Attachments

 

 

Quality Handbook

 

 

Programme Specification Template - Undergraduate

 

SECTION A:CORE INFORMATION

 

  1.  

Name of programme:

Applied Investigation

  1.  

Award title:

BA Honours

  1.  

Programme linkage:

 

Is this part of group of linked programmes between which students can transfer at agreed points?

No

 

  1.  

Is the programme a top-up only?

 

No

  1.  

Does the programme have a Foundation Year (Level 3) associated with it so that students enter for a four-year programme and progress directly from the Foundation Year to Stage 1 without having to re-apply?

 

No

  1.  

Level of award:

 

Level 5, Level 6

  1.  

Awarding Body:

University of Sunderland

  1.  

Department:

Business

  1.  

Programme Studies Board:

Corporate and Work Based Learning

  1.  

Programme Leader:

 

Ian Carr/Emma Spooner

 


  1. How and where can I study the programme?

 

At Sunderland:

 

Full-time on campus

 

Part-time on campus

 

As work-based learning full-time

As work-based learning part-time

 

As a full-time sandwich course

 

As a part-time sandwich course

 

By distance learning

 

 

At the University of Sunderland London campus: 

 

Full-time on campus

 

Part-time on campus

 

As work-based learning full-time

As work-based learning part-time

 

As a full-time sandwich course

 

As a part-time sandwich course

 

By distance learning

 

 

At a partner college:

 

Full-time in the UK 

 

Part-time in the UK

 

Full-time overseas

 

Part-time overseas

 

By distance learning

 

As a full-time sandwich course in the UK

 

As a part-time sandwich course in the UK

 

As a full-time sandwich course overseas

 

As a part-time sandwich course overseas

 

As work-based learning full-time in the UK 

 

As work-based learning part-time overseas

 

Other (please specify)

 

 

  1. How long does the programme take?

 

 

Min number of years / months

Max number of years / months

Full-time

 

 

Part-time

 

 

Distance learning

 

 

Work-based learning

2 years

6 years

 

For start-dates please see the current edition of the Prospectus or contact the relevant department at the University. For start-dates for programmes delivered in a partner college, please contact the relevant college.

 

SECTION B:FURTHER CORE INFORMATION 

 

Use Outline Programme Proposal Form for ADC for questions 13 to 25

 

  1. Learning and teaching strategy. 

Our aim is to ensure the approach to teaching and learning on the Applied Investigation programme is ‘engaging’ for students. This means that the learning journey is taken beyond consultation or participation and is instead, a rich and active partnership where students work alongside staff, other students and their organisations as partners. Our philosophy is to ensure Sunderland Business School provides an environment within which students, staff and organisations engage in ongoing narrative that aims to bring about demonstrable enhancement of the educational experience, student learning journey, student knowledge and skills. This requires that we continuously improve our learning environment based on personal engagement with students, collaboration between students, academic staff and organisations. It is where students are seen as an active part of the system because they are ‘experts in their student experience. It is an explicit intention to ensure students are encouraged, inspired and motivated by their learning and they see the relevance of what they have learned so they are able to better apply that in the module assessment process, across the programme holistically, and importantly within their chosen careers.

 

The philosophy adopts what is classed as a 'Learning Centred Paradigm' i.e. it situates learners at the centre of their learning journey. It empowers and motivates students, creates engagement, enhances satisfaction and supports student achievement and ultimately effective performance in the workplace. Importantly it considers students as partners in the learning journey. Partnership is framed as ‘a process of student engagement, understood as staff, students’ and employers learning and working together to foster engaged student learning and engaging learning and teaching enhancement. It demands all participants are actively engaged in and stand to gain from the process of learning and working together’ (HEA, 2014 p.10). The approach is positively linked with learning gain and achievement, is sophisticated in its approach and offers a more authentic relationship between students, academic staff and employers, with the explicit intention of delivering a genuinely transformative learning experience for all (HEA, 2014: Cook-Sather, Bovill and Felten, 2014).

