Attachments

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Programme Title:

 

BA (Honours) English (with Pathways)

 

Faculty of Education and Society

 

School of Culture

 

PROGRAMME SPECIFICATION

2019-20

 

Date of Validation Event:

July 11th 2017

Date Approved by QMSC:

 

 

 

 

 

 


Version History

 

Please complete each time a new version is drafted e.g.

 

Version

Occasion of Change

Change Author

Last Modified

1.0

Version presented for approval

 

July 2017

2.0

Version presented for Periodic review

 

January 2018

3.0

Change after stage 2 module titles

 

September 2018

4.0

 

Change after stage 3 module titles

 

February 2019

5.0

Added the free option module choices for each pathway and ensured all module codes are correct

 

May 2019

6.0

Corrected numbering of Knowledge Outcomes and added matrix of modes of teaching, learning and assessment

 

July 2019

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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Quality Handbook

 

 

AQH-B2-3a Undergraduate Programme Specification Template

August 2015

 

AQH-B2-3a Undergraduate Programme Specification Template

 

Please note:

  • Standard text is in grey highlight.

 

Rationale

This innovative new programme has been developed to combine three discrete yet complementary areas of English, namely: Language, Literature and Creative Writing.

 

Previously the English Team offered three separate programmes:

  1. English,
  2. English Language and Literature, and
  3. English & Creative Writing.

 

The decision to combine the three separate programmes reflects various considerations.  Student feedback collected across the three programmes revealed that students felt they would have liked to have experienced all three areas before deciding which degree to study.  Statistics collected from annual monitoring evidenced a small but significant number of students who changed programmes at the end of Stage One, having been made aware of the alternative English programmes.  This sometimes necessitated students having to additional core modules.  The fluctuation in recruitment to the discrete programmes was also considered and it was decided that an English Programme with Specialist Pathways could manage more effectively the fluctuations, offer students the opportunity to ‘sample’ the three areas of English provision before deciding upon their ‘final’ subject, help to create a strong cohort identity with students belonging to one programme but also affording the opportunity to be a part of a Specialist Pathway, which supports student aspirations, both personal and professional.

 

In Stage One of the new programme all students will follow a common core of modules drawn from each of the areas of English to allow them to experience the three Pathways. At the end of their first year they have the opportunity to choose a Specialist Pathway with the choice of either Language Literature or Creative Writing, which all have their own cores and options at Stages Two and Three. There is added flexibility, which allows students to select modules from any other Pathway as options to continue their interest in the other English subjects.

 

The optional module selection at Stages Two and Three, which reflects the specialisms of staff working on the programme, will vary from year to year depending on student selection at module choice.  The English Team will formally adopt the University Regulation 3.5, which allows a module from the stage below to be counted up which also helps to broaden the choice of selected modules in any given year (see appendix four)

 

While the programme is not intended to be explicitly vocational, it seeks to reflect the University’s Strategic Plan, which places a strong emphasis on developing the next generation of leaders and tomorrow makers, equipped with the skills necessary to make a significant contribution to the outside world.  Within the new programme, there are a number of initiatives in operation, including specific modules, which are designed to develop critical thinking skills, allow students to be co-creators of knowledge and offer opportunities for staff and students to engage with and support local communities and cultural initiatives through volunteering and work based learning, thereby greatly enhancing student employability upon completion of their degrees. 

 

Modules include:

 

  • LAC203 Language and Education

Language and Education is designed to be of particular use for students contemplating a career in teaching.  This module explores how language operates in the British education system in terms of the spoken interaction in the classroom and the way literacy emerges in a literate society such as Britain.  It is useful for students considering a career in Primary and Secondary education.

 

LAC 282 Writing Works

Winner of the 2015-2016 University of Sunderland Vice Chancellor’s Learning Enhancement Award, LAC282 Writing Works is an innovative module on the analysis and production of workplace writing, the many reports, briefings, proposals, policy documents, newsletters, blogs, emails, applications, personal statements, covering letters and so on that emerge out of most professional workplaces.  Being able to negotiate these many forms of workplace writing, both as critical readers and skilled authors, underpins the very abilities that the University defines as requisite for ‘graduateness’: the ability to think and learn independently, ‘the ability to solve problems, work creatively, embrace complexity and risk, and express oneself clearly and effectively with confidence.

 

  • CWR202 The Healing Pen: Creative Writing for Therapeutic Purposes

Creative Writing and Therapy is also an innovative module which equips students with a working knowledge of therapeutic models, utilising creative writing as a means of self-expression.  The skills learned within this module will allow students to progress into more specialised therapeutic training and improve their chances of gaining employment or indeed self-employed.

 

  • CRW302 Creative Writing and Publishing

Creative Writing and Publishing gives academic accreditation to students working for Spectral Visions Press; a publishing house hosted by the School of Culture within the Faculty of Education and Society. Students have the opportunity to work alongside academic staff within Spectral Visions Press Publishing House. This offers students real world application in editing, proof-reading, typesetting, copywriting, copy-editing and many other highly sought after skills associated with the world of publishing.  Students will also be able to work alongside a range of creative writers in the community.

 

Initiatives include:

 

  • ‘Spectral Visions’, which invites students from all areas of English, involves staff and students working together to arrange an annual conference which enjoys the attendance of large numbers of A-Level students (and their teachers) who have bespoke talks and workshops designed to enhance their studies. This event gives our students a considerable skill-set, which they can use to enhance their CVs.

 

  • ‘Spectral Visions Press’, an innovative publishing house which exists to publish the creative work of students, academics and external freelance writers. Largely student-run, it trains its volunteer staff in all aspects of a professional publishing house including editing, proofreading, copywriting and typesetting to name but a few. It has multiple publications to date and usually publishes two to three volumes each year. All students are welcome to join and those who wish to further learn about publishing as a career can take the CWR302 Spectral Visions Press: Creative Writing and Professional Practice (Note: this is core at Stage Three of the Creative Writing Pathway). Volunteer staff leave with a work reference in addition to the academic reference available to all students

 

  • ‘The Healing Pen’, a staff and student led group which meets one evening a week, explores creative writing in the context of various therapeutic models, including meditation and mindfulness, journaling, sound healing, colour therapy, NLP and affirmations to name but a few.  Student and staff from around the University are welcome to join and contribute to the sessions.  It also acts as a support group for students coping with heavy demands of undergraduate study and affords them a supportive environment in which they can be listened to.  Piloted in 2016/7, The Healing Pen has proven highly successful to the extent that students have carried on with the group outside of term-time. In the new English Programme students who wish to explore this from a more academic perspective can take CWR202 The Healing Pen: Creative Writing for Therapeutic Purposes (Note: this is core at Stage Two of the Creative Writing Pathway).

 

SECTION A: CORE INFORMATION

 

  1. Name of programme

 

English

 

  1. Award title

 

BA Honours English

 

Note: depending on the ‘pathway’ chosen by a student, s/he will graduate with an additional pathway identifier (see Section 31 and Appendix 1):

 

BA English: English Literature

BA English: English Language

BA English: English and Creative Writing

 

  1. Programme linkage

Is this part of group of linked programmes between which students can transfer at agreed points?  No

Is the programme a top-up only? No

 

  1. Does the programme have a Foundation Year (level 3) associated with it so that students enter for a four-year programme and progress directly from the Foundation Year to Stage 1 without having to re-apply? No

 

If yes:

 

  1. Level of award (eg Level 6 for BA/BSc)

 

 

 

  1. Awarding body: University of Sunderland

 

  1. Which School is it in? Culture

 

  1. Programme Studies Board? English

 

  1. Programme Leader Dr Barry Lewis

 

  1. How and where can I study the programme?

 

At Sunderland:

 

Full-time on campus

Part-time on campus

As work-based learning full-time

 

As work-based learning part-time

 

As a full-time sandwich course

 

As a part-time sandwich course

 

By distance learning

 

 

At the University of Sunderland London campus: 

 

Full-time on campus

 

Part-time on campus

 

As work-based learning full-time

 

As work-based learning part-time

 

As a full-time sandwich course

 

As a part-time sandwich course

 

By distance learning

 

 

At a partner college:

 

Full-time in the UK 

 

Part-time in the UK

 

Full-time overseas

 

Part-time overseas

 

By distance learning

 

As a full-time sandwich course in the UK

 

As a part-time sandwich course in the UK

 

As a full-time sandwich course overseas

 

As a part-time sandwich course overseas

 

As work-based learning full-time in the UK 

 

As work-based learning part-time overseas

 

Other (please specify)

 

 


  1. How long does the programme take?

 

 

Min number of years / months

Max number of years / months

Full-time

3

9

Part-time

5

9

Distance learning

 

 

Work-based learning

 

 

 

For start-dates please see the current edition of the Prospectus or contact the relevant department at the University. For start-dates for programmes delivered in a partner college, please contact the college.

