Attachments

 

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Faculty of Education & Society

 

Department of Education

 

 

 

BA Education Studies

 

PROGRAMME SPECIFICATION

 

2019-20

 

Date of Validation Event:

12th December 2014

Date Approved by QMSC:

 

 

 

 

 

 


Version History

 

Please complete each time a new version is drafted e.g.

 

Version

Occasion of Change

Change Author

Last Modified

1.0

Version presented for Faculty approval

Kate Duffy

07/11/14

2.0

Version presented for University approval

 

Kate Duffy

20/11/14

3.0

Updated following Validation event

Kate Duffy

14/01/15

4.0

Programme regulations added

Kate Duffy

09/04/15

5.0

Assessment weightings amended for EDU105, EDU202, EDU301

Kate Duffy

16/02/16

6.0

Amended assessment tasks for EDU201;301;303;305;306

Kate Duffy

Nov 2017

7.0

Amended assessment tasks to Edu307 and EDU103

Kate Duffy

June 2018

8.0

New modules to replace 10 credit mods (EDU106/7; EDU205/6 – replaced by EDU108;EDU207)

 

Kate Duffy

May 2019

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Quality Handbook

 

 

AQH-B2-3a Transitional Undergraduate Programme Specification Template

February 2014

 

SECTION A: CORE INFORMATION

 

  1. Name  of programme

Education Studies

 

  1. Award title (eg BA Honours)

BA Honours

 

  1. Programme linkage

Is this part of group of linked programmes between which students can transfer at agreed points? (eg a version with / without a placement year, a group of programmes with a common first year etc)

 

 

 

 

  1. Is the programme a top-up only?

 

 

 

 

  1. Does the programme have a Foundation Year (level 3) associated with it so that students enter for a four-year programme and progress directly from the Foundation Year to Stage 1 without having to re-apply? (ie an ‘Extended Studies’ programme)

 

 

 

  1. Level of award (eg Level 6 for BA/BSc)

 

 

 

  1. Awarding body: University of Sunderland

 

  1. Which department is it in?

Education

 

  1. Programme Studies Board?

Secondary and Education Studies

 

  1. Programme Leader

Kate Duffy

 

  1. How and where can I study the programme?

 

At Sunderland:

          

Full-time on campus

          

Part-time on campus

          

As work-based learning full-time

 

As work-based learning part-time

 

As a full-time sandwich course

 

As a part-time sandwich course

 

By distance learning

 

 

  1. How long does the programme take?

 

 

Min number of years

Max number of years

Full-time

3

9

Part-time

5

9

 

Distance learning

 

 

Work-based learning

 

 

 

For start-dates please see the current edition of the Prospectus or contact the relevant department at the University. For start-dates for programmes delivered in a partner college, please contact the college.

 

SECTION B – FURTHER CORE INFORMATION 

 

Use Outline Programme Proposal Form for ADC (AQH-B2-2), for questions 13 to 25

 

  1. Learning and teaching strategy. 

The programme’s design and delivery has been informed by the framework set out in the University of Sunderland, Student Success Strategy 2017-2021in addition to the QAA Benchmark criteria for Education Studies (2007/2014). Both have helped form the basis for setting out the values and principles underpinning the programme.

 

Teaching

Teaching methods and approaches are informed by enquiry and collaboration and aim to build students confidence to ensure they are able to act confidently and be able to rationalise, for example, pedagogical decision making in responsible roles in education and related sectors. Pedagogical approaches will foster effective relationships between academics and students through ongoing dialogue about student learning, engagement and progression (Student Success Strategy  2017).

Teaching methods will vary to enable students to take risks in their learning and provide scaffolding to enable them to become more independent and self-reliant through the use of problem solving activities and educational dilemmas. For example, at stage one, students are supported towards gaining a deeper understanding of their past and current experiences of education through systematic reflective and observational techniques. At stage two, students are encouraged to evaluate other’s experiences of education and recognise, during a placement, the impact of their role as an educator, upon the experiences of others. At stage three students are able to enquire more deeply into their practice as educators through primary research and advanced pedagogical practice. Progression planned in this way will help students to fully understand the complexity of situations and make informed judgements about them. Module and programme feedback from students on the Combined Education Studies programme in 2013/14, requested more guest speakers and visits from and to educational establishments and professions. The programme will aim to draw on the research, practice and disciplines from academics across all Faculties, such as Sociology, Psychology and Sport. Visits to educational establishments such as cultural venues, colleges and schools will form part of relevant modules.

 

Learning

Students are encouraged, from stage one, to become active, independent and reflective learners. This is reflected explicitly in the teaching activities as well as the assessment tasks as students are expected to regularly show that they can work as part of effective teams as well on their own. However, independent learning is not seen as solitary but as an essentially dialogic process. Students must demonstrate that they can design and plan their own learning and this is likely to include asking for advice from appropriate persons, and being able to view sources and resources critically.  This is of particular importance with the increase in information available through internet sources.  The programme aims to enhance student’s use of learning technologies by utilising the University’s Virtual Learning Environment (VLE), Canvas, primarily as a means to differentiate and extend learning. Additional literature and activities are uploaded to the site based around teaching sessions and are presented as a way of encouraging students to think further about the concepts and ideas introduced or developed in class.  The communication tools are used (email, announcements, discussion groups) to extend student’s knowledge by promoting invites to university wide research seminars, specifically from FES Research Institute and to keep in contact with module leaders and tutors with updates and changes generally. Turnitin is predominantly used for all summative assessment; however it is also used for the submission of draft work in stage one, semester one, in order to allow students to gain valuable formative feedback on early module work. Discussion boards are encouraged for students and staff to discuss concepts and topics outside of the seminars. Announcements and email are used to communicate any additional curricular context such as the research seminars and philosophy clubs. Twitter link from the Programme Leader is also connected to the Canvas site so students can be alerted to recent documents and thinking around the discipline of education.

 

Assessment

There is an understanding that teaching, learning and assessment are closely interrelated, and students are encouraged to see this relationship. Each module and stage will explicitly integrate the assessment tasks into the learning process. This will be done through the use of formative assessment opportunities during modules and using summative assessments to challenge, encourage and support students in taking more responsibility for their own learning and progression.  Students will experience a range of methods of assessments, such as, project design; academic posters and leaflets that allow them to demonstrate their talents and their full range of knowledge and understanding of issues in education and related fields. Assessment tasks will incorporate the use of creative technologies such as movie making and online resource design and experiential learning situations, such as group work, presentations and work experience, as well as traditional methods expected in a humanities degree programme such as essays and reports. Employers expect educationalists to be good communicators, be able to be innovative and creative in their approaches to meeting the needs of others and these skills are reflected in the assessment tasks across all the stages.

 

Student support, engagement and feedback

The Faculty recognises that students often need most additional support and guidance in their first year of study at level four. They often need guided formative assessment and feedback on early assessments and directive support with writing, thinking and reading at this level. This programme utilises scheduled academic tutorials as part of each module in order to help build confidence or to stretch and challenge stronger students on an individual basis. If students have referred work they are supported to complete this in the required time to keep them on track. Personal tutoring is seen as an integral part of the academic process and supports learning and development. There are several opportunities for students to have access both academic and pastoral support and they will be invited to a tutorial twice yearly. The programme team will be allocated a small cohort of students at stage one that will continue through to the final stage.