 

Our philosophy will do the following:

  1. Transition and induct students so they are ready for their learning journey
  2. Enable students to develop their personal and professional capital – this kind of capital derives from a sense of belonging and from active relationships with others.
  3. Support the development of academic skills and understanding of the learning process ‘how to learn’
  4. Allow students to make sense of their learning through assimilating and integrating the information they have received (across the module and programme and how this manifests itself in the workplace)
  5. Stimulate critical thinking amongst students to enhance their professional capability in the workplace
  6. Give the students opportunities to express themselves and develop their academic and professional voice
  7. Create an environment where the student, academic and where appropriate, the organisation create a more cohesive relationship (trust)
  8. Enable opportunities for developmental feedback and feed-forward to enhance learning, personal and professional development
  9. Encourage the cognitive and affective development of the students
  10. Create greater clarity, integration and alignment between the knowledge transfer (lecture), the workshop/seminar activities, the independent learning students need to engage with and the assignment (constructive alignment)  this usually leads to much greater engagement with independent learning as the student sees it as an important element of their learning
  11. To develop the students professional identity (personal distinctiveness) and attune that to impact positively on their chosen career path.

 

  1. Retention strategy

The Learning Teaching and Assessment Strategy recognises the University’s strong and continuing commitment to access and equality of opportunity and in light of the University’s success in widening participation, the programme team are concerned to ensure that all learners are retained through receiving appropriate support and guidance throughout the duration of their study and beyond. Student support however, is also a principal motivation in the design of the programme and as such, there is extensive support and focus on academic practice, developing critical thinking skills, research and critical reflection. 

 

  1. Any other information

Students are work based learners who have practical experience and expertise in their profession and in relation to the subjects being taught, which they will bring to their studies. Many will not have experienced higher education before and will typically be returning to study to enhance their career prospects and develop their professional practice. Their experience will be an advantage in terms of their knowledge and a key area of development will be in academic research and writing skills. For this reason there is extensive study support available to all students of the programme

As part-time, work based learners there will be support study skills development and transference of learning into the workplace, which will be facilitated by module tutors and leaders and project supervisors who are highly experienced in work based learning and supporting work based learners to achieve high standards. Support is available in the classroom, via email and telephone and through online or face to face coaching/feedback sessions.  The purpose of these sessions is to:

  • Support critical reflection on learning and feedback to aid personal and professional development
  • Identify opportunities for enhancing career prospects

 

Studies Advice

The academic tutor or supervisor will be the first point of contact for studies advice on particular tasks that learners have been asked to complete.  Academic tutors and supervisors will meet with students at key points through the programme with specific intentions to support reflection on learning and support progress with the final programme assessment.

 

Personal Development Planning

The personal development planning (PDP) process provides an opportunity for learners to practice self-management skills that are beneficial to them both as students and as employees. It assists learners to:

  • Take responsibility for their own learning
  • Be aware of how learning relates to a wider context
  • Improve general skills for study and career management
  • Provide evidence of achievements

 

SECTION C:TEACHING AND LEARNING

 

  1. What is the programme about?

The overall aims and objectives of this programme are reflected within the overall aims and objectives of the University of Sunderland’s Work-Based Learning framework. Specifically this programme aims to develop critical and reflective practitioners with the requisite skills and knowledge relevant to professional practice as investigators.

 

  1. What will I know or be able to do at each Stage of the programme?

By the end of this Stage of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

 

 

Learning Outcomes Stage 2 – skills

S1Identify, analyse and critically evaluate contemporary issues in the workplace around conducting investigations and interviewing witnesses and suspects and demonstrate how it impacts on their working practices

S2Demonstrate an ability to apply theoretical knowledge around investigative practice and interviewing to the workplace and identify their own needs around Continuous Professional Development

 

Learning Outcomes Stage 2 – knowledge

K1Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the contemporary issues impacting on investigative practice and interviewing in the workplace

K2Critically evaluate theoretical and practical issues relevant to the workplace and understand how they are relevant to contemporary practice

 

Learning Outcomes Stage 3 – skills

S3Identify, analyse and critically evaluate their own development needs in the work context, develop and enact strategies to meet these needs

S4Demonstrate an ability to perform the work role to a standard that is satisfactory within the context of their own professional guidelines

 

Learning Outcomes Stage 3 – knowledge

K3Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of their role within their specific employment context.

