Attachments

Quality Handbook

 

 

Programme Specification

 

SECTION A:CORE INFORMATION

 

  1.  

Name of programme:

Film and Media

  1.  

Award title:

BA (Hons)

  1.  

Programme linkage:

(Is this part of group of linked programmes between which students can transfer at agreed points?)

No

 

 

  1.  

Is the programme a top-up only?

No

  1.  

Does the programme have a Foundation Year (Level 3) associated with it so that students enter for a four-year programme and progress directly from the Foundation Year to Stage 1 without having to re-apply?

Yes – Integrated Foundation Year (IFY)

 

  1.  

Level of award:

Level 6

  1.  

Awarding Body:

University of Sunderland

  1.  

Department:

Journalism, Media and Cultural Studies

  1.  

Programme Studies Board:

Film, Media and Culture

  1.  

Programme Leader:

 

John Paul Green

  1. How and where can I study the programme?

 

At Sunderland:

 

Full-time on campus

Part-time on campus

 

  1. How long does the programme take?

 

 

Min number of years / months

Max number of years / months

Full-time

3

9

Part-time

6

9

 

For start-dates please see the current edition of the Prospectus or contact the relevant department at the University. For start-dates for programmes delivered in a partner college, please contact the relevant college.

 

SECTION B:FURTHER CORE INFORMATION 

 

Use Outline Programme Proposal Form for ADC for questions 13 to 25

 

  1. Learning and Teaching Strategy

 

The learning and teaching strategy for this programme is:

  • develop independent, active and reflective learners;
  • create learning environments where teaching approaches, learning technologies, and institutional structures and culture foster these learners;
  • ensure that staff are supported and developed for their roles, and valued for their contribution to learning and the learner experience
  • promote learning partnerships in which innovative, supportive and challenging practice inspires students to approach their courses and careers with curiosity, enthusiasm and creativity.

The main learning and teaching methods employed are a combination of:

  • Lectures

to present and explain factual information and give a grounding in the key theories, genres and works associated with media and film.

  • Seminars

to allow guided group discussion as a means of clarifying and elaborating on aspects of course work and thinking.

  • Presentations

Over time, you will gain practice presenting your work. This not only helps with your oral and visual presentation skills, it helps you to develop the skills to evaluate your own work and concisely identify the key points that can sell the idea to your audience.

  • Tutorials

are very frequent throughout the programme. They are either one-to-one with the tutor or in small groups to discuss your ideas, thinking, approach, analysis, facts.

  • Demonstrations and hands-on tuition

to show you practical techniques both in the studio and on the computer.

  • Group critiques

to allow you to practice presenting your work to others and to develop the ability to become reflective in your practice, and to learn from the feedback of others.

  • Independent learning or private study

encourages you to become resourceful and self-reliant using your own initiative and time management skills. With experience you also learn when it’s better to seek appropriate guidance. This is a core skill that employers are keen to see in any graduate.

  • Electronic learning resources

develop skills of research and analysis, and encourage you to become an independent learner embracing the notion of professional self- development.

  1. Retention Strategy

 

The University has a range of strategies in place to guide and support students, which help to maintain retention:

 

Induction

Students enrolling on this programme are taken through a week of induction activities, introducing them to the University, the staff and fellow students.

There is normally a range of events (including a social event with film and media staff involving a quiz), library inductions and students union activities all designed to help students make friends, settle in to University life, find their way around and get ready for their studies.

 

Student handbook

All students receive a student handbook that explains important things about their academic studies, how and where to get advice and support, and directs them to some of the wider support systems in place for students

 

Student Reps

Students on all programmes at each stage elect a student representative who can speak for them at the various committees and forums where decisions are made about how the programme is run.

 

Attendance

In becoming a student you have made a serious commitment to your personal and academic development and we expect you to engage actively in your programme. Engagement includes attendance at lectures, seminars, and practical sessions and so on, plus making good use of the library and of electronic resources and submitting work on time.  We don't have an 'acceptable level' of absence because in principle we expect you to attend lectures and classes. We understand on occasion you may have to miss a class for good reason but if this happens you will need to make sure that you keep up with the work.

 

SSLC

Each department holds Staff Student Liaison Committee meetings at least once per term at which student representatives and staff are invited to identify things that are worth commending about the operation of each programme, as well as things that need to be addressed. An action plan ensures that all agreed actions are followed up and addressed.