 

SECTION B – FURTHER CORE INFORMATION 

 

Use Outline Programme Proposal Form for ADC (AQH-B2-2), for questions 13 to 25

 

26. Learning and teaching strategy. 

 

The new BA (Hons) English degree (with pathways) has a learning and teaching strategy focused around lectures, seminars, and the new VLE (Canvas). It is designed to help students become active, independent, and reflective learners. Lectures are used to communicate the core content of modules, while seminars and workshops provide students with the opportunity to develop their knowledge and skills through a range of tutor-guided activities, including close textual analysis, the guided reading of primary and secondary material and (in creative writing) the drafting and reviewing of their own compositions. The presentation and sharing of ideas is a key function of the seminar, and in class students are encouraged to work in pairs and in small groups, as well as individually.

 

Traditionally, humanities degrees have placed considerable emphasis on independent learning, and the new BA (Hons) English at Sunderland is no different in this respect. Students will be given guided, focused and manageable tasks to complete before each teaching session, and extensive use of Canvas will enable this (see Section 43). The user-friendly platform allows for the posting of text, images, sound files, videos, discussion threads, and assessments; it will be an integral part of all modules offered in English, facilitating blended learning and flipped classrooms. In this way, students’ engagement with independent study can be encouraged, and they will develop crucial employability skills in time management and organisation. Successful independent study, of course, owes a great deal to an institution’s library. Students will be well-supported in this respect: the library has undergone a physical and virtual makeover in recent years, and from their arrival at Sunderland students will receive tailored guidance within their core modules about how to use the library facilities to access high quality information for their studies.

 

Students will also be supported in their learning through the opportunity to meet one-to-one with academic staff during office hours (normally 2 per week); tutors are also happy to engage in electronic discussions with their students (by email, or through the VLE).

 

Learning and teaching on the degree is structured so that over the course of the three stages students incrementally acquire the skills and knowledge to succeed academically. At Stage One students receive a grounding in ‘English’ as a degree subject, in all its diversity. It is at this stage that students are introduced to skills in academic writing and presentation (through special sessions within the core modules). At Stages Two and Three, students will be able to study more specialised topics via the Pathways and optional modules, and will sharpen their skills in the expression of complex arguments.  Assessments become more challenging towards Stage Three, and seek to develop students’ criticality and independent learning.  Stage Three includes the ‘Advanced Study’ module, which will allow students to present their achievements in literary, linguistic or creative work in the form of both a dissertation/portfolio and a poster presentation.

 

27. Retention strategy

 

The structure of the degree means that students will develop an identity as a cohort during the Stage One ‘common core’. The fact that all English students (no matter which Pathway) will take the same six modules in their first year will help to build a strong group identity which can be carried into Stages Two and Three, so helping with retention. (See also comments on ‘Student Support’ in Section 42). The assessments at Stage One are designed to evaluate students' skills but to also help them gain confidence and highlight areas where they can make improvements to prepare them for Stage Two and Three.

 

  1. Any other information

 

The Programme has been designed to meet the Subject Benchmarks for each individual Pathway

 

 

SECTION C - TEACHING AND LEARNING

 

  1. What is the programme about?

 

The programme integrates the wide-ranging expertise of the academics who teach English at Sunderland to allow students to engage with a common first year to experience each of the three strands of English as mutually reinforcing branches of study:

 

  • English Language: the study of language and semiosis as a medium of communication and an expression of social identity;
  • English Literature: the study of a body of culturally valued texts (novels, plays, short stories, films, poetry, song lyrics, etc.);
  • Creative Writing: the study and practice of shaping language creatively in a range of canonical and non-canonical styles and genres.

 

At the end of Stage One, students are able to choice a specific Pathway to allow them to develop their preferred subject in more depth. Within each Pathway, students are allowed to take optional modules from the other Pathways.


  1. What will I know or be able to do at each Stage of the programme?

 

Stage One exists as a common core for all students.

 

Learning Outcomes Stage One (English Language, English Literature, Creative Writing) – Skills  

 

By the end of this Stage of the programme successful students should have:

 

  • S1: the ability to produce accurate and appropriately presented verbal and written work;
  • S2: the ability to read and synthesise information, differentiate between scholarly and unscholarly sources of information and locate appropriate information and resources to prepare for assignments;
  • S3: the ability to engage in close readings of prose fiction, poetry, dramatic and literary critical texts;
  • S4: the ability to talk and write about relevant linguistic topics using appropriate metalinguistic terminology;
  • S5: the ability to edit their own creative work, and that of peers, with a high level of rigor and scrutiny and to explain the content and structure of their own writing;
  • S6: the ability to write a short story using the structures of Monomyth and also use it to analyse their own writing.

 

Learning Outcomes Stage One (English Language, English Literature, Creative Writing) – Knowledge

 

By the end of this Stage of the programme successful students should:

 

  • K1: have an awareness of changes in literary forms and styles over time;
  • K2: have an awareness of critical debate and some of the problems of interpretation;
  • K3: have knowledge of key terminology needed in the discussion of fiction, poetry, drama and literary criticism;
  • K4: have an understanding of what human language is, how it differs from non-linguistic forms of communication, how it evolved, similarities and differences between the main modes of language and how language functions in society;
  • K5: have an understanding of the history and global spread of the English language;
  • K6: have an understanding of lexis, morphology, syntax, phonetics, phonology, semantics, and pragmatics and how these concepts can be applied in the description and analysis of the English language;
  • K7: an understanding of models of storytelling, Jungian archetypes and Myth Criticism;
  • K8: an awareness of the drafting and editing work required of a professional writer;
  • K9: an awareness of the forms of writing for various media such as film, radio and stage and an understanding of the principal literary genres of prose, poetry, and drama.

 

At the end of Stage One students will then choose a Pathway. Each Pathway has its own learning outcomes.


English Language Pathway

 

English: English Language Learning Outcomes Stage Two – Skills

By the end of this Stage of the programme successful students should:

 

  • S7: have the ability to examine concepts underlying the study of language in relationship to the requirements of the English curriculum;
  • S8: have the ability to analyse spoken and written texts with the appropriate application of basic metalinguistic terms;
  • S9: be able to describe and evaluate linguistic data from a sociolinguistic perspective;
  • S10: be able to interpret the graphical representation of sociolinguistic data;
  • S11: be able to carry out a small-scale piece of sociolinguistic research.

 

English: English Language Learning Outcomes Stage Two – Knowledge

By the end of this Stage of the programme successful students should:

 

  • K10: have an understanding of the facilitation of language and literacy development in children;
  • K11: have an understanding of key sociolinguistic concepts such as dialect, variety, diglossia, code-switching, (socio)-linguistic variable, creole, dialectology, language ideology;
  • K12: have an understanding of social concepts such as community of practice, social network, cultural capital and an awareness of how they are relevant to the study of language variation;
  • K13: have knowledge of selected sociolinguistic theories and methods.

 

English: English Language Learning Outcomes Stage Three – Skills

 

By the end of this Stage of the programme successful students should:

 

  • S12: have the ability to use metalanguage to critically engage in contemporary linguistic and sociolinguistic debate;
  • S13: have the ability to critically evaluate issues within their selected area of enquiry;
  • S14: have the ability to employ the most appropriate methodology to collect data.

 

English: English Language Learning Outcomes Stage Three -Knowledge

By the end of this Stage of the programme successful students should:

 

  • K14: have a critical understanding of a specific area of language in society;
  • K15: knowledge and understanding of a range research methodologies appropriate to their chosen research project.

 


English Literature Pathway

 

English Literature Learning Outcomes StageTwo – Skills

By the end of this Stage of the programme successful students should have:

 

  • S7: the ability to write a thoughtful argument about a literary text or issue in relation to literary history, criticism or theory;
  • S8: the ability to use critical perspectives to create arguments that can be applied to literary texts;
  • S9: the ability to work effectively in a group to discuss different critical approaches to literature and formulate responses to key questions in preparation for and participation in a final debate.

 

English Literature Learning Outcomes Stage Two – Knowledge

By the end of this Stage of the programme successful students should:

 

  • K10: have a critical understanding of central issues related to literary history, criticism and theory that have preoccupied writers and critical practitioners since Plato;
  • K11: have an increased knowledge of the major periods and movements in English literary history;
  • K12: have a developing understanding of a number of different critical perspectives on literature (and culture);
  • K13: have a developing understanding of the way these critical perspectives have developed historically.

 

English Literature Learning Outcomes Stage Three – Skills

By the end of this Stage of the programme successful students should:

 

  • S10: have the ability to carry through a sustained and critical piece of work on a [literary] topic of the student’s choice
  • S11 have the ability to read complex texts carefully, showing evidence of independent thought and critical judgement and employ research skills in order to generate evidence, and use this in the formulation of a coherent academic argument;
  • S12 be able to display a level of originality of insight and argument.

 

English: English Literature Learning Outcomes Stage Three – Knowledge

By the end of this Stage of the programme successful students should have:

 

  • K14 an in-depth knowledge of more than one specialist literary topic;
  • K15 a critical awareness of and engagement with a body of academic writing in connection with a  chosen research topic.