K4Critically evaluate the major conceptual, theoretical and practical issues relevant to a student’s specific work role and identify how these issues may be relevant to their practice.

 

Learning Outcomes – Ordinary degree

If you are awarded an Ordinary degree you will have achieved the majority of the learning outcomes for the programme studied. However you will have gained fewer credits at Stage 3 than students awarded an Honours degree, your knowledge will typically be less broad and you will typically be less proficient in higher-level skills such as independent learning.

 

  1. What will the programme consist of?

 

Each undergraduate programme consists of a number of Stages from a minimum of 1 to a maximum of 4, each of which is equivalent to a year’s full-time study. The summary below describes briefly what is contained in each Stage. Most programmes have a mixture of core (i.e. compulsory) modules and optional ones, often with increasing choice as you move through the programme and gain in experience. In some programmes the choice of optional modules gives you particular ‘routes’ through the programme.

 

Stage 2: The curriculum is designed following consultation with various professional policing stakeholders as well as previous cohorts of students, to enhance knowledge and skills in areas that are regarded as being important in the performance of the modern investigator’s role. Hence, within the programme, there is a balance between academic research, work-based skills, theory and practical application. In developing the teaching and learning strategies for the programme, the specific needs of employers have been taken into account. Cognisance has also been made of your experience and your professional backgrounds. You will begin the programme with an induction to both the University and the programme itself. You will study three modules which will run consecutively. At the beginning of the programme, we recognize that you may not be familiar with academic research and the initial taught element is designed to introduce you to what this entails in the context of both the police and academic environments. The initial contact hours delivered to the group will be from both the academic tutor and the professional lead. The delivery by the academic tutor will focus on research skills and academic writing, whilst the professional lead will be seeking to identify the issues currently being considered by the investigative community.

 

The first module ‘WBL201 Conducting Investigations’ (40 Credits) focuses on contemporary issues in investigative practice. You will specifically consider how critical thinking skills are applied within investigative practice and will explore the concept of investigative mindset. You will also analyse your own workplace and conduct an assessment to identify the opportunities and obstacles to effective investigation. You will consider relevant, contemporary issues for example changing policing practice, learning and development opportunities and the impact of technology on investigative practice. You will identify an opportunity for change in investigative practice within your workplace. Following your initial contact hours you will then undertake a period of study and will submit two pieces of written work for assessment.

 

The second module ‘WBL202 Contemporary Issues in Interviewing Victims and Witnesses’ (40 Credits) will explore the current models of witness interviewing that are utilised by investigators. You will consider how the models were developed and the reasoning behind the structured approach to interviewing. You will explore how witness memory works and will consider how questioning techniques and the use of a structured approach can impact on the quantity and quality of information that is provided by a victim or witness. You will also consider the validity of written witness statements in the criminal justice process and how the processes involved in recording a witness statement can impact on the quality of the final product. You will submit one written piece of work and complete one group presentation.

 

The third module ‘WBL203 Contemporary Issues in Interviewing Suspects’ (40 Credits) will specifically focus on current issues being faced by suspect interviewers in the workplace. You will consider issues around the disclosure of evidence to a suspect and will explore the impact of early, late or staged disclosure in an interview. You will also focus on how, when and with whom to build rapport during a suspect interview and will develop a working knowledge of what rapport looks like in practice and how it can be applied appropriately in an investigative interview. Finally you will consider the role of Continuous Professional Development in the workplace and specifically apply it to interviewing practice. You will be encouraged to critically reflect on your own experiences and identify an action plan focusing on your professional development. You will submit one written assignment for this module.

 

Stage 3: You will undertake a refresher and enhancement of research skills and will also be introduced to the two modules you will be studying.