 

Personal tutor

All students are allocated a personal tutor who is there to turn to and who can support them or direct them to where appropriate help may be obtained.  Students can request a change of tutor without any questions asked.

 

Additional support

All on-campus students have access to the University’s central support services including Counselling, Disability Service, Health and Well-being, Chaplaincy, financial support and advice, International Office and Careers and Employability Service. The Students’ Union provides an independent service which offers advice and support across the full range of personal and academic problems which students may encounter. These services are available via the Student Gateway or directed by tutors.

SECTION C:TEACHING AND LEARNING

 

  1. What is the programme about?

 

The programme enables you to study film and cinema within the context of media and cultural theory.  The programme aims to:

 

            familiarise students with a range of theoretical and methodological approaches to the film, media and cultural studies (FM&CS);

            develop knowledge of key concepts, theoretical approaches, histories and debates in FM&CS;

            develop students’ specialist knowledge in specific subject areas within film, media  and cultural studies, whilst maintaining breadth of study across it;

            develop students’ independent research skills;

            develop students’ analytical skills;

            introduce students to a range of  learning  methods;

            develop  high level of  communication skills;

            offer students the opportunity to engage in practice to a specialist level in up  to one area of media production/practice.

 

 

  1. What will I know or be able to do at each Stage of the programme?

 

Learning Outcomes Stage 1 – Skills  

By the end of this Stage of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

  • S1 – Explain and express theories and concepts in the analysis of media texts including film.
  • S2 – Communicate appropriate judgement in planning, selecting or presenting information.
  • S3 – Write essays that include academic conventions of research.

 

Learning Outcomes Stage 1 – Knowledge

By the end of this Stage of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

  • K1 – Knowledge of the theoretical concepts and issues necessary for further study within fields of film and media.
  • K2 – Understanding of the impact of historical changes on film and media.
  • K3 – Knowledge of the institutional contexts in which the social, political and cultural operate.

 

Learning Outcomes Stage 2 – Skills

By the end of this Stage of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

  • S4 – Apply appropriate theoretical perspectives and research methods in analysing specific areas of film and media output and consumption.
  • S5 – Ability to evaluate their own and other people’s work and present ideas clearly to a specific audience.
  • S6 – Plan, develop and conduct research in to specialise area of film and media.

 

Learning Outcomes Stage 2 – Knowledge

By the end of this Stage of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

  • K4 – Detailed knowledge and advanced understanding of key theories and debates relating to the analysis of media texts, audiences and film theory.
  • K5 – Detailed knowledge of a variety of specialised historical developments in film and media studies.
  • K6 – Detailed knowledge of audience consumption of film, media and/or culture.
  • K7 – Knowledge of appropriate academic research methods for the investigation of film and media topics

 

Learning Outcomes Stage 3 – Skills

By the end of this Stage of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

  • S7 – Critique and apply specific concepts within specialised film and media texts.
  • S8 – Possess advanced skills and analysis, synthesis and presentation in written work
  • S9 – Application of appropriate independent research skills to ensure the reliability and validity of a research project.

 

Learning Outcomes Stage 3 – Knowledge

By the end of this Stage of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

  • K8 – Demonstrate a critical awareness of organisational structures, influences and processes within the field of film and media studies.
  • K9 – Demonstrate an extended knowledge of the key theories within film, media and cultural studies.
  • K10 – Demonstrate a critical appreciation and understanding of the current debates within film and media studies.

 

Learning Outcomes – Ordinary degree

If you are awarded an Ordinary degree you will have achieved the majority of the learning outcomes for the programme studied. However you will have gained fewer credits at Stage 3 than students awarded an Honours degree, your knowledge will typically be less broad and you will typically be less proficient in higher-level skills such as independent learning.

 

  1. What will the programme consist of?

 

Each undergraduate programme consists of a number of Stages from a minimum of 1 to a maximum of 4, each of which is equivalent to a year’s full-time study. The summary below describes briefly what is contained in each Stage. Most programmes have a mixture of core (i.e. compulsory) modules and optional ones, often with increasing choice as you move through the programme and gain in experience. In some programmes the choice of optional modules gives you particular ‘routes’ through the programme. The programme structure including a detailed list of modules can be found in the programme regulations.