 


Creative Writing Pathway

 

English: Creative Writing Learning Outcomes Stage Two - Skills

By the end of this Stage of the programme successful students should have:

 

  • S7: the ability to apply concepts of critical thinking to creative writing practice;
  • S8: the ability to develop and present cogent written arguments supported by relevant analysis;
  • S9: the ability to use reflective strategies to help capture and synthesise personal experiences and other research in creative writing;
  • S10: the ability for students to see themselves as practitioners and reflect critically on their own creative writing practice;
  • S11: the ability to formulate a therapeutic creative writing workshop designed for a specified group of people.

 

English: Creative Writing Learning Outcomes Stage Two – Knowledge

By the end of this Stage of the programme successful students should have:

 

  • K10: a developing understanding of the differences between descriptive, expository, narrative and argumentative texts;
  • K11: an understanding of how creative writing practice can inform the understanding of core concepts of critical thinking;
  • K12: a critical understanding of how creative writing practice can inform the understanding of core concepts of critical thinking
  • K13: an understanding of the development of new writing strategies drawn from critical reflection upon writing practice.

 

English: Creative Writing Learning Outcomes Stage Learning Outcomes Stage 3 – Skills

By the end of this Stage of the programme successful students should have:

 

  • S12: the ability to produce clear, accurate, artistically coherent and technically sophisticated written work, which articulates a combination of research and creative ideas;
  • S13: the ability to critically evaluate and reflect on their own practices and assumptions.

English: Creative Writing Learning Outcomes Stage 3 – Knowledge

By the end of this Stage of the programme successful students should have:

 

  • K14: a critical understanding of the role of readers and audiences in realising texts and performance as imaginative experience;
  • K15: a critical understanding of the interplay between practice, criticism and theory within their chosen form(s).


Learning Outcomes – Ordinary degree

 

If you are awarded an Ordinary degree you will have achieved most of the learning outcomes for the programme studied. However, you will have gained fewer credits at Stage 3 than students awarded an Honours degree, your knowledge will typically be less broad and you will typically be less proficient in higher-level skills such as independent learning.

 

  1. What will the programme consist of?

 

Each undergraduate programme consists of a number of Stages from a minimum of 1 to a maximum of 4, each of which is equivalent to a year’s full-time study. The summary below describes briefly what is contained in each Stage. Most programmes have a mixture of core (ie compulsory) modules and optional ones, often with increasing choice as you move through the programme and gain in experience. In some programmes the choice of optional modules gives you particular ‘routes’ through the programme. The programme structure including a detailed list of modules can be found in the programme regulations.

 

This is the ‘common core’ of the degree at stage 1. All students take two modules in English literature, two in English language and two in creative writing:

 

  • ELL141 Order from Chaos: Narrative and Poetry for the 21st Century (20 credits)
  • ELL142 Stages and Pages: Drama and Criticism for the 21st Century (20 credits)
  • LAC101 Language in the 21st Century (20 credits)
  • LAC102 Describing Modern English (20 credits)
  • CWR101 The Writer’s Journey: Monomyth (20 credits)
  • CWR102 The Writer’s Craft: Developing your Skills (20 credits)

 

These six modules will give students an accessible grounding in the key skills and knowledge in each of the three subject areas. Also, distributed across these modules will be sessions on study skills.

 

By the end of Stage 1 all students will have been provided with a lively introduction to literary study. They will have read novels, poems and plays covering a variety of themes, including the supernatural, crime, consciousness, revenge, technology, national identity, big business and environmental catastrophe. In addition, students will look at how the concepts of tragedy and comedy have been dramatised from Ancient Greece to the present day. As well as an understanding of literary texts and contexts, students will develop essential approaches and skills for understanding and analysing narrative, poetry and drama. They will also have been introduced to narrative, poetry and prose from the perspective of the creative writer, exploring short story writing through the mechanism of mythic archetypes, and poetry, prose and drama through the exploration of memories and experience. Finally, students will have been introduced to the systematic and rigorous study of language – with a particular focus on English – exploring how accelerating global flows of people and technological change influences the forms and functions of language, and developing the skills and knowledge to describe English at the levels of sound, structure and meaning.

 

Even though students choose a pathway at the end of the first year, the skills that they have covered on all Stage 1 modules are valuable and will be useful in the subsequent stages of their degree.

 

At the end of Stage One students will choose their ‘pathway’ for the remainder of the degree. These three pathways are outlined below.


English Language Pathway

Stage 1

CORE

20 credits

LAC101

CORE

20 credits

LAC102

CORE

20 credits

ELL141

CORE

20 credits

ELL141

CORE

20 credits

CWR101

 

CORE

20 credits

CWR102

 

Stage 2

CORE

20 credits

LAC202

 

CORE

20 credits

LAC203

 

Designated option

20 credits

LAC201 or

LAC204 or

LAC271 or

LAC281 or

LAC282

 

Designated option

20 credits

LAC201 or

LAC204 or

LAC271 or

LAC281

OPTION

20 credits

 

OPTION

20 credits

 

Stage 3

CORE

40 credits

LAC310

Designated option

20 credits

LAC301 or

LAC302 or

LAC305 or

LAC307

Designated option

20 credits

LAC301 or

LAC302 or

LAC305 or

LAC307

OPTION

20 credits

 

OPTION

20 credits

 

 

Stage Two

 

Core modules

 

  • LAC202 Contemporary Sociolinguistics (20 credits)
  • LAC203 Language and Education (20 credits)

 

and at least 40 credits from the English language pathway designated modules

 

  • LAC201 Language and Childhood (20 credits)
  • LAC204 Language and the Media (20 credits)
  • LAC271 Language and Power (20 credits)
  • LAC281 Language, Literature and Computers (20 credits)
  • LAC282 Writing Works (20 credits)

 

The remaining 40 credits can come from any module within the programme offered for Stage Two including cores, subject to availability. These are:

 

Literature: ELL 241, ELL242, ELL255, ELL260, ELL 261, ELL 262, ELL263, ELL264, ELL279, ELL280

Creative Writing: CWR201, CWR202, CWR203, CWR204, CWR205, CWR206

 

At the end of stage two, students following the English Language Pathway will have developed – through the core modules – an understanding of the relationship between language and society and knowledge of the causes of linguistic variation and change; they will also have studied how language operates in the British education system in terms of spoken interaction in the classroom and the way literacy emerges in a literate society. They will also have been able – through their choice of designated pathway modules – to focus on two of the following areas of study: child language development, the role of language in the media, language and power, and corpus linguistics.

 

 

 

 

Stage Three

 

Core module

 

  • LAC310 Advanced Study (English Language) (40 credits)

 

and at least 40 credits from the English Language pathway designated modules (choices may vary from year to year)

 

  • LAC301 Broadcast Talk (20 credits)
  • LAC302 Language and Gender (20 credits)
  • LAC305 English in the North East (20 credits)
  • LAC307 Reading and Writing Children’s Fictions (20 credits)

 

The remaining 40 credits can come from any module within the programme offered for Stage Three including cores, subject to availability. These are:

 

Literature: ELL329, ELL344, ELL360, ELL361, ELL365, ELL370, ELL385, ELL390, ELL391, ELL392

Creative Writing: CWR301, CWR302, CWR303, CWR304

 

At the end of stage three, students following the English Language Pathway will have completed an extended piece of research on a language topic of their choice (chosen in consultation with their supervisor). They will have presented this research in the form of a poster presentation and a dissertation. Depending on their module choice they will also have covered two of the following specialised language topics, often benefiting from the research expertise of the tutors who teach them: World Englishes, Broadcast Talk, Language and Gender, English in the North East of England, Language and Children’s Fictions. In addition, they will have taken two of any other modules offered for stage three, subject to availability.

 


English Literature Pathway

 

Stage 1

CORE

20 credits

ELL141

CORE

20 credits

ELL142

CORE

20 credits

LAC101

CORE

20 credits

LAC102

CORE

20 credits

CWR101

 

CORE

20 credits

CWR102

Stage 2

CORE

20 credits

ELL241

CORE

20 credits

ELL242

Designated option

20 credits

ELL261 or

ELL262 or

ELL263 or

ELL280

Designated option

20 credits

ELL261 or

ELL262 or

ELL263 or

ELL280

OPTION

20 credits

 

 OPTION

20 credits

 

Stage 3

CORE

40 credits

 

Designated option

Genre

20 credits

ELL329 or

ELL344 or

ELL360 or

ELL385 or

ELL392

Designated option

Period

20 credits

ELL361 or

ELL365 or

ELL390 or

ELL391

 

OPTION

20 credits

 

OPTION

20 credits

 

 

Stage Two

 

Core modules

 

  • ELL241 Questioning Literature: History and Theory (20 credits)
  • ELL242 Refocusing Literature: Applying Literary Theory to Texts (20 credits)

 

and at least 40 credits from the English literature pathway designated modules

 

  • ELL261 Romanticism: Literature in the Age of Revolution (20 credits)
  • ELL262 Literature from the Inferno to Paradise: The Renaissance (20 credits)
  • ELL263 Exploring the City and the World in Eighteenth-Century Literature (20 credits)
  • ELL280 Literature of the Victorian Age (20 credits)

 

The choice of the above designated modules should balance the 40 credits across the semesters. The remaining 40 credits can come from any module within the programme offered for Stage Two including cores, subject to availability. These are:

 

Literature: ELL255, ELL260, ELL264, ELL279

Language: LAC201, LAC202, LAC203, LAC204, LAC271, LAC281, LAC282

Creative Writing: CWR201, CWR202, CWR203, CWR204, CWR205, CWR206

 

At the end of stage two, students following the English Literature Pathway will have addressed – through the core modules – central issues in literary history, criticism, and theory, such as what is literature and how the ‘canon’ of English literature has been shaped and changed over time. They will also have been introduced to the major periods and movements in English literary history, exploring the relationship between texts and historical contexts and the insights that historicist and feminist approaches can bring to literary criticism. In addition, they will also have been able – through their choice of designated pathway modules – to study at least two of the following: the literature of the Renaissance; the literature of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries; Romanticism.