 

Academic practice, development and support

The programme leader has sought feedback, guidance and input from the Faculty staff member for Learning and Teaching with regards to the structure and underpinning principles of this programme with the view that it demonstrates good practice in these areas. Teaching, learning and assessment strategies aim to support students to achieve their maximum potential and tailored support will assist students in raising their assessments towards  2:1 and 1st classifications. Strategies such as ‘writing workshops’ where a focus is placed upon activities with smaller groups of students to work with each other and the module tutor or programme leader, to develop drafts of their work and highlight areas to improve.

 

  1. Retention strategy 

Teaching is primarily through seminars and small group tutorials and this gives the academics the opportunity to get to know the students individually. Students are made aware that their contributions are an essential part of the programme and they are valued highly as such. Students are expected to be active participants in the teaching and learning process and this enables academics and students to build effective relationships. Academics use this information to improve student’s engagement on the programme by adapting teaching and learning methods and content in the curriculum to meet individual need. Academics are both personal and academic tutors for students and this holistic approach is seen as being most effective towards retaining students on the programme. Having a holistic understanding about the students and their motivations enables academics to identify students that may be at risk of either dropping out of the programme or not attaining to their full potential.

 

The Faculty of Education and Society systematically monitors attendance and this is subsequently monitored by the academics to identify students in need of additional support either from faculty staff or by other departments such as Health and Wellbeing, study support.

 

  1. Any other informationPlease add anything you think may be useful to the approval panel.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SECTION C - TEACHING AND LEARNING

 

  1. What is the programme about?

The programme explores education in its broadest sense and recognises its importance towards human development and maintaining a liberal society. It aims to produce graduates who have a critical understanding of the principles of education and its systems and structures. Graduates of the programme are capable of analysing and appraising educational policy and practice across a range of contexts and phases. Although the primary career aim is likely to be teaching, the programme offers a solid base for a wide range of educationally related fields both in the public, private and third sector, such as informal and vocational learning, care, training, professional development, curriculum development. As a humanities programme, students will critically explore all phases of education from a wide range of perspectives such as historical, economical, philosophical, sociological and psychological.

 

  1. What will I know or be able to do at each Stage of the programme?

 

Learning Outcomes Stage 1 – Skills  

By the end of this Stage of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

 

S1. Present, evaluate and interpret both quantitative and qualitative data and make sound judgements about education from this.

S2. Communicate the results of their scholarly enquiry into education, reliably and accurately using structured and coherent arguments.

S3. Reflect on their own and others' value systems.

 

Learning Outcomes Stage 1 – Knowledge

By the end of this Stage of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

 

K1. Recognise the educational processes and the cultural, political, psychological, philosophical and historical contexts within which they are embedded.

K2. Explain the underlying concepts and principles across all phases of education in context.

K3. Identify contemporary issues across all phases of education.

K4.Evaluate the processes of teaching, learning and human development and how different perspectives impact upon educational practices.

 

Learning Outcomes Stage 2 – Skills

By the end of this Stage of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

 

S4. Apply underlying contexts and principles, such as theories of teaching and learning in a practical education-related context.

S5. Demonstrate the use of appropriate methods of enquiry in educational research and critically analyse those results.

S6. Effectively communicate information, arguments and analysis of sociological, philosophical and historical perspectives.

S7. Deploy appropriate techniques of teaching and learning in educationally related contexts and use a range of evidence to formulate appropriate methods of educational practice.

S8. Use their knowledge and understanding critically to locate and justify a personal position in relation to the subject.

S9. Articulate their own approaches to learning and organise effective work and work with others.

 

Learning Outcomes Stage 2 – Knowledge

By the end of this Stage of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

 

K5. Evaluate the cultural, societal, historical and technological implications for a wide range of learning contexts.

K6. Evaluate the appropriateness of approaches in education across a wider variety of contexts in education.

K7. Understand the diversity of learners and the complexities of the education process and human development. 

K8. Understand the underpinning values or organisational structures and purposes of educational systems, and the possible implications for learners and the learning process. 

 

Learning Outcomes Stage 3 – Skills

By the end of this Stage of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

 

S10. Deploy accurately established techniques of analysis and enquiry into education educational issues.

S11. Communicate information and ideas, problems and solutions, to both specialist and non-specialist audiences.

S12. Critically evaluate arguments, assumptions and abstract data to make judgments about the ethical issues surrounding education.

S13. Manage their own learning and to effectively use scholarly review and primary sources related to educational issues.

S14. Identify and reflect on potential connections and discontinuities between each of the aspects of subject knowledge and their application in educational policies and contexts.

 

Learning Outcomes Stage 3 – Knowledge

By the end of this Stage of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

 

K9. Systematically develop and sustain arguments demonstrating an understanding of the complex principles of education psychology, philosophy, sociology and policy.

K10. Describe and comment upon aspects of research into education and identify ambiguity and uncertainty related to that knowledge.

K11 Apply methods and techniques they have learned to extend their learning and to carry out self- directed projects such as a comparative study and an independent dissertation.

K12. Analyse the complexity of the interaction between learning and local and global contexts.

K13.Critically evaluate the complex interactions between stakeholders and participants in educational contexts, subjects and other professions.

 

Learning Outcomes – Ordinary degree

If you are awarded an Ordinary degree you will have achieved the majority of the learning outcomes for the programme studied. However you will have gained fewer credits at Stage 3 than students awarded an Honours degree, your knowledge will typically be less broad and you will typically be less proficient in higher-level skills such as independent learning.

 

  1. What will the programme consist of?

Each undergraduate programme consists of a number of Stages from a minimum of 1 to a maximum of 4, each of which is equivalent to a year’s full-time study. The summary below describes briefly what is contained in each Stage. Most programmes have a mixture of core (ie compulsory) modules and optional ones, often with increasing choice as you move through the programme and gain in experience. In some programmes the choice of optional modules gives you particular ‘routes’ through the programme. The programme structure including a detailed list of modules can be found in the programme regulations.

 

Stage 1

At stage one, students will have demonstrated that they have grasped the underlying aims and key concepts of educational theory, practice and policy. They will have an informed awareness of the historical developments of education and how they have influenced the systems we have today. This understanding enables students to analyse current issues in education and understanding the inequalities that can arise. Students will also understand the key theories of how people learn throughout their life.

 

Stage 2

Students will have demonstrated that they can apply the theories and concepts from stage one in practical contexts and situations. They will further develop their communication skills as educationalists and be able to reflect, with increasing criticality, upon experience and practice in educational contexts.  They will also begin to recognise the importance of addressing individual needs and identify those in society who are potentially disadvantaged. A placement in a suitable educational context will help to consolidate this learning. Students are encouraged to be creative and innovative in their response to other’s needs within these educational contexts as well as in their academic work.