 

Stage 1

At stage 1 students are introduced to the relationship between theory, research, criticism and practice as it applies to film studies, media studies and cultural studies. Core modules introduce a wide-ranging set of theories associated with film, media and cultural studies, as well as providing an overview of film history from the late 19th century to the start of the 21st. Option modules provide students with opportunities to take courses in the history of radio and TV, in contemporary cinema and also television cultures. Furthermore students have the opportunity to undertake scriptwriting and media/film production modules.

Stage 2

Stage 2 draws on, and allows students to integrate and refine, the knowledge and skills they have attained at stage 1, with core modules that further develop theoretical, analytical and critical skills in the areas of media and cultural studies, as well as film theory and criticism. Options at this stage include either academic research skills or scriptwriting, along with modules that explore the histories of American, British and European cinema, as well as animated film. offer a range of case studies of film production in context. Students also have the opportunity to further develop scriptwriting and media/film production skills to the value of 40 credits.

Stage 3

At stage 3 the emphasis shifts further towards advanced, self-directed learning with tutorial support and more specialized topics. Students will be required to develop specialized areas of interest through independent learning, either with a written dissertation or a full-length feature script of between 60 and 90 pages. A core module in media and cultural students extends and advances theoretical, analytical and critical skills, while a range of options enable students to pursue more specialized investigations into such topics as horror films, the cinema of Alfred Hitchcock, Science Fiction TV and emotion in cinema. At this level, students can still take scriptwriting and media/film production modules to the value of 40 credits.

 

 

  1. How will I be taught?

 

Scheduled teaching activities

Independent study

Placement

 

The Programme uses a diverse range of teaching and learning strategies that assist in the development of technical and professional skills of students. In the early stages of the Programme, the modules are staff led, providing teaching and learning through staff led sessions and seminars. However, by stage 3 the self- negotiated projects/dissertation lead to a greater student-led emphasis within their learning with staff guidance. Each module offers a variety of individual tutorials, seminars, hand-outs, demonstrations, peer reviews, and feedback.

 

A list of the modules in each Stage of the programme can be found in the Programme Regulations.

 

A summary of the types of teaching, learning and assessment in each module of the programme can be found in the Matrix of Modes of Teaching.

 

 

 

 

 

 

  1. How will I be assessed and given feedback? 

 

Written examinations

 

Coursework

Practical assessments

 

Written assignments, essays and reports

  • are used to test knowledge and understanding. They also test your academic research skills and the ability to select critical detail from large amounts of information and to interpret, evaluate, organise and present a coherent argument or report based on that information.

 

Seminar and presentations

  • are used to test your ability to sift key information and present it coherently and succinctly to an audience. Depending on the nature of the project, the assessment may require that you present individually or as part of a team.

 

A summary of the types of teaching, learning and assessment in each module of the programme can be found in the Matrix of Modes of Teaching.

 

The generic assessment criteria which we use can be found here. Some programmes use subject-specific assessment criteria which are based on the generic ones.

 

This programme uses the Generic University Assessment Criteria

YES

 

This programme uses the Subject Specific Assessment Criteria

 

NO

 

The University regulations can be found here.

 

The University aims to return marked assessments and feedback within 4 working weeks of the assignment submission date after internal moderation processes have been completed. If this is not possible, students will be notified by the Module Leaders when the feedback is available and how it can be obtained.

 

The Academic Misconduct Regulations and associated guidance can be found here. It is the responsibility of students to ensure they are familiar with their responsibilities in regards to assessments and the implications of an allegation of academic misconduct.

 

Students should refer to the University Regulations for information on degree classifications and compensation between modules.

 

 

 

 


  1. Teaching, learning and assessment matrix

 

NB. Not all option modules may be offered in any one academic year and will depend on the availability of staff and the priorities of the school. In addition, modules will usually need to be selected by a minimum number of students. Option modules may be available on more than one programme and the Programme Leaders will liaise with the Faculty Management Team to ensure there is a reasonable amount of choice in any given year.

 

Matrix of modes of teaching, learning and assessment:

(S = Skills Learning Outcome, K = Knowledge Learning Outcome) Key: D = Developed  T = Taught  A = Assessed)

 

 

Stage 1

 

Module

Code

Core /

optional

Modes of

T&L

Modes of

Assessment

LO

S1

LO

K1

LO

S2

LO

K2

LO

K3

LO

S3

Intro. Media

& Cultural studies

MAC 101

core

Lectures, self-directed

study, screenings, seminars

Essay 50%

Essay 50%

T A

T A

T

A

T A

T A

D A

History of Cinema

MED125

core

Lectures, self-directed study,

screenings, seminars

Pres 30%

Essay 70%

T A

T A

 