Stage Three

 

Core module

 

  • ELL370 Advanced Study (English Literature) (40 credits)

 

and at least 20 credits from the English literature pathway designated modules GENRE (choices may vary from year to year)

 

  • ELL329 Women’s Autobiography (20 credits)
  • ELL344 World Englishes in Fiction (20 credits)
  • ELL360 What’s New in American Fiction?: The Art of the US Short Story, 1948-2010 (20 credits)
  • ELL385 Modern Fiction: Gender, Sexuality and Experimentation (20 credits)
  • ELL392 ‘The Play’s the Thing’:  Shakespeare’s Dramatic Genres (20 credits)

 

and at least 20 credits from the English literature pathway designated modules PERIOD (choices may vary from year to year)

 

  • ELL361 In Our Times: Contemporary British and Irish Novels (20 credits)
  • ELL365 Troubles: 100 Years of Irish Poetry 1916-2016 (20 credits)
  • ELL390 Chaucer’s Genres: The Canterbury Tales (20 credits)
  • ELL391 Monsters, Madness and Murder: Gothic Literature

 

The remaining 40 credits can come from any module within the programme offered for Stage Three including cores, subject to availability. These are:

 

Language: LAC301, LAC302, LAC305, LAC307, LAC310

Creative Writing: CWR301, CWR302, CWR303, CWR304

 

At the end of stage Three, students following the English Literature Pathway will have had the opportunity to carry out a major research project on a topic of their choice (chosen in consultation with their supervisor). They will have presented this research in the form of a poster presentation and a dissertation. In addition, they will have taken two literature modules and two of any other modules offered for Stage Three, subject to availability. Many of these Stage Three modules offer students the opportunity to carry out specialised literary study, reflecting the research interests of tutors.


Creative Writing Pathway

Stage 1

CORE

20 credits

CWR101

 

CORE

20 credits

CWR102

 

CORE

20 credits

ELL141

CORE

20 credits

ELL141

CORE

20 credits

LAC101

CORE

20 credits

LAC102

Stage 2

CORE

20 credits

CWR201

 

CORE

20 credits

CWR202

 

Designated option

20 credits

CWR203 or

CWR204 or

CWR205 or

CWR206

 

Designated option

20 credits

CWR203 or

CWR204 or

CWR205 or

CWR206

 

OPTION

20 credits

 

OPTION

20 credits

 

Stage 3

CORE

40 credits

CWR301

Designated option

20 credits

CWR302 or

CWR303 or

CWR304

 

Designated option

20 credits

CWR302 or

CWR303 or

CWR304

OPTION

20 credits

 

OPTION

20 credits

 

 

 

Stage Two

 

Core modules

  • CWR201 Creative Writing and Critical Thinking (20 credits)
  • CWR202 The Healing Pen: Creative Writing for Therapeutic Purposes (20 credits)

 

and at least 40 credits from these Creative Writing pathway designated modules

  • CWR203 Explorations in Prose Fiction (20 credits)
  • CWR204 Writing for Stage (20 credits)
  • CWR205 Performance, Poetry and Song (20 credits)
  • CWR206 How to Write like Tolkien: Archetypal Literature from Homer to Harry Potter (20 credits)

 

The remaining 40 credits can come from any module within the programme offered for Stage Two including cores, subject to availability. These are:

 

Literature: ELL 241, ELL242, ELL255, ELL260, ELL 261, ELL 262, ELL263, ELL264, ELL279, ELL280

Language: LAC201, LAC202, LAC203, LAC204, LAC271, LAC281, LAC282

 

At the end of Stage Two, students following the English and Creative Writing Pathway will have developed – through the core modules – an understanding of central aspects of critical thinking, in particular the basic principles of argument and logic, and how they can be related to creative writing practice. In addition, they will acquire a grounding in different methods of using creative writing techniques therapeutically (for well-being or personal and/or professional development purposes). Depending on their choice of modules from the designated pathway options, students will also be able to extend their study of creative writing into, for example, writing for the stage and writing mythic literature; they will also be able to deepen their understanding of writing poetry and prose.

 

 

 

 

 

Stage Three

 

Core module

 

  • CWR301 Advanced Study (Creative Writing) (40 credits)

 

and at least 40 credits from the Creative Writing pathway designated modules

 

  • CWR302 Spectral Visions Press: Creative Writing and Professional Practice
  • CWR303 Genre Fiction
  • CWR304 Writing the Novel

 

The remaining 40 credits can come from any module within the programme offered for Stage Three including cores, subject to availability. These are:

 

Literature: ELL329, ELL344, ELL360, ELL361, ELL365, ELL370, ELL385, ELL390, ELL391, ELL392

 

Language: LAC301, LAC302, LAC305, LAC307, LAC310

 

At the end of Stage Three, students following the English and Creative Writing Pathway will have explored – through the Advanced Study in Creative Writing – a larger idea (such as a flash fiction or short story collection) that could be marketed post-degree. Their development as writers will also have been nurtured as a consequence of taking modules in two of the following areas: exploring the novel, genre fiction, and creative writing and publishing. In addition, they will have taken two of any other modules offered for stage three, subject to availability.

 


  1. How will I be taught?

Scheduled teaching activities

X

Independent study

X

Placement

X depending on module

 

See B. 26.

 

A list of the modules in each Stage of the programme can be found in the Programme Regulations.

 

A summary of the types of teaching, learning and assessment in each module of the programme can be found in the Matrix of Modes of Teaching.

 

  1. How will I be assessed and given feedback? 

Written examinations

*

Coursework

*

Practical assessments

*

 

A summary of the types of teaching, learning and assessment in each module of the programme can be found in the Matrix of Modes of Teaching.

 

The generic assessment criteria which we use can be found here. Some programmes use subject-specific assessment criteria which are based on the generic ones.

 

This programme uses the Generic University Assessment Criteria

YES

 

This programme uses the Subject Specific Assessment Criteria

YES*

 

*Creative Writing Pathway only.

 

The University regulations can be found here.

 

Assessment on the degree is often in the form of the traditional academic essay, particularly on the literature and language pathways. This format gives students the time and space to synthesize their reading and respond in a detailed and coherent manner to questions and tasks set by their tutors. Group presentations, multiple-choice tests, debates, research projects, textual analyses, and poster presentations also feature on the menu of assessment tasks in literature and language.  In creative writing assessments, students must demonstrate the ability to produce original works of fiction, drama and poetry, and they must also show an explicit awareness of their own craft through written commentaries on their work. Over the course of the degree, the assessment tasks on all pathways increasingly ask more of the students: some Stage 2 and 3 assessments require students to explore topics they have identified for themselves and carry out their own research (with tutor guidance).

 

The range of assessment tasks allows students to display their communicative capacities in a range of styles. The majority of modules assess their learning outcomes in at least two pieces of work which means that students can often use the feedback from the first piece to help improve subsequent pieces. In addition, students are given a number of chances to complete work successfully through the referral system, and can be granted deferrals in the appropriate circumstances (determined by the relevant Module Assessment Board on advice from the Extenuating Circumstances Panel and Disability Support).

 

  1. Teaching, learning and assessment matrix

 

  1. How does research influence the programme? 

 

Research area

Example publications 2012-present

Post-colonialism

Nash, G., Kerr-Koch, K. and Hackett, S. (eds.) (2013) Post-colonialism and Islam: Theory, Literature, Culture, Society and Film. London: Routledge.

Literary theory

Kerr-Koch, K. (2013) Romancing Fascism: Modernity and Allegory in Benjamin, de Man, Shelley. London: Bloomsbury.

American literature

Lewis, B. (2012) 'Vertical Perfection, Horizontal Inevitability: The Gold Bug Variations'. In Ideas of Order: Narrative Patterns in the Novels of Richard Powers, edited by Antje Kley and Jan D. Kucharzewski (Universitätsverlag).

Creative writing (teaching)

Dobbs, S. et al. (2014) English Language, Literature and Creative Writing: A Practical Guide for Students. London: Anthem Press.

Creative writing (practice)

Dobbs, S. (2012) Killing Daniel. Norwich: Unthank Books.

Workplace Writing and Texts

Mandala, S. (2017) Pragmatic Stylistics and Dramatic Dialogue: Re-Assessing Gus’s Role in Pinter’s The Dumb Waiter in Mildorf, J. and Thomas, B. (eds) Dialogue Across Media: Amsterdam: John Benjamin

 

Hiberno-Irish literature and culture

O’Malley-Younger, A. (2016) ‘A terrible beauty is bought: 1916, commemoration and commodification’. Irish Studies Review. 24(4): 455-467.

