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TDA

TDA

 

 

 

 

Youth, Crime and Criminology

SSC207

Option

L/PS/GW

40% PR

60% CW

 

 

 

TDA

TDA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TDA

 

TDA

 

 

 

Policing Past Present and Future(s)

SSC209

Core

L/WS/GW

CW 100%

 

 

 

TDA

TDA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TDA

 

TDA

 

 

 

Applied Quantitative Research in the Social Sciences

SSC223

Core

L/PS/GW

CW50%

EX 50%

 

 

 

 

 

TDA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TDA

TDA

 

 

 

Practical Application in Criminology

SSC210

Option

L/PS/GW

CW 100%

 

 

 

 

TDA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TDA

 

TDA

 

 

 

Gender Diversity and Human Rights: Global perspectives

SSC231

Option

L/PS

CW100%

 

 

 

TDA

TDA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TDA

 

TDA

 

 

 

Counselling Approaches in Practice Settings

SSC212

Option

L/WS/PS/GW

CW100%

 

 

 

 

TDA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TDA

 

TDA

 

 

 

Medicalisation, Normality and the Body

SSC220

Option

L/WS/PS/GW

CW50%

PR 50%

 

 

 

TDA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TDA

 

TDA

 

 

 

Working together to Safeguard Vulnerable Children, Young People and Adults

SSC227

Option

L/WS/PS/GW

PR 40%

TCT 60%

 

 

 

 

TDA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TDA

 

TDA

 

 

 

 

Stage 3

 

Module

Code

Core/

optional

Modes of T&L

Modes of Assessment

K1

K2

K3

K4

K5

K6

K7

K8

K9

S1

S2

S3

S4

S5

S6

S7

S8

S9

‘Race’, Racialisation and the Criminal Justice System

SSC305

Option

L/PS

CW 100%

 

 

 

 

 

 

TDA

TDA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TDA

TDA

 

Re-imagining Crime and Criminology

SSC311

Core

L/PS/GW

CW 50%

EX 50%

 

 

 

 

 

 

TDA

TDA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TDA

TDA

 

Substance Use & Society

SSC312

Option

L/PS/GW

CW 70%

EX 30%

 

 

 

 

 

 

TDA

TDA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TDA

TDA

 

Punishment and Society

SSC314

Core

L/PS/GW

CW 100%

 

 

 

 

 

 

TDA

TDA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TDA

TDA

 

Criminology Dissertation

SSC315

Core

PS/GW/WS

CW 100%

 

 

 

 

 

 

TDA

TDA

TDA

 

 

 

 

 

 

TDA

TDA

TDA

Violence, Gender and Society

SSC317

Option

L/GW/PS/FV

CW 100%

 

 

 

 

 

 

TDA

TDA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TDA

TDA

 

The Clinical Gaze: Medicine, Disability and Confinement

SSC319

Option

L/PS/GW

CW 100%

 

 

 

 

 

 

TDA

TDA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TDA

TDA

 

Justice for Young People

SSC320

Option

T/PS

40% PR

60% CW

 

 

 

 

 

 

TDA

TDA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TDA

 


 

Quality Handbook

 

 

SITS SUMMARY PROGRAMME/SHORT COURSE DETAILS

(Form to be completed electronically by the Faculty and forwarded to the Quality Support Officer supporting the Approval event, or sent to Planning & MI for faculty devolved processes before sending to Quality Support (with the exception of Short Courses and GRS))

This form is to be completed when a new programme has been validated and approved so that the programme codes and progression and awards rules can be set up in SITS.  This also needs to be completed at periodic course review when there have been significant modifications to the course.

 

Please note that all details entered onto this form will go onto every student’s record that is attached to this programme and it is therefore imperative that the information is correct. 

 

1 Programme Details

New/ Modification/Review:

Please ensure the minor modification document is included

Modification

Full Programme Title (including award):

Criminology, B.Sc. (Hons)

If replacement for existing course, specify title and course code:

 

Qualification Aim:

e.g. Foundation degree of Science, Bachelor of Arts (Honours)

B.Sc. (Hons)

Qualification Level (NQF level):

Level 6/BSc Honours

HECoS Code

See HESA Website https://www.hesa.ac.uk/innovation/hecos

 

Is the programme Open or Closed:

A course is defined as closed when specifically designed for a certain group of people and not also available to other suitably qualified candidates. It may be designed for a particular company however if the same course is also run for other suitably qualified candidates, not employed by the company, then the course is not closed. If the programme is closed please specify who it is for.

Open

Faculty and School:

Education and Society

Social Sciences

Location of study:

e.g. Sunderland in London, Sunderland

Sunderland

Last Date Registration (PBI) Number of days:

The number of days after the start date of the course that it is possible for students to register onto it. It is also referred to as the migration date. This is normally 18 days.  Please indicate if more or less than this number.

 

Programme Leader:

Dr Paul Dresser

Academic Team for the programme:

 

Date of Approval/Modification/Review:

29/05/2019

Date of next review (QS to complete):

2022/2023

Accrediting Body or PSRB
If yes please attach a completed PSRB form

No

 

Programme Specific Regulations

If yes, please attach a completed Programme Specific Regulations form

No

 

Does this programme come under the Unistats return?

