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Programme Specification

 

SECTION A: CORE INFORMATION

 

  1. Name of programme:Artist Designer Maker: Glass and Ceramics

 

  1. Award titleBA (Hons)

  1. Programme linkage No

 

 

  1. Is the programme a top-up only? No

 

 

  1. Does the programme have a Foundation Year (level 3) associated with it so that students enter for a four-year programme and progress directly from the Foundation Year to Stage 1 without having to re-apply? Yes

 

Art and Design Foundation

Art and Design (Extended)

 

  1. Level of award Level 6

 

  1. Awarding body:University of Sunderland

 

  1. Which school is it in?School of Art and Design

 

  1. Programme Studies Board?Glass and Ceramics

 

  1. Programme LeaderRobert Winter

 

  1. How and where can I study the programme?

 

At Sunderland:

 

Full-time on campus

Part-time on campus

 

  1. How long does the programme take?

 

 

Min number of years / months

Max number of years / months

Full-time

3

9

Part-time

6

9

SECTION B – FURTHER INFORMATION

 

  1. Learning and Teaching Strategy

 

This programme embraces the possibilities of both art and design and is underpinned by making skills in a variety of materials. Glass and Ceramics are a focus but you can work in other materials for example wood, metal and plastic - as well as digital media. We aim to develop you as graduates who have the skills to work in diverse art, design and making contexts. You are are likely to develop ‘portfolio careers’ that might involve a mix of working as ‘Fine Artists’ for gallery exhibitions, designers making work to commission for specific contexts, and makers who can fabricate work for yourselves or others.

 

This programme is also about developing your confidence, problem solving skills, communications skills and professionalism so that you are will well prepared to enter the professional world. ‘Hands on’ making is central to this programme and through learning making skills you will develop your individual creativity. Alongside this, you will learn about the wider cultural context of art, design and making as well as about career options in this exciting field. Where you learn will also be important and on this programme you will work in excellent studios in National Glass Centre and FabLab (fabrication laboratory - is a workshop offering digital fabrication skills and equipment). Another key aspect of the programme is that wherever possible we will bring you into contact with professionals in the field as well as professional opportunities such external exhibitions. So at the end of the programme you are likely to have already developed an emerging professional CV and be well networked in your chosen career area.

 

This programme is underpinned by what have been described as the ‘signature pedagogies’, which are distinctive in art and design teaching (Shreeve, Sims & Trowler, 2010). These approaches will help you to develop professional skills and attributes which will be transferable to many jobs and careers in the future:

 

          Learning has a material and physical dimension - There is recognition of the whole person’s involvement in learning; it is not simply a matter of cerebral activity, but a bodily learning that involves the emotions and senses

 

          Learning involves living with uncertainty and unknown outcomes – The tutor can’t always tell you the answer and you will develop personal responsibility and independence – important attributes for employment

 

          Learning has a visible dimension – You can see your learning in work in progress. This is often not the case in other subjects

 

          Aspects of learning take into account the audience – Who your work is for and in what context it is shown is important. Again this is not always the case in other subjects

 

          The intention is to develop independent creative practitioners - The tutor’s role is not to develop students who are all able to recite a fixed canon of knowledge, but to encourage individuals who understand where they and their work fits, and belongs, within a practice

 

 

          Learning is fundamentally social – The learning (artworks) are visible and discussed. Students have access to more experienced students and tutors (and visiting artists) and discussion is a key part of, often informal, learning situations. This social element can also help you to build confidence in working with others

          Process is important and developmental - The developmental nature of student and tutor interaction is often centred on unfinished and on-going work in progress. These opportunities for formative feedback are facilitated by the visibility of the ‘work’ around them and the readily accessible work of others, it is faster to ‘read’ a ceramic vessel than a dissertation, and meaning may be jointly debated with the whole group in the presence of both student and tutor

 

          Teaching and Learning Spaces – You tend to learn in the studio or sometimes in professional (‘real world’) contexts.

 

          Tutor Identity In art subjects most tutors are professional artists, designers, curators or writers as well as teachers. This is often not the case in other subjects.

 

These aspects might also be linked to an approach of inducting students into a ‘Community of Practice’ (Drew, 2004). This idea links to Wenger (1998), and his concept of many learning activities consisting of ‘legitimate peripheral participation in a community’. In the case of this programme the community is the art, design and making community with in the university itself (especially National Glass Centre and Fab lab), the region and the national and international community in our subject. For example, you will be taught by award winning internationally known staff - all recognised professional designers, artists, curators or writers. This means you will benefit from the latest ways of working as well as from our contacts to help launch their career. You will will work in excellently equipped studios based in the National Glass Centre and FabLab, so can access many events and exhibitions in these buildings as well as visiting professionals (including artists, designers and makers). Open plan working areas facilities the learning community and allows students to learn and share knowledge freely. You will be offered professional ‘real world’ opportunities (legitimate peripheral participation in a community), which could include the chance to show your work in public exhibitions, undertake internships, work on real commissions, and competitions – all of which will help you to build a professional CV. Students will learn in a supportive creative community and be encouraged to become nationally, even internationally, networked during their time on the course.

 

The glass and ceramics department is unique in its placement at the heart of the National Glass Centre at the University of Sunderland. The additional learning opportunities and resources that this facilitates are actively promoted within this programme. You will be encouraged to participate in museum/gallery/studio visits both in groups and as individuals. Attending conferences and/or public demonstrations by professional makers are actively promoted. The additional resources of ‘National Glass Centre Research’ and ‘Ceramics Arts Research Centre University of Sunderland’ (CARCuos) enhance the offer further.

 

Professional ‘Real World’ experience is central to this programme. For example, you will be required to participate in a public exhibition as part of your programme, as part of the Stage 2 ‘Making for Exhibition’ module. Also at Stage 2 as part of the ‘Professional Practice: Engaging with the Creative Community’ module students must apply for an opportunity such as an internship, competition or funding – this mirrors the approach that professional artists will need to take in their careers. These aspects of the programme will present you with challenges through which you can build experience and confidence for your dynamic career in the creative industries!

References:

Drew, L. (2004). The experience of teaching creative practices: conceptions and approaches to

teaching in the community of practice dimension. In Enhancing Curricula: Towards the Scholarship

of Teaching and Learning in Art, Design and Communication. Barcelona: CLTAD.

 

Shreeve, A; Sims; E & Trowler, P. (2010). ‘A kind of exchange’: learning from art and design teaching. Higher Education Research & Development Vol. 29 , Iss. 2, 2010

 

Wenger, E. (1998). Communities of Practice. Learning meaning and identity. Cambridge:

Cambridge University Press.

 

 

  1. Retention Strategy

 

Every student enrolling on this programme either in a full-time or part-time capacity is taken through a comprehensive induction process, introducing them to the University, the staff, fellow students, key terminology and approaches to studying at HE, and how and where to get support and advice.