T A

T D

D A

Intro. To Film Studies

MAC170

core

Lectures, self-directed

study, film analysis workshops, seminars,

screenings

extract analysis 40%

 

theory essay 60%

T A

T A

D

D

T D

T A

TV Cultures

MED124

Designated option

Lectures, self-directed

study, seminars, screenings

Pres 50%

Essay 100%

T A

T A

D

T D

T D

D A

Media Histories

MED112

Designated option

Lectures, self-directed

study, seminars, screenings

Pres 50%

Essay 50%

T A

T A

D

T A

T A

D

Contemporary Cinema

Med121

Designated option

Lectures, self-directed study, seminars, screenings

Pres 40%

Essay 60%

T A

T A

D

T D

T D

D A

 

 

Stage 2

 

Module

Code

Core /

optional

Modes of

T&L

Modes of

Assessment

LO

K4

LO

K5

LO

K6

LO

K7

LO

S4

LO

S5

LO

S6

Media Studies 1

MAC 201

core

Lectures, self-directed

study,

workshops, seminars,

screenings

Essay 50%

Essay 50%

T

A

T

D

T

A

T A

T A

 

T A

Film Theory and Criticism

MAC217

core

Lectures, self-directed study,

seminars, screenings

Presentation 30%

Essay 70%

T A

T A

T A

T D

 

T D

T A

Academic Research

Skills

MED217

Designated option

Lectures, self-directed

study,

workshops

Portfolio/dissertation proposal 100%

D

 

 

T A

D

A

D

T

A

Scriptwriting

MAC274

Designated option

Lectures, self-directed

Study &

workshops

Report 30%

Script 70%

D

D

D

D

T

A

T A

D

A

Film and

Society

FIL202

Core

Lectures, self-directed study,

seminars, screenings

Essay Plan 20%

Essay 80%

T A

T A

D

T A

 

T A

T A

American Film Genres

FIL201

Designated option

Lectures, self-directed

study,

workshops, screenings

Presentation 30%

Essay 70%

T A

T A

D

A

D

A

 

D

DA

Animated Film

MAC285

Designated option

Lectures, self-directed study, group

work, seminars, screenings

Presentation 30%

Essay 70%

T A

T A

D

T D

 

T D

T A

 

 

 

Stage 3

 

Module

Code

Core /

optional

Modes of

T&L

Modes of

Assessment

LO

K8

LO

K9

LO

K10

LO

S7

LO

S8

LO

S9

Media Studies 2

MAC 301

Designated Option

Lectures, self-directed study,

seminars

Presentation 40%

Essay 60%

T

A

T

A

T

A

T A

T A

 

Dissertation

MAC390

Designated option

Lectures, self-directed study,

tutorials

Dissertation 100%

D A

D A

D A

D A

D A

T A

Practical Project: Script

MAC399

Designated option

Lectures, self-directed study,

tutorials

Presentation 15%

Script 55%

Report 30%

 

D

 

D

 

D

T A

Film, Horror

& the Body

MAC366

Designated option

Lectures, self-directed

study,

seminars, screenings

Presentation 20%

Essay 80%

D

D A

D A

T A

T A

 

Science Fiction Fantasy TV

MAC387

Designated option

Lectures, self-directed

study,

seminars, screenings

Essay 50%

And either an essay or a script 50%

T

A

T A

T A

T A

T A

 

Hitchcock

MED305

Designated option

Lectures, self-directed study, group work, seminars,

screenings

Presentation 30%

Essay 70%

T D

D A

T A

D A

T A

 

Film & Feeling

MED324

Designated option

Lectures, self-directed study, group

work, seminars, screenings

Presentation 25%

Essay or Video Essay 75%

T D

D A

D A

D A

D A

 

Film Studies Special Topic

MED333

Designated option

Lectures, self-directed

study, seminars, screenings

Presentation 30%

Essay 70% or Festival Brochure

T

A

T A

T A

D A

D A

 


  1. How does research influence the programme? 

 

The rich research activity of the staff informs our students throughout their study. Current staff members co-edit the prestigious British Film Institute Film Stars series of books, while other staff are involved in running the Women’s Film History Project. Staff are also members of NECS (European Network Cinema), BAFTSS (British Association of Film, TV and Screen Studies) and SCMS (Society of Cinema and Media Studies).