The following are excluded from the Unistats return:

  • Programmes of 120 credits or less (including top ups)
  • ‘Closed’ Courses
  • Programmes of one year’s full-time duration even if they have more than 120 credits
  • Programmes which will be delivered only to overseas students
  • Postgraduate programmes
  • A course that is run as part of an apprenticeship

Yes

Is this an undergraduate programme whose primary (but not necessarily only) purpose is to improve the effectiveness of practitioners registered with a professional body? If yes, please specify which body:

https://www.hesa.ac.uk/collection/c16061/accreditation_list/

e.g. a short course aimed at registered nurses

No


Professional Body:

 

 

Interim  Awards

If a student does not achieve their qualification aim, what lower awards might they be entitled to, assuming they have the credits?  The subject title for any lower level award should be given where this is different from the subject of the qualification aim. This should be the same title as the main award unless an alternative is approved via a Programme Specific Regulation.

 

Interim Award Title

Credits Required

Interim Structure

Please show mandatory requirements if applicable e.g. core module codes

1

Certificate of Higher Education

120

SSC 102, SSC 103, SSC 121, SSC 113, SSC124 plus one criminology level 4 option.

 

2

Diploma of Higher Education

240

As above, plus SSC 206, SSC 209, SSC 222, SSC 223 plus two level 5 criminology options.

 

3

Ordinary Degree

300

As above plus 60 stage 3 credits.

 

2 Mode of Attendance

 

Tick all that apply

Min number of years

Max number of years

Overall length of programme in years/months/weeks

Intake dates (months)

Max and min cohort sizes

01 Full-time*

3

9

 

September (annually)

 

31 Part-time*

6

18

 

 

 

Sandwich*

 

 

 

 

 

 

Off-campus

 

 

 

 

 

 

On-campus

          

 

 

 

 

 

Distance learning

 

 

 

 

 

 

Work-based learning

(optional)

 

 

 

 

 

Collaborative

 

 

 

 

 

 

Proposed start-date (month/year)

 

Full-time (031)

Full-time students are those expected to study for more than 24 weeks per year, for a minimum of 21 hours per week and are paying the full-time fee. (Note – this includes any work based learning).

Part-time (031)

Students who are expected to study for less than 21 hours per week.

Sandwich

Please ensure you include the title of the sandwich programme in Section 3

 

 

 

3 Admissions

An admissions or MCR code will be created to allow student applications.

Tick appropriate

UUCAS

Universities and Colleges Admission Services

Required for full-time undergraduate programmes only.

           

DDirect Entry

Required for FT, PT, PG and PGR, only where students will be admitted through the admissions teams or where the programme needs to be advertised on the web.

           

GGTTR

Graduate Teacher Training Registry
Education only, where applicable

 

 

4 Collaborative Provision

UK

N/A

Overseas

N/A

Institution

Collaborative Model

Funding Arrangements

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Does this course offer a sandwich placement?

If yes, please indicate which programme year this placement is to take place.

No

Programme Year:

Is this sandwich placement compulsory or optional?

N/A

Does this course offer a study abroad year out? If yes, please indicate which programme year this placement is to take place.

Yes

Programme Year: Year Two

Is this study abroad year out compulsory or optional?

Optional

 

5  Major Source of Funding

Please note this relates to funding for the programme and not individual students

Office for Students (previously known as HEFCE)

           

Education & Skills Funding Agency (includes Degree Apprenticeships)

 

DfE   https://www.gov.uk/government/organisations/national-college-for-teaching-and-leadership

 

Wholly NHS Funded

Partially NHS Funded

Departments of Health/NHS/Social Care. For all Health funded programmes please indicate whether the programme is eligible for an NHS Bursary

-  Eligible for NHS BursaryNo

 

 

 

Other Funding:

 

– If Other, please specify:

 

 

 

6 Education Programmes Only

This section must be completed for any programmes marked above as ‘NCTL’ funded

Teacher Training Identifier:

 

Teacher Training Scope:

 

Qualification Aim:

QTS and academic award, QTS only, QTS by assessment only

 

 

7 Fees

Where non-standard fees are proposed this will need approval by Fees and Bursaries Group before the programme can be advertised.

Undergraduate:

(Please select option)

         Standard

Other (please state):

 

Postgraduate:

(Please select option)

Fees stated are for full time programmes

All part-time programmes should be Band 2

Band 1 (classroom) £6000 (Sunderland) £6500 (UoSiL)

Band 2 (mixed) £6500 (Sunderland) £6800 (UoSiL)

Band 3 (laboratory) £7000 (Sunderland) £7200 (UoSiL)

MBA: £11500 (Sunderland) £11500 (UoSiL)

Other: (please state)

 

 

 

 

   DETAILS SUPPLIED BY:Dr. Paul Dresser        DATE: 25/06/19


Module List

Award, Route (if applicable) and Level

New/Existing/ Modified  Module (N/E/MM)

Module Title

Module Code

Module Credit Value

Whether core or option

Must choose (i.e. designated option):

Assessment weighting – give % weight for each assessment item

Pre-/co-requisites

Module leader

Other comment (if required)

Date of Entry on SITS.