 

You will be assigned a Personal Tutor during the induction period and all students meet their tutor within the first 2 weeks. Following this you are offered three tutorials a year to review your overall progress and set targets for development. There will be other tutorials relating to specific projects and modules. This assigned student tutor relationship is usually maintained for the duration of the programme however at any point students can request a change of tutor and this is implemented wherever possible.

 

 

SECTION C - TEACHING AND LEARNING

 

  1. What is the programme about?

Developing individual creativity and skills through cutting edge and established methods of practical making and conceptual thinking.

Providing excellent learning environments, individual student workspaces and an exhibition in National Glass Centre.

Utilising our pioneering research and professional practice to inform and develop curriculum.

Fostering reflective and critical approaches to creative practice by promoting diagnostic, communication and digital skills.

Providing diverse examples of creative careers through visiting professionals, exhibitions and conferences.

Offering vocational and professional opportunities in preparation for a dynamic career in the creative industries.

Enabling students to gain confidence, build resilience and develop a personal understanding of the broader cultural and social contexts of art, design and making.

 

  1. What will I know or be able to do at each Stage of the programme?

 

Learning Outcomes Stage 1 – Skills  

By the end of this Stage of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

  • S1.  Demonstrated essential skills and necessary techniques for the manipulation and use of the range of materials and equipment offered within the programme. (QAA – S2)
  • S2.  Demonstrated research skills for information retrieval in order to develop, reflect upon and communicate their ideas. (QAA – S1, S6, S12)
  • S3.  Demonstrated skills to organise and manage a diverse workload in order to produce work by a set deadline. (QAA – S8, S9, S11)
  • S4.  Demonstrated a variety of ways in which their ideas can be developed and communicated and select the appropriate materials and processes to realise these ideas. (QAA – S3, S4, S5)
  • S5. Demonstrated key skills as appropriate in communication, working with and benefiting from the judgements of others and improving own learning and problem solving. (QAA – S7, S10, S13)

 

Learning Outcomes Stage 1 – Knowledge

By the end of this Stage of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

  • K1.  Demonstrated a basic understanding of the properties, qualities and application of materials and technologies covered within the programme and how these might be used in artist, designer, and/or maker practice (QAA – K3)
  • K2.  Demonstrated a basic knowledge and understanding of the broad context of the historical and contemporary issues/practices in art, design and making. (QAA – K1, K2)
  • K3.  Demonstrated some knowledge and understanding of the significance of the work of other practitioners. (QAA – K4)

 

Learning Outcomes Stage 2 – Skills

By the end of this Stage of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

  • S6.  Demonstrated the ability to identify and use appropriate skills and techniques in the manipulation of the materials offered within the programme. (QAA – S2)
  • S7.  Demonstrated skills in research to retrieve, manage and evaluate a wide range of information in order to develop, reflect upon and communicate their ideas (QAA S1, S6, S12)
  • S8.  Demonstrated skills to independently generate and implement a plan to produce work and an ability to accommodate change and uncertainty. (QAA – S8, S9, S11)
  • S9.  Demonstrated a wide variety of ways in which their ideas can be communicated and carefully consider and analyse the selection and use of appropriate materials and processes for their intended audience. (QAA – S3, S4, S5)
  • S10.  Demonstrated skills appropriate to working with and benefiting from the judgements of others, improving their own learning and problem solving and accept responsibility for determining and achieving goals. (QAA – S7, S10, S13)

 

 

 

Learning Outcomes Stage 2 – Knowledge

By the end of this Stage of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

  • K4.  Demonstrated a broad understanding of the materials and technologies relevant to artists, designers and makers (QAA – K3)
  • K5.  Demonstrated a sufficient specialist knowledge and understanding of the broad context of the historical and contemporary themes/practices relevant to artists, designers and makers. (QAA – K1, K2)
  • K6.  Demonstrated a broad knowledge and critical understanding of the significance of the work of other practitioners. (QAA – K4)

 

Learning Outcomes Stage 3 – Skills

By the end of this Stage of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

  • S11.  Applied specific skills in the manipulation of the materials selected for their proposed project. (QAA – S2)
  • S12.  Utilised specialised research techniques to retrieve, manage and evaluate a wide range of information in order to develop, critically reflect upon and communicate their ideas. (QAA – S1, S6, S12)
  • S13.  Exercised appropriate critical judgment to independently generate and implement a plan to produce work and an ability to accommodate change and uncertainty. (QAA – S8, S9, S11)
  • S14.  Demonstrated specialised and innovative ways in which their ideas can be communicated and implement critical judgment on the selection and use of appropriate materials and processes for an intended audience. (QAA – S3, S4, S5)
  • S15.  Demonstrated an ability to initiate and lead a project and to accept accountability for setting and achieving goals, working with and benefiting from the judgements of others and to present their results using professional skills appropriate in communication. (QAA – S7, S10, S13),

 

Learning Outcomes Stage 3 – Knowledge

By the end of this Stage of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

  • K7. Demonstrated a specialised understanding of the materials and technologies relevant to art, design and making (QAA – K3)
  • K8.  The ability to critically evaluate and demonstrate a systematic and coherent specialist knowledge and understanding of the broad context of the historical and contemporary styles/ practices (QAA – K1, K2)
  • K9.  Applied a professional level of knowledge and critical understanding of the significance of the work of other practitioners (QAA – K4)

 

Learning Outcomes – Ordinary degree

 

If you are awarded an Ordinary degree you will have achieved the majority of the learning outcomes for the programme studied. However you will have gained fewer credits at Stage 3 than students awarded an Honours degree, your knowledge will typically be less broad and you will typically be less proficient in higher-level skills such as independent learning.

 

  1. What will the programme consist of?

 

Each undergraduate programme consists of a number of Stages from a minimum of 1 to a maximum of 4, each of which is equivalent to a year’s full-time study. The summary below describes briefly what is contained in each Stage. Most programmes have a mixture of core (ie compulsory) modules and optional ones, often with increasing choice as you move through the programme and gain in experience. In some programmes the choice of optional modules gives you particular ‘routes’ through the programme. The programme structure including a detailed list of modules can be found in the programme regulations.

 

Stage 1

Focus on skill acquisition to introduce a broad base of techniques:

 

       Ceramics: throwing, glazes, hand building, slip casting, decals, mono-printing, press molding

       Glass: glassblowing, kiln casting, stained glass, glass painting, sandcasting, sandblasting, glass cutting, gluing and construction

       Finishing techniques: grinding and polishing, wood finishing, metal patination,

       Digital crafts; for example Rhinoceros, TinkerCAD, Blender, Fusion 360, 3d printing, water jet cutting, laser cutting

       Wood and metal - basic skills

       Artists talks and visits will provide examples of professional careers and practice

       Presentation skills

       Aspects of historical and contemporary Artist Designer Maker contexts

       Academic research, referencing and writing skills

 

Stage 2:

Focus on development of professional transferable skills, understanding of contexts of practice and broader cultural issues, and of independent study and skills acquisition:

 

          Continuing skill acquisition, including printmaking for glass and ceramics, advanced ceramics techniques, and digital skills

          Applying for ‘real world’ opportunities like competitions, exhibitions and work experience.