Younger, C. (ed.) (2013) Border Crossings: Narration, Nation and Imagination in Scots and Irish Literature and Culture Newcastle: Cambridge Scholars

Language and gender

Smith, A. (2017) Bulging biceps and tender kisses: the sexualisation of fatherhood’. Social Semiotics.

Broadcast talk

Smith, A. and Higgins, M. (2016) Belligerent Broadcasting: Synthetic Argument in Broadcast Talk. London: Routledge.

North East English

Pearce, M. (2017) ‘The linguistic landscape of North East England’. In Hancil, S. and Beal, J. (eds) Perspectives on Northern Englishes. Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter.

Romanticism

Fallon, D. (2017) Blake, Myth, and Enlightenment: The Politics of Apotheosis. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.

 

Table 1: Example research outputs 2012-2017

 

All members of the teaching team are research active – indeed, Sunderland was one of only seven universities in the UK to enter every member of its English team for the 2014 REF – and belong to the faculty’s Centre for Humanities Research. According to feedback from the REF sub-panel, in terms of publications, 'international excellence was evident in all areas, and there was the additional strength of world-leading achievement in dialect, language analysis and creative writing'. The impact of research carried out in English was deemed to be 'considerable in terms of reach and significance', with work 'embedded in and committed to enriching its local community'. Most staff members have produced work that is directly relevant to their teaching (see Table 1). This research has influenced the development of the programme. The example publications indicate that the team provides a model for the students and ensures that the curriculum is vibrant and current. In addition, many of the modules on the degree require students to carry out their own research. This is most obvious in the Advanced Study module, at Stage Three but other modules have an assessed research element (e.g. LAC271 ‘Language and Power’, LAC281 ‘Language, Literature and Computers’ and LAC282 Writing Works).

 

Our commitment to undergraduate research in the School of Culture is demonstrated in Codex: A Journal of Undergraduate Scholarship and Research in the Humanities. This is a yearly publication (the first edition came out in 2013) showcasing the best dissertations in English, History & Politics, and Languages.

 

SECTION D EMPLOYABILITY

 

  1. How will the programme prepare me for employment? (See also Section 42)

 

The programme gives you the opportunity to develop skills which you can use in the future. Some skills are more specific than others to the subject area, or to a particular type of activity, but all skills can be applied in a range of employment situations, sometimes in quite unexpected ways. The skills which this programme is designed to develop are listed below.

 

The proposed degree programme will help students to develop a set of transferrable skills, which are highly valued by employers. These include: interpretation of spoken and written texts/data, retrieval, analysis and synthesis of complex data, attention to detail, clear written and verbal communication skills, computer and software skills, presentation skills, skills in reflective learning, organisation and time management.

 

More specifically, the Stage Three module ‘Creative Writing and Publishing’ gives academic accreditation to students working for Spectral Visions Press; a publishing house hosted by the School of Culture within the Faculty of Education and Society. Students can become voluntary workers within Spectral Visions Press Publishing House which is largely student-run. This offers students the opportunity to experience working in editing, proof-reading, typesetting, copywriting, copy-editing and many other highly sought after skills associated with the world of publishing.

 

The Stage Two core module ‘Creative Writing and Therapy’ is also somewhat unusual within UK universities and will equip students with a working knowledge of therapeutic models, utilising creative writing as a means of self-expression. The skills learned within this module will allow students to progress into more specialised therapeutic training and improve their chances of gaining employment or indeed self-employed status.

 

The Stage Two ‘Language and Education’ module is designed to be of particular use for students contemplating a career in teaching. The PGCE route into teaching is a popular choice for our graduates. The core, designated, and optional modules on the English Literature Pathway will provide prospective English teachers with a broad coverage of literature from different periods, by a range of different authors, and covering a variety of themes and styles, as well as experiencing ways of analysing and bringing literary texts to life in the classroom.

 

Other popular careers include media, journalism, publishing, advertising, marketing, PR, the civil service and the law. Many of our students go onto further study, at Sunderland (e.g. on the popular English MA) or at other HE institutions (e.g. University of Durham, University of Newcastle, etc.).

 

Are there also opportunities for on-campus students outside your programme of study?

 

Within the Faculty of Education and Society and the wider university there is a range of opportunities for charitable and volunteer work which is actively promoted – from simple fund-raising events, such as zip wire, white water rafting and Christmas jumper days, to volunteering in the community.  English students are also enthusiastic members of the Spectral Visions group, which organises an annual event for local Sixth Formers as well as other events in the community. These all benefit the students academically, socially and in relation to their future employability.

 

For information about other opportunities available to our students who study on campus, click here.

 

  1. Particular features of the qualification (optional)

 

  1. Professional statutory or regulatory body (PSRB) accreditation. 

 

PSRB accreditation is not relevant to this programme 

*

PSRB accreditation is currently being sought for this programme

 

This programme currently has PSRB accreditation

 

 

 

SECTION E PROGRAMME STRUCTURE AND REGULATIONS

 

Use Programme Regulations Form, for questions 39 and 40

 

SECTION F ADMISSIONS, LEARNING ENVIRONMENT AND SUPPORT

 

  1. What are the admissions requirements?

 

The University’s standard admissions requirements can be found in the university regulations. Programme-specific requirements which are in addition to those regulations are given below. 

 

The typical offer to join the BA English at Stage 1 is 120 UCAS points from a minimum of two A Levels or equivalent (e.g. 1 x AVCE double award). We accept a maximum of 6 points from Level 3 Key Skills qualifications. We also normally require three passes at GCSE grade C or above, which must include Mathematics and English Language, or a minimum of Level 2 Key Skills in Communication and Application of Number. Those who have studied for a GCSE which has a numerical grade will need to achieve a grade 4 or above.  However, applications are welcomed from prospective students with non-traditional qualifications, work based experience and qualifications.

 


  1. What kind of support and help will there be?

 

A number of strategies are in place to support students throughout their studies. From the moment they arrive they are made aware of how to access this support. During Welcome Week/Induction Week students will meet the Programme Leader and teaching team for advice sessions about all aspects of their studies. There will also be opportunities for students and staff to mingle in informal, friendly environments during the week (subject to Faculty funding). Each student will be allocated a personal tutor (PT) drawn from the teaching staff, and PTs will support their tutees pastorally throughout the course of their studies, inviting them for regular tutorials.  Students are also supported by the Programme Leader, who keeps in regular contact, reminding them of key events and advising them in relation to referrals, mitigating circumstances, transfers, leaves of absence, and so on.  The three Pathway Leaders will also be able to provide additional support, particularly in relation to module choice.  The Programme Leader will work closely with Sunderland Futures to ensure that career guidance is an integral part of the programme at each Stage.

 

The University provides a range of professional support services including health and well-being, counselling, disability support, and a Chaplaincy. Click on the links for further information.

 

  1. What resources will I have access to?

 

On campus

In a partner college

 

By distance learning

 

 

On campus

 

Tick all that apply

General Teaching and Learning Space

IT

Library

VLE

Laboratory

 

Studio

 

Performance space

 

Other specialist

 

Technical resources 

 

The School of Culture is based within the Reg Vardy Centre at St Peter’s Campus.  This is a light, airy building with high-quality classrooms and good quality audio-visual technology. In addition, the nearby Media Centre has a cinema, which can be used for screenings of films and documentaries related to the degree programme.

 

St Peter’s campus is well equipped with computers for student use – these can be found mainly in the library, which is spacious and comfortable, and stocked with relevant publications: there are approximately 10,000 titles in literature and literary criticism, and 1,500 in English language and linguistics. In addition, students have access to a number of excellent electronic databases, including Art Full Text; British Newspapers 1600-1900; Eighteenth Century Collections Online (ECCO); the John Johnson Collection; JSTOR; LexisLibrary; MLA International Bibliography, and Literary Reference Center Plus. The library also subscribes to many academic journals in language, literature and creative writing, most of which are available electronically.

 

The new VLE (Canvas) will have a central role in the degree. According to the company website, Canvas is “powerful, reliable and refreshingly easy to use”, having been “designed … to meet the requirements of modern students, teachers and institutions”. Within the degree there will be extensive use of Canvas. The ‘Programme Space’ will be a one-stop virtual environment containing the degree’s ‘virtual’ programme guide, and there will be spaces devoted to every module taught on the degree: each module will have a dedicated space, and will include lecture and seminar materials, useful links, My Module Resources, and multimedia items to enhance the learning experience. Some module leaders might also choose to handle assignment submission through the VLE; others might set up structured discussion threads where the students will be encouraged to engage in debate, receiving feedback from peers and tutors (see Section 26).

 

Information about the University’s facilities can be found here.

 

  1. Are there any additional costs on top of the fees?

 

No, but all students buy some study materials such as books and provide their own basic study materials.