 

WBL301 Extending Professional Competence (30 Credits) will introduce learners to the wider impact of their professional actions and activities, both for themselves and their organizations. It provides an opportunity for the participants to consider the changing nature of their professional environment and the knowledge, skills and behaviours required of them to adapt and respond to these changes. Students will be introduced to various theories of Work Place Learning to inform ideas about how their ability to become more competent in the workplace might be realized. Finally, focusing on a process of critical reflection upon their current skills and knowledge, the module asks participants to develop a plan to extend their professional competence and an area central to improving or changing their future performance. In so doing, they will demonstrate an understanding of personal preferences in various situations and create the flexibility to meet changing needs through an understanding of personal preferences.

 

You will also complete WBL308 Research Dissertation in Applied Investigations (90 Credits). The contact hours delivered to the group will be from both the academic tutor and the professional lead. The delivery by the academic tutor will focus on research skills (including research methods) and academic writing, whilst the professional lead will be seeking to identify the issues currently being considered by the Police Service that are focused on the ‘spine’ of the investigation process with a view to identifying potential areas of research. Following the initial input, you will be individually supported by both the professional and academic tutors with the intention of supporting the development of the critical thinking and analytical skills required at this level of study. From this and/or your own professional experiences, you will then be required to choose an area of interest to you and/or your particular force, which is of national significance. You will carry out significant research on that topic and produce a dissertation (including a research proposal) aimed at informing future NPCC strategy. It is hoped that many of these dissertations will be suitable for publication in the Investigator journal.

 

  1. How will I be taught?

 

Scheduled teaching activities

Independent study

Placement

 

 

Lectures: Formal input of models, concepts and theories across a range of subject areas designed to provide not just underpinning knowledge, but to place some structural frameworks into the student learning experience. 

 

Independent Learning: Students will be given a series of structured tasks and activities to undertake.  These will include reading, purposeful writing tasks and thinking, researching material and data from a workplace, personal reflection and diagnostic evaluations. Students will be encouraged to practice these independent skills as an integral part of the programme, without which personal progress is likely to be impaired.

 

Self-Directed Learning: Although this programme is designed to be very practical and skills based, the programme team recognise that sound study and research skills will contribute to the learner’s ability to continually update their knowledge and skills.  Work and project based assignments will demand self-reliance and pro-activity on the part of the learner in order for them to be able to set their own study and research plans.

 

A list of the modules in each Stage of the programme can be found in the Programme Regulations.

 

A summary of the types of teaching, learning and assessment in each module of the programme can be found in the Matrix of Modes of Teaching.

 

  1. How will I be assessed and given feedback? 

 

Written examinations

 

Coursework

Practical assessments

 

 

  • Coursework
  • Essays
  • Reports
  • Group presentation

 

The programme is designed to develop and enhance knowledge that is relevant to the workplace, to enhance the ability to put knowledge into practice in a work environment and integrate this into the work role adding value for the employer. The programme therefore uses a range of formative and summative assessment activities. During the contact days you will engage in formative assessment activities: class discussions around specific practical case studies and practical research activities. The summative assessment is primarily in the written form with one group presentation. Essays, the research proposal and the final dissertation will allow you the opportunity to develop your written communications skills and your research skills. The group presentation allows you to develop your verbal communication and presentation skills. You are also required to produce a reflective log identifying and detailing their development over the programme as well as their own changing learning needs, strengths, weaknesses and identifying priorities for development.

 

 

A summary of the types of teaching, learning and assessment in each module of the programme can be found in the Matrix of Modes of Teaching.

 

The generic assessment criteria which we use can be found here. Some programmes use subject-specific assessment criteria which are based on the generic ones.

 

This programme uses the Generic University Assessment Criteria

YES

 

This programme uses the Subject Specific Assessment Criteria

 

NO

 

The University regulations can be found here.