 

Most members of staff hold research degrees at Doctoral and Masters level, and are presently engaged in writing and delivering conference papers, in some cases organising conferences, writing and publishing scholarly journal articles, book chapters, books and editing anthologies, serving as editorial board members of national and international journals, as well as acting as readers for a range   of academic publishers. These activities inform the staff’s approaches to assessing student coursework and advising and guiding students in the production of high level academic studies. The Media Area continues to consolidate and develop its research activities, skills and methodologies through initiatives based on individual projects, collaborative exchange, and contact with external scholars and funding partners and the Centre of Research in Media and Cultural Studies (CRMCS) has gained an international reputation for world-leading research in this field with notable expertise in the areas of pornography, star studies and women in the film and media industries (among others).

 

The CRMCS research seminars, held fortnightly on Monday evenings, also provide important staff development and staff from across all parts of the Media Area attend, together with postgraduate, and sometimes undergraduate, students. Speakers at these events often discuss research in progress that is directly related to the undergraduate syllabus.

Academic staff have strong links with the regional community. These links include working alongside industry partners, local schools and community groups. Among the highest-profile reach-out activities is Spark FM, the University-run and student-managed Community Radio Station. It is managed by students and features student work (including a weekly film review programme), as well as including programming elements originated in community groups within the region. Staff and students participate in the production of programmes for this station, which often benefit from staff expertise and knowledge, disseminating research to the local community.

 

The Prospect Building at St Peter’s Campus is equipped with a cross-Faculty Learning Resource Centre and specialist Library provision. Staff liaise regularly with these resource providers, who are supportive and generally responsive to expressed needs and provide excellent help with the development of online learning resources (e.g., My Module Resources).

 

 

SECTION D:EMPLOYABILITY

 

  1. How will the programme prepare me for employment?

 

The programme gives you the opportunity to develop skills which you can use in the future. Some skills are more specific than others to the subject area, or to a particular type of activity, but all skills can be applied in a range of employment situations, sometimes in quite unexpected ways. The skills which this programme is designed to develop are listed below.

 

In addition to a curriculum that is designed to foster high level communication skills, time management, group working and I.T. skills, the programme enables students to study abroad at stage 2, which enables students to gain higher levels of independence and maturity while simultaneously broadening their cultural experience and social network.

 

Placement modules are also available to students on the programme, subject to relevant pre-requisites. Students are prepared for placements via a series of seminars and tutorials by supervising academic staff and appropriate officers from Student Services before their work placement. Assessment is by academic staff. In addition, the University offers a number of centrally based programmes designed to support student innovation. These include the Media Hub (which includes Sportsbyte, Northern Lights, Fashion North and SRNews), Made TV and  FabLab, which seek to support students who wish to develop work in both voluntary and business sectors; and The Enterprise Place, which offers students initially free and, later, subsidised facilities, support and mentoring with a view to helping develop creative ideas into viable business propositions. Students can allow contribute to the University’s student magazines, such as Spark and Vibe, to presenting on and/or managing Spark FM, the University’s award-winning Community Radio Station. Students also enter their work in a variety of prestigious national and international competitions, including National Student Television Awards (NASTA), Royal Television Society awards, Nations and regions, Radio production Awards and Student Radio Awards.

 

At stage 2, students may study in the USA, Canada, Australia, and a number of EU countries, where University or subject-specific agreements exist. In each case, students are interviewed and study abroad approved only subject to satisfactory progress on their degree programme. Students must also have approval for their proposed programme of study. During the period of study abroad tutors maintain contact with students via email. Credits for approved study abroad are counted towards the student’s degree programme.

Other activities that students can attend and participate in include the Wednesday lunchtime Masterclasses, a series of lectures and workshops running throughout the academic year featuring invited industry practitioners. Furthermore, action-planning, career and goal-setting are central to Sunderland Futures, which includes the Sunderland professional Award (SuPA) and Higher Education Achievement Report (HEAR).

 

There are also opportunities for on-campus students outside your programme of study.

 

For information about other opportunities available to our students who study on campus, click here.

 

Additional opportunities to develop your experiences more widely will vary if you study at one of our partner colleges. For information about the extra-curricular activities available in any of our colleges please contact the college direct. 