 

Yes (optional) All students buy some study materials such as books and provide their own basic study materials. In addition there are some additional costs for optional activities associated with the programme (see below)

Yes (essential) All students buy some study materials such as books and provide their own basic study materials. In addition there are some essential additional costs associated with the programme (see below)

 

 

LAC307 students have the option to buy a hard-copy of the module reader for £11. If they prefer not to pay they can use the electronic version for free instead.

 

If there is sufficient student interest, some modules (e.g. ELL261 Romanticism) may run an optional informal fieldtrip, organised between staff and students with a small fee to cover travel costs in shared cars and any entry costs to museums/sites covered by students.

 

  1. How are student views represented?

 

All taught programmes in the University have student representatives for each Stage (year-group) of each programme who meet in a Student-Staff Liaison Committee (SSLC) where they can raise students’ views and concerns. The Students’ Union and the faculties together provide training for student representatives. SSLCs and focus groups are also used to obtain student feedback on plans for developing existing programmes and designing new ones. Feedback on your programme is obtained every year through module questionnaires and informs the annual review of your programme. Student representatives are also invited to attend Programme and Module Studies Boards which manage the delivery and development of programmes and modules.  Various Faculty committees, particularly Faculty Academic Experience Committee, Academic Development Committee and Quality Management Sub-Committee also have student representation. This allows students to be involved in higher-level plans for teaching and learning. There is a parallel structure at university level on which students are represented by sabbatical officers who are the elected leaders of the Students’ Union.

 

The University’s student representation and feedback policy can be found here.

 

Undergraduate programmes only: Final-year students are also invited to complete a National Student Survey (NSS) which asks a standard set of questions across the whole country. The results of this are discussed at Programme Studies Boards and at Faculty Academic Experience Committee to identify good practice which can be shared and problems which need to be addressed. We rely heavily on student input to interpret the results of the NSS and ensure that we make the most appropriate changes.

 

As well as the processes outlined above, members of the English teaching group keep regular office hours during teaching weeks and students are free to air any concerns to staff members at these times.

 

SECTION G QUALITY MANAGEMENT 

 

  1. National subject benchmarks

 

The Quality Assurance Agency for Higher Education publishes benchmark statements which give guidance as to the skills and knowledge which graduates in various subjects and in certain types of degree are expected to have. These can be found here.

 

Are there any benchmark statements for this programme?

YES

 

 

The subject benchmark(s) for this programme is/are:

 

Creative Writing <http://www.qaa.ac.uk/en/Publications/Documents/SBS-Creative-Writing-16.pdf>

English <http://www.qaa.ac.uk/en/Publications/Documents/SBS-English-15.pdf>

Linguistics <http://www.qaa.ac.uk/en/Publications/Documents/SBS-Linguistics-15.pdf>

 

The QAA also publishes a Framework for Higher Education Qualifications (FHEQ) which defines the generic skills and abilities expected of students who have achieved awards at a given level and with which our programmes align. The FHEQ can be found here.

 

  1. How are the quality and standards of the programme assured?

The programme is managed and quality assured through the University’s standard processes. Programmes are overseen by Module and Programme Studies Boards which include student representatives. Each year each module leader provides a brief report on the delivery of the module, identifying strengths and areas for development, and the programme team reviews the programme as a whole.  The purpose of this is to ensure that the programme is coherent and up-to-date, with suitable progression from one Stage to another, and a good fit (alignment)  between what is taught and how students learn and are assessed - the learning outcomes, content and types of teaching, learning and assessment. Student achievement, including progress between Stages of the programme and degree classification, is kept under review. The programme review report is sent to the Faculty Quality Management Sub-Committee which in turn reports issues to the University’s Quality Management Sub-Committee (QMSC) and Academic Development Committee (ADC).

 

External examiners are appointed to oversee and advise on the assessment of the programme. They ensure that the standards of the programme are comparable with those of similar programmes elsewhere in the UK and are also involved in the assessment process to make sure that it is fair. They are invited to comment on proposed developments to the programme. Their reports are sent to the Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Academic) as well as to the Faculty so that issues of concern can be addressed.

 

All programmes are reviewed by the University on a six-yearly cycle to identify good practice and areas for enhancement. Programmes are revalidated through this review process. These reviews include at least one academic specialist in the subject area concerned from another UK university. The University is subject to external review by the Quality Assurance Agency for Higher Education on a six-year cycle. Their review reports for Sunderland can be found here.

 

Further information about our quality processes can be found here.

 

Please also complete the SITS form.

 

Appendix 1

 

PART B   -  Programme  Regulation/s

 

Name of programme: English

Title of final award: BA with Honours

Interim awards[1]: Certificate in English; Diploma in English; Ordinary degree in English.

 

Stage 1: Common core

 

Core modules

 

Title

Code

Core / optional

Credit

Order from Chaos: Narrative and Poetry for the 21st Century

ELL141

Core

20

Stages and Pages: Drama and Criticism for the 21st Century

ELL142

Core

20

The Writer’s Journey: Monomyth

CWR101

Core

20

The Writer’s Craft: Developing your Skills

CWR102

Core

20

Language in the 21st Century

LAC101

Core

20

Describing Modern English

LAC102

Core

20

 

Optional Modules

There are no optional modules at Stage 1

 

Progression Regulations: University Regulations Apply


Stage Two: English Language Pathway

 

Two cores

 

LAC202: Contemporary Sociolinguistics (20 credits)

LAC203: Language and Education (20 credits)

 

At least 40 credits from these English language and literature pathway designated modules

 

LAC201: Language and Childhood (20 credits)

LAC204: Language and the Media (20 credits)

LAC271: Language and Power (20 credits)

LAC281: Language, Literature and Computers (20 credits)

 

The remaining 40 credits can come from any module within the programme offered for stage two including cores, subject to availability (see Appendix 4).

 

Progression Regulations: University Regulations Apply

 

Stage 3: English Language and Literature Pathway

 

One core

 

LAC310: Advanced Study (English Language) (40 credits)

 

Students must achieve 40 credits from the following modules (choices might vary from year to year)

 

ELL344: World Englishes in Fiction (20 credits)

LAC301: Broadcast Talk (20 credits)

LAC302: Language and Gender (20 credits)

LAC305: English in the North East (20 credits)

LAC307: Reading and Writing Children’s Fictions (20 credits)

 

Students must achieve an additional 40 credits from any two other final year modules (see Appendix 4).

 

Progression Regulations: University Regulations Apply

 


Stage Two: English Literature Pathway

 

Two cores

 

ELL241: Questioning Literature: History and Theory (20 credits)

ELL242: Refocusing Literature: Applying Literary Theory to Texts (20 credits)

 

At least 40 credits from these literature pathway designated modules

 

ELL63: Exploring the City and the World in Eighteenth-Century Literature (20 credits)

ELL261: Romanticism (20 credits)

ELL262: From Inferno to Paradise: The Renaissance (20 credits)

ELL280: Literature of the Victorian Age (20 credits)

 

An additional 40 credits

 

The remaining 40 credits can come from any module within the programme offered for stage two including cores, subject to availability (see Appendix 4).

 

Progression Regulations: University Regulations Apply

 

Stage 3: English Literature Pathway

 

One core

 

ELL370: Advanced Study (English Literature) (40 credits)

 

Students must achieve 40 credits from the following modules (choices might vary from year to year)

 

ELL329: Women’s Autobiography (20 credits)

ELL344: World Englishes in Fiction (20 credits)

ELL360: What’s New in American Fiction?: The Art of the US Short Story, 1948-2010 (20 credits)

ELL361: In Our Times: Contemporary British and Irish Novels (20 credits)

ELL365: The Troubles: 100 Years of Irish Poetry 1916-2016 (20 credits)

ELL385: Modern Fiction: Gender, Sexuality and Experimentation (20 credits)

ELL390: Chaucer’s Genres: The Canterbury Tales (20 credits)

ELL391: Monsters, Madness and Murder: Gothic Literature (20 credits)

ELL392: ‘The Play’s the Thing’: Shakespeare’s Dramatic Genres (20 credits)

 

Students must achieve an additional 40 credits from any two other final year modules (see Appendix 4).

 

Progression Regulations: University Regulations Apply

 


Stage Two: Creative Writing Pathway

 

Two cores

 

CWR201: Creative Writing and Critical Thinking (20 credits)

CWR202: The Healing Pen: Creative Writing for Therapeutic Purposes (20 credits)

 

At least 40 credits from these creative writing pathway designated modules

 

CWR203: Explorations in Prose Fiction (20 credits)

CWR204: Writing for Stage (20 credits)

CWR205: Performance, Poetry and Song (20 credits)

CWR206: How to Write like Tolkien: Archetypal Literature from Homer to Harry Potter (20 credits)

 

At least 20 credits from these creative writing pathway designated modules

 

ELL261: Romanticism: Literature in the Age of Revolution (20 credits)

ELL262: Literature from the Inferno to Paradise: The Renaissance (20 credits)

 

Any remaining credits can come from any module within the programme offered for stage two including cores, subject to availability (see Appendix 4).