          First semester: Focus on work in place, space and context through developing a project in response to a specific place, purpose or audience.

          Design boards, visualisations and sample making

          Second semester: planning, executing and evaluating a self-directed project for exhibition at a professional public gallery - usually at Shipley Art Gallery, Gateshead.

          Opportunity to study abroad including USA, Australia or Sweden.

 

Stage 3

The final year is geared towards the exhibition of a professional body of work at National Glass Centre:

 

          Experimentation, visualization, testing in order to develop a professional and resolved body of work for exhibition.

          Refinement of making skills, finishing techniques, presentation methods and consolidation of ideas in a final body of artworks.

          Research and write a critical dissertation relevant to students’ individual studio work and/or career goals.  Also focus on establishing a professional identity and career plan

          Research career options, understand the nature of the sector the student aspires to enter and in turn develop a relevant career plan

          Develop online portfolio or drawings and finished work

  1. How will I be taught?

Scheduled teaching activities

Independent study

 

The BA Artist Designer Maker: Glass and Ceramics Programme uses a diverse range of teaching and learning strategies that assist in the development of technical, aesthetic and professional skills of students. In the early stages of the programme, the modules are structured to provide teaching and learning through staff led demonstrations and seminars. However, by stage 2 ‘self-negotiated’ projects lead to a greater student-led emphasis within their learning with staff guidance. Each module offers a variety of individual tutorials, seminars, handouts on the virtual learning environment (VLE), demonstrations, peer reviews, and feedback.

 

 

The main learning and teaching methods employed are a combination of:

 

  • Demonstrations and hands-on tuition to show students practical techniques in the studios.

 

  • Seminars to allow guided group discussion as a means of clarifying and elaborating on aspects of course work and thinking.

 

  • Lectures to present and explain factual information and give a grounding in the key theories, the approaches of relevant artists, genres and works associated with glass & ceramics practice.

 

  • Tutorials either individually or in groups allow for bespoke guidance on students’ work.

  • Group reviews to allow students to practice presenting their work to others and to develop the ability to become reflective in their practice, and to learn from the feedback of others.

 

  • Independent learning or private study encourages students to become resourceful and self-reliant using their own initiative. With experience they also learn when it’s better to seek appropriate guidance. This is a core skill that employers are keen to see in any graduate.

 

  • Creative assignments and studio practice are the tried and tested ways of both developing practical subject-specific skills and of judging the ability of a student to respond creatively to a brief.

 

  • Learning proposals provide an opportunity for students to develop their planning and negotiating skills, and to understand the full scope and requirements of a brief.

 

  • Sketchbooks, technical notebooks, and contextual files give students and tutors a way of reflecting on how ideas and concepts have developed. It also gives an indication of the depth of thought, analysis, evaluation and synthesis of ideas that has taken place. This is both a teaching/learning tool and an assessment tool.

 

  • Electronic learning resources (electronic journals, internet, videos, blogs) develop skills of research and analysis, and they encourage students to become independent learners embracing the notion of professional self-development. ‘Canvas’ is used as an on-line repository of module and programme information, timetable, tutorial booking tool and discussion forum as well as a notice board to inform students of events.

 

 

 

  1. How will I be assessed and given feedback? 

 

Written examinations

 

Coursework

Practical assessments

 

A summary of the types of teaching, learning and assessment in each module of the programme can be found in the Matrix of Modes of Teaching.

 

The generic assessment criteria which we use can be found here. Some programmes use subject-specific assessment criteria which are based on the generic ones.

 

This programme uses the Generic University Assessment Criteria

YES

For written assignments

This programme uses the Subject Specific Assessment Criteria

YES

For practical projects

 

The University regulations can be found here.

 

  • Studio practice tests your deeper understanding of materials and process, as well as your ability to plan work over a period of time. Studio practice is the assessment of the practical work produced during the module, and can take a wide range of forms. For example, in the earlier stage of the programme students might present their studio practice at their desk spaces. In stages 2 and 3 some assessments of work will take place in public exhibition spaces where you can show the professional presentation of work. Most modules require the identification of a final body of work as distinct from tests and experiments and prototypes.

  • Visual research - sketchbooks, technical notebooks, and contextual files give students and tutors a way of reflecting on how ideas and concepts have developed. It also gives an indication of the depth of thought, analysis, evaluation and synthesis of ideas that has taken place, and the influences that have impacted on the creative and technical process. This is both a teaching/learning tool and an assessment tool.

 

  • Professional development portfolio tests your understanding and presentation of professionalism in support of their practice.   

  • Written assignments are used to test knowledge and understanding. They also test the ability to select critical detail from a large amount of information and to interpret, evaluate, organise and present a coherent argument or report based on that information.

  • Seminar and presentations to fellow students and staff are used to test students understanding and knowledge of their practice within the wider context and present it coherently and succinctly to an audience.

 

  • Assessment

If the assessment was made by one member of staff then a second marker will review samples of the work and both assessors will agree the marks before the module assessment board. Level 5 and 6 modules are also sampled by an External Examiner. All marks then go through a Module Assessment Board, which ratifies the grades.

Student feedback on assessment is provided both verbally and in written form, in both cases referring clearly to the assessment criteria and learning outcomes of the module. This enables students to understand the level of their mark, and draws their attention to areas for improvement.

 

 

  1. How does research influence the programme? 

 

The Centre for Research in Art & Design

 

Research is the systematic study of particular questions, issues or problems in order to create new knowledge that is useful for others. University lecturers undertake research, as well as teaching, in order to advance knowledge in their subjects and importantly to develop the curriculum for their students. In art and design subjects, research can take a number of forms including writing articles and books, curating exhibitions, presenting ideas at conferences and making artworks or designs. Your lecturers will use the experience and knowledge that they gain from this in order to support you to achieve your goals.

 

Research in art and design at the University of Sunderland is focused through ‘The Centre for Research in Art & Design’ part of the Institute for Research in the Arts & Creative Industries. We have a well-established research record, especially in professional art and design practice. This is sometimes known as ‘practice-led’ research. The centre is divided into eight research groups and achieved 40% internationally excellent and world–leading research in the most recent national audits of research quality - REF 2014 and RAE 2008. We also have research students, who are studying PhD and MPhil degrees in most subject areas. These students are undertaking training in research and this is something that you may wish to consider after your degree.

 

Based in the National Glass Centre research is undertaken in both glass and ceramics and is primarily concerned with developing creative practice at a national and international level.  ‘National Glass Centre Research’ and the Ceramics Arts Research Centre University of Sunderland (CARCuos) are both involved with the creation of new artworks, techniques and approaches to creative practice, as well as contextual and historical issues. We also have a strong track record of research students with graduates now working around the world.