 

Assessments

 

WBL201 Assessment  001 - Essay

Explore the importance of critical thinking skills to an investigator

 

WBL201 Assessment  002 - Report

Conduct an analysis of your investigative workplace focusing on the opportunities and threats to conducting effective and efficient investigations

 

WBL202 Assessment 001 - Essay

Examine the value of adopting a structured approach to witness interviewing

 

WBL202 Assessment  002 – Group Presentation

Students required to prepare and undertake a group presentation to their peers in the group exploring the question ‘How valid are written witness statements?’

 

WBL203 Assessment – Essay

The assessment is one essay addressing contemporary issues in suspect interviewing and will consider the following themes

  • Stages at which evidence should be presented to a suspect in an interview
  • How interviewers effectively build rapport with an interviewee in a suspect interview
  • How investigators can you continue to develop as an interviewer

 

WBL301 Assessment – Coursework

Part 1 - Students will select a commonly held assumption that they see as significant to the way in which investigative professionalism in the work place has been constructed, exploring this assumption critically, drawing on relevant literature.

Part 2 - Students will present a review of your professional development plans for the future roles, which focuses on a specific area of personal competence critical to their successful future performance. They will consider issues of professional identity, contemporary professional practice and transition management planning.

 

 

 

 

WBL308 Assessment - Dissertation

 

The essence of the assessment for this module is that it will require students to produce a dissertation. There is one assessment made of two specific tasks:

 

Research Plan (10%)

Students will be required to produce a research plan (which will contribute towards 10% of the final module mark

 

Dissertation (90%)

Will require students to undertake the research identified and outlined within the plan.

 

The dissertation (weighted at 90% of the final mark) is designed to be an evaluation of one area of professional practice. Students will be required to demonstrate an ability to be able to research, evaluate and make appropriate recommendations for the improvement of either their own organization’s operational and strategic practice or make a contribution to the development of more general policy and procedures in the selected area of work.

 

The assessment strategy adopted on the programme is designed to;

  • Ensure that all graduates have achieved the learning outcomes for the Programmes. Module Learning Outcomes are directly related to Programme Learning Outcomes and all assessments indicate which Module Learning Outcome they are assessing.
  • Assess achievement, both formatively and summatively over the whole of the degree programme.
  • Distinguish between levels of achievement and reward attainment of objectives
  • Utilise a range of assessment methods and techniques which engage student interest and foster enthusiasm for the subject.

 

Students are informed, via Module Guides, of the nature, timing and criteria for each assessment used. The programme leaders work with staff to ensure that the deadlines for assessed work are spread across the assessment period. All assessments are internally moderated by designated members of the team and by the relevant External Examiners before issue. Careful moderation processes and scrutiny of assessment ensure equivalence of standard and appropriateness of assessment for measuring outcomes. An internal and external moderation operates likewise with regard to completed student work.

 

The assessment strategy requires the use of a diverse range of methods; research assignments, presentations, essays and reports offering the opportunity for students to demonstrate knowledge, understanding and application of both theory and practice. Such methods will also allow students to indicate both the breadth and depth of their directed and independent research.

 

The assessment strategy is designed to achieve all of the module learning outcomes, relates specifically to students’ work based environment and is designed to provide tangible benefit to the students personally, professionally and to the organisations in which they work

 

The University aims to return marked assessments and feedback within 4 working weeks of the assignment submission date after internal moderation processes have been completed. If this is not possible, students will be notified by the Module Leaders when the feedback is available and how it can be obtained.

 

The Academic Misconduct Regulations and associated guidance can be found here. It is the responsibility of students to ensure they are familiar with their responsibilities in regards to assessments and the implications of an allegation of academic misconduct.

 

Students should refer to the University Regulations for information on degree classifications and compensation between modules.