 

  1. Professional statutory or regulatory body (PSRB) accreditation.

 

PSRB accreditation is not relevant to this programme 

PSRB accreditation is currently being sought for this programme

 

This programme currently has PSRB accreditation

 

 

 

 

 

SECTION E:PROGRAMME STRUCTURE AND REGULATIONS

 

Complete and insert Part B of the Programme Regulations Form, for questions 39 and 40

 

SECTION F:ADMISSIONS, LEARNING ENVIRONMENT AND SUPPORT

 

  1. What are the admissions requirements?

 

Three passes at GCSE grade C or above are also required, which must include Mathematics and English language or a minimum of  Level  2  Key Skills in Communication, Application of Number and Information Technology.

 

UCAS Tariff equivalents to the above would be accepted for BTEC Nationals, Scottish Highers and the Irish Leaving Certificate.

 

Normal University requirements of applicants  from  access  courses  would apply, including  a minimum of grade C in GCSE in mathematics  and English language or an equivalent achievement as part of the course. All non-standard applicants will be offered an interview.

Candidates wishing to be considered for direct entry to Level 2/3 of the programme will have to demonstrate appropriate levels of APL, in accordance with the University policy.

 

The University’s standard admissions requirements can be found in the university regulations. Programme-specific requirements which are in addition to those regulations are given below.

 

The current entry requirements for this programme is as specified in the Fees and Entry Requirements section on the programme page on the University’s website.

 

Can students enter with advanced standing?

Yes

 

 

If yes, to which Stages?

Stage 1

 

Stage 2

X

Stage 3

X

Stage 4

 

 

The course will also take direct entry to stages 2 and 3 two or three depending on prior experience or having suitable qualifications such as HND or Foundation degree. The key criteria here will be based on relevant previous experience and this will be assessed at interview.

 

The University has a process by which applicants whose experience to date already covers one or more modules of the programme they are applying for may seek Accreditation of Prior Learning (APL). Full details can be found here but if you think that this may be relevant to you, please contact the department which offers the programme you are interested in.

 

 

 

 

  1. What kind of support and help will there be?
    1. in the department:

 

Every student receives personal copies of the programme handbook or has access to them online. These contain a wide range of information including the current Induction information and the relevant safety policy as well as information on how to access the full University Services.

 

Every student, at the beginning of the induction period, is supplied with detailed timetables of the induction activities and of the course on to which he/she has enrolled.

 

Students requesting or showing signs of needing additional support or who have specific learning needs will be advised and directed to the support available. All students are asked to complete induction evaluation questionnaires to comment on the effectiveness of the induction programme.

 

On commencement of the programme, all students are allotted a personal tutor who will support them through their studies. Both the personal tutor and the programme leader support students by helping them to understand and navigate through the modular credit scheme and also, where appropriate, by acting as a signpost to refer students to any of the other support systems within the University or beyond.

 

Tutorials will normally take place at least twice a term (and more often as necessary) in order to discuss programme-specific issues and identify any personal difficulties and to help to develop and maintain the students progress file. Students normally see their personal tutor individually at appropriate points during each term to discuss their progress. Students will be referred to Student Services, Financial Counsellor, Students Union and other appropriate agencies who offer expertise to deal with issues of a more personal nature. Students are informed about the careers service, the counselling service, the chaplaincy and the international student service during induction and when necessary during tutorials. The careers service delivers aspects of the programme at Stages 2 and 3.

 

  1. in the university as a whole:

The University provides a range of professional support services including wellbeing, counselling, disability support, and a Chaplaincy. Click on the links for further information.

 

 

  1. What resources will I have access to?

 

On campus

In a partner college

 

By distance learning

 

 

On campus

General Teaching and Learning Space

IT

Library

VLE

Laboratory

N/A

Studio

 

Performance space

 

Other specialist

Media Centre, editing and recording suites, including the TV studio and Chroma Room

Technical resources 

Cameras, lights and sound recording equipment for the purposes of audio and AV production

 

University Library Services offer a range of resources, both in print and online, in support of University learning, teaching and research activities. The three site libraries provide information collections, a variety of study spaces, IT facilities and experienced library staff during core hours, with online services and support available at any time off-campus. In addition, both The Murray and St. Peter’s libraries offer 24/7 access during main teaching weeks.

 

On joining the University, all students attend a Library Induction session and library staff are available to help with enquiries during library opening hours. In addition, library staff are experienced in working with academic colleagues in designing and delivering customised Information Skills workshops, either timetabled sessions embedded into core modules or individual sessions provided on request. These workshops provide students with the skills they need to identify and evaluate information from both print collections and electronic sources, including subject specific databases and gateways, online journals and other quality sources available on the Internet. Students can also access subject specific help sheets, online tutorials, FAQs and many more sources of information on the Library website www.library.sunderland.ac.uk

 

Information about the University’s facilities can be found here.