 

Stage 3

Students will have demonstrated that they can work independently as well as in groups to enquire about and question their own and other’s values and assumptions in education. Students will be encouraged to explore education from a global perspective and critically evaluate judgements made towards the ‘goods’ of education such as the distinction between the outcomes of schooling as opposed to the aims for an educated society. Students will appreciate that these judgements are underpinned by complex ideologies and approaches. Students will understand how education and learning is managed and led in the particular context at a micro and macro level. There will be more opportunity for students to choose optional modules to tailor their learning towards their future career aspiration.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Overview of the programme

Single honours: Full Time

Stage One – ALL CORE (120 credits)

Semester One

Semester two

EDU101: The History and Aims of Education (20 credits)

EDU102: Contemporary Issues in Education (20 credits)

EDU103: Understanding Experiences of Education (20 credits)

EDU104: Theories of Learning, Teaching and Assessment (20 credits)

 

EDU105: Socio Cultural Issues in Education (20 credits)

EDU108: Developing Personal Skills in English and Mathematics (20 Credits)

Stage two – 120 credits ALL CORE (120 Credits)

EDU 201: Approaches to Meeting Special Educational Needs (20 credits)

EDU202: Philosophy and Education  (20 credits)

EDU203: Developing Creative Solutions  (20 credits)  (semester 3 module)

LLS221: Students as Tutors (20 credits) (existing LLS Module)

EDU207: English and Mathematics in Society

EDU204: Research in Education (20 credits)

Stage three – (100 credits CORE, 20 credits Optional *- 120 credits)

EDU307:  Dissertation (40 Credits - CORE)

EDU301: Comparative Education and the Global Citizen (20 credits - CORE)

EDU302: Ethics and Education (20 credits - CORE)

Choose one of the following modules

EDU303: Leading and Managing in Education (20 credits - CORE)

 

EDU306: Advancing subject knowledge and pedagogy (Mathematics) (20 credits) *

EDU305: Advancing subject knowledge and pedagogy (English) (20 credits) *

EDU308: Learning in the 21st century (20 credits)*

LLS320* Advanced Independent Study in HE

 

 

 

 

 

Single honours: (Part Time option, entering at stage 2)

The programme is also aimed at students who are already working in education or related employment (for example, vocational teachers and trainers within further and secondary education or the employment training sector). These students are likely to have completed an ‘in-service’ Certificate in Education (post compulsory education) or equivalent, have undertaken regular CPD in their subject and pedagogical practice and have been working in the sector for a minimum of 2 years.

Direct entry to the programme will be at stage 2 with a completed Professional Certificate in Post Compulsory Education and Training (or equivalent), and as part time students they will complete 80 credits per year. Please see attached AQH -14-3 for Type one progression form.

Stage two – ALL CORE (80 Credits)

EDU 201: Approaches to Meeting Special Educational Needs (20 credits)

EDU202: Philosophy and Education  (20 credits)

EDU203: Developing Creative Solutions  (20 credits)  (semester 3 module)

LLS221: Students as Tutors (20 credits) (existing LLS Module)

Stage two/three ALL CORE (80 Credits)

EDU207: English and Mathematics in Society

EDU204: Research in Education (20 credits)

EDU301: Comparative Education and the global citizen (20 credits - CORE)

EDU302: Ethics and Education (20 credits - CORE)

Stage three – (80 credits CORE, 20 credits Optional*)

EDU307:  Dissertation (40 Credits - CORE)

Choose one of the following modules

EDU303: Leading and managing education (20 credits - CORE)

 

EDU306: Advancing subject knowledge and pedagogy (Mathematics) (20 credits) *

EDU305: Advancing subject knowledge and pedagogy (English) (20 credits) *

EDU308: Learning in the 21st century (20 credits)*

LLS320* Advanced Independent Study in HE

 

 

 

  1. How will I be taught?

 

Scheduled teaching activities

          

Independent study

          

Placement

          

 

Teaching approaches focus upon collaboration and enquiry. Students are expected to learn from and with each other and to ask questions of each other supportively through focused dialogue and discussion.  To this end, groups will be small and held mainly in seminar classrooms as opposed to lecture theatres. The types of teaching and learning that the students will experience will enable them to appreciate education as a discipline in its own right and how values and judgements impact upon it.  Students will gain an understanding of what makes a practice educational and that theory is closely linked to, and can inform, practice. At each stage students are encouraged, through teaching and learning activities, to increase their communication and leadership skills. An educator’s role is unique in that it is essential that they employ strategies and approaches that elicit two way communications. To this end, at stage one and three, students are required to plan and facilitate short sessions where they lead the learning with their peers. At stage two, they have the opportunity to practise these skills in more formal education settings with small groups or in one to one situations.

 

A humanities degree is distinctive as it encourages students to be reflective, curious and critical. Applying general theories to specific social contexts, requires students to have the ability to work with complex academic literacies. The academic literacies of critical reading, writing and thinking are developed during each stage of the programme. Students are taught specifically these literacies during their modules and also during individual formative feedback given during the module and prior to final submission of their work. All module summative (final) assessment is used formatively in order to help guide and support individual students to develop and improve their work and to develop their confidence in self assessment. Students are required to understand education through a range of other disciplines such as Psychology, Sociology and Philosophy. These distinctly different modes of thinking require students to read widely and interpret their reading whilst applying it to the discipline of education. To support students in building their confidence in these areas, academics share their interpretations of literature in their lectures and seminars and model critical reading and writing. Some teaching sessions may be directly used for students and academics to read and critique literature, ideas and concepts together.

 

A list of the modules in each Stage of the programme can be found in the Programme Regulations – Appendix 1

 

A summary of the types of teaching, learning and assessment in each module of the programme can be found in the Matrix of Modes of Teaching – Appendix 2

 

  1. How will I be assessed and given feedback? 

Written examinations

 

Coursework

          

Practical assessments

          

 

A summary of the types of teaching, learning and assessment in each module of the programme can be found in the Matrix of Modes of Teaching.

 

The generic assessment criteria which we use can be found here. Some programmes use subject-specific assessment criteria which are based on the generic ones.

 

This programme uses the Generic University Assessment Criteria

YES

 

This programme uses the Subject Specific Assessment Criteria

 

NO

 

The University regulations can be found here.

 

At stage one of the programme, students are encouraged to develop their skills of reflection and use this to reflect upon their experiences of education to date. In semester one, students are developing their understanding of the aims of education in terms of its historical and cultural development over time. Students use this knowledge to interpret their experiences through a variety of presentation, personal autobiographies and collaborative mini research projects coupled with essays that aim to develop their academic thinking, reading and writing for degree level study. In semester two, they are encouraged to apply these new ways of understanding to wider issues and contexts in education and increase their critical thinking and writing skills in annotated bibliographies to support critical essays. In order to prepare students for an educational placement at stage two, students are required to evaluate observations of teaching and learning and deliver their own short teaching session. Students are also required to strengthen their knowledge of numeracy and literacy in preparation for their placement module LLS221: Students as Tutors, in stage two. These skills are developed in the module EDU108: Developing Personal Skills in English and Mathematics at stage one.

 

At stage two, the assessment tasks are more practical in nature and encourage students to increase their confidence to apply and facilitate learning theories in a range of contexts with peers and others. Each module requires the students to critically evaluate the concepts and ideas presented and then apply them in practical way. The aim is to build upon their understanding of their own previous experience, evaluated at stage one and begin to develop their own philosophy of what education means to them for their future careers. Stage two assessment activities encourage students to develop their ability to be innovative and creative and to consider how the impact of their actions as educationalist affects others ability to learn and develop.  At stage three, the assessment tasks increasingly allow students to identify the areas and contexts they would like to explore more deeply. Students are encouraged to undertake projects that demonstrate more complex, collaborative and interpretive work and highlight a capacity for independent work and innovation. The assessment tasks of a dissertation and comparative education report allow students to develop key employment skills of dealing with complex research strategies that would be highly advantageous to any public or private employer in a wide range of situations.  Other assessment activities encourage students to further enhance their understanding of pedagogy and communication skills as well as demonstrating their creativity and innovation skills. Student’s academic skills of thinking, reading, writing and critical analysis will also be further developed in essays that encourage students to apply theories in different contexts and make ethical judgments about the value of that knowledge. 

