Attachments

 

 

Quality Handbook

 

 

Programme Specification - Undergraduate

 

 

SECTION A:CORE INFORMATION

 

  1.  

Name of programme:

Social Work (Integrated Degree Apprenticeship)

 

  1.  

Award title:

BA Honours

 

  1.  

Programme linkage:

 

Is this part of group of linked programmes between which students can transfer at agreed points?

No

 

  1.  

Is the programme a top-up only?

 

No

  1.  

Does the programme have a Foundation Year (Level 3) associated with it so that students enter for a four-year programme and progress directly from the Foundation Year to Stage 1 without having to re-apply?

 

No

 

  1.  

Level of award:

 

Level 6

  1.  

Awarding Body:

University of Sunderland

 

  1.  

Department:

Social Sciences

 

  1.  

Programme Studies Board:

Social Work

 

  1.  

Programme Leader:

 

Jane Scutt

 


  1. How and where can I study the programme?

 

At Sunderland:

 

Full-time on campus

 

Part-time on campus

 

As work-based learning full-time

As work-based learning part-time

 

As a full-time sandwich course

 

As a part-time sandwich course

 

By distance learning

 

 

 

 

  1. How long does the programme take?

 

 

Min number of years / months

Max number of years / months

Full-time

 

 

Part-time

 

 

Distance learning

 

 

Work-based learning

3

6

 

For start-dates please see the current edition of the Prospectus or contact the relevant department at the University.

 

SECTION B:FURTHER CORE INFORMATION 

 

Use Outline Programme Proposal Form for ADC for questions 13 to 25

 

  1. Learning and teaching strategy

 

On this programme our aim is to ensure that key social work principles underpin and are demonstrated in all aspects of your teaching and learning – from set classroom and assessment tasks to formal and informal interactions with all contributors to the programme.

 

Candidates who are successful in gaining a place on BA (Hons) Social Work (Integrated Degree Apprenticeship) arrive with a range of academic, personal and practice experiences which are valued as a crucial contribution to learning on the programme. The programme team has a strong commitment to adult learning principles; in particular, apprentices are encouraged to be actively involved in managing their own learning, using and building on their own relevant experiences and that of others in the teaching/learning group. There is an emphasis on activities that support apprentices to develop the ability to reflect on their own learning, values and skills, as a basis for professional practice. The process of reflection is built into teaching, learning and assessment activities, including individual tutorials, support from your workplace mentor and supervision by your Practice Educator during your designated practice learning opportunities. The staff team will use the same processes of reflection to review their contribution to your learning and their interaction with you.

 

As an apprentice, you will undertake much of your learning ‘on the job’ with the support of your employer and designated mentor.  Throughout the programme, we will support you to make links between the taught content of the programme, independent study and the application of your developing knowledge, skills and behaviours in the workplace.

 

You will be encouraged to examine and question ‘taken for granted’ views (including your own!) and knowledge and to develop your understanding of wider social and organisational contexts which shape the lives of service users and carers and the nature of social work. You will be encouraged to examine power structures, discrimination and social inequalities and consider their implications for practice. As part of your development as an independent learner you will develop research skills which enable you to access ‘evidence’ to support or challenge current understandings and practice in social work. Small group discussions, debates and presentations within the workshop approach we take to teaching create opportunities for you to develop your own views and learn from others.

 

There is a strong emphasis on experiential and problem based learning within the classroom to support practice based learning on placement. We use case studies, practice scenarios, role play and current practice documentation within these activities which help you to move between theory, knowledge and practice. Examples of such activities include court skills sessions, communication skills, a child safeguarding case conference. Social media, interactive web-based study and other self-directed activities also add a real-world perspective to the learning you will undertake.

 

Your teaching and learning will be enhanced by the contribution of current practitioners, representatives of specialist services and service users and carers. They will deliver sessions on specific topics but will also be involved in experiential learning alongside you and contribute to assessments. Their views and feedback inform developments within the programme. You will be able to work alongside students and apprentices from related programmes such as community and youth work, law and childhood studies with a range of practitioners to assess risk and plan intervention to develop your understanding of safeguarding processes and multidisciplinary working.

 

As you progress through the programme we will support you to develop confidence as an independent learner and practitioner, and the assessment tasks and expectations on placement reflect this shift as you move towards qualification.

 

 

  1. Retention strategyDescribe any particular initiatives not described elsewhere (e.g. in student support section) to support student retention.

 

The programme retention strategy has three key aspects;

  • it ensures that you are fully informed about what is expected of you throughout the programme, and resources and support available to you to meet these expectations.
  • it focuses on creating supportive and collaborative relationships between staff and apprentices so that apprentices can fully engage with the programme.
  • the programme is robust in its requirements but works within these requirements and regulations to respond as flexibly as possible to possible obstacles to progression.

 

This begins at induction in the first year when activities focus on introducing apprentices to each other, to the staff team, the programme and the University resources and facilities. It is an opportunity to establish the ethos of the programme in terms of teaching, learning, expectations and support. Apprentices identify their learning aims for the year and make plans about how these will be achieved. You will be given a comprehensive Programme Handbook at the beginning of the programme, which is available on the Virtual Learning environment (Canvas). Apprentices are advised of assessment requirements in each module at the beginning of the academic year, and the information is repeated in module guides, on Canvas and in an academic assignment year planner.

The programme recognises the complex contexts that apprentices may need to manage and have developed a coordinated and responsive approach to meeting apprentices’ personal and academic support needs to enable them so far as possible to maintain their studies. You will be allocated a personal tutor when you commence the programme and wherever possible this tutor will remain your key source of support throughout the programme. The role of the tutor is clearly outlined within Programme Handbooks and the Personal Tutor Handbook and is discussed in more detail in section 42. You will meet regularly with your tutor in planned sessions but can also contact them outside these times if you need additional information or support. We try to be as accessible as possible via e-mail and face to face contact.

In addition to the tutorial system, the programme leader maintains regular contact with the apprentice cohort during each year of the programme, ensuring there are planned opportunities for feedback (Student Staff Forum at the end of each term) as well as responding to informal feedback during teaching and tutorial sessions throughout the year.

 

We understand that there will be times for some apprentices when their progress on the programme is less than straightforward because of challenges in your academic or personal lives. Many apprentices come to the programme with a range of responsibilities to be balanced. Your tutor, the lecturers leading the modules you take and the Programme Leader are able to advise you about the processes the University has in place to try to ensure that you are able to manage these and successfully complete the programme. These include processes which allow you to defer assessments/study or take time away from study, within the University regulations.

Throughout the programme, there will be a close, collaborative relationship between you as the apprentice, your employer and the University.  12-weekly review meetings are a requirement of all apprenticeship programmes and these regular meetings between you, your workplace mentor and personal tutor (as well as your Practice Educator during designated practice learning opportunities) will enable effective communication, review your progress and provide support. 

 

 

  1. Any other information

 

The programme combines an academic degree qualification with eligibility to apply for registration as a qualified social worker with the Health and Care Professions Council on successful completion of the full programme.

 

 

SECTION C:TEACHING AND LEARNING

 

  1. What is the programme about?

 

We aim:

  • To ensure that on successful completion of the programme, you will meet the Standards of Proficiency for Social Work and are eligible to apply for registration as a Social Worker with the Health and Care Professions Council.
  • To ensure that you reach the standards of practice at qualifying level, as outlined in the Professional Capabilities Framework and the Institute for Apprenticeships Standard for the Integrated Degree Apprenticeship for Social Worker
  • To create opportunities for you to develop as a critically reflective, analytical and research minded practitioner.
  • To deliver a curriculum influenced throughout by current research and practice and the experiences of service users and carers.
  • To ensure that social work values of valuing diversity and commitment to anti-oppressive practice and social justice are integral to the programme.

 

 

 

 

  1. What will I know or be able to do at each Stage of the programme?

 

Learning Outcomes Stage 1 – Skills  

By the end of this Stage of the programme successful apprentices should know, understand or be able to do the following:

 

S1The ability to find, organise and present information in a written form in a coherent and literate manner

S2The ability to discuss diverse or competing perspectives

S3The capacity to take responsibility for managing own learning and development using a range of approaches.

S4The use of problem-solving skills.