 

You are likely to benefit from research in a number of ways. Examples might include:

 

  • Publications by your lecturers in your module reading lists
  • Lecturers giving presentations on their artworks and projects and discussing them in seminars
  • Invitations to visit exhibitions by lecturers
  • Opportunities for you to work alongside your lecturers on research projects
  • Presentations by external contacts made by your lecturers through their research
  • Presentation by PhD students about their research

 

Specific recent examples relevant to your programme include:

 

Senior Lecturer, Colin Rennie teaches computer aided design and this has influenced his art practice. Colin is an expert glassblower, and his development of new ways of fabricating glass artwork using technology reflects on how the field is changing. Colin teaches these methods in the ‘Studio techniques for making’ module. Kevin Petrie (Professor of Glass and Ceramics) and Andrew Livingstone (Professor of Ceramics) have recently published a book with Bloomsbury called ‘The Ceramics Reader’.

This book brings together key texts on the subject of ceramics and the crafts and is used in the ‘Dialogues in Art, Design and Making’ and ‘Dissertation: Your creative context’ modules. Inge Panneels runs her own business as an artist and is also researching the use of maps and mapping by artists. Inge brings her insights as a professional artist into the ‘Professional Practice: Planning Your Creative Career’ module where she helps students research and prepare for life after university.

 

 

SECTION D EMPLOYABILITY

 

  1. How will the programme prepare me for employment?

 

The programme gives you the opportunity to develop skills which you can use in the future. Some skills are more specific than others to the subject area, or to a particular type of activity, but all skills can be applied in a range of employment situations, sometimes in quite unexpected ways. The skills which this programme is designed to develop are listed below.

 

As stated above we emphasise ‘real world’ opportunities as a key aspect of our course. This provides students with a chance to gain professional skills in a safe context as well as helping them to build a professional CV. This programme is focused on helping you gain the making and conceptual skills needed to practice as an artist, designer and maker. Many of our graduates set up businesses and sell their creations through galleries, shops, craft and design fairs, or take commissions. The skills of our graduates also enable them to work in museums and galleries, education, retail management, environmental planning, community work, industrial design, arts administration and funding, arts therapy, events organisation and publishing. Teaching is also a popular route for our graduates and we offer opportunities for students to gain experience of this throughout the programme. Graduates also often continue to study on our MA and PhD programmes.

 

As well as teaching our students the core skills of being an artist, designer or maker, this programme also offers the chance for students to develop a broader range of skills and attitudes that can allow them to work in other areas. These include: creative thinking, team working, presentation skills, writing skills, research skills, digital skills, and time management.

 

We have modules focused on employability and professional skills at each stage. These will help you to develop the core creative skills needs for life as an artist such as drawing for ideas development, researching information about creative careers to give you role models to consider; marketing skills; and promotional skills such as CV development, digital portfolios, websites, social media, letter heads and stationary, and business planning. The careers and employability service are closely linked to the programme and the ‘Sunderland Futures’ offer, which supports students with employability, is promoted at each stage.

 

There are also opportunities for on-campus students outside your programme of study.

 

We actively encourage and support our students to apply for the University of Sunderland’s ‘Futures Fund’ scheme. This is an open competition where students can apply for funding to help support an opportunity that will help develop their learning or career prospects. Our have been successful in using this to attend master classes, take study trips to other countries, or undertake internships. Students on this programme have also been successful in gaining funded summer internships. We encourage students to take part in competitions such as the Stevens Architectural Glass Competition and Gillian Dickinson Young Sculpture Award. It is important to note that the programme is designed so that opportunities students undertake outside of the programme can be factored into some of the modules and assessed. For example, some of the live projects that students can apply for at stage 2 can be assessed in the ‘Engaging with your creative community’ module. Several students set up their own businesses or exhibit their work while a student and aspects of this can often be assessed at stage 3 for example in the ‘Professional Practice: Planning Your Creative Career’ module or reflected upon in the ‘Dissertation: Your Creative Context’ module.

 

For information about other opportunities available to our students who study on campus, click here.

 

Additional opportunities to develop your experiences more widely will vary if you study at one of our partner colleges. For information about the extra-curricular activities available in any of our colleges please contact the college direct. 

 

 

  1. Professional statutory or regulatory body (PSRB) accreditation. 

 

PSRB accreditation is not relevant to this programme 

PSRB accreditation is currently being sought for this programme

 

This programme currently has PSRB accreditation

 

 

 

SECTION E ADMISSIONS, LEARNING ENVIRONMENT AND SUPPORT

 

  1. What are the admissions requirements?

 

The University’s standard admissions requirements can be found in the university regulations. Programme-specific requirements which are in addition to those regulations are given below. 

 

Where possible all applicants are personally interviewed by members of the programme team. Particular emphasis is placed on the portfolio of the applicant and their suitability for the subject. Interviews are considered important so that the programme structure and content can be explained to ensure applicants understand the nature of the programme fully and have the opportunity to ask questions. Potential applicants may attend an advisory interview at an agreed time before making an official application, to discuss aspirations and possible portfolio adjustment. Candidates will normally make application through the UCAS system and then be asked to attend for Interview.

 

In common with the existing undergraduate provision within the Arts and Design Area, this programme would normally require 122 UCAS tariff points from 2 A levels/AVCEs or equivalent. In addition, points from AS levels may be counted towards the tariff total. A maximum of 20 points from Level 3 Key Skills would be accepted. UCAS Tariff equivalents to the above would be accepted for BTEC Nationals, Scottish Highers: and the Irish Leaving Certificate. Normal University requirements for applicants from access courses will apply. 

 

 

 

 

Students who have passed the University of Sunderland Art and Design Foundation Year can also progress to this programme.

 

Can students enter with advanced standing?

Yes

 

 

If yes, to which Stages?

Stage 1

 

Stage 2

Stage 3

Stage 4

 

 

The course will also take direct entry to stages 2 and 3 two or three depending on prior experience or having suitable qualifications such as HND or Foundation degree. The key criteria here will be based on relevant previous experience and this will be assessed at interview.

 

The University has a process by which applicants whose experience to date already covers one or more modules of the programme they are applying for may seek Accreditation of Prior Learning (APL). Full details can be found here but if you think that this may be relevant to you, please contact the department which offers the programme you are interested in.

 

 

  1. What kind of support and help will there be?

 

You will have access to the programme handbook online. Every student, at the beginning of the induction period, is supplied with detailed timetables of the induction activities and of the course on to which he/she has enrolled. Students requesting or showing signs of needing additional support or who have specific learning needs will be advised and directed to the support available.

 

On commencement of the programme, you will be allotted a Personal Support Tutor who will support you through your studies. This tutor supports you by helping you to understand and navigate through your programme and also, where appropriate, by acting as a signpost to refer you to any of the other support systems within the University or beyond. Personal Tutorials will normally take place four times a year, either individually or in groups, to discuss programme-specific issues and identify any personal difficulties and to help to develop and maintain the students progress. Where needed students will be referred to other student services, Financial Counsellor, Students Union or other appropriate agencies. Students are informed about the careers service, the counselling service, the chaplaincy and the international student service during induction and when necessary during tutorials. The careers and employability service also delivers aspects of the programme.