 

 

 

 


 

  1. Teaching, learning and assessment matrix

 

Module

Code

Core /

Option

Credits

Modes of T&L

Modes of Assessment

LOS1

LOK1

LOS2

LOK2

LOS3

LOK3

LOS4

LOK4

Stage Two

 

 

 

 

Conducting Investigations

WBL201

Core

40

VLE; Lectures; Workshops

 

Essay

Report

Taught

Developed

Assessed

Taught

Developed

Assessed

Taught

Developed

Assessed

Taught

Developed

Assessed

 

 

 

 

Contemporary Issues in Interviewing Victims and Witnesses

WBL202

Core

40

VLE; Lectures; Workshops

 

Essay

Group Presentation

Taught

Developed

Assessed

Taught

Developed

Assessed

Taught

Developed

Assessed

Taught

Developed

Assessed

 

 

 

 

Contemporary Issues in Interviewing Suspects

WBL203

Core

40

VLE; Lectures; Workshops

 

Essay

Taught

Developed

Assessed

Taught

Developed

Assessed

Taught

Developed

Assessed

Taught

Developed

Assessed

 

 

 

 

Stage Three

 

 

 

 

Extending Professional Competence

WBL301

Core

30

VLE; Lectures; Workshops

 

Essay

Personal Development Plan

 

 

 

 

Taught

Developed

Assessed

Taught

Developed

Assessed

Taught

Developed

Assessed

Taught

Developed

Assessed

Research Dissertation

WBL308

Core

90

VL; Lectures; Workshop; Personal Tutorials

Dissertation

 

 

 

 

 

Taught

Developed

Assessed

Taught

Developed

Assessed

Taught

Developed

Assessed

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


  1. How does research influence the programme? 

 

The programme is designed to be research-led, research-oriented, research-tutored and research-based. Fundamental to the programme is that research is made meaningful to students so they understand the personal, professional, intellectual and importantly, the practical relevance of research.

 

  • Research-led:  the curriculum emphasises the teaching of the subject content from an academically robust stance i.e. students learn about the latest research in the subject field where the emphasis is on understanding research findings, rather than the research process, and research is presented as information content. Academic depth and rigour is achieved through ensuring the design incorporates current research literature in the field of study. It includes embedding current research both faculty and beyond. Students will be engaged in locating, collecting, referencing, critiquing, applying evidence, challenging assumptions, questioning and interpreting contemporary research articles, conference papers and case studies.
  • Research-oriented:  the curriculum emphasises the process of knowledge construction in the subject. In research-oriented mode, students learn about the research process by which knowledge is produced. This will be embedded through: the teaching of research methods together with embedding context specific research knowledge construction in specific modules.
  • Research-tutored: The programme and curriculum emphasises learning focused on students writing and discussing research papers or essays. Students are actively engaged in evaluating and critiquing the research of others. This will be a focus in all modules across the programme.
  • Research-based:  The programme and curriculum emphasises students undertaking inquiry-based and problem based learning. The learning division between lecturer and student is minimised and the teaching mode is based on cooperation/dialogue. This research may involve primary research within an organisation. 

 

The curriculum is underpinned by the research and consultancy activities of the members of the programme team. Members of the programme team are active as researchers, practitioners and consultants in areas relevant to the programme and this experience is incorporated into the programme and its development.

 

 

SECTION D:EMPLOYABILITY

 

  1. How will the programme prepare me for employment?

 

The programme gives you the opportunity to develop skills which you can use in the future. Some skills are more specific than others to the subject area, or to a particular type of activity, but all skills can be applied in a range of employment situations, sometimes in quite unexpected ways. The skills which this programme is designed to develop are listed below.

 

Employment as an investigator is normally an entry requirement for joining the programme. Consequently, the programme seeks to help you reflect upon your current role and identify your own learning and staff development needs within your work context and to identify new opportunities. In addition, whilst you may not feel the need to make use of the Service, you will have access to the full range of university career guidance facilities. The University Careers and Employability Service is available to current students and graduates for up to 3 years after completion of your programme of study. It provides a comprehensive range of help and careers resources. You will also be offered advice on how you might wish to continue your studies through the MA in Applied Investigations.

 

For information about other opportunities available to our students who study on campus, click here.

 

  1. Particular features of the qualification: N/A

 

  1. Professional statutory or regulatory body (PSRB) accreditation.

 

PSRB accreditation is not relevant to this programme 

PSRB accreditation is currently being sought for this programme

 

This programme currently has PSRB accreditation

 

 

The programme is currently accredited until: N/A

 

The implications of the accreditation not being renewed are: N/A

 

Please see PSRB Renewal Process for information on the renewal process.