S5The ability to use supporting evidence to substantiate opinions and conclusions

S6The ability to explore own values, behaviours and personal attributes and how they impact upon the professional task

S7Core communication skills and the capacity to engage effectively with others.

S8Basic skills in reflection and capacity to learn from feedback.

 

 

Learning Outcomes Stage 1 – Knowledge

By the end of this Stage of the programme successful apprentices should know, understand or be able to do the following:

 

K1Understanding of the profession’s ethical principles and their relevance to practice.

K2Understanding of the importance and contribution of service user and carer perspective

K3An appreciation of disadvantage, discrimination and ways of working with diversity

K4Understanding of the principles of rights justice, social inclusion and economic wellbeing

K5Understanding of key aspects of the roles, tasks, skills and values of social     work

K6An awareness of theoretical frameworks that underpin social work processes

K7Understanding of a range of psychological perspectives on human growth, development   and behaviour

K8An initial understanding of key aspects of the legal and policy frameworks and guidance that inform and mandate social work practice

K9Understanding of key aspects of a range of sociological theories and concepts

K10A recognition of organisational contexts and frameworks for social work practice.

 

 

Learning Outcomes Stage 2 – Skills

By the end of this Stage of the programme successful apprentices should know, understand or be able to do the following:

 

S9Understand the role of the professional social worker and demonstrate professionalism in a range of contexts. (PCF1)

S10Apply social work ethical principles and values to guide professional practice. (PCF2)

S11Recognise diversity and apply anti-discriminatory and anti-oppressive principles in practice.  (PCF3)

S12Understand and, with support, apply in practice the principles of human rights, social justice, inclusion and equality (PCF4)

S13Apply knowledge of social sciences, law, social work theory and research to practice. (PCF5)

S14Use skills of reflection and analysis to inform and provide a rationale for professional decision-making. (PCF6)

S15Use judgement and authority to intervene with individuals, families and communities to promote independence, provide support and prevent harm, neglect and abuse. (PCF7)

S16Understand their role within social work organisational frameworks and within multi-agency and inter-professional settings, and operate appropriately within these. (PCF8)

S17Identify how professional leadership in social work can enhance practice and recognise the value of sharing and supporting the learning and development of others.    (PCF9)

S18Recognise and appraise diverse or competing perspectives, theories and values

S19Substantiate opinions and conclusions by use of reasoned argument and relevant evidence, both orally and in writing.

S20Analyse complex human situations using a range of knowledge and experience.

 

Learning Outcomes Stage 2 – Knowledge

By the end of this Stage of the programme successful apprentices should know, understand or be able to do the following:

 

K11Understanding of how the profession’s ethical principles inform the decision making process

K12Understanding of processes for ensuring service user and carer participation and influence

K13Understanding of the effects of oppression, discrimination and social exclusion.

K14Critical appraisal of social work theories, processes models and methods of working.

K15Understanding of the impact of diverse range of life experiences and chances on the identity, and needs of children, families and adults.

K16Understanding of forms of harm and the concept of risk.

K17Critical understanding of the legislative, policy and practice responses in relation to safeguarding, meeting needs, promoting choice and protecting human rights.

K18Critical understanding of key aspects of organisational theory as they apply to social work practice

 

Learning Outcomes Stage 3 – Skills

By the end of this Stage of the programme successful apprentices should know, understand or be able to do the following:

 

S21Identify and behave as a professional social worker, committed to professional development and meeting the requirements of the professional regulator. (PCF1)

S22Critically apply social work ethical principles and values to guide professional practice. (PCF2)

S23Demonstrate a critical understanding of diversity and apply anti-discriminatory and anti-oppressive principles in practice. (PCF3)

S24Promote human rights, promote social justice and economic wellbeing. (PCF4)

S25Apply a critical understanding of social sciences, law and social work theory to practice. (PCF5)

S26Use skills of critical reflection and analysis to inform and provide a rationale for professional decision-making and develop imaginative, creative practice (PCF 6)

S27Use judgement and authority to intervene in complex situations with individuals, families and communities to promote independence, provide support and prevent harm, neglect and abuse. (PCF7)

S28Operate effectively within social work organisational frameworks and multi-agency and inter-professional settings and contribute to their development. (PCF8)

S29Recognise the importance of and begin to demonstrate professional leadership and contribute to supporting the learning and development of others.   (PCF9)

S30The ability to synthesise theory, knowledge and research to create a coherent and well-argued discussion, both orally and in writing.

S31The ability to critically analyse diverse or competing perspectives theories or values.

S32Creative and resourceful problem solving skills when addressing complex issues.

S33The ability to contribute positively to team work in a range of settings.

 

 

Learning Outcomes Stage 3 – Knowledge

By the end of this Stage of the programme successful apprentices should know, understand or be able to do the following:

 

K19Critical understanding of ethical dilemmas and their impact on decision making

K20Critical understanding of the processes for partnership working with service users and carers.

K21Critical understanding of the principles and frameworks for human rights and social justice and their influence on practice

K22Understanding of the complexities of personal and structural discrimination and oppression in social work practice.

K23Critical understanding of the ideological and political context for social work

K24Critical understanding of the application to social work of research, theory and knowledge from social science disciplines

K25Critical understanding of research methodologies and methods

 

 

Learning Outcomes – Ordinary degree

If you are awarded an Ordinary degree you will have achieved the majority of the learning outcomes for the programme studied. However you will have gained fewer credits at Stage 3 than apprentices awarded an Honours degree, your knowledge will typically be less broad and you will typically be less proficient in higher-level skills such as independent learning.  Apprentices who are awarded an ordinary degree will not be eligible to apply for registration as a Social Worker with the Health and Care Professions Council.

 

  1. What will the programme consist of?

 

Each undergraduate programme consists of a number of Stages from a minimum of 1 to a maximum of 4, each of which is equivalent to a year’s full-time study. The summary below describes briefly what is contained in each Stage. Most programmes have a mixture of core (i.e. compulsory) modules and optional ones, often with increasing choice as you move through the programme and gain in experience. In some programmes the choice of optional modules gives you particular ‘routes’ through the programme. The programme structure including a detailed list of modules can be found in the programme regulations.

 

In the BA (Hons) Social Work (Integrated Degree Apprenticeship) programme, all modules are core modules.  There are no option modules.

 

This programme has been designed to ensure that all aspects of the Professional Capabilities Framework, the Institute for Apprenticeships Standard for the Integrated Degree Apprenticeship for Social Worker and the Knowledge and Skills Statements for Adult Social Work and Child and Family Social Work are covered at the appropriate level, and that on graduation you meet the HCPC Standards of Proficiency for Social Work. 

 

Stage 1

The programme will provide you with a broad foundation in relevant social science disciplines at Stage One with a focus on the application of these to social work practice.  This means that you will be introduced to key ideas from sociology to support you to understand structures, processes and divisions within society. You will explore key schools of thought in psychology and examine how understandings of human growth and development inform social work practice. You will be introduced to the political and ideological context for social work and you will begin to look in more detail at specific areas of relevant law including human rights and equality. Alongside this, you will learn about the historical background of social work, explore its key values in relation to your own and examine what is meant by important concepts such as discrimination, oppression, social justice and equality.  You will be introduced to the basic social work processes and frameworks within which social workers practise and theories that underpin practice.

 

The Foundations of Learning for Social Work module begins with essential study skills teaching and development and ensures that you have a strong foundation for academic success, as well as a clear understanding of the frameworks for assessment and development of practice.  In the Skills for Social Work Practice module you will be introduced to essential professional practice skills and approaches such as active listening and communication skills, as well as reflective practice in preparation for placement. You will build on your existing experience in social care as we encourage you to develop your understanding of your professional identity as a social work apprentice. Through opportunities to shadow practitioners in the work place, your understanding of professionalism and the social work role will be enhanced. A community study will enable you to draw together and reflect on your learning from this stage. This will be assessed within a professional discussion with a panel of practitioners, service user and carers and academic staff. Throughout this level we place a strong emphasis on apprentices working with and learning from the experiences of service users and carers and practitioners.

 

 

Stage 2

 

At Stage Two, you will look more closely at the legal and policy frameworks in adults’ and children’s services. Teaching and learning throughout is strongly underpinned by a whole family approach and this is consolidated in a joint activity involving a number of programmes based on case material and supported by practitioners and service users and carers. You will explore theoretical frameworks for understanding the wide and diverse experiences of people who use services, as well as the organisational structures and social contexts for providing services. You will explore in particular models and methods of social work practice, with an emphasis on the importance of holistic assessment and seeing the individual within their family and community.