 

All on-campus students have access to the University’s central support services including Counselling, Disability Service, Health and Well-being, Chaplaincy, financial support and advice, International Office and Careers and Employability Service. The Students’ Union provides an independent service, which offers advice and support across the full range of personal and academic problems which students may encounter. Students wishing to lodge a complaint or an appeal can seek advice from the Students’ Union or from ‘The Registry’. Full details of all these services can be found on the University’s web-site. Where appropriate, academic or support staff in the Faculty will sign-post students to these specialist services. There is a student ‘Gateway’ on each campus that provides a ‘one stop shop’ for student advice.

 

The University provides a range of professional support services including health and well-being, counselling, disability support, and a Chaplaincy. Click on the links for further information.

 

 

  1. What resources will I have access to?

 

On campus

In a partner college

 

By distance learning

 

 

On campus

 

General Teaching and Learning Space

 

IT

Library

VLE

Laboratory

 

Studio

Performance space

 

Other specialist

Technical resources 

 

Please note that the list below might be updated and modified from time to time.

 

GLASS STUDIO WORKSHOPS

 

Hotshop

  • 2 custom furnaces 150 kilo pots
  • 4 gloryholes:
  • 4 rolling yokes
  • 4 toploaders (moveable):
  • 4 benches
  • 1 pipe warmer
  • 4 annealers
  • 5 marvers:

 

 

Cold Workshop

  • 1 linisher
  • 1 diamond saws, 1 diamond drill, 1 large diamond lathes
  • 3 polishing machines
  • 1 sandblaster
  • 1 large flatbed grinders, 2 small flatbed grinders
  • assorted selection of air grinding tools and disks
  • 1 band saw
  • Suna grinder and disks
  • 2 Diamond Glass lathes

 

 

Glass Kilns

  • ‘Baby kiln’ 130 x 80 x 80 cm interior
  • 1 large flatbed kiln 200 x 150 cm interior
  • 2 small flatbed kilns 100 x 50 cm interior
  • 8 casting kilns (various sizes)
  • 2 hot pour casting kilns
  • 2 stained glass kiln
  • 2 bead kilns
  • 2 test kilns

 

 

Mould making Studio

  • Dry material /dust extraction system
  • 3 gel-flex melters
  • 2 wax melting pots
  • 1 wax steamers
  • Drying cabinet
  • Custom made stone topped tables

 

 

Waterjet area

  • Waterjet Sweden waterjet cutting machine 3 x 2 m cutting area
  • PC with Lantec software

 

 

‘Digital Studio’

  • Maker bot 2 3d printer.
  • Form lab laser printer
  • Delta wasp 3d clay printer.
  • einScan 3d scanner

 

 

Print Studio

  • Large screen print bed, Large exposure unit, Drying cabinet
  • Assorted screen frames

 

 

Architectural Glass

  • 1 Wizard edge grinders, 7 light boxes, Vertical glass easels
  • 8 large custom made worktables

 

 

Lampwork workshop

  • 7 work stations with burners,
  • Ribbon burner,
  • 7 Tool kits

 

 

 

CERAMICS STUDIO

 

  • 13 throwing wheels
  • Slab roller, 80cm 150cm
  • Extruder
  • Whirler
  • 2 plaster turning lathes,
  • Large drying cabinet,
  • slip-casting room with slip casting plant.
  • glazing room,
  • Glaze spray booth
  • 2 Pug mills
  • 7 ceramics kilns various sizes
  • 1 large gas kiln 100 x 100 x 150 cm interior
  • 1 medium gas kiln 60 x60 x 60 cm interior
  • 2 top loading kilns
  • Portable Raku Kiln
  • 3D Ceramic Printer

 

IT Suite

8 PCs with scanners, MS Windows software, Adobe Photoshop software, Rhino 3d modeling software AutoCad Software, Macromedia Studio Max software, Printers, Laminator, Data and slide projectors

 

 

FABLAB KIT

 

Epilogue Laser cutter

This is a 40W CO2 laser with a bed size of 600x300mm. It can cut a range of materials such as paper, card, acrylic, wood and laser ply up to a thickness of 6mm. It can also be used to mark the surface of mirror, glass and stone so images can be transferred to give an effect similar to sand blasting. It is a very simple piece of equipment to use and just requires images to be prepared in a vector format.

 

CadCam Tech FB1500 Laser cutter

This is a 50W CO2 laser with a bed size of 1400x900. As with the Epilog, it can cut a range of materials such as paper, card, acrylic, wood and laser ply but can up slightly thicker materials (up to a thickness of 10mm). Also available with this machine is a rotary axis unit that enables round objects to be marked e.g. engraving the surface of a glass.

 

Vinyl Cutter

Like the laser cutters, the machine uses vector images to cut an image however, a small knife is used to make the cuts rather than a laser. A stock is kept of various colours of self-adhesive vinyls as well as a range of colours suitable for transferring to materials (t-shirts, etc) via a heat press.

 

Electronics bench

Range of microelectronics equipment to build and test circuits. Mainly centred around the Arduino family of microcontrollers which can be used to build circuits that range from something simple such as controlling a few LED lights to something far more complex with sensors or motors.

 

ShopBot (large CNC router)

Common on with other digital fabrication equipment in the FabLab, the ShopBot uses vector drawings to cut and shape materials. This machine uses a powerful high speed spindle to cut through materials up to 150mm thick with a bed size of 2440x1220 mm.

A much broader range of materials can be used with this machine compared to the laser such as any grade of plywood, wood and plastics.

 

Roland Mill (small CNC router)

Similar to the ShopBot, however this machine is much small and far more precise with milling cutters that are as small as 0.2mm. This machine is primarily used for producing circuit boards for electronics use but it can be used to engrave and shape materials such as plastic or jewellers wax.

 

3D Printing

 

Ultimakers: We have 5 Ultimakers (2+, 2+ Extended, Go’s) that are simple to use 3D printers. We stock a range of PLA materials in different colours (including a “natural” PLA that is suitable for burn out mould making).

 

Stratasys Dimension 1200es: This is a much higher spec printer than the Ultimaker and prints in ABS which is a much tougher, engineering grade of plastic that can be used to make functional, end use parts. The build volume is relatively large at 254 x 254 x 305 mm and the build chamber is heated during printing to ensure prints do not warp or develop internal stresses. This printer also prints in using two materials, the second of which is a dissolvable support material which enable the printing of complex models without the complication of removing support material that may be fused to the model.

 

ZCorp 510: Unlike the other 3D printers at the FabLab, this machine binds layers of a plaster-like that material to build up layers in fine detail. The printer has a build volume of 254 x 356 x 203mm and prints in full-colour either from coloured 3D designs or from jpeg or tiff images that can be mapped onto the 3D object you create.