 

  1. Teaching, learning and assessment matrix – Appendix 2

 

 

 

 

  1. How does research influence the programme? 

Research influences the programme on a number of levels. In the first instance, it is seen as a key element of being an educationalist. At each stage of the programme students are required to undertake research projects that enable students to feel confident that they can create their own knowledge about educational contexts and perspectives. At stage one, EDU103: Understanding Experience of Education, students are required to use reflection as a way of interpreting theirs and other’s experiences of education and position those experiences within historical, cultural and political contexts. They will develop initial skills of collecting and analysing qualitative data that is an essential part of an educationalist’s role. The project is a collaborative one that encourages students to rely upon others in the research process, to work closely as a team, recognising differences in interpretation while developing skills of negotiation. Stage one also encourages the giving and receiving of feedback through peer review in EDU104: Theories of Learning, Teaching and Assessment which is also seen as a significant aspect of the role of the educator. At stage two, in EDU204: Research in Education they build upon their knowledge and application of a variety of research techniques and plan their own research study in order to increase their confidence as sole researchers.  Students will present an academic poster demonstrating the coherence and value of their research into educational issues. The poster will be presented and written in a way that is clear to both specialists and non-specialists in the field. At stage three, students will further increase their self-directed research capacity by undertaking a clearly defined comparative study EDU301: Comparative Education in the form of a report and by producing an independent dissertation EDU307: Dissertation of an educational issue that is relevant to their career aim or interests in the subject.

 

The development of this programme has been informed by current research topics undertaken in the faculty that have informed this programme are around; the globalisation of education, creativity and innovation, moral education and moral dimensions of educational practice and the social aspects of illiteracy and innumeracy, race and special educational need. Students are encouraged to attend and contribute to the research centres in the faculty, such as the FES Research Institute.

 

SECTION D EMPLOYABILITY

 

  1. How will the programme prepare me for employment?

 

The programme gives you the opportunity to develop skills which you can use in the future. Some skills are more specific than others to the subject area, or to a particular type of activity, but all skills can be applied in a range of employment situations, sometimes in quite unexpected ways. The skills which this programme is designed to develop are listed below.

 

The development of graduate skills are developed in the curriculum

 

Thinking Critically and Creatively

This programme is situated within the discipline of the humanities and to this end views the ability to think critically and creatively as an essential part of creating competent democratic citizens. Employers regularly report in the press and other studies such as James and Brookfield (2014) that they value employees who are able to use their imagination, solve problems creatively, reasonably and ethically. The development of students’ critical thinking is evident in every module where students must demonstrate not only that they have presented a rational, reasonable and informed response but also that they significantly consider their response and its affect upon others. This is seen as a key dimension to the role of an educationalist that distinguishes it from other roles in society.

 

The programme is unique in its use of community of philosophical enquiry (EDU202: Philosophy and Education) as a process and pedagogy aimed to develop collaborative and caring ways of thinking critically. This is also supported by developing skills of innovation and design (EDU203: Designing Creative Solutions) that are essential to helping educationalists be reactive and fully responsive to the needs of the people they work with in a variety of contexts. At stage three, students are given the opportunity to develop more advanced understanding of pedagogical knowledge which will enhance their ability to apply for employment or further study in educational fields. They will be able to develop skills of entrepreneurship and innovation that are also desired by employers.

 

Literacy and numeracy

The standards of literacy and numeracy are regularly part of education policy and discourse and widely regarded as key determinants of success or failure both in education and wider society. Developing the skills of reading, writing and number make all other subjects and contexts and practices accessible. It is a specific focus across all phases of education. This Education Studies programme is distinctive as it pays particular attention to ensuring that not only do the future educators have strong skills in these areas but can also support others in this area too. At stage one, students recap these skills and reflect upon how they have learned them in order to prepare themselves for a more practical application at stage two. During stage two, there is a placement module where students can become active facilitators within learning classrooms and situations by supporting the development of others literacy and numeracy skills. Possible placement options could be as teaching assistants in primary school classrooms, support within additional revision sessions within secondary education, supporting students in vocational training to understand and apply terminology and functional skills, working in youth clubs or charity organisations to assist young people to apply for jobs and for example, complete relevant forms. These are all potential employment destinations after graduation. The placement opportunity enables students to build networks and employment relations and connections as well as gaining references and feedback.

 

Research

Both the public, private and third sectors rely upon research-aware and research-active employees in order to create and evaluate new ways of working. Funding for educational activity can often involve an element of research against desired outcomes or the design of resources that can be disseminated more widely across the sector. This requires the educational researcher or educational practitioner to have a clear understanding of the current issues in education and their historical developments, as well as a motivation to understand the experiences of the people that are to be affected by these interventions. It is also important that they make judgments and decisions in their everyday practice as educationalists which are in the best interests of the recipients of the results of these projects.  For example, teachers within compulsory and post compulsory education contexts are required to continuously reflect upon and enquire into their practice which is seen as a key element of their professional development. Students will develop skills of managing and interpreting complex secondary data as part of their comparative report in EDU301 in addition to evaluating a range of mixed method research and design processes and strategies across all three stages of the programme.

 

Confidence

Students completing this degree may be going straight into employment with or without further professional training. As educationalists within any field they enter, they will be seen as trusted and autonomous practitioners. Through assessment tasks across all stages, students are required to demonstrate and develop their confidence and knowledge through presentations both in groups and on their own (EDU101: The History and Aims of Education; EDU103: Understanding experiences of education; EDU104: Theories of Learning, Teaching and Assessment; EDU203: Designing Creative Solutions ; LLS221: Students as Tutors; EDU301: Comparative Education and Globalisation; EDU303:Leading and managing in education; EDU305/6 advanced pedagogical practices – English, mathematics) and will be expected to defend their informed positions through presenting a clear argument within discussions and the enquiries in EDU202: Philosophy and Education. An educationalist is considered to be a confident communicator and leader of learning situations. At each stage of the programme students are gradually expected to be more autonomous in their ability to support and identify support for those they are working with. For example, in stage one they are required to apply theories of learning to teach their peers in a micro teach. At stage two they are expected to apply strategies to support others with literacy and numeracy in their placements and at stage three, they are expected to further develop their understanding of how people learn and be able to design resources and approaches to enable them to best support others in one to one situations.

 

There are also opportunities for on-campus students outside your programme of study.