N/MM only

( After event)

JACS Code

HECoS Code

Academic Team

Cert.H.E.

E

Social Problems

 

SSC102

20

C

C

PR 50% CW 50% 

N/A

W. Podd

 

2010

L300

 

 

Cert.H.E.

E

Introduction to Criminal Justice

SSC103

20

C

C

CW100%

N/A

N. Roberts

 

2010

L300

 

 

Cert.H.E.

 

N

Exploring Psycho-Social Theory

SSC110

20

O

DO

CW 100%

N/A

S. Macdonald

 

2011

L300

 

 

Cert.H.E.

 

N

Crime, Surveillance and Social Control

SSC111

20

O

DO

PR  40%

CW 60%

N/A

P. Dresser

 

2015

L300

 

 

Cert.H.E.

E

Inequality, Diversity and Society

SSC112

20

O

DO

CW 100%

N/A

S. Quaid

 

2010

L300

 

 

Cert.H.E.

E

Applied Qualitative Research in the Social Sciences

SSC113

20

C

C

PR 35%

CW 65%

N/A

D. Peacock

 

2015

L300

 

 

Cert.H.E.

N

Classical Readings in Criminology

SSC121

20

C

C

100% CW

N/A

K. Tudor

 

2019

L300

 

 

Cert.H.E.

N

Patterns and Trends in Crime and Victimisation

SSC124

20

C

C

40% CW,

60% Exam

N/A

D. Peacock

 

2019

L300

 

 

Dip. H.E

E

Theoretical Issues in Criminology

SSC206

20

C

C

CW100%

N/A

K. Tudor

 

2010

L300

 

 

Dip. H.E

E

Youth, Crime and Criminology

SSC207

20

O

O

PR 40% CW 60%

N/A

F.  Cosgrove

 

2010

L300

 

 

Dip. H.E

E

Policing Present and Future(s)

SSC209

20

O

O

CW 100%

N/A

F.  Cosgrove

 

2010

L300

 

 

Dip. H.E

 

N

Practical Application in Criminology

SSC210

20

O

O

CW 100%

N/A

P. Dresser

 

2010

L300

 

 

Dip. H.E.

E

Counselling Approaches in Practice Settings

SSC212

20

O

O

CW 100%

N/A

N. Evans

 

2015

L300

 

 

Dip. H.E.

E

Gender Diversity and Society

SSC219

20

O

O

CW100%

SSC 112, SSC 101, 102, 109 or equivalent

S. Quaid

 

2008

L300

 

 

Dip. H.E

E

Offender Management in Criminal Justice

SSC222

20

C

C

CW 100%

N/A

N. Roberts

 

2015

L300

 

 

Dip. H.E

E

Applied Quantitative Research in the Social Sciences

SSC223

20

C

C

CW50%

EX 50%

SSC113

D. Peacock

 

2010

L300

 

 

Dip. H.E.

N

Medicalisation, Normality and the Body

SSC220

20

O

O

CW 50%

PR 50%

N/A

A. Dalton

 

2017

L300

 

 

Dip. H.E.

N

Working together to Safeguard Vulnerable Children, Young People and Adults

SSC227

20

O

O

PR 40%

TCT 60%

N/A

L. Deacon

 

2016

L300

 

 

B.SC (Hons)

E

Justice for Young People

SSC 320

20

0

0

PR 40%

CW 60%

N/A

F. Cosgrove

 

2017

L300

 

 

B.SC (Hons)

E

‘Race’, Racialisation and the Criminal Justice System

SSC 305

20

O

O

CW 100%

N/A

P. Dresser

 

2015

L300

 

 

B.Sc .(Hons)

E

Re-Imagining Crime and Criminology

SSC311

20

C

C

CW 50%

EX 50%

N/A

D.Peacock

 

2017

L300

 

 

B.Sc .(Hons)

E

Substance Use & Society

SSC312

20

O

O

CW 70%

EX 30%

N/A

J Merchant

 

2010

L300

 

 

B.Sc .(Hons)

E

Punishment and Society

SSC314

20

O

O

CW 100%

SSC 101 or SSC 102 or SSC 103, and one of SSC 201, SSC 206, SSC 222

P. Rushton

 

2010

L300

 

 

B.Sc. (Hons)

E

Criminology Dissertation

SSC315

40

C

C

CW 100%

Two of SSC 206, SSC 222, SSC 223

N. Roberts

 

2010

L300

 

 

B.Sc .(Hons)

 

N

Violence, Gender and Society

SSC317

20

O

O

CW 100%

SSC 112 or SSC 219 or equivalent

N. Roberts

 

2015

L300

 

 

B.Sc. (Hons)

N

The Clinical Gaze: Medicine, Disability and Confinement

SSC319

20

O

O

CW 100%

N/A

S. Macdonald

 

2016

L300

 

 

 

 

 


[1] Same as main award unless agreed otherwise at validation – eg to meet PSRB requirements

[2] This will be the norm – university regulations apply

[3] This will be the norm – university regulations apply

[4] This will be the norm – university regulations apply