 

Workshop

We have a range of workshop tools such as drills, saws, scroll saw, work benches to cut and work with a range of materials.

 

 

UNIVERSITY LIBRARY

 

University Library & Study Skills supports students with the provision of a high quality learning environment, comprehensive print and online resource collections, 1400 study places, 300+ PCs, online module reading lists and study skills support. All students have the full use of the University’s two libraries. Resources for Artist Designer Maker: Glass and Ceramics students are located in the Murray Library. The libraries are accessible during extensive opening hours and in core teaching weeks both Murray and St Peter’s libraries have provision for additional unstaffed access. The latest opening hours can be found on the library website at library.sunderland.ac.uk/about-us/opening-hours/

 

The UL&SS web site library.sunderland.ac.uk provides a gateway to information resources and services for students both on and off campus. Tailored resources and support are available from specific subject areas of the UL&SS web site and a ‘Live Chat’ function enables student to access library support and help 24/7. Module reading lists are live interactive resource lists available from within online module spaces on Canvas and the University’s Library website. University Library Services includes a robust study skills support offer, available to all our students across the University both on and off campus, contributing to students’ attainment and the quality of their experience. Skills delivery options include online skills support, on campus assignment skills drop-in events, embedded skills sessions, dissertation workshops and one to one support.

 

Information about the University’s facilities can be found here.

 

  1. Are there any additional costs on top of the fees?

 

No, but all students buy some study materials such as books and provide their own basic study materials.

 

Yes (optional) All students buy some study materials such as books and provide their own basic study materials. In addition there are some are additional costs for optional activities associated with the programme (see below)

 

Yes (essential) All students buy some study materials such as books and provide their own basic study materials. In addition there are some are essential additional costs associated with the programme (see below)


 

Your programme fees include access to basic materials and equipment such as standard types of glass, clay, plaster for mould making, and kiln firings. During the programme you are likely to want to augment this with some additional materials depending on your particular personal projects. How much you chose to spend will depend on you and spending more on materials does not necessarily lead to better results. You may also be asked to attend visits to galleries and studios in the region from time to time and this may require some travel expenses. We will also ask that you equip yourself with a basic tool kit, drawing materials and sketchbooks. The total costs of this will be variable but could be around £100 per year.

 

 

  1. How are student views represented?

All taught programmes in the University have student representatives for each Stage (year-group) of each programme who meet in a Student-Staff Liaison Committee (SSLC) where they can raise students’ views and concerns. The Students’ Union and the faculties together provide training for student representatives. SSLCs and focus groups are also used to obtain student feedback on plans for developing existing programmes and designing new ones. Feedback on your programme is obtained every year through module questionnaires and informs the annual review of your programme. Student representatives are also invited to attend Programme and Module Studies Boards which manage the delivery and development of programmes and modules.  Various Faculty committees, particularly Faculty Student Success Committee, Academic Development Committee and Quality Management Sub-Committee also have student representation. This allows students to be involved in higher-level plans for teaching and learning. There is a parallel structure at university level on which students are represented by sabbatical officers who are the elected leaders of the Students’ Union.

 

The University’s student representation and feedback policy can be found here.

 

Final-year students are also invited to complete a National Student Survey (NSS) which asks a standard set of questions across the whole country. The results of this are discussed at Programme Studies Boards and at Faculty Student Success Committee to identify good practice which can be shared and problems which need to be addressed. We rely heavily on student input to interpret the results of the NSS and ensure that we make the most appropriate changes.

 

We are happy to hear your views throughout the programme and suggestions are welcome. At the end of modules we will ask for feedback on the module so we can we can factor that into developments in the following year.

 

 

SECTION F QUALITY MANAGEMENT

 

  1. National subject benchmarks

 

The Quality Assurance Agency for Higher Education publishes benchmark statements which give guidance as to the skills and knowledge which graduates in various subjects and in certain types of degree are expected to have. These can be found here.

 

Are there any benchmark statements for this programme?

YES

 

 

The subject benchmark for this programme is: Art and Design (2017)

 

The QAA also publishes a Framework for Higher Education Qualifications (FHEQ) which defines the generic skills and abilities expected of students who have achieved awards at a given level and with which our programmes align. The FHEQ can be found here.

 

 

  1. How are the quality and standards of the programme assured?

 

The programme is managed and quality assured through the University’s standard processes. Programmes are overseen by Module and Programme Studies Boards which include student representatives. Each year each module leader provides a brief report on the delivery of the module, identifying strengths and areas for development, and the programme team reviews the programme as a whole.  The purpose of this is to ensure that the programme is coherent and up-to-date, with suitable progression from one Stage to another, and a good fit (alignment) between what is taught and how students learn and are assessed - the learning outcomes, content and types of teaching, learning and assessment. Student achievement, including progress between Stages of the programme and degree classification, is kept under review. The programme review report is sent to the Programme Studies Board which in turn reports issues to the University’s Quality Management Sub-Committee.

 

External examiners are appointed to oversee and advise on the assessment of the programme. They ensure that the standards of the programme are comparable with those of similar programmes elsewhere in the UK and are also involved in the assessment process to make sure that it is fair. They are invited to comment on proposed developments to the programme. Their reports are sent to the Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Academic) as well as to the Faculty so that issues of concern can be addressed.

 

All programmes are reviewed by the University on a six-yearly cycle to identify good practice and areas for enhancement. Programmes are revalidated through this review process. These reviews include at least one academic specialist in the subject area concerned from another UK university.

 

Further information about our quality processes can be found here.

 

 

 


Matrix of modes of teaching, learning and assessment for Stage 1

Module

Code

Core / option

Modes of T&L

Modes of Assessment

LO S1

LO K1

LO S2

LO K2

LO K3

LO S3

LO S4

LO S5

Studio Techniques for Making 

ADM101

Core

Taught studio inductions/ Demonstrations

Practical work

Taught & assessed

Taught & assessed

 

 

Taught & assessed

 

 

Taught & assessed

Ideas into Practice 

ADM102

Core

Lectures/seminars

Group Reviews/tutorials with team

Workshop activities including drawing workshops

Practical work. Visual and contextual research

Taught & assessed

Taught & assessed

 

 

Taught & assessed

Taught & assessed

Taught & assessed

Taught & assessed

Contexts for art, design and making 

ADM103

Core

Lectures, Seminar, presentations and artist talks, Tutorials

Written texts, Powerpoint presentations

 

 

Taught & assessed

Taught & assessed

Taught & assessed

Taught & assessed

 

Taught & assessed

 