 

The module content will encourage you to consider the impact of issues such as discrimination, oppression and poverty, and you are given the opportunity to consider principles of human rights and social justice in social work practice. Alongside this, we will help you to understand the tensions around areas such as harm, capacity, risk assessment, professional judgement and working together with other professionals. Practitioners and service users contribute to teaching and you will be encouraged to use research about service users’ experiences to help you understand and evaluate policy and practice. You will undertake a 70-day practice learning opportunity.  The precise nature of this opportunity will be determined by negotiation between yourself, your employer and the University (during the programme as a whole, you will have practice learning opportunities in two contrasting practice settings).  During your practice learning opportunity, you will engage with professional supervision and further develop your reflective practice skills. Your practice will be assessed using the Professional Capabilities Framework at this level. Towards the end of Stage Two, you will develop your knowledge of social work research methods and use this to explore the ways that research informs an area of practice of your choice.

 

Stage 3

At Stage Three, you will be able to explore your own interests in more depth and use your skills as an independent learner. We will examine the philosophical underpinnings of social work values in more depth and apply these to ethical practice dilemmas with individuals and families, across all age groups and within a range of contexts. There is a strong focus on developing your skills in critical analysis and decision making, and assessing and managing risk. There is an opportunity to explore emerging contemporary issues using a human rights perspective. In the final practice learning opportunity, you will consolidate your learning and further develop your practice skills in more complex situations. As you move towards the position of being a qualified practitioner you will be helped to build on and further strengthen your understanding of professionalism and leadership, focusing in particular on the use of professional supervision.  Once you have successfully completed the first half of Stage Three you will reach the Gateway to the final module where you will be supported to prepare for the End Point Assessment.

 

 

  1. How will I be taught?

 

Scheduled teaching activities

Independent study

Placement

 

 

The programme team has a strong commitment to adult learning principles. We encourage apprentices to be actively involved in managing their own learning, using and building on their own relevant experiences and that of others in the teaching/learning group. There is an emphasis on activities that support apprentices to develop the ability to reflect on their own learning, values and skills, as a basis for professional practice. Within the University we have developed a workshop format as our favoured approach, although the more traditional lecture and seminar mode is also used where there are large class groups. Workshop activities may include formal lecture input, small group discussion, experiential exercises, apprentice research and presentation, use of audiovisual material and input from expert practitioners, service users and carers who are involved in teaching throughout the programme.

 

We will ensure that you have the opportunity to learn from practitioners about how current policy developments are being translated into practice, and about ‘cutting edge’ practice models. We have developed excellent partnerships with service users and carers who are involved in teaching and assessment at all levels of the programme which enables you to consider the diverse experiences of individuals and groups with whom you might work as a social worker.

 

Small group learning activities will encourage you to build on skills in peer support and team working, which are particularly relevant to social work. Your own relevant personal, voluntary or employment experiences are valued and utilised in the learning process.  Throughout the programme, we will support and encourage you to apply your developing knowledge and skills in the workplace and to complete tasks which enable you to make the links between theory and practice.  Case studies and a variety of interactive practice materials will also be used to support your learning.

At Stage One the involvement of service users and carers and practitioners in communication skills teaching will create opportunities for you to practise your basic interviewing and assessment techniques in a realistic but safe setting, and then reflect on your own recorded performance. You will be supported to reflect on your own values and develop your understanding of the value base of social work within workshop sessions. Individual and group tutorials will provide further opportunity for you to explore these areas using directed reading, individual and group exercises.

 

The module and programme pages on the VLE will direct you to useful sources of information, guidance about assignments as well as about research seminars or conferences. The assignment programme includes individual written assignments, presentation work, work based projects and the use of reflective journals and will provide you with the opportunity to develop skills such as researching and using information as well as communication and presentational skills.

 

You will have support from a mentor within your workplace throughout the programme, but during your designated practice learning opportunities, you will also receive supervision from a qualified Practice Educator who will assess your practice against the requirements of the Professional Capabilities Framework for Social Work. Opportunities for developing your knowledge and understanding will be provided through individual practice learning sessions, agency training, studying agency policies, visits to a range of resources and direct work with service users and workers from a range of professional backgrounds. Meetings with your Practice Educator will provide you with the opportunity to reflect on and analyse your practice and learning through written reports and verbal contributions.

 

A list of the modules in each Stage of the programme can be found in the Programme Regulations.

 

A summary of the types of teaching, learning and assessment in each module of the programme can be found in the Matrix of Modes of Teaching.

 

  1. How will I be assessed and given feedback? 

 

Written examinations

Coursework

Practical assessments

 

A summary of the types of teaching, learning and assessment in each module of the programme can be found in the Matrix of Modes of Teaching.

 

The generic assessment criteria which we use can be found here. Some programmes use subject-specific assessment criteria which are based on the generic ones.

 

This programme uses the Generic University Assessment Criteria

YES

 

This programme uses the Subject Specific Assessment Criteria

 

NO

 

The University regulations can be found here.

 

In Stage 1, you will firstly undertake a diagnostic written assignment designed to help you, with assistance from a tutor, to identify your learning needs in terms of producing an academic piece of work. Study skills teaching, based around a workbook, will enable you to prepare for this assignment. Feedback from the exercises and the diagnostic assignment will help you to tackle your Stage One assignments. These will help you to begin to build your skills in information gathering and analysis. Alongside this you will begin to explore the experience of working as a member of a team and develop skills in presenting information clearly to an audience in group presentations. Communication skills will be assessed using a role play simulation of a social work interview as well as observations of your practice in the workplace and your reflection on your own practice within this process. 

 

Stage 2 assignment tasks are linked to current policy and practice where possible, with emphasis on theory, and skills in evaluation and analysis. Reflection on practice and the ability to integrate knowledge, theory and values to practice skills are key features of the assessment of your practice learning opportunity. These are assessed through completion of a portfolio of evidence e.g. notes of supervision sessions and reflective accounts. The reflective practice module is graded using a professional discussion exercise between you, an academic, and a practice educator, which explores a particular piece of practice and your learning and professional development within the workplace. In Law and Policy for Social Workers, we will test your factual knowledge and application of law to practice through case study based exercises undertaken in examination conditions.  In Research for Social Work Practice, you will be able to choose an area of social work practice and examine the research evidence relating to this area, assessed by means of an extended project.

 

In Stage 3 the assessment tasks will expect you to undertake much more detailed research around your own areas of interest and to demonstrate more advanced skills in evaluation and critical analysis in both your academic study and practice. At this stage assessment tasks will require you to demonstrate a more complex understanding of the knowledge, skills and values that underpin practice. Although there is a greater emphasis at this level on producing more complex written assignments, you will also be encouraged to be more curious and creative in presentations, debates, and an interactive case study. You will be expected to take a broader view of social work and to explore some of the complex dilemmas in policy and practice. The Service Development Project will enable you to choose an aspect of practice in your work setting and identify how this could be developed or improved.  This is a practical piece of work which will be assessed by means of a presentation.  In completing your practice portfolio, you will need to provide a range of placement based evidence including records of direct observations of practice, critical commentary on supervision and practice examples. These assessments will form a substantial part of the evidence required for having met the PCF capabilities at qualifying level as a whole.  It will supplement evidence from assessments in other modules at this stage to demonstrate that you have met the HCPC Standards of Proficiency for Social Work, the requirements of the Institute for Apprenticeships Standard for Integrated Degree Apprenticeship for Social Worker and are developing the knowledge and skills identified in the Knowledge and Skills Statements for Social Workers in Adult Services, and for Child and Family Social Work.

 

The assessment strategy is in line with University assessment regulations but does not include compensation within modules or condonement of modules overall. This ensures that all learning outcomes are successfully achieved and you reach the qualifying level in all areas of the Professional Capabilities Framework.

 

The University aims to return marked assessments and feedback within 4 working weeks of the assignment submission date after internal moderation processes have been completed. If this is not possible, apprentices will be notified by the Module Leaders when the feedback is available and how it can be obtained.