 

All students, both full and part-time will have access to support from the Careers and Employability Service and the wider Sunderland Futures provision including opportunities to:

 

  • Gain experience and develop skills through paid internships, student jobs, volunteering and the student ambassador scheme.
  • Benefit from the expertise and support of experienced professionals through professional mentoring.
  • Experience life and study in another country and culture through student exchanges.
  • Participate in Leading Lights, a specialist training programme to develop leadership skills.
  • Use careers guidance to reflect on how their skills and experiences relate to career choices.
  • Explore the graduate job market through employer presentations, an annual graduate recruitment fair and access to Opportunities Online, the Careers and Employability Service’s online vacancy service.
  • Explore starting a business through support from the Enterprise Place.
  • Prepare to articulate their skills and experiences convincingly in applications and at interviews through CV/application coaching and interview coaching.
  • Gain recognition for their achievements and skills through the Sunderland Professional Award.

Students will be made aware of these opportunities through an inclusion in their student handbook, in addition to information on specific events and activities in the VLE.

 

For information about other opportunities available to our students who study on campus, click here.

Additional opportunities to develop your experiences more widely will vary if you study at one of our partner colleges. For information about the extra-curricular activities available in any of our colleges please contact the college direct. 

 

  1. Particular features of the qualification (optional) N/A

 

  1. Professional statutory or regulatory body (PSRB) accreditation. 

PSRB accreditation is not relevant to this programme 

*

PSRB accreditation is currently being sought for this programme

 

This programme currently has PSRB accreditation

 

SECTION E PROGRAMME STRUCTURE AND REGULATIONS

 

Use Programme Regulations Form, for questions 39 and 40

 

SECTION F ADMISSIONS, LEARNING ENVIRONMENT AND SUPPORT

 

  1. What are the admissions requirements?

 

The University’s standard admissions requirements can be found in the university regulations. Programme-specific requirements which are in addition to those regulations are given below. 

 

The standard entry is 300 points with GCSE Mathematics and English at grade C or above. Students can be accepted with Mathematics and English qualifications equivalent to GCSE.

 

Can students enter with advanced standing?

Yes

 

 

 

If yes, to which Stages?

Stage 1

 

Stage 2

Stage 3

Stage 4

 

 

If yes, with what qualifications?

 

Students can gain entry to stage 2 of the programme after completing the Professional Certificate in Post Compulsory Education and Training or equivalent.

 

The University has a process by which applicants whose experience to date already covers one or more modules of the programme they are applying for may seek Accreditation of Prior Learning (APL). Full details can be found here but if you think that this may be relevant to you, please contact the department which offers the programme you are interested in.

 

  1. What kind of support and help will there be?
    1. in the department: describe the student support in place in the department/ faculty

 

Students are supported both pastorally and academically by the programme leader and the module leaders through the programme’s tutorial provision. The programme leader will teach modules at each semester in every stage in order to maintain a level of continuity and regular contact with all students throughout their time on the programme. Tutorials will form an important part of the modular curriculum and will aim to support students in their success, attainment and achievement while identifying any students at risk or in need of additional, specialist support. Students are allocated a personal tutor from the programme team at stage one of the programme and the student remains in that cohort for their entire time with the university on programme.

 

  1. in the university as a whole:

The University provides a range of professional support services including health and well-being, counselling, disability support, and a Chaplaincy. Click on the links for further information.

 

  1. in a partner college:

Please see the relevant college prospectus or website for details of student support if you are planning to study in one of our partner colleges.

 

  1. What resources will I have access to?

 

On campus

In a partner college

 

By distance learning

 

On campus

Tick all that apply

General Teaching and Learning Space

IT

Library

VLE

Laboratory

 

Studio

 

Performance space

 

Other specialist

 

Technical resources 

 

 

The majority of the teaching sessions are seminar based therefore general classrooms are suitable. Electronic whiteboards and other learning technologies are increasingly used widely in many educational contexts. There is access to electronic whiteboards and advanced presentation equipment in David Goldman building which will support students in their practical assessments.

 

The main library is St Peter’s  library which is situated adjacent to the main teaching building in David Goldman.

 

University Library Services Support Document

Education programmes

 

University Library Services, (ULS), support both staff and students with the provision of a high quality learning environment, comprehensive print collections, extensive e–resources,  1400 study places, 300+ PCs and skills training facilities and study skills support.

 

All (including foundation and collaboration) students have the full use of the University’s two libraries. The libraries are open extensive hours and are staffed for 59 hours a week, including weekends and evenings.  During core teaching weeks, The Murray Library is open 24x7 and St Peters Library is open until 12 midnight.

 

 

Bookstock


The availability of books for teaching and learning is enhanced in a variety of ways:

  • Production of online resource lists which may include digitised book chapters and journal articles, (copyright permitting)
  • Short Loan: a collection of books and other materials in heavy demand, that are available for overnight loan, making them more accessible for students
  • The provision of weekly loan items, particularly duplicate copies of key texts, to improve availability for part-time students
  • All students have access to the interlibrary loans service, which will normally obtain books and documents that the service does not hold, usually within ten days of requesting

 

Periodicals
ULS subscribes to over 20,000 print and electronic titles. Usage is monitored and the portfolio of titles is continually reviewed.

Search and retrieval tools include, DISCOVER, the library’s online resource discovery tool to access e-resources such as online journal articles, and a range of subject specific databases including:

  • Professional Development collection
  • British Education Index
  • ERIC – Educational resources Information Centre
  • Science Direct

 

Online Information

Staff and students can access library resources either on campus or off campus via the web. ULS maintains a web site www.library.sunderland.ac.uk which provides a gateway to information resources and services for students both on and off campus. Tailored resources and support are available from specific subject areas of the ULS web site.

 

Single sign-on with university userID and password is used to allow staff and student access to extensive subscribed electronic resources regardless of location.


Skills for Learning

All new students are offered an induction to Library Services at the start of their first term.

In addition, Academic Liaison Librarians work with academic staff to provide both group and individual skills sessions to develop students’ knowledge of electronic resources appropriate to their subject area. Sessions include skills training in using online journals, searching for quality academic information on the Internet and understanding plagiarism, citation and referencing.

Skills for Learning. Online tutorials and resources available from the library web site that have been developed for on and off campus students.

http://library.sunderland.ac.uk/skills/

Skillability: Skills for Learning Workshops. On campus 1 hour workshops delivered during lunchtime and twilight/early evenings to fit around students’ timetables.

http://library.sunderland.ac.uk/skills/skillability/

 

Help and support

The library provides support to users in a number of ways:

 

  • Face to face in the libraries via staffed helpdesks, roving support from library staff and group or one to one skills sessions
  • Named subject librarians available for specific support
  • Online skills tutorials available from the library website
  • A dedicated email service where users may contact the library with any queries and will receive a reply with 24 hours
  • “Live Chat”- real-time online help available at various periods throughout the day, enabling users to chat with library staff and receive instant support
  • Out of hours IT telephone support service

 

Information about the University’s facilities can be found here.

 

Please see the relevant college prospectus or website for details of college learning resources if you are planning to study in one of our partner colleges.

 

  1. Are there any additional costs on top of the fees?

 

No, but all students buy some study materials such as books and provide their own basic study materials.

 

Yes (optional) All students buy some study materials such as books and provide their own basic study materials. In addition there are some are additional costs for optional activities associated with the programme (see below)

Yes (essential) All students buy some study materials such as books and provide their own basic study materials. In addition there are some are essential additional costs associated with the programme (see below)

 

 

Students are expected to begin the programme with a Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) check to enable them to participate in the placement module.