Learning Outcomes Stage 1 – Skills  

By the end of this Stage of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

  • S1.  Demonstrated essential skills and necessary techniques for the manipulation and use of the range of materials and equipment offered within the programme. (QAA – S2)
  • S2.  Demonstrated research skills in information retrieval in order to develop, reflect upon and communicate their ideas. (QAA – S1, S6, S12)
  • S3.  Demonstrated skills to organise and manage a diverse workload in order to produce work by a set deadline. (QAA – S8, S9, S11)
  • S4.  Demonstrated a variety of ways in which their ideas can be communicated select the appropriate materials and processes to realise these ideas. (QAA – S3, S4, S5)
  • S5. Demonstrated key skills appropriate in communication, working with and benefiting from the judgements of others and improving own learning and problem solving. (QAA – S7, S10, S13)

Learning Outcomes Stage 1 – Knowledge

By the end of this Stage of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

  • K1.  Demonstrated a basic understanding of the properties, qualities and application of materials and technologies covered within the programme and how these might be used in artist, designer, and/or maker practice (QAA – K3)
  • K2.  Demonstrated a basic knowledge and understanding of the broad context of the historical and contemporary issues/practices in art, design and making. (QAA – K1, K2)
  • K3.  Demonstrated some knowledge and understanding of the significance of the work of other practitioners. (QAA – K4)

 

 

 

 

 

Matrix of modes of teaching, learning and assessment for Stage 2

Module

Code

Core / option

Modes of T&L

Modes of Assessment

LO S6

LO K4

LO S7

LO K5

LO S8

LO K6

LO S9

LO S10

Making for Place, Space and Audience

ADM201

Core

Lectures, Workshops, Demos, tutorials, visits, assisted making

Practical work

Taught and assessed

Taught and assessed

 

Taught and assessed

Taught and assessed

Taught and assessed

Taught and assessed

Taught and assessed

Making for Exhibition

ADM202

Core

Tutorials, Reviews, Workshops, exhibition

Practical work. Visual and contextual research

Taught and assessed

Taught and assessed

Taught and assessed

Taught and assessed

Taught and assessed

 

 

 

Dialogues in Art, Design and Making

ADM 203

Core

Lectures, seminars, tutorials

Written texts, Powerpoint presentations

 

 

Taught and assessed

Taught and assessed

 

Taught and assessed

Taught and assessed

Taught and assessed

Professional Practice Engaging with the creative community

ADM204

Core

Seminars, workshops, artist talks, Tutorials

 

 

 

Taught and assessed

 

Taught and assessed

Taught and assessed

 

 

 

Learning Outcomes Stage 2 – Skills

By the end of this Stage of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

  • S6.  Demonstrated the ability to identify and use appropriate skills and techniques in the manipulation of the materials offered within the programme. (QAA – S2)
  • S7.  Demonstrated skills in research to retrieve, manage and evaluate a wide range of information in order to develop, reflect upon and communicate their ideas (QAA S1, S6, S12)
  • S8.  Demonstrated skills to independently generate and implement a plan to produce work and an ability to accommodate change and uncertainty. (QAA – S8, S9, S11)
  • S9.  Demonstrated a wide variety of ways in which their ideas can be communicated and carefully consider and analyse the selection and use of appropriate materials and processes for their intended audience. (QAA – S3, S4, S5)
  • S10.  Demonstrated skills appropriate in communication, working with and benefiting from the judgements of others, improving own learning and problem solving. Accept responsibility for determining and achieving goals. (QAA – S7, S10, S13)

Learning Outcomes Stage 2 – Knowledge

By the end of this Stage of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

  • K4.  Demonstrated a broad understanding of the materials and technologies relevant to artists, designers and makers (QAA – K3)
  • K5.  Demonstrated a sufficient specialist knowledge and understanding of the broad context of the historical and contemporary themes/practices relevant to artists, designers and makers. (QAA – K1, K2)
  • K6.  Demonstrated a broad knowledge and critical understanding of the significance of the work of other practitioners. (QAA – K4)

 

Matrix of modes of teaching, learning and assessment for Stage 3

Module

Code

Core / option

Modes of T&L

Modes of Assessment

LO S11

LO K7

LO S12

LO K8

LO S13

LO K9

LO S14

LO S15

Experiment Visualise, Prototype

ADM301

Core

Tutorials, Seminars and reviews

Practical work

Taught and assessed

Taught and assessed

 

 

Taught and assessed

Taught and assessed

Taught and assessed

 

Refine Resolve Exhibit

ADM302

Core

Lectures/seminars

Group Reviews/tutorials with team

Workshop activities including drawing workshops

Practical work.

Taught and assessed

Taught and assessed

 

Taught and assessed

Taught and assessed

Taught and assessed

Taught and assessed

Taught and assessed

Dissertation: Your Creative Context

ADM303

Core

Seminars, presentations and artist talks, Tutorials

Written text

 

 

Taught and assessed

Taught and assessed

Taught and assessed

Taught and assessed

 

 

Professional Practice: Planning Your Creative Career

ADM304

Core

Lectures, Seminars, Workshops, Visits, Tutorials

Career Planning Portfolio including market research, digital portfolio and promotional materials

 

 

Taught and assessed

Taught and assessed

Taught and assessed

Taught and assessed

Taught and assessed

Taught and assessed

 

Learning Outcomes Stage 3 – Skills

By the end of this Stage of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

  • S11.  Applied specific skills in the manipulation of the materials selected for their proposed project. (QAA – S2)
  • S12.  Utilised specialised research techniques to retrieve, manage and evaluate a wide range of information in order to develop, critically reflect upon and communicate their ideas. (QAA – S1, S6, S12)
  • S13.  Exercised appropriate critical judgment to independently generate and implement a plan to produce work and an ability to accommodate change and uncertainty. (QAA – S8, S9, S11)
  • S14.  Demonstrated specialised and innovative ways in which their ideas can be communicated and implement critical judgment on the selection and use of appropriate materials and processes for an intended audience. (QAA – S3, S4, S5)
  • S15.  Demonstrated an ability to initiate and lead a project and to accept accountability for setting and achieving goals, working with and benefiting from the judgements of others and to present their results using professional skills appropriate in communication. (QAA – S7, S10, S13),

Learning Outcomes Stage 3 – Knowledge

By the end of this Stage of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

  • K7. Demonstrated a specialised understanding of the materials and technologies relevant to art, design and making (QAA – K3)
  • K8.  The ability to critically evaluate and demonstrate a systematic and coherent specialist knowledge and understanding of the broad context of the historical and contemporary styles/ practices (QAA – K1, K2)
  • K9.  Applied a professional level of knowledge and critical understanding of the significance of the work of other practitioners (QAA – K4)

SITS SUMMARY PROGRAMME/SHORT COURSE DETAILS

 

PROGRAMME DETAILS

 

Exit Award: Title of programme/award

BA (Hons) Artist Designer Maker: Glass and Ceramics

If replacement for existing, specify title of old

BA (Hons) Glass and Ceramics

Faculty(ies):

Arts and Creative Industries

School:

Art and Design

SITS Programme/Short Course code[1]

 

Programme Studies Board[2]

Glass and Ceramics

UCAS code[3] (if applicable).  If other please state method.