 

The Academic Misconduct Regulations and associated guidance can be found here. It is the responsibility of apprentices to ensure they are familiar with their responsibilities in regards to assessments and the implications of an allegation of academic misconduct.

 

Apprentices should refer to the University Regulations for information on degree classifications and compensation between modules.

 

 


 

  1. Teaching, learning and assessment matrix

 

NB. All modules on the programme are core modules; there are no option modules.

 

Key: T: TaughtD: Developed      A: Assessed

 

Stage 1

 

Module

Code

Core / optional

Modes of T&L

Modes of Assessment

S1

S2

S3

S4

S5

S6

S7

S8

K1

K2

K3

K4

K5

K6

K7

K8

K9

K

10

Foundations of Learning for Social Work

SWA101

Core *

Workshops, private study, work based learning, tutorials

Essay, Structured written task

 

T

A

 

D

 

T

A

 

D

 

T

A

 

D

 

 

 

T

A

 

D

 

D

 

 

 

 

 

D

 

D

 

 

 

D

 

 

T

A

Skills for Social Work Practice

SWA102

Core *

Workshops, private study, work based learning, tutorials

Observed interview + written reflection, Presentation,

Portfolio

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

D

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

D

 

T

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

 

 

D

 

 

 

T

A

Social Work Values and Ethics

 

SWA103

Core *

Workshops, private study, work based learning, tutorials

Presentation, Essay

 

D

 

D

 

D

 

 

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

 

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

D

 

 

 

T

A

 

 

 

 

Theory for Social Work Practice

 

SWA104

Core *

Workshops, private study, work based learning, tutorials

Essay x2

 

D

 

D

 

D

 

A

 

T

A

 

D

A

 

D

 

T

A

 

D

 

D

 

 

D

 

D

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

 

T

A

 

D

 

*Indicates a compulsory module which must be successfully passed for progression to further modules or to the next academic year of study.


Stage 2

 

 

Module

Code

Core / optional

Modes of T&L

Modes of Assessment

S

9

S

10

S

11

S

12

S

13

S

14

S

15

S

16

S

17

S

18

S

19

S

20

K

11

K

12

K

13

K

14

K

15

K

16

K

17

K

18

Law and Policy for Social Workers

SWA201

Core *

Workshops, private study, work based learning, tutorials

Exam x2

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

D

 

D

 

D

 

D

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

D

 

 

 

 

 

 

T

A

 

D

The Social Work Process

SWA202

Core *

Workshops, private study, work based learning, tutorials

Essay,

Portfolio

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

D

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

D

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

Reflective Social Work Practice

 

SWA203

Core *

Workshops, private study, work based learning, tutorials

Essay,

Presentation,

Portfolio

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

D

 

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

D

 

D

 

D

 

T

A

 

T

A

Research for Social Work Practice

 

SWA204

Core *

Workshops, private study, work based learning, tutorials

Structured written task,

Research based project

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

D

 

D

 

T

A

 

 

D

 

 

 

 

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

 

 

 

T

A

 

D

 

 

 

T

A

 

D

 

 

*Indicates a compulsory module which must be successfully passed for progression to further modules or to the next academic year of study.


Stage 3

 

 

Module

Code

Core / optional

Modes of T&L

Modes of Assessment

S

21

S

22

S

23

S

24

S

25

S

26

S

27

S

28

S

29

S

30

S

31

S

32

S

33

K

19

K

20

K

21

K

22

K

23

K

24

K

25

Social Work in Complex Practice Situations

SWA301

Core *

Workshops, private study, work based learning, tutorials

Essay, Portfolio

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

 

D

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

D

 

T

A

 

T

A

Service Development Project

SWA302

Core *

Workshops, private study, work based learning, tutorials

Essay, Project, Portfolio

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

D

End Point Assessment

 

 

SWA303

Core *

Workshops, private study, work based learning, tutorials

Essay, Presentation, Exam, Discussion

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

 

*Indicates a compulsory module which must be successfully passed for progression to further modules or to the next academic year of study.


  1. How does research influence the programme? 

 

Social work is a profession which is constantly adapting to new challenges whilst strengthening its understanding of core issues. This is reflected in the programme’s commitment to ensuring that all teaching is based on the most recent research, academic literature and policy developments. The teaching and assignments support you to develop skills in research to enable you to maintain currency and develop your knowledge and skills in practice. During the programme, we aim to help you develop your engagement with social research and to become a research-minded professional. Towards the end of Stage Two, in module SWA204 (Research for Social Work Practice) you will develop your knowledge of social research methods and focus specifically on the application of research to a particular area of social work practice.

 

The Social Work team has a strong commitment to research and evidence informed teaching and we are engaged in a wide variety of research activities including practice related outreach activities which add currency to teaching on the programme.  Current and recent examples of the team’s research interests include ‘identity and belonging’, social workers’ use of legal frameworks in practice, inter-professional working, self-care for social work practitioners, thresholds for intervention in cases of child neglect, the development of carers’ identity, hoarding behaviour and the impact of institutionalisation on people with learning disabilities.

The programme also draws on a wide range of researchers and practitioners from the field to provide specialist input into a number of modules at all levels.

The social work team are active members of the Centre for Applied Social Science, (CASS click here) which combines original academic research with practice-based collaborations and reach-out activities. There are regular Faculty and Departmental research seminar sessions for staff and students (including apprentices) and the social work team both present and participate in these sessions.

 

SECTION D:EMPLOYABILITY

 

  1. How will the programme prepare me for employment?

 

The programme gives you the opportunity to develop skills which you can use in the future. Some skills are more specific than others to the subject area, or to a particular type of activity, but all skills can be applied in a range of employment situations, sometimes in quite unexpected ways. The skills which this programme is designed to develop are listed below.

 

As a social work apprentice, you are already in employment and in applying to come on this programme you have expressed a commitment to a career in social work. The curriculum is of course carefully designed to ensure you develop the knowledge, skills and behaviours to enter the profession. The involvement of practitioners, employers and service users and carers adds another dimension to this as you are able to network and develop your understanding of the wider context for social work. This is strengthened further in your daily practice in your workplace but also in your designated practice learning opportunities. There may be additional opportunities to learn new skills to promote your personal development and resilience, e.g. to learn mindfulness skills with carers or to work with service users on assertiveness skills.

 

If you decide to move into a different field of employment in the future, you will take with you valuable and transferable skills in working as a member of team, problem solving in complex situations, managing risk and stress and excellent communications skills in verbal and written form. You will have developed your skills in critical analysis and decision making, and will have demonstrated you are resourceful and creative in problem solving.

 

Your employer has supported you to access the Apprenticeship programme and in doing so has demonstrated a commitment to supporting your professional development.  Throughout the programme there will be opportunities to enhance your opportunities for employment through the Sunderland Futures programme (see link below) and – should you wish - support in the process of gaining employment from the Careers and Employment Service who provide bespoke sessions for the programme and individual coaching opportunities for apprentices.

 

For information about other opportunities available to our apprentices who study on campus, click here.

 

 

  1. Particular features of the qualification:

 

The BA Social Work programme is approved by the Health and Care Professions Council and successful completion of the full programme only leads to eligibility for the successful graduate to apply to the HCPC for registration as a qualified social worker

 

 

  1. Professional statutory or regulatory body (PSRB) accreditation: 

 

PSRB accreditation is not relevant to this programme 

 

PSRB accreditation is currently being sought for this programme

 

This programme currently has PSRB accreditation

 

The programme is currently accredited indefinitely, subject to the HCPC’s annual monitoring process.

 

The implications of the accreditation not being renewed are:

 

Without PSRB approval, apprentices completing the programme would not be eligible to apply for registration with the HCPC as a qualified social worker

 

Please see PSRB Renewal Process for information on the renewal process.

The relevant PSRB(s) is the Health and Care Professions Council

 

The terms of the accreditation are as follows:

 

The approval (accreditation) of the programme, once given, is open-ended subject to satisfactory annual monitoring.             

 

Accreditation gives graduates eligibility for the successful graduate to apply to the HCPC for registration as a qualified social worker. This depends upon successful completion of the whole programme.