 

  1. How are student views represented?

 

All taught programmes in the University have student representatives for each Stage (year-group) of each programme who meet in a Student-Staff Liaison Committee (SSLC) where they can raise students’ views and concerns. The Students’ Union and the faculties together provide training for student representatives. SSLCs and focus groups are also used to obtain student feedback on plans for developing existing programmes and designing new ones. Feedback on your programme is obtained every year through module questionnaires and informs the annual review of your programme. Student representatives are also invited to attend Programme and Module Studies Boards which manage the delivery and development of programmes and modules.  Various Faculty committees, particularly Faculty Academic Experience Committee, Academic Development Committee and Quality Management Sub-Committee also have student representation. This allows students to be involved in higher-level plans for teaching and learning. There is a parallel structure at university level on which students are represented by sabbatical officers who are the elected leaders of the Students’ Union.

 

The University’s student representation and feedback policy can be found here.

 

Undergraduate programmes only: Final-year students are also invited to complete a National Student Survey (NSS) which asks a standard set of questions across the whole country. The results of this are discussed at Programme Studies Boards and at Faculty Academic Experience Committee to identify good practice which can be shared and problems which need to be addressed. We rely heavily on student input to interpret the results of the NSS and ensure that we make the most appropriate changes.

 

Programmes offered in partner colleges: If you are studying in one of our partner colleges the college will have its own mechanisms for obtaining student feedback. Some of these may be the same as those on-campus at the University but others may be different. You should ask your college for further information.

 

For distance learning operated from Sunderland: if you are studying by distance learning you will have slightly different arrangements from those used on campus. In particular you  are likely to have virtual rather than physical meetings and discussions. However these arrangements  should provide comparable opportunities for you to give feedback. Details are given below.  

 

The programme leader and module leaders are very approachable and welcome students’ questions, queries and feedback at any time during their programme. All staff will share their office hours with students and students can make an appointment via email or telephone to come in to see them.  While tutorial time is pre-planned in all modules, students are encouraged to seek additional/alterative time if they feel they need it. Each semester, the Nominal Group technique is used by the student representatives in order to gain general cohort feedback from students at each stage of the programme. This technique allows student lead the direction of the feedback on the whole programme. The programme leader responds to this feedback formally and informs students when/if changes have been made in response to their feedback.

 

SECTION G QUALITY MANAGEMENT 

 

  1. National subject benchmarks

 

The Quality Assurance Agency for Higher Education publishes benchmark statements which give guidance as to the skills and knowledge which graduates in various subjects and in certain types of degree are expected to have. These can be found here.

 

Are there any benchmark statements for this programme?

YES

 

 

The subject benchmark(s) for this programme is/are:

 

QAA Education Studies (2007/2014)

The QAA also publishes a Framework for Higher Education Qualifications (FHEQ) which defines the generic skills and abilities expected of students who have achieved awards at a given level and with which our programmes align. The FHEQ can be found here.

 

  1. How are the quality and standards of the programme assured?

 

The programme is managed and quality assured through the University’s standard processes. Programmes are overseen by Module and Programme Studies Boards which include student representatives. Each year each module leader provides a brief report on the delivery of the module, identifying strengths and areas for development, and the programme team reviews the programme as a whole.  The purpose of this is to ensure that the programme is coherent and up-to-date, with suitable progression from one Stage to another, and a good fit (alignment)  between what is taught and how students learn and are assessed - the learning outcomes, content and types of teaching, learning and assessment. Student achievement, including progress between Stages of the programme and degree classification, is kept under review. The programme review report is sent to the Faculty Quality Management Sub-Committee which in turn reports issues to the University’s Quality Management Sub-Committee (QMSC) and Academic Experience Committee (AEC).

 

External examiners are appointed to oversee and advise on the assessment of the programme. They ensure that the standards of the programme are comparable with those of similar programmes elsewhere in the UK and are also involved in the assessment process to make sure that it is fair. They are invited to comment on proposed developments to the programme. Their reports are sent to the Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Academic) as well as to the Faculty so that issues of concern can be addressed.

 

All programmes are reviewed by the University on a six-yearly cycle to identify good practice and areas for enhancement. Programmes are revalidated through this review process. These reviews include at least one academic specialist in the subject area concerned from another UK university. The University is subject to external review by the Quality Assurance Agency for Higher Education on a six-year cycle. Their review reports for Sunderland can be found here.

 

Further information about our quality processes can be found here.

 

 

Please also complete the SITS form – Appendix 3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Quality Handbook

 

 

 

 

 

 

SITS SUMMARY PROGRAMME/SHORT COURSE DETAILS

(Form to be completed electronically by the Faculty and forwarded to the Quality Support Officer supporting the Approval event, or sent to Planning & MI for faculty devolved processes before sending to Quality Support (with the exception of Short Courses and GRS))

This form is to be completed when a new programme has been validated and approved so that the programme codes and progression and awards rules can be set up in SITS.  This also needs to be completed at periodic course review when there have been significant modifications to the course.

 

Please note that all details entered onto this form will go onto every student’s record that is attached to this programme and it is therefore imperative that the information is correct. 

 

1 Programme Details

New/ Modification/Review:

Please ensure the minor modification document is included

Modification

Full Programme Title (including award):

BA (Hons) Education Studies

If replacement for existing course, specify title and course code:

N/A

Qualification Aim:

e.g. Foundation degree of Science, Bachelor of Arts (Honours)

Bachelor of Arts (Honours)

Qualification Level (NQF level):

6

HECoS Code

See HESA Website https://www.hesa.ac.uk/innovation/hecos

X300

Is the programme Open or Closed:

A course is defined as closed when specifically designed for a certain group of people and not also available to other suitably qualified candidates. It may be designed for a particular company however if the same course is also run for other suitably qualified candidates, not employed by the company, then the course is not closed. If the programme is closed please specify who it is for.

Open

Faculty and School:

FES

School of Education

Location of study:

e.g. Sunderland in London, Sunderland

Sunderland

Last Date Registration (PBI) Number of days:

The number of days after the start date of the course that it is possible for students to register onto it. It is also referred to as the migration date. This is normally 18 days.  Please indicate if more or less than this number.

18 days

Programme Leader:

Kate Duffy

Academic Team for the programme:

Secondary Education & Education Studies

Date of Approval/Modification/Review:

Approval December 2014; Modification June 2019

Date of next review (QS to complete):

2020/21

Accrediting Body or PSRB
If yes please attach a completed PSRB form

Yes/No

 

Programme Specific Regulations

If yes, please attach a completed Programme Specific Regulations form

Yes/No

See form attached for part time mode of study

Does this programme come under the Unistats return?

The following are excluded from the Unistats return:

  • Programmes of 120 credits or less (including top ups)
  • ‘Closed’ Courses
  • Programmes of one year’s full-time duration even if they have more than 120 credits
  • Programmes which will be delivered only to overseas students
  • Postgraduate programmes
  • A course that is run as part of an apprenticeship

Yes/No

Is this an undergraduate programme whose primary (but not necessarily only) purpose is to improve the effectiveness of practitioners registered with a professional body? If yes, please specify which body:

https://www.hesa.ac.uk/collection/c16061/accreditation_list/

e.g. a short course aimed at registered nurses

Yes/No


Professional Body:

 

 

Interim  Awards

If a student does not achieve their qualification aim, what lower awards might they be entitled to, assuming they have the credits?  The subject title for any lower level award should be given where this is different from the subject of the qualification aim. This should be the same title as the main award unless an alternative is approved via a Programme Specific Regulation.