 

Progression Regulations: University Regulations Apply

Stage 3: Creative Writing Pathway

 

One core

 

CWR301: Advanced Study (Creative Writing) (40 credits)

 

Students must achieve at least 40 credits from the following modules (choices might vary from year to year)

 

CWR302: Spectral Visions Press: Creative Writing and Professional Practice

CWR303: Genre Fiction

CWR304: Writing the Novel

 

Any additional credits

 

Students must achieve any additional credits from any two other final year modules (see Appendix 4).

 

Progression Regulations: University Regulations Apply

 

 

 

 


Appendix 2

Matrix of modes of teaching, learning and assessment

The programme learning outcomes for BA (Hons) English are derived from the learning outcomes of its core modules. The teaching, learning and assessment of the outcomes are mapped for each stage of the programme below. All modules on the degree use a mix of lectures, seminars, and independent study as modes of teaching and learning. At Stages 2 and 3 the pathways are treated separately. (S = Skills; K = Knowledge.)

 

Stage 1 (All pathways)

 

Module

Code

Core / optional

Modes of T&L

Modes of Assessment

S1

S2

S3

S4

S5

S6

K1

K2

K3

K4

K5

K6

K7

K8

K9

K10

Order from Chaos: Narrative and Poetry

ELL141

Core

Lectures, seminars, independent study

Essay (45%); Essay (45%); Attendance/participation (10%)

TDA

TDA

TDA

 

 

 

TDA

TDA

TDA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stages and Pages: Drama and Criticism

ELL142

Core

Lectures, seminars, independent study

Group presentation (30%); Essay (60%); Attendance/participation (10%)

TDA

TDA

TDA

 

 

 

TDA

TDA

TDA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Writer’s Journey: Monomyth

CWR101

Core

Lectures, seminars, independent study

Short story (50%); Presentation of mapping grid (50%)

TDA

TDA

 

 

TDA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TDA

 

 

 

The Writer’s Craft: Developing your Skills

CWR102

Core

Lectures, seminars, independent study

Original writing (70%); Commentary (30%)

 

 

 

 

 

TDA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TDA

TDA

 

Language in the 21st Century

LAC101

Core

Lectures, seminars, independent study

Test (30%); Essay (70%)

TDA

TDA

 

TDA

 

 

 

 

 

TDA

TDA

T

 

 

 

 

Describing Modern English

LAC102

Core

Lectures, seminars, independent study

Test (30%); Essay (70%)

TDA

TDA

 

TDA

 

 

 

 

 

TD

TD

TDA

 

 

 

 

 

Stage 2 (English Language pathway)

 

Module

Code

Core / optional

Modes of T&L

Modes of Assessment

S7

S8

S9

S10

S11

K10

K11

K12

K13

Language and Childhood

LAC201

Optional

Lectures, seminars, independent study

Test (30%); Essay (70%)

 

TDA

TDA

 

 

TDA

 

 

TDA

Contemporary Sociolinguistics

 

LAC202

Pathway core

Lectures, seminars, independent study

Essay (50%); Essay (50%)

 

TDA

TDA

TD

TDA

 

D

TD

 

Language and Education

LAC203

Pathway core

Lectures, seminars, independent study

Test (30%); Project (70%)

TDA

TDA

TDA

TD

TDA

TDA

TDA

TDA

TDA

Language and the Media

LAC204

Optional

Lectures, seminars, independent study

Essay (50%); Essay (50%)

 

TDA

TDA

 

 

 

 

TDA

TDA

Language and Power

LAC271

Optional

Lectures, seminars, independent study

Textual analysis (33%); Project (67%)

 

TDA

TDA

 

TDA

 

TDA

TDA

TDA

Language, Literature and Computers

LAC281

Optional

Lectures, seminars, practical workshops, independent study

Test (25%); Project (75%)

 

TDA

TDA

TD

TDA

 

TD

TD

TDA

Writing Works

LAC282

Optional

Lectures, seminars, practical workshops, independent study

Essay (25%); Report (50%); Written assignment (25%)

 

 

TDA

TDA

 

 

 

 

 

TDA

Stage 3 (English Language pathway)

 

Module

Code

Core / optional

Modes of T&L

Modes of Assessment

S12

S13

S14

K14

K15

Broadcast Talk

LAC301

Optional

Lectures, seminars, independent study

Essay (30%); Essay (70%)

TDA

TDA

TD

TDA

TD

Language and Gender

LAC302

Optional

Lectures, seminars, independent study

Essay (20%); Essay (80%)

TDA

TDA

TD

TDA

TD

English in the North East

LAC305

Optional

Lectures, seminars, independent study

Essay (30%); Essay (70%)

TDA

TDA

TD

TDA

TD

Reading and Writing Children’s Fictions

LAC307

Optional

Lectures, seminars, independent study

Essay (30%); Essay (70%)

TDA

TDA

TD

TDA

TD

Advanced Study (Language)

LAC310

Pathway core

Lectures, seminars, independent study

Presentation and poster proposal (20%); Written project (80%)

TDA

TDA

TDA

TDA

TDA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stage 2 (English Literature pathway)

 

Module

Code

Core / optional

Modes of T&L

Modes of Assessment

S7

S8

S9

K10

K11

K12

K13

Reading and Writing the Short Story

ELL232

Pathway option

 

Essay (50%); Piece of Creative Writing (40%);

Critical commentary (10%)

TDA

TDA

 

TDA

TDA

TDA

TDA

Questioning Literature

ELL241

Pathway core

Lectures, seminars, independent study

Multiple choice test (25%); Attendance/ participation (10%); Essay (65%)

TDA

TDA

TDA

TDA

TDA

TDA

TD

Refocusing Literature

ELL242

Pathway core

Lectures, seminars, independent study

Essay (50%);

Continuous assessment and debate (50%)

TDA

TDA

TDA

TDA

 

TDA

TDA

X-Raying Narrative Fiction

ELL255

Pathway option

 

Portfolio of exercises (60%); MCQ Test (30%); Seminar contribution (10%)

TDA

 

TDA

 

 

TDA

 

The Writing of American Freedom and Slavery

ELL260

Pathway option

 

Essay (70%); Presentation (30%)

TDA

TDA

 

 

TDA

TDA

 

Romanticism

ELL261

Designated option

 

Essay (45%); Essay (45%); Attendance/participation (10%)

TDA

TDA

TDA

TDA

TDA

TDA

TDA

Literature from the Inferno to Paradise: The Renaissance

ELL262

Designated option

 

Revision Portfolio (30%), Exam (70%)

 

TDA

TDA

 

TDA

TDA

 

 

Exploring the City and the World in 18thCentury Literature

ELL263

Designated option

 

Essay (50%), Essay (50%)

TDA

TDA

 

TDA

TDA

TDA

TDA

Under the Red, White and Blue American Literature, 1920-2020

ELL264

Pathway option

 

Presentation (50%); Test (40%); Seminar contribution (10%)

TDA

TDA

TDA

TDA

TDA

TDA

 

Genres of Poetry

ELL279

Pathway option

 

Essay and poem (50%); Essay (50%)

TDA

TDA

 

TDA

TDA

TDA

TDA

Literature of the Victorian Age

ELL280

Designated option

 

Essay (50%); Essay (50%)

TDA

TDA

 

TDA

TDA

TDA

TDA

 

Stage 3 (English Literature pathway)

 

Module

Code

Core / optional

Modes of T&L

Modes of Assessment

S10

S11

S12

K14

K15

Women’s Autobiography

ELL329

Designated option

 

Presentation (30%); Essay (70%)

TDA

TDA

 

TDA

TDA

Representations of Totalitarianism and the Holocaust

ELL343

Designated option

 

Essay (70%); Presentation (30%)

TDA

TDA

 

TDA

TDA

World Englishes in Fiction

ELL344

Designated option

 

Essay (50%); Essay (50%)

TDA

TDA

 

TDA

TDA

The Art of the US Story 1960-2016

ELL360

Designated option

 

Essay (70%); Presentation (30%)

TDA

TDA

 

TDA

TDA

In Our Times: Contemporary British and Irish Novels.