 

There are programme-specific regulations relating to the following. Details are given in the programme regulations:

 

The modules to be studied

Pass-marks for some or all modules and/or parts

(elements) of modules 

Requirements for progression between one Stage and another

Placement requirements

Attendance requirements

Professional practice requirements

Degree classification  

 

Other 

 

 

Interim or exit awards are not accredited and do not confer eligibility to apply for registration with HCPC as a qualified social worker.

 

SECTION E:PROGRAMME STRUCTURE AND REGULATIONS

 

Complete and insert Part B of the Programme Regulations Form, for question 39

 

PART B   -  Programme  Regulations

 

The following programme specific regulations are the same as for the traditional route BA (Hons) Social Work.

 

Name of programme: Social Work (Integrated Degree Apprenticeship)

Title of final award: BA with Honours

Interim awards[1]: Certificate in Applied Social Care Studies

Diploma in Applied Social Care Studies

Ordinary Degree in Applied Social Care Studies

 

Accreditation: BA with Honours is subject to approval by the Health and Care Professions Council.  Once given, this an open-ended approval subject to satisfactory annual monitoring.

 

University Regulation:1.1, 2.3.2, 4.2.1, 4.3.1, 6.1.3

 

  1. Admissions

Applicants whose first language is not English must achieve a minimum IELTS score of 7 in all four areas.

For admission to the programme there must be:

  • A satisfactory health check
  • A satisfactory Disclosure and Barring Service check at enhanced level
  • A satisfactory outcome of any declaration of involvement with Local Authority Adults or Children’s Services
  • A satisfactory outcome of any declaration of disciplinary issues.

 

  1. Time Limits

The maximum time allowed for an apprentice to complete will be six years from the date of first registration. In exceptional extenuating circumstances, as adjudicated by the Social Work Programme Assessment Board, a maximum of one year additional registration may be granted.

 

 

  1. Interim Award Titles

A variation from the university regulations is requested to allow the interim award titles to be different from the main title award.

 

Stage 1

 

Core modules:

 

Code

Title

Credits

SWA101

Foundations of Learning for Social Work

30

SWA102

Skills for Social Work Practice

30

SWA103

Social Work Values and Ethics

30

SWA104

Theory for Social Work Practice

30

 

  1. Progression Regulations

 

To meet the recommendations of the Health and Care Professions Council and the Institute for Apprenticeships, the following restrictions are requested to be approved by Academic Board as a variation from the University regulations.

 

You must achieve a pass of 40% in each of the elements of assessment in all modules.  In addition, no modules can be compensated so you must achieve an overall pass of 40% in each module.

 

The pre-requisites for modules at Stage 2 are such that no module may be trailed as a failed module to Stage 2.

 

Stage 2

 

Core modules

 

Code

Title

Credits

SWA201

Law and Policy for Social Workers

30

SWA202

The Social Work Process

30

SWA203

Reflective Social Work Practice

30

SWA204

Research for Social Work Practice

30

 

Progression Regulations

 

To meet the recommendations of the Health and Care Professions Council and the Institute for Apprenticeships, the following restrictions are requested to be approved by Academic Board as a variation from the University regulations.

 

You must achieve a pass of 40% in each of the elements of assessment in all modules in order to pass the module. In addition, no modules can be compensated so you must achieve an overall pass of 40% in each module.

 

Stage 3

 

Core modules

 

Code

Title

Credits

SWA301

Social Work in Complex Practice Situations

30

SWA302

Service Development Project

30

SWA303

End Point Assessment

60

 

Progression Regulations

To meet the recommendations of the Health and Care Professions Council and the Institute for Apprenticeships, the following restrictions are requested to be approved by Academic Board as a variation from the University regulations.

 

You must achieve a pass of 40% in each of the elements of assessment in all modules in order to pass the module. In addition, no modules can be compensated so you must achieve an overall pass of 40% in each module.

 

5. Attendance

The BA (Hons) Social Work (Integrated Degree Apprenticeship) programme leads to a professional qualification; therefore 100% attendance in class is expected. Any apprentice whose attendance falls below 80% in any module without extenuating circumstances during one semester will not normally be permitted to undertake assessment and will be referred in the relevant module/s and/or may be required to withdraw from the programme. Apprentices with extenuating circumstances will be deferred in the relevant module/s. The programme academic team will make a recommendation on how the minimum attendance requirement can be met. 

 

6. Placement Referral and Resubmission

An apprentice who fails a placement module at the first attempt may be allowed by the Assessment Board, as appropriate to:

  • re-submit relevant written work as a referral; and / or
  • repeat the placement (as a repeat with attendance) at the end of which one further referral of the written element will be permitted if needed, but the apprentice may not repeat the placement for a third time.

 

7. Withdrawal from Placement

An apprentice who has failed to submit for and / or has failed the assessments in all the modules of the given Stage to date, without extenuating circumstances, will be required by the MAB (Module Assessment Board) to withdraw from the placement until satisfactory performance has been achieved.  This may result in the apprentice having to take an extra year in which to complete the placement.

 

8. Extensions to Placements

Under exceptional circumstances, the placement can be extended for up to two weeks.


SECTION F:ADMISSIONS, LEARNING ENVIRONMENT AND SUPPORT

 

  1. What are the admissions requirements?

 

The University’s standard admissions requirements can be found in the university regulations. Programme-specific requirements which are in addition to those regulations are given below.

 

The current entry requirements for this programme is as specified in the Fees and Entry Requirements section on the programme page on the University’s website and in the BA (Hons) Social Work (Integrated Degree Apprenticeship) Admissions Process (Appendix 1). 

 

 

Can apprentices enter with advanced standing?

 

No

 

The University has a process by which applicants whose experience to date already covers one or more modules of the programme they are applying for may seek Accreditation of Prior Learning (APL). Full details can be found here but if you think that this may be relevant to you, please contact the department which offers the programme you are interested in.

 

 

  1. What kind of support and help will there be?

 

  1. in the department:

 

We are strongly committed to offering well-planned and consistent support for apprentices from the point of application and admission onwards

.

Induction

The Admissions Tutor for the programme will keep in touch with you once you have been offered a place and you will be invited to a pre-course briefing to meet staff, existing and past apprentices, service users and carers to learn more about the programme and prepare you for enrolment. When you arrive there will be two weeks of induction activities which introduce you to fellow apprentices, the building, university resources and the details of the programme. There are lots of opportunities to discuss any queries with staff and you will be introduced to the VLE and the library.

 

You will be given a comprehensive Programme Handbook which summarises this information and has details about the programme structure and timetable. There will be a module guide for each module. These give you detailed information about the content and expectations of the module and guide you towards the full range of support materials for your learning available on the VLE. You will quickly find that the module and programme spaces on the VLE are used for communicating information and discussions to support teaching in the classroom and assignment preparation.

 

Tutor Support

You will be allocated a personal tutor for each of the three stages of the Programme.   The role of the tutor is clearly outlined within Programme Handbooks, so that apprentices are understand the difference between academic and personal tutoring. These roles are also explained at induction.

The programme has a structured tutorial programme so you will know from the beginning of the year how many times you can expect to see your tutor during planned Professional and Academic Development sessions. Apprentices are introduced to the concept of emotional resilience at the beginning of Stage One within the tutorial process and the Readiness for Practice Portfolio evidences apprentices’ on-going review of their own emotional wellbeing, and strategies for supporting resilience as they progress through the programme. The range of activities within the portfolio is shaped by, and provides evidence for, the appropriate stages of the PCF throughout the programme. You will be reassured at of induction that you are able to contact your personal tutor to arrange additional individual tutorials to seek support with any issues impacting on your studies.

 

In addition to the tutorial system, there are tutors responsible for each stage. They ensure that information affecting the whole cohort is communicated effectively but are also another point of contact. The Level Tutors teach on modules which ensure they have contact with the apprentices at that level throughout the academic year and are responsible for reviewing attendance across modules.

 

 

Academic tutorial support

Academic support is also available to apprentices from module tutors. As with personal tutoring, tutorials include both individual and group support. Module tutors will incorporate time within teaching sessions to offer guidance on assignmentsStructured small group tutorials are also arranged to support assignment preparation and module leaders offer feedback on assignment plans via e-mail.