 

Interim Award Title

Credits Required

Interim Structure

Please show mandatory requirements if applicable e.g. core module codes

1

Level 4: Certificate in HE

120

EDU101; 102; 103; 104; 105; 108

 

2

Level 5: Diploma in HE

240

EDU201; 202; 203; 204; 207; LLS221

3

Level 6: Degree (Non-hons)

300

EDU301; 302; 303

 

2 Mode of Attendance

 

Tick all that apply

Min number of years

Max number of years

Overall length of programme in years/months/weeks

Intake dates (months)

Max and min cohort sizes

01 Full-time*

YES

3

6

 

Sept

Min 10

31 Part-time*

YES

3

6

 

Sept

Min 10

Sandwich*

 

 

 

 

 

 

Off-campus

 

 

 

 

 

 

On-campus

YES

 

 

 

 

 

Distance learning

 

 

 

 

 

 

Work-based learning

 

 

 

 

 

 

Collaborative

 

 

 

 

 

 

Proposed start-date (month/year)

Sept 2019

Full-time (031)

Full-time students are those expected to study for more than 24 weeks per year, for a minimum of 21 hours per week and are paying the full-time fee. (Note – this includes any work based learning).

Part-time (031)

Students who are expected to study for less than 21 hours per week.

Sandwich

Please ensure you include the title of the sandwich programme in Section 3

 

 

 

3 Admissions

An admissions or MCR code will be created to allow student applications.

Tick appropriate

UUCAS

Universities and Colleges Admission Services

Required for full-time undergraduate programmes only.

YES

DDirect Entry

Required for FT, PT, PG and PGR, only where students will be admitted through the admissions teams or where the programme needs to be advertised on the web.

YES

GGTTR

Graduate Teacher Training Registry
Education only, where applicable

NO

 

4 Collaborative Provision

UK

 

Overseas

 

Institution

Collaborative Model

Funding Arrangements

N/A

 

 

 

 

 

 

Does this course offer a sandwich placement?

If yes, please indicate which programme year this placement is to take place.

No

Programme Year:

Is this sandwich placement compulsory or optional?

 

Does this course offer a study abroad year out? If yes, please indicate which programme year this placement is to take place.

No

Programme Year:

Is this study abroad year out compulsory or optional?

 

 

5  Major Source of Funding

Please note this relates to funding for the programme and not individual students

Office for Students (previously known as HEFCE)

Student Fees

Education & Skills Funding Agency (includes Degree Apprenticeships)

 

DfE   https://www.gov.uk/government/organisations/national-college-for-teaching-and-leadership

 

Wholly NHS Funded

Partially NHS Funded

Departments of Health/NHS/Social Care. For all Health funded programmes please indicate whether the programme is eligible for an NHS Bursary

-  Eligible for NHS BursaryY/N

 

 

 

Other Funding:

 

– If Other, please specify:

 

 

 

6 Education Programmes Only

This section must be completed for any programmes marked above as ‘NCTL’ funded

Teacher Training Identifier:

 

Teacher Training Scope:

 

Qualification Aim:

QTS and academic award, QTS only, QTS by assessment only

 

 

7 Fees

Where non-standard fees are proposed this will need approval by Fees and Bursaries Group before the programme can be advertised.

Undergraduate:

(Please select option)

Standard

Other (please state):

 

Postgraduate:

(Please select option)

Fees stated are for full time programmes

All part-time programmes should be Band 2

Band 1 (classroom) £6000 (Sunderland) £6500 (UoSiL)

Band 2 (mixed) £6500 (Sunderland) £6800 (UoSiL)

Band 3 (laboratory) £7000 (Sunderland) £7200 (UoSiL)

MBA: £11500 (Sunderland) £11500 (UoSiL)

Other: (please state)

 

 

 

 

   DETAILS SUPPLIED BY:Kate Duffy DATE:21/06/2019


 

 

 

Appendix 1

 

PART B   -  Programme  Regulation/s

 

Name of programme: BA (Hons) Education Studies

Title of final award: BA (Hons) Education Studies

Interim awards[1]:N/A

Accreditation: N/A

 

University Regulations: 4.2.2 / 2.3.1 / 6.4.2

Programme-specific regulations to meet Professional Body requirements:

 

Different levels of modules taken within the same Stage

 

Study requirements

 

Stages 2 and 3 must be completed within a total of 6 years including any leave of absence.

 

Stage 1

Entry to the programme is into Stage 2 and follows successful completion of the Certificate in Education (PCET) (120 40 @ level 4 and 80 @ level 5) credits pass / fail (College-based).

 

Stage 2

Core modules:40 @ Level 5/ 40 @ level 6

 

Code

Title

Credits

EDU204

Research in Education

20

EDU207

English and Mathematics in Society

20

EDU301

Comparative Education and the global citizen

20

EDU302

Ethics and Education

20

 

Optional / Elective Modules

There are no optional / elective modules at Stage 2

 

Stage 3

Core modules: 80 @ level 6

 

Code

Title

Credits

EDU303

Leading and managing education

20

EDU305

Advancing subject knowledge and pedagogy (English)

20

EDU306

Advancing subject knowledge and pedagogy (mathematics)

20

EDU307

Dissertation in Education Studies

40

 

Optional / Elective Modules

Students must choose between EDU305 or EDU306 at stage 3


Appendix 2

Matrix of modes of teaching, learning and assessment

 

Stage 1

 

Module

Code

Core / optional

Modes of T&L

Modes of Assessment

LO S1

LO S2

LO S3

LO K1

LO K2

LO K3

LO K4

The History and Aims of Education

EDU101

CORE

L,S,P,GW

Essay, presentation

T, D

T, A

T, D

T,D,A

T,D,A

 

 

Contemporary Issues in Education 

 

EDU102

CORE

E, S, L, T,

Essay; annotated bibliography

T, A

T, A

T, D

T,D, A

T, D, A

D,A

D,A

Understanding Experiences of Education 

 

EDU103

CORE

L, S, SE, P, T, GW

Digital autobiography; collaborative research project

T,D,A

T, D, A

T, D, A

T, A

T, A

 

T,D,A

Theories of Learning, Teaching and Assessment 

EDU104

CORE

S, L, P, T, PS

observations; micro teach

 

D, A

D

T

D

D

T, A

Socio-Cultural Issues in Education

EDU105

CORE

 

Leaflet

Essay

T,D

T,D,A

T,D,A

T,D,A

 

T,D,A

 

Developing Personal Skills in Mathematics and English

EDU108

CORE

S, T, SE

Portfolio

T,D,A

T,D, A

 

 

D

D

T, D, A

 

 

 

Stage 2

 

Module

Code

Core / optional

Modes of T&L

Modes of Assessment

LO S4

LO S5

LO S6

LO S7

LO S8

LO S9

LO K5

LOK6

LOK7

LOK8

Approaches to Meeting Special Educational Needs and disabilities

EDU201

CORE

L, S, PS, SE

Plan

Essay

T,A

 

 

T,A

T, D,

T,D,A

T,D

 

T,D,A

 

Philosophy and Education

EDU202

CORE

E, S, L, P, GW, SE, T

Practical facilitation; Essay

T,D,A

T,D

T,D,A

T,D,A

D,A

 