ELL361

Pathway option

 

Formative essay (20%);

Summative essay (70%);

Seminar contribution (10%)

TDA

TDA

 

TDA

TDA

Troubles: 100 Years of Irish Poetry 1916-2016

 

ELL365

Pathway option

 

Essay (70%); Presentation (30%)

TDA

TDA

 

TDA

TDA

Advanced Study (Literature)

ELL370

Pathway core

Lectures, seminars, independent study

Presentation and poster proposal (20%); Written project (80%)

TDA

TDA

TDA

TDA

TDA

Stage 2 (Creative Writing pathway)

 

Module

Code

Core / optional

Modes of T&L

Modes of Assessment

S7

S8

S9

S10

S11

K10

K11

K12

K13

K14

Creative Writing and Critical Thinking

CWR201

Pathway core

Lectures, workshops, independent study

Prose and commentary (50%); Portfolio of debate presentation

TDA

TDA

TDA

 

 

TDA

TDA

TDA

 

 

Creative Writing and Therapy

CWR202

Pathway core

Lectures, workshops, independent study

Reflective journal (50%); Creative Writing workshop (50%)

 

 

TDA

TDA

TDA

 

 

 

TDA

TDA

Explorations in Prose Fiction

CWR203

Designated credit module for Creative Writing pathway

Lectures, workshops, independent study

In-class reflection (25%); Prose piece and commentary (75%)

TDA

TDA

TDA

TDA

 

TDA

TDA

TDA

TDA

TDA

Writing for Stage

CWR204

Designated credit module for language pathway

Lectures, workshops, independent study

Pitch and extract (40%); Writing sample and reflection (60%)

TDA

TDA

TDA

TDA

 

TDA

TDA

TDA

TDA

TDA

Performance, Poetry and Song

CWR205

Designated credit module for Creative Writing pathway

Lectures, workshops, independent study

Poetry: Free verse and form (50%); Performance piece or poem (50%)

TDA

TDA

TDA

TDA

 

TDA

TDA

TDA

TDA

TDA

How to Write like Tolkien: Reading and Writing Mythic Literature

CWR206

Designated credit module for Creative Writing pathway

Lectures, workshops, independent study

Short story (50%); Analysis of short story (50%)

TDA

TDA

TDA

TDA

 

TDA

TDA

TDA

TDA

TDA

 


Stage 3 (Creative Writing pathway)

 

Module

Code

Core / optional

Modes of T&L

Modes of Assessment

S12

S13

K15

K16

Advanced Study (Creative Writing)

CWR301

Pathway core

Workshops, Group and individual tutorials, independent study

Project (100%)

TDA

TDA

TDA

TDA

Creative Writing and Publishing

CWR302

Designated credit module for Creative Writing pathway

Lectures, workshops, independent study

Letter of Application and CV (25%); Creative Writing (40%);

Reflective journal (35%)

TDA

TDA

TDA

TDA

Genre Fiction

CWR303

Designated credit module for Creative Writing pathway

Lectures, workshops, independent study

Short story (50%); Analysis of short story (50%)

TDA

TDA

TDA

TDA

Writing the Novel

CWR304

Designated credit module for Creative Writing pathway

Lectures, workshops, independent study

Presentation (20%); Submissions packet (20%)

TDA

TDA

TDA

TDA

 

 


 

 

SITS SUMMARY PROGRAMME/SHORT COURSE DETAILS

(Form to be completed electronically by the Faculty and forwarded to the Quality Assurance and Enhancement (QAE) Quality Officer supporting the Approval event, or sent to Management Information and Systems Development (MISD) for faculty devolved processes before sending to QAE)

PROGRAMME/SUBJECT/SHORT COURSE DETAILS

 

Exit Award: Title of programme/award

BA Hons English

If replacement for existing, specify title of old

BA Hons English

BA Hons English Language and Literature

BA Hons English and Creative Writing

Faculty(ies):

FES

School:

Culture

SITS Programme/Short Course code[2]

 

Programme Studies Board[3]

English

UCAS code[4] (if applicable).  If other please state method.

Q300

JACS code[5]

 

Qualification Level / Qualification Aim

 

 

Modes of delivery and duration:

 

(delete yes/no as necessary)

Full time       yes/ 3 years

Sandwich     no 

Part time      yes 5 years

Work Based Learning  no

On-campus  yes

Off-campus  no 

CSP Only. Other subject combinations not allowed with this subject:

 

Programme Leader:

Dr Barry Lewis

Date of Approval Event

7th June 2017

Date of next review (QAE to complete)

 

Start date of programme/Short Course

September 2017

Number of intakes per annum and likely month(s) intake(s) starts.

1

FUNDING DETAILS

 

Confirm funding arrangements for programme e.g. HEFCE/TDA/NHS/Other[6]

Student fees

If it is TDA, is it primary/secondary/F.E./Other (please state)

 

Is the programme Open or Closed[7]:

Open

ACCREDITING BODY

No

 

PROGRAMME SPECIFIC REGULATIONS

Are there to be programme specific regulations?

The Programme has adopted REG 3.5

 

COLLABORATIVE:

Please complete details

UK                     no

 

Overseas           no

Institution                                      Collaborative model[8]         Funding arrangements[9]

Interim award title

Credits required

Interim structure

Please show mandatory requirements if applicable e.g. core module codes

Certificate of Higher Education

120

All Stage 1 core modules

 

 

Diploma of Higher Education

240

120 of these credits must be achieved at Stage 2. The credits earned must include the core modules for Stage 1 and also both cores from the student’s pathway at Stage 2.

 

Ordinary BA in English

 

300

Students must earn 300 credits.180 of these credits must be at Stages 2 and 3. Of these 180 credits, 60 must be at Stage 3. The credits for Stages 1 and 2 are stipulated above. The 60 credits required at Stage 3 will be derived from the range of modules available at that level. Students may elect to receive the Ordinary Degree, or to continue studying for the BA (Hons).

 

 

DETAILS SUPPLIED BY:Michael Pearce, David Fallon, Colin Younger   DATE:   8th May 2017


Appendix 4 Module List

 

Stage One

Award, Route (if applicable) and Level

New/Existing/ Modified  Module (N/E/MM)

Module Title

Module Code

Module Credit Value

Whether core or option

Must choose (ie designated option):

Assessment weighting – give % weight for each assessment item

Pre-/co-requisites

Module leader

Other comment (if required)

Date of Entry on SITS.

N/MM only

(After event)

JACS Code

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stage 1

N

Order from Chaos: Narrative and Poetry for the 21st Century

ELL141

20

Core

 

Essay (50%); Essay (50%)

 

D. Fallon

 

 

Q320

Stage 1

N

Stages and Pages: Drama and Criticism for the 21st Century

ELL142

20

Core

 

Group presentation (30%); Essay (70%);

 

P. Dempsey

 

 

Q320

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stage 1

N

Language in the 21st Century

LAC101

20

Core

 

Test (30%); Essay (70%)

 

M. Pearce

 

 

Q310

Stage 1

N

Describing Modern English

LAC102

20

Core

 

Test (30%); Essay (70%)

 

M. Pearce

 

 

Q310

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stage 1

N

The Writer’s Journey

CWR101

20

Core

 

Short story (50%); Presentation of mapping grid (50%)

 

C. Younger

 

 

Q390

Stage 1

N

The Writer’s Craft

CWR102

20

Core

 

Original writing (70%); Commentary (30%)

 

C. Younger

 

 

Q390

 

 

 

Stage Two

Award, Route (if applicable) and Level

New/Existing/ Modified  Module (N/E/MM)

Module Title

Module Code

Module Credit Value

Whether core or option

Must choose (ie designated option):

Assessment weighting – give % weight for each assessment item

Pre-/co-requisites

Module leader

Other comment (if required)

Date of Entry on SITS.

N/MM only

(After event)

JACS Code

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stage 2

N

Questioning Literature: History and Theory

ELL241

20

Core for literature pathway

 

Multiple choice test (50%); Essay (50%)

 

K. Kerr-Koch

 

 

Q320

Stage 2

N

Refocusing Literature: Introduction to Literary Theory and Criticism

ELL242

20

Core for literature pathway

 

Essay (50%);

Preparation for debate and debate (50%)

 

K. Kerr-Koch

 

 

Q320

Stage 2

E

X-Raying the Short Story

ELL255

20

Option for all pathways

 

Portfolio of exercises (60%); MCQ Test (40%);

 

B. Lewis

 

 

Q320

Stage 2

N

The Writing of American Freedom and Slavery

ELL260

20

Option for all pathways

 

Essay (70%); Presentation (30%)

 

P. Dempsey

 

 

Q300

Stage 2

N

Romanticism: Literature in the Age of Revolution

ELL261

20

 

Designated credit module for literature and creative writing pathways

Essay (50%); Essay (50%)

 

K. Kerr-Koch

 

 

Q320

Stage 2

N

Literature from the Inferno to Paradise: The Renaissance

ELL262

20

 

Designated credit module for literature and creative writing pathways

Revision Portfolio (30%), Exam (70%)

 

 

A. Younger

 

 

Q320

Stage 2

N

Exploring the City and the World in Eighteenth Century Literature

ELL263

20

 

Designated credit module for literature and creative writing pathways

Essay (50%), Essay (50%)

 

D. Fallon

 

 

Q320

Stage 2

N

Under the Red, White and Blue: American Literature, 1920-2020

ELL264

20

Option for all pathways

 

Presentation (50%); Test (50%)

 

B. Lewis

 

 

Q320

Stage 2

N

Genres of Poetry: Lyric, Narrative, Dramatic

ELL279

20

Option for all pathways

 

Essay and poem (50%); Essay (50%)

 

G. Nash

 

 

Q300

Stage 2

N

Literature of the Victorian Age

ELL280

20

 

Designated credit module for literature pathway

Essay (50%); Essay (50%)

 

G. Nash

 

 

Q320

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stage 2

N

Language and Childhood

LAC201

20

 

Designated credit module for language pathway

Test (30%); Essay (70%)

 

M. Pearce

 

 

Q110

Stage 2

N

Contemporary Sociolinguistics

LAC202

20

Core for language pathway

 

Test (30%); Project (70%)

 

M. Pearce

 

 

Q140

Stage 2

N