 

 

Feedback to apprentices on performance

Within tutorials with your personal tutor you will be given feedback not only on your academic performance (e.g. via the use of the diagnostic assignment at Stage One) but on your developing professional identity. On-going formative feedback is offered within teaching sessions to the group or individuals and more formal written feedback on individual assignments is supplemented by feedback to all apprentices on common mistakes or difficulties in responding to an assignment task, either within a teaching session, or using the VLE. All apprentices who have been referred or deferred in assignments are offered an individual academic tutorial, followed if necessary by further e-mail contact or further tutorial support.

 

Support during practice learning

Much of your learning will happen in your workplace throughout the Apprenticeship programme.  You will have a mentor allocated by your employer who will offer support and guidance and there will be regular tripartite meetings between your mentor, tutor and yourself to monitor your progress against the apprenticeship standard.  During your designated practice learning opportunities at Stage 2 and Stage 3, you will also be part of a Practice Learning Team including your university Placement Tutor and your Practice Educator, a social worker with additional training. The Practice Educator will offer you weekly supervision to reflect on your progress and support you in your practice. S/he will assess your practice against the requirements of the Professional Capabilities Framework for Social Work, which will be reviewed at the midway point and at the end of your placement.

 

Study skills support

Module SWA101, ‘Foundations of Learning for Social Work’ includes in-depth study skills support. This covers essential aspects of academic study, for example, essay planning, referencing conventions, and researching information. These are incorporated within a study skills workbook, with exercises which are marked by your personal tutor. The first assignment is marked in detail and you meet with your tutor to discuss this and identify any additional support you may need.

 

At the beginning of Stage Two and Stage Three refresher sessions are delivered by programme staff to cover essay planning, accessing on line material and referencing. 

 

We have excellent relationships with the Disability and Health and Well-being Teams within the university and can support you to access appropriate advice if you need it.

 

 

  1. in the university as a whole:

The University provides a range of professional support services including wellbeing, counselling, disability support, and a Chaplaincy. Click on the links for further information.

 

 

  1. What resources will I have access to?

 

On campus

In a partner college

 

By distance learning

 

On campus

 

General Teaching and Learning Space

IT

Library

VLE

Laboratory

 

Studio

 

Performance space

 

Other specialist

 

Technical resources 

 

 

Most of your teaching and learning will take place at St Peter’s Campus, in the
Reg Vardy Building and David Goldman Informatics Centre. The social work staff team also have their offices in the Reg Vardy Building, which offers rooms to accommodate large lectures, workshops, seminars and small group work. There is also a room set up with soft furnishings to support communication skills training. There are a number of informal meeting spaces and small rooms for individual tutorials. All teaching rooms are equipped with AV equipment and Smartboards and there are computer labs available for apprentices’ use when teaching is not taking place. The Prospect Library is five minutes’ walk away from the buildings where teaching takes place and provides an excellent range of resources and study support services which are detailed via the link below. Apprentices may also access the Murray Library at City Campus.

 

Information about the University’s facilities can be found here.

 


 

  1. Are there any additional costs on top of the fees? 

 

No, but all students buy some study materials such as books and provide their own basic study materials.

Yes (optional) All students buy some study materials such as books and provide their own basic study materials. In addition there are some are additional costs for optional activities associated with the programme (see below)

 

Yes (essential) All students buy some study materials such as books and provide their own basic study materials. In addition there are some are essential additional costs associated with the programme (see below)

 

 

 

 

  1. How are student views represented?

 

All taught programmes in the University have student representatives for each Stage (year-group) of each programme who meet in a Student-Staff Liaison Committee (SSLC) where they can raise students’ views and concerns. The Students’ Union and the faculties together provide training for student representatives. SSLCs and focus groups are also used to obtain student feedback on plans for developing existing programmes and designing new ones. Feedback on your programme is obtained every year through module questionnaires and informs the annual review of your programme. Student representatives are also invited to attend Programme and Module Studies Boards which manage the delivery and development of programmes and modules.  Faculty Academic Committee, also has student representation. This allows students to be involved in higher-level plans for teaching and learning. At university level Students are represented on University level Committees by sabbatical officers who are the elected leaders of the Students’ Union.

 

The University’s student representation and feedback policy can be found here.

 

Final-year students (including apprentices) are also invited to complete a National Student Survey (NSS) which asks a standard set of questions across the whole country. The results of this are discussed at Programme Studies Boards and at Faculty Academic Committee to identify good practice which can be shared and problems which need to be addressed. We rely heavily on student input to interpret the results of the NSS and ensure that we make the most appropriate changes.

 


Because we teach in a way which encourages your participation we find that we receive ongoing feedback from apprentices about how the module/year is progressing. Module evaluation includes group activities and discussions in the final session, and at the end of each semester we hold a apprentice/staff forum in which apprentices feedback on the overall programme. These processes mean we can be making adjustments where necessary throughout the year.

 

Academic staff are as available as possible to apprentices to offer advice and guidance, within and outside teaching sessions.  Support is offered by email and in person via appointments, but if an apprentice has an urgent issue to discuss we will always try to make sure a staff member is available to help.

 

 


SECTION G:QUALITY MANAGEMENT 

 

  1. National subject benchmarks

 

The Quality Assurance Agency (QAA) for Higher Education publishes benchmark statements which give guidance as to the skills and knowledge which graduates in various subjects and in certain types of degree are expected to have. These can be found here.

 

Are there any benchmark statements for this programme?

YES

 

The subject bench mark statement for this programme is: The Subject Benchmark Statement for Social Work (2016). This can be found at:

 

https://www.qaa.ac.uk/docs/qaa/subject-benchmark-statements/sbs-social-work-16.pdf?sfvrsn=1d95f781_6

 

Professional Body Requirements

In addition, there are particular professional body requirements for this programme:

 

The Health and Care Professions Council Standards of Proficiency for Social Work:

https://www.hcpc-uk.org/resources/standards/standards-of-proficiency-social-workers-in-england/

 

The Health and Care Professions Council Standards of Education and Training:

https://www.hcpc-uk.org/standards/standards-relevant-to-education-and-training/set/

 

The Professional Capabilities Framework, currently held by the British Association of Social Workers.

https://www.basw.co.uk/pcf/

 

Furthermore, apprentices must meet the requirements of the relevant Apprenticeship Standard, published by the Institute for Apprenticeships:

https://www.instituteforapprenticeships.org/apprenticeship-standards/social-worker-degree/

 

The QAA also publishes a Framework for Higher Education Qualifications (FHEQ) which defines the generic skills and abilities expected of apprentices who have achieved awards at a given level and with which our programmes align. The FHEQ can be found here.

 

 

  1. How are the quality and standards of the programme assured?

 

The programme is managed and quality assured through the University’s standard processes. Programmes are overseen by Module and Programme Studies Boards which include apprentice representatives. Each year each module leader provides a brief report on the delivery of the module, identifying strengths and areas for development, and the programme team reviews the programme as a whole.  The purpose of this is to ensure that the programme is coherent and up-to-date, with suitable progression from one Stage to another, and a good fit (alignment) between what is taught and how apprentices learn and are assessed - the learning outcomes, content and types of teaching, learning and assessment. Apprentice achievement, including progress between Stages of the programme and degree classification, is kept under review. The programme review report is sent to the Programme Studies Board and the Faculty in turn reports issues to the University’s Quality Management Sub-Committee (QMSC).

 

The Programme Studies Board is supported in its work by two sub-groups: the Practice Learning Group, and the Recruitment and Admissions Group.  They consider issues particular to their area of expertise and if necessary bring recommendations for change to the Programme Studies Board.

 

During their designated practice learning opportunities, apprentices are under the supervision of a Practice Educator who is evidenced to be meeting or have met the required standards for practice education in social work through being in the process of or have successfully completed the requirements for Stage 1 (for first PLO) or Stage 2 (for final PLO) of the Practice Educator Professional Standards, or equivalent.  Whilst in the workplace, apprentices also continue to receive support from a tutor who acts as a point of contact between the employer and the University and will intervene in the case of any difficulties or disputes as well as monitoring the apprentice’s progress. 

 

The University is also part of a wider strategic partnership which includes regional employers.  All members have signed up to a Memorandum of Co-operation which is designed to promote excellence in social work training in order to meet employer requirements.

 

At the end of each academic year, the programme team meets with employer and service user and carer representatives to review the programme, consider any adjustments or developments and plan for the following year, to ensure the influence of current policy and practice on curriculum content and design.