 

  1. Are there any additional costs on top of the fees?

 

No, but all students buy some study materials such as books and provide their own basic study materials.

 

Yes (optional) All students buy some study materials such as books and provide their own basic study materials. In addition there are some are additional costs for optional activities associated with the programme (see below)

 

Yes (essential) All students buy some study materials such as books and provide their own basic study materials. In addition there are some are essential additional costs associated with the programme (see below)

 

List any additional costs the students will have to meet and whether this is optional (e.g. an optional field trip) or essential (e.g. buying a lab coat). Give an estimate of the approximate cost which may be a range (e.g. depending where the field trip goes in a particular year) and some idea of what the activity is (e.g. a visit to an art gallery) (Maximum 250 words)

 

  1. How are student views represented?

All taught programmes in the University have student representatives for each Stage (year-group) of each programme who meet in a Student-Staff Liaison Committee (SSLC) where they can raise students’ views and concerns. The Students’ Union and the faculties together provide training for student representatives. SSLCs and focus groups are also used to obtain student feedback on plans for developing existing programmes and designing new ones. Feedback on your programme is obtained every year through module questionnaires and informs the annual review of your programme. Student representatives are also invited to attend Programme and Module Studies Boards which manage the delivery and development of programmes and modules.  Faculty Academic Committee, also has student representation. This allows students to be involved in higher-level plans for teaching and learning. At university level Students are represented on University level Committees by sabbatical officers who are the elected leaders of the Students’ Union.

 

The University’s student representation and feedback policy can be found here.

 

Undergraduate programmes only: Final-year students are also invited to complete a National Student Survey (NSS) which asks a standard set of questions across the whole country. The results of this are discussed at Programme Studies Boards and at Faculty Academic Committee to identify good practice which can be shared and problems which need to be addressed. We rely heavily on student input to interpret the results of the NSS and ensure that we make the most appropriate changes.

 

We encourage students to contact staff either face to face or via email if that have any questions or problems. We are also very keen that our student representatives take a full role in feeding back on the programme. A strong partnership between staff and students is important to us and we will actively seek student feedback when considering developments to modules or the programme.

 

 

SECTION G:QUALITY MANAGEMENT 

 

  1. National subject benchmarks

 

The Quality Assurance Agency (QAA) for Higher Education publishes benchmark statements which give guidance as to the skills and knowledge which graduates in various subjects and in certain types of degree are expected to have. These can be found here.

 

Are there any benchmark statements for this programme?

YES

 

 

The subject benchmark(s) for this programme is/are: Communication, Film, Media and Cultural Studies

 

The QAA also publishes a Framework for Higher Education Qualifications (FHEQ) which defines the generic skills and abilities expected of students who have achieved awards at a given level and with which our programmes align. The FHEQ can be found here.

 

 

  1. How are the quality and standards of the programme assured?

 

The programme is managed and quality assured through the University’s standard processes. Programmes are overseen by Module and Programme Studies Boards which include student representatives. Each year each module leader provides a brief report on the delivery of the module, identifying strengths and areas for development, and the programme team reviews the programme as a whole.  The purpose of this is to ensure that the programme is coherent and up-to-date, with suitable progression from one Stage to another, and a good fit (alignment) between what is taught and how students learn and are assessed - the learning outcomes, content and types of teaching, learning and assessment. Student achievement, including progress between Stages of the programme and degree classification, is kept under review. The programme review report is sent to the Programme Studies Board and the Faculty in turn reports issues to the University’s Quality Management Sub-Committee (QMSC).

 

External examiners are appointed to oversee and advise on the assessment of the programme. They ensure that the standards of the programme are comparable with those of similar programmes elsewhere in the UK and are also involved in the assessment process to make sure that it is fair. They are invited to comment on proposed developments to the programme. Their reports are sent to the Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Academic) as well as to the Faculty so that issues of concern can be addressed.

 

All programmes are reviewed by the University on a six-yearly cycle to identify good practice and areas for enhancement. Programmes are revalidated through this review process. These reviews include at least one academic specialist in the subject area concerned from another UK university. Quality Assurance Agency (QAA) review reports for Sunderland can be found here.

 

Further information about our quality processes can be found here.

 

Please also complete and insert the SITS form.