 

JACS code[4]

W700

Qualification Level / Qualification Aim

Level 6

BA (Hons)

Modes of delivery and duration:

 

Full time       Yes – 3 years

Sandwich     No  

Part time      Yes – 6 years

Work Based Learning  No

On-campus  Yes

Off-campus  No 

CSP Only. Other subject combinations not allowed with this subject:

N/A

Programme/Subject/Short Course Leader:

Robert Winter

Date of Approval /Modification/Review

5 September 2017 (Validation Date)

Date of next review (Quality Support to complete)

UG Art and Design review – 2020/21

Start date of programme/Short Course

September 2018

Number of intakes per annum and likely month(s) intake(s) starts.

1

 

FUNDING DETAILS

 

Confirm funding arrangements for programme e.g. HEFCE/TDA/NHS/Other[5]

HEFCE

If it is TDA, is it primary/secondary/F.E./Other (please state)

N/A

Is the programme Open or Closed[6]:

OPEN

 

ACCREDITING BODY

No

If yes please attach completed form AQH-Ciii2

 

PROGRAMME SPECIFIC REGULATIONS

Are there to be programme specific regulations?

No

If yes, please attach completed form AQH-B3 Appendix 2 or AQH-B8.

 

COLLABORATIVE:

Please complete details

UK                     no

 

Overseas           no

Institution                                      Collaborative model[7]         Funding arrangements[8]

 

…………………………………………..            ………………………………         ….……………………..

 

…………………………………………..            ………………………………         ………………………..

 

…………………………………………..            ………………………………         …………………………

 

 

  INTERIM AWARD SCHEDULE

 

Interim award title

Credits required

Interim structure

 

 

Certificate of Higher Education

 

120

 

ADM101 – Studio Techniques for Making(60)

ADM102 – Ideas into Practice(40)

ADM103 – Key Themes for Art, Design and Making(20)

 

 

Diploma of Higher Education

 

240

 

ADM201 – Making for Place, Space and Audience(40)

ADM202 – Making for Exhibition(40)

ADM203 – Dialogues in Art, Design and Making(20)

ADM204 – Professional Practice(20)

 

 

 

DETAILS SUPPLIED BY:Professor Kevin Petrie

Professor of Glass and Ceramics and Team Leader (Arts)

 

 


PART B   -  Programme  Regulation/s

Name of programme:Artist Designer Maker: Glass and Ceramics

Title of final award:BA (Hons)

Interim awards[9]:Certificate in Artist Designer Maker: Glass and Ceramics;

Diploma in Artist Designer Maker: Glass and Ceramics;

Ordinary degree in Artist Designer Maker: Glass and Ceramics;

Accreditation:N/A

 

University Regulation:N/A – there are no programme-specific regulations

 

Regulations apply to students

Date the regulations apply

Intakes affected

Stage 1

September 2018

 

Stage 2

September 2019

 

Stage 3

September 2020

 

 

Stage 1

 

Core modules:

Code

Title

Credits

ADM101

Studio Techniques for Making

60

ADM102

Ideas in to Practice

40

ADM103

Key Themes for Art, Design and Making

20

 

Stage 2

 

Core modules

Code

Title

Credits

ADM201

Making for Place, Space and Audience

40

ADM202

Making for Exhibition

40

ADM203

Dialogues in Art, Design and Making

20

ADM204

Professional Practice: Engaging with the Creative Community

20

 

Stage 3

 

Core modules

Code

Title

Credits

ADM301

Experiment Visualise Prototype

40

ADM302

Refine Resolve Exhibit

40

ADM303

Dissertation: Your Creative Context

20

ADM304

Professional Practice: Planning Your Creative Career

20

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Module List

Award, Route (if applicable) and Level

New/Existing/ Modified  Module (N/E/MM)

Module Title

Module Code

Module Credit Value

Whether core or option

Must choose (ie designated option):

Assessment weighting – give % weight for each assessment item

Pre-/co-requisites

Module leader

Other comment (if required)

Date of Entry on SITS.

N/MM only

( After event)

JACS Code

Stage 1

N

Studio Techniques for Making 

ADM101

60

CORE

 

Body of glass and ceramic work 60% Body of metal wood and mixed media work 40%

 

Colin Rennie

 

 

w700

Stage 1

N

Ideas into Practice 

ADM102

40

CORE

 

Visual research and drawing 50%. Two finished bodies of practical work, in two material areas 50%

 

Robert Winter

 

 

w700

Stage 1

N

Key Themes in Art, Design and Making 

ADM103

20

CORE

 

Writing portfolio 50%. Presentations 50%

 

Joe Woodhouse

 

 

w700

Stage 2

N

Making for Place, Space and Audience

ADM201

40

CORE

 

Body of practical work 100%.

 

Jeff Sarmiento

 

 

w700

Stage 2

N

Making for Exhibition

ADM202

40

CORE

 

Practical work 60%. Visual research 30% .Proposal &

Evaluation 10%.

 

Robert Winter

 

 

w700

Stage 2

N

Dialogues in Art, Design and Making

ADM 203

20

CORE

 

Writing portfolio 50%. Presentations 50%

 

Neil Ewens

 

 

w700

Stage 2

N

Professional Practice: Engaging with the Creative Community

ADM204

20

CORE

 

Folder of professional practice materials 70%. Presentation 30%.

 

Cate Watkinson

 

 

w700

Stage 3

N

Experiment. Visualise. Prototype.

ADM301

40

CORE

 

Body of test pieces 30%.  Prototype 30%. Portfolio of images and sketchbook work 40%

 

Colin Rennie

 

 

w700

Stage 3

N

Refine. Resolve. Exhibit.

ADM302

40

CORE

 

Presentation of final studio 70%. Supporting work 30%                                           

 

Colin Rennie

 

 

w700

Stage 3

N

Dissertation: Your Creative Context

ADM303

20

CORE

 

4500-5500 written illustrated text 100%

 

Jeff Sarmiento

 

 

w700

Stage 3

N

Professional Practice: Planning Your Creative Career

ADM304

20

CORE

 

Market Research 60%. Presentation of ‘professional package’ 40%

 

Cate Watkinson

 

 

w700

 

 


[1] To be allocated in consultation with MISD team in Planning and Finance

[2] Programme Studies/Assessment Board that will have management responsibilities for the programme.

[3] Please contact Admissions Manager for code

[4] JACS code = e.g. (V1) History, (G5) Computing Science, etc. for information contact relevant Faculty Associate Dean (See QAA Website http://www.qaa.ac.uk/WorkWithUs/Documents/jacs_codes.pdf)

[5] Please confer with Amanda Watson for funding status for programme

[6] An Open programme constitutes an open admissions policy.  A Closed programme is normally specific to one client only.  If in doubt please consult Academic Services or Planning and Finance.

 

[7] As per QAE guidelines

[8] Please contact Amanda Watson for confirmation of funding details

[9] Same as main award unless agreed otherwise at validation – eg to meet PSRB requirements