 

External examiners are appointed to oversee and advise on the assessment of the programme. There is a requirement from the HCPC for at least one of the external examiners to be from the relevant part of the Register.   They ensure that the standards of the programme are comparable with those of similar programmes elsewhere in the UK and are also involved in the assessment process to make sure that it is fair. They are invited to comment on proposed developments to the programme. Their reports are sent to the Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Academic) as well as to the Faculty so that any issues of concern can be addressed.

 

All programmes are reviewed by the University on a six-yearly cycle to identify good practice and areas for enhancement. Programmes are revalidated through this review process. These reviews include at least one academic specialist in the subject area concerned from another UK university. Quality Assurance Agency (QAA) review reports for Sunderland can be found here.

 

Further information about our quality processes can be found here.

 

Please also complete and insert the SITS form.


 

Quality Handbook

 

 

 

SITS SUMMARY PROGRAMME/SHORT COURSE DETAILS

(Form to be completed electronically by the Faculty and forwarded to the Quality Support Officer supporting the Approval event, or sent to Planning & MI for faculty devolved processes before sending to Quality Support (with the exception of Short Courses and GRS))

This form is to be completed when a new programme has been validated and approved so that the programme codes and progression and awards rules can be set up in SITS.  This also needs to be completed at periodic course review when there have been significant modifications to the course.

 

Please note that all details entered onto this form will go onto every student’s record that is attached to this programme and it is therefore imperative that the information is correct. 

 

1 Programme Details

New/ Modification/Review:

Please ensure the minor modification document is included

New

Full Programme Title:

BA (Hons) Social Work (Integrated Degree Apprenticeship)

If replacement for existing course, specify title and course code:

N/A

Qualification Aim:

e.g. Foundation degree of Science, Bachelor of Arts (Honours)

 

Bachelor of Arts (Honours)

Qualification Level (NQF level):

 

6

JACS 3.0 code

JACS code = e.g. (V100) History, (I100) Computing Science, etc. See HESA Website https://www.hesa.ac.uk/jacs3

 

L500

HECOS Code: 100503

Is the programme Open or Closed:

A course is defined as closed when specifically designed for a certain group of people and not also available to other suitably qualified candidates. It may be designed for a particular company however if the same course is also run for other suitably qualified candidates, not employed by the company, then the course is not closed.

 

Open, but initially only to partner local authorities

Faculty and School:

Education and Society

Social Sciences

Location of study:

e.g. SAGE, Sunderland in London, Sunderland

Sunderland

Last Date Registration (PBI) Number of days:

The number of days after the start date of the course that it is possible for students to register onto it. It is also referred to as the migration date.

18 days

Programme Leader:

Jane Scutt

Academic Team for the programme:

Social Work

Date of Approval/Modification/Review:

Approval event 18/06/19

Date of next review (QS to complete):

 

Accrediting Body or PSRB
If yes please attach a completed PSRB form

Yes – Health and Care Professions Council

 

Programme Specific Regulations

If yes, please attach a completed Programme Specific Regulations form

Yes

 

Does this programme come under the Unistats return?

If yes, please attach a completed Unistats form

No

Is this an undergraduate programme whose primary (but not necessarily only) purpose is to improve the effectiveness of practitioners registered with a professional body? If yes, please specify which body:

http://www.hefce.ac.uk/media/HEFCE,2014/Content/Pubs/2016/201622/HEFCE2016_22.pdf  (Page 88, paragraph f) e.g. a short course aimed at registered nurses

No


 

 

 

 

 

Interim  Awards

If an apprentice does not achieve their qualification aim, what lower awards might they be entitled to, assuming they have the credits?  The subject title for any lower level award should be given where this is different from the subject of the qualification aim.

 

Interim Award Title

Credits Required

Interim Structure

Please show mandatory requirements if applicable e.g. core module codes

1

Certificate in Higher Education / Certificate in Applied Social Care Studies

 

NB Achievement of this award does not confer eligibility to apply for registration with HCPC

 

120

Apprentices must successfully complete the following core modules:

SWA101 Foundations of Learning for Social Work

SWA102 Skills for Social Work Practice

SWA103 Social Work Values and Ethics

SWA104 Theory for Social Work Practice

 

2

Diploma in Higher Education/Diploma in Applied Social Care Studies

 

NB Achievement of this award does not confer eligibility to apply for registration with HCPC

240

Apprentices must successfully complete the modules described above and in addition the following core modules:

SWA201 Law and Policy for Social Workers

SWA202 The Social Work Process

SWA203 Reflective Social Work Practice

SWA204 Research for Social Work Practice

 

3

BA Applied Social Care Studies

 

NB Achievement of this award does not confer eligibility to apply for registration with HCPC

 

300

Apprentices must successfully complete the modules described above and in addition the following core modules:

SWA301 Social Work in Complex Practice Situations

SWA302 Service Development Project

 

 

 

 

Combined Subjects Programmes only

Will the subject run as Major/Minor/Dual:

 

Any subject(s) not permitted to be combined with this subject:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2 Mode Of Attendance

01                          Full-time

Full-time students are those expected to study for more than 24 weeks per year, for a minimum of 21 hours per week and are paying the full-time fee.

02                          Other Full-time

Students who attend full-time for a period less than 24 weeks per year

 

31Part-time

Students who are expected to study for less than 21 hours per week.

 

31Part-time at Full-time Rate

Students who are studying full-time credits over part-time attendance

 

 


 

 

3 Admissions

An admissions or MCR code will be created to allow student applications.

Tick appropriate

UUCAS

Universities and Colleges Admission Services

Required for full-time undergraduate programmes only.

 

DDirect Entry

Required for FT, PT, PG and PGR, only where students will be admitted though the admissions teams or where the programme needs to be advertised on the web

GGTTR

Graduate Teacher Training Registry

Education only, where applicable

 

 

 

 

4Collaborative Provision

UK

 

Overseas

 

Institution

Collaborative Model

Funding Arrangements

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

5aCourse Block

Full-time - Overall length of the programme in months:

36

Part-time - Overall length of the programme in months:

 

Does this course offer a sandwich placement?

If yes, please indicate which programme year this placement is to take place.

No

 

Is this compulsory or optional?

N/A

Does this course offer a study abroad year out? If yes, please indicate which programme year this placement is to take place.

No

 

Is this compulsory or optional?

N/A

 


6   Major Source of Funding

Please note this relates to funding for the programme and not individual students

HEFCE

Higher Education Funding Council for England

 

Skills Funding Agency/EFA/Degree Apprenticeship

NCTL

National College for Teaching and Leadership

 

Wholly NHS Funded

Partially NHS Funded

Departments of Health/NHS/Social Care. For all Health funded programmes please indicate whether the programme is eligible for an NHS Bursary

-  Eligible for NHS BursaryY/N

 

 

 

Standard Fee

If no then the Learning Resources Form should be attached

Yes/No

Other Funding:

 

– Please Specify:

 

 

7   Education Programmes Only

This section must be completed for any programmes marked above as ‘NCTL’ funded

Teacher Training Identifier:

 

Teacher Training Scope:

 

Qualification Aim:

QTS and academic award, QTS only, QTS by assessment only

 

 

 

 

   DETAILS SUPPLIED BY:Sarah Beck       DATE:23/04/19

 

 



Module List

Award, Route (if applicable) and Level

New/Existing/ Modified  Module (N/E/MM)

Module Title

Module Code

Module Credit Value

Whether core or option

Must choose (i.e. designated option):

Assessment weighting – give % weight for each assessment item

Pre-/co-requisites

Module leader

Other comment (if required)

Date of Entry on SITS.