T,D,A

T,D,A

 

T,D,A

Developing Creative Solutions

EDU203

CORE

T, S, GW, SE

Design project

TDA

T,D A

 

 

TDA

TDA

T

TDA

DA

DA

Research in Education 

EDU204

CORE

L,S, E, PS,P, T

Poster; Research report

T,D

T,D,A

T,D

D,A

D,A

T,D,A

 

D,A

 

D

English and Mathematics in Society

EDU207

CORE

L,S,SE,T,

PS

Essay

T D A

D

DA

T,D,A

D, A

 

T, D

 

T,D,A

T,D,A

Students as Tutors

LLS220

 

CORE

PS, SE, T

Placement;

Portfolio;

D,A

D,A

 

T,D,A

D,A

T,D,A

 

D,A

D

 


Stage 3

Module

Code

Core / optional

Modes of T&L

Modes of Assessment

LOS10

LOS11

LOS12

LOS13

LOS14

LOK9

LOK10

LOK11

LOK12

LOK13

Comparative Education and the global citizen

EDU301

CORE

S, L, PS, GW, T

Portfolio,

Essay

T,D,A

D, A

D,A

D,A

T.D,A

T,D,A

D,A,

D,A,

D,A,

T,D,A

Ethics and Education

 

EDU302

CORE

E, S, L, PS, P, T

Critical Analysis;

Persuasive report

T,D,A

T,D,A

T,D,A

D,A

 

D,A

T,D,A

D,A

 

T,D,A

Leading and managing in education 

EDU303

CORE

L, S, E, GW, T

Group Presentation; essay

D,A

D,A

D,A

 

 

T,D,A

D,A

D

D,A

T,D,A

Learning in the 21st century 

EDU308

OPTION

L,S,E,

Essay

DA

DA

TDA

DA

TDA

TDA

DA

DA

DA

TDA

Advancing Subject knowledge and Pedagogy

(English)

EDU305

OPTION

L,S,SE,T

Case study, Essay

T,D,A

T,D,A

D,A

D,A

D,A

T,D,A

D

D

D,A

T,D,A

Advancing Subject knowledge and Pedagogy (Mathematics)

EDU306

OPTION

L,S, SE, T

Commentary, case study

T,D,A

T,D,A

D,A

D,A

D,A

T,D,A

D,

D

D,A

T,D,A

Independent Study in HE

LLS320

OPTION

L,S, P,SE

 

T,D,A

D,A,

D,A

D,A

D,A

D,A

T,D,A,

D,A,

D,A

D,A

Dissertation in Education studies

EDU307

CORE

PS, L, T, S

Dissertation 10,000 word project

T,D,A

D,A,

D,A

D,A

D,A

D,A

T,D,A,

D,A,

D,A

D,A

 


 

 

Module List

Award, Route (if applicable) and Level

New/Existing/ Modified  Module (N/E/MM)

Module Title

Module Code

Module Credit Value

Whether core or option

Must choose (ie designated option):

Assessment weighting – give % weight for each assessment item

Pre-/co-requisites

Module leader

Other comment (if required)

Date of Entry on SITS.

N/MM only

( After event)

JACS Code

HECos

Code

Academic Team

Cert HE

BA Education Studies

E

The History and Aims of Education

EDU101

20

C

 

50/50

NONE

Ian Elliott

 

 

X300

 

Sec ED & Ed Studies

Cert HE

BA Education Studies

E

Understanding experiences of Education

EDU103

20

C

 

100

NONE

Lynne Dagg

 

 

X300

 

Sec ED & Ed Studies

Cert HE

BA Education Studies

E

Socio- Cultural issues in Education

EDU105

20

C

 

P/F/100

NONE

Steven Haswell

 

 

X300

 

Sec ED & Ed Studies

Cert HE

BA Education Studies

E

Contemporary issues in education

EDU102

20

C

 

50/50

NONE

Steven Haswell

 

 

X300

 

Sec ED & Ed Studies

Cert HE

BA Education Studies

E

Theories of Learning, Teaching and Assessment

EDU104

20

C

 

50/50

NONE

Kate Duffy

 

 

X300

 

Sec ED & Ed Studies

Cert HE BA Education Studies

N

Developing personal skills in English and Mathematics

EDU108

20

C

 

100

NONE

Vicki Jowett

 

 

X300

 

Sec ED & Ed Studies

Dip HE

BA Education Studies

E

Approaches to Meeting Educational Needs and disabilities

EDU201

20

C

 

100

NONE

Dionne Ross

 

 

X300

 

Sec ED & Ed Studies

Dip HE

BA Education Studies

E

Developing Creative Solutions

EDU203

20

C

 

20/40

/30/10

NONE

Kate Duffy

 

 

X300

 

Sec ED & Ed Studies

Dip HE

BA Education Studies

N

English and Mathematics in Society

EDU207

20

C

 

100

NONE

Kate Duffy

 

 

X300

 

Sec ED & Ed Studies

Dip HE

BA Education Studies

E

Philosophy and Education

EDU202

20

C

 

60/40

NONE

Kate Duffy

 

 

X300

 

Sec ED & Ed Studies

Dip HE

BA Education Studies

E

Students as Tutors

LLS221

20

O

 

100

NONE

Kate Duffy

 

 

??

 

Sec ED & Ed Studies

Dip HE

BA Education Studies

M

Research in Education

EDU204

20

C

 

50/50

NONE

Kate Duffy

 

 

X300

 

Sec ED & Ed Studies

Dip HE

BA Education Studies

N

Learning outside of the classroom

EDU208

20

O

 

40/60

NONE

Kate Duffy

 

 

X300

 

Sec ED & Ed Studies

Degree Education Studies

E

Comparative Education and the Global Citizen

EDU301

20

C

 

40/60

NONE

Kate Duffy

 

 

X300

 

Sec ED & Ed Studies

Degree Education Studies

N

Learning in the 21st Century

EDU308

20

O

 

100

NONE

TBC

 

 

X300

 

Sec ED & Ed Studies

Degree Education Studies

 

 

E

Advancing subject knowledge and pedagogy (mathematics)

EDU306

20

O

 

40/20/20/20

NONE

Samantha Tate

 

 

X300

 

Sec ED & Ed Studies

Degree Education Studies

E

Advancing subject knowledge and pedagogy

(English)

EDU305

20

O

 

40/20/20/20

NONE

Kate Duffy

 

 

X300

 

Sec ED & Ed Studies

Degree Education Studies

E

Independent Study in HE

LLS320/40

20

O

 

100

NONE

Maria Dawson

 

 

X300

 

Sec ED & Ed Studies

Degree Education Studies

E

Ethics and Education

EDU302

20

C

 

40/60

NONE

Kate Duffy

 

 

X300

 

Sec ED & Ed Studies

Honours Education Studies

E

Leading and managing in education

EDU303

20

C

 

40/60

NONE

Kate Duffy

 

 

X300

 

Sec ED & Ed Studies

Honours Education Studies

E

Dissertation in education studies

EDU307

40

C

 

P/F/ 100

NONE

Kate Duffy

 

 

X300

 

Sec ED & Ed Studies

 

 

 


[1] Same as main award unless agreed otherwise at validation – eg to meet PSRB requirements