N/MM only

( After event)

JACS Code/ HECOS Code

Academic Team

Stage 1

NM

Foundations of Learning for Social Work

SWA101

30

C

 

CW1 Essay 50%

 

CW2 Structured Written Task 50%

Co:

SWA102

SWA103

SWA104

Julie Smiles

 

 

L500

100503

Social Work

NM

Skills for Social Work Practice

SWA102

30

C

 

CW1 Observed Interview and Refection

50%

 

Practical 1

Community Study 50%

 

CW2 Skills Portfolio Pass/Fail

Co:

SWA101

SWA103

SWA104

Julie Smiles

 

 

L500

100503

Social Work

NM

Social Work Values and Ethics

SWA103

30

C

 

CW1 Group Presentation 50%

 

CW2 Essay 50%

Co:

SWA101

SWA102

SWA104

Karin Scott

 

 

L500

100503

Social Work

NM

Theory for Social Work Practice

SWA104

30

C

 

CW1 Essay 50%

 

CW2 Essay 50%

Co:

SWA101

SWA102

SWA103

Jane Scutt

 

 

L500

100503

Social Work

Stage 2

NM

Law and Policy for Social Workers

SWA201

30

C

 

Exam 1 Adult Law

50%

 

Exam 2 Child Law

50%

Pre:

SWA101

SWA102

SWA103

SWA104

Co:

SWA202

SWA203

SWA204

Jane Scutt

 

 

L500

100503

Social Work

NM

The Social Work Process

SWA202

30

C

 

CW1 Essay 100%

 

Practical 1 Portfolio

Pass/Fail

Pre:

SWA101

SWA102

SWA103

SWA104

Co:

SWA201

SWA203

SWA204

TBC

 

 

L500

100503

Social Work

NM

Reflective Social Work Practice

SWA203

30

C

 

CW1 Essay 50%

 

CW2 Presentation 50%

 

Practical 1 Portfolio

Pass/Fail

Pre:

SWA101

SWA102

SWA103

SWA104

Co:

SWA201

SWA202

SWA204

TBC

 

 

L500

100503

Social Work

NM

Research for Social Work Practice

SWA204

30

C

 

CW1 Structured Written Task 30%

 

CW2

Research Based Project 70%

Pre:

SWA101

SWA102

SWA103

SWA104

Co:

SWA201

SWA202

SWA203

TBC

 

 

L500

100503

Social Work

Stage 3

NM

Social Work in Complex Practice Situations

SWA301

30

C

 

CW1 Essay 100%

 

Practical 1 Portfolio Pass/Fail

Pre:

SWA101

SWA102

SWA103

SWA104

SWA201

SWA202

SWA203

SWA204

Co:

SWA302

TBC

 

 

L500

100503

Social Work

NM

Service Development Project

SWA302

30

C

 

CW1 Essay 30%

 

Practical 1 Project 70%

 

Practical 2 Portfolio

Pass/Fail

Pre:

SWA101

SWA102

SWA103

SWA104

SWA201

SWA202

SWA203

SWA204

Co:

SWA301

TBC

 

 

L500

100503

Social Work

NM

End Point Assessment

SWA303

60

C

 

CW1 Essay: Case Study 50%

 

Exam 1:

Scenario Exercise 50%

Pre:

SWA101

SWA102

SWA103

SWA104

SWA201

SWA202

SWA203

SWA204

SWA301

SWA302

TBC

 

 

L500

100503

Social Work

 

 


Appendix 1

University of Sunderland

BA (Hons) Social Work (Integrated Degree Apprenticeship)

Admissions Process

 

Stage 1:  Expressions of Interest

This initial stage is co-ordinated by employers.

If recruiting existing staff, employers must ensure that their job roles are suitable.  All social work apprentices must be in a setting where they will have:

  • Day to day contact with service users and/or carers
  • A breadth of opportunities across the full range of knowledge, skills and behaviours in the Social Worker Apprenticeship Standard

In addition, applicants for the Apprenticeship Programme must meet minimum academic standards (see Note below).

Employers will post a call-out to interested applicants through their own channels and confirm the total number of funded places available for successful applicant(s) in the current cohort.

Employers then undertake an internal process of filtering to include initial job role suitability, University Entry requirements check, DBS check and funding eligibility check.  This may include additional activities (e.g. role play exercise, interview) as determined by the employer.

 

Stage 2: University Application

All applicants must complete a University standard application form, requiring details of qualifications, employment history, personal statement and two references.  One reference must be from the applicant’s current employer (usually from their line manager) and the other should ideally be an academic reference.

Applicants with a minimum of 80 but below 120 UCAS points will also need to submit a 1500 written task (see Appendices 1-2 below).

In addition, all applicants must complete a Professional Suitability Self-Declaration form giving details of any previous criminal convictions or cautions, disciplinary issues and any investigations by Local Authority Children’s or Adult services.

The University completes a funding eligibility check at this stage.

 

Stage 3: Shortlisting

Applications are shortlisted by the University Admissions Tutor.  In shortlisting, the Admissions Tutor will look for relevant experience in social care, as well as academic suitability for the programme.  The University will provide feedback to unsuccessful applicants and guidance on how to progress a future application. Successful applicants will be invited to a selection day.  Employers will be informed which applicants have been shortlisted for interview.

 

Stage 4: Selection Day

This is a full day event comprising:

  • Welcome talk
  • Document check (qualifications, DBS, health/disability questionnaire)
  • Written test - 1 hour
  • Observed group discussion (observed by academic, employer and service user/carer representatives) - 20 minutes
  • Individual interview (with academic, employer and/or service user/carer involvement) - 30 minutes

To ensure fairness and independence, no applicant will be interviewed or observed by a representative of their own employer as part of this stage of the process.

Shortly after the selection day, a decision will be communicated to applicants and employers, with feedback to unsuccessful applicants.

 

Note: Academic Entry Requirements

All applicants require:

A minimum of 120 UCAS points (or equivalent)*

OR

A minimum of 80 UCAS points (or equivalent) + evidence of exceptional practice experience**

In addition all applicants require:

Maths GCSE Grade C (or equivalent)

English GCSE Grade C (or equivalent)

 

If English is not your first language, you will also need International English Language Testing System (IELTS) at a score of 7.0 in all components.

 

* A list of qualifications within the UCAS tariff can be found at: https://www.ucas.com/file/63541/download?token=uz826-Cb  There is also a tariff calculator tool on the UCAS website: https://www.ucas.com/ucas/tariff-calculator

** Exceptional practice experience will be evidenced by means of a 1500 words written reflection on a case study based on the applicant’s own practice (verified by their employer), which will also be discussed at interview (further details can be found in Appendices 1-2 below)

 


University of Sunderland

BA (Hons) Social Work (Integrated Degree Apprenticeship)

Admissions Process

 

Academic Entry Requirements: Exceptional Practice Experience

 

Applicants to the Social Work Apprenticeship Programme who have below 120 UCAS points (or equivalent) will need to have a minimum of 80 UCAS points (or equivalent) and provide evidence of exceptional practice experience.  Exceptional practice experience will be evidenced by means of a 1500 words written account of the applicant’s own practice (verified by their employer), which will also be discussed at interview.

 

Task:  Examine your personal and career development during your time working in a social care setting.  You should illustrate this with an example of a piece of work you have completed with an individual or family which demonstrates your ability to form effective working relationships and respond appropriately to identified needs.

It is suggested that you use the following structure:

  • Introduction – your work setting and role (100 words approx.)
  • An overview of how you have developed both personally and in terms of your career whilst working in social care (300 words approx.)
  • A brief description of your chosen practice example – please make sure that any personal details are anonymised and that you keep description to a minimum (200 words approx.)
  • An explanation of the skills you used to work effectively in this situation – this should be your main focus (750 words approx.)
  • A brief conclusion, summarising your discussion (150 words approx.)

Your work should be typed in Arial 12 font or similar and double spaced.  It must be your own independent work and will be checked at the University via Turnitin anti-plagiarism software.  The word limit is 1500 words maximum.  Work which is longer than 1500 words will only be assessed up to the word limit.  Your work must be verified by your employer and will be assessed against the following criteria:

University of Sunderland

BA (Hons) Social Work (Integrated Degree Apprenticeship)

Draft Admissions Process

Subject to Approval by University of Sunderland and HCPC

 

Academic Entry Requirements: Exceptional Practice Experience

Employer Verification

 

For applicants completing the 1500 words ‘Exceptional Practice Experience’ task, this form must be completed, signed and submitted with your application form.

Name of Applicant:

 

Name of Employer:

 

 

I verify that the practice described by the above-named applicant in their account of Exceptional Practice Experience is their own work

 

Additional comments (if applicable):

 

 

Signed:

 

Date:

 

 

Verifier Details:

Name:

 

Job Role:

 

Contact telephone number:

 

Email address:

 

 

 


[1] Same as main award unless agreed otherwise at validation – eg to meet PSRB requirements