The relevant PSRB(s) is/are: N/A

 

The terms of the accreditation are as follows: N/A

 

The programme is recognised as: BA Honours

 

The programme is accredited dependent on N/A

 

Accreditation gives graduates: N/A

 

This depends upon successful completion of the programme.

 

Is membership of the PSRB dependent on further requirements? N/A

 

There are programme-specific regulations relating to the following. Details are given in the programme regulations:

 

The modules to be studied

 

Pass-marks for some or all modules and/or parts

(elements) of modules 

 

Requirements for progression between one Stage and another

 

Placement requirements

 

Attendance requirements

 

Professional practice requirements

 

Degree classification  

 

Other 

 

 

 

 

Interim or exit awards are not accredited. 

 

Free text for description which is not covered by the options above.

 

 

 

SECTION E:PROGRAMME STRUCTURE AND REGULATIONS

 

PART B   -  Programme  Regulation/s

 

Name of programme: Applied Investigation

Title of final award: BA with Honours

Interim awards[[1]]:

Diploma of Higher Education in Applied Investigation

Ordinary degree in Applied Investigation

Accreditation: None

 

University Regulation: 2.2.3

 

Stage 2

 

Core modules

 

Code

Title

Credits

WBL201

Conducting Investigations

40

WBL202

Contemporary Issues in Interviewing Victims and Witnesses

40

WBL203

Contemporary Issues in Interviewing Suspects

40

 

Elective modules

There is no provision for an elective module at Stage 2.

 

Progression Regulations

None

 

Stage 3

 

Core modules

 

Code

Title

Credits

WBL301

Extending Professional Competence

30

WBL308

Work Based Research Project in Applied Investigations

90

 

Elective modules

There is no provision for an elective module at Stage 3.

 

Progression Regulations

A module of a size in excess of those explicitly stated in the regulations i.e. 90 credits (where the Regulations only go to a maximum of 60 credits) is authorized.

 


SECTION F:ADMISSIONS, LEARNING ENVIRONMENT AND SUPPORT

 

  1. What are the admissions requirements?

 

The University’s standard admissions requirements can be found in the university regulations.

 

Programme-specific requirements which are in addition to those regulations are given below. 

 

Many applicants for work based learning programmes do not have traditional entry qualification; therefore applications will be evaluated on a combination of prior academic achievement, professional and/or occupational experience and achievement and personal qualities appropriate to this level of study. The baseline for entry is defined with reference to the national occupational standards for police interviewers as defined by the College of Policing (CoP). You will need to demonstrate that you have been judged as competent at PIP Level 1 or equivalent. In the case of non-police personnel prior learning and skills will be judged against this criterion and prospective students will have to demonstrate that they have achieved competencies equivalent to those defined by the CoP.

 

The University has a process by which applicants whose experience to date already covers one or more modules of the programme they are applying for may seek Accreditation of Prior Learning (APL). Full details can be found here but if you think that this may be relevant to you, please contact the department that offers the programme you are interested in.

 

For articulation purposes, the following Learning Outcomes will apply:

 

Learning Outcomes Stage 1

LO1 Plan, Conduct and Evaluate interviews with Victims and Witnesses of priority and volume crime or serious, complex or major investigations using specialist interview techniques and               demonstrating responsiveness to unpredictable witnesses and victims, operating in a wide               range of contexts and in non-routine contexts.

LO2Plan, Conduct and Evaluate interviews with Suspects of priority and volume crime or serious, complex or major investigations using specialist interview techniques and               demonstrating responsiveness to unpredictable suspects, taking responsibility for the               nature and outcome of the interview.

LO3Evaluate information, either intelligence and evidence, and determine solutions to a variety of unpredictable problems in the conduct of priority and volume investigations

 

The current entry requirements for this programme is as specified in the Fees and Entry Requirements section on the programme page on the University’s website.

 

Can students enter with advanced standing?

Yes

 

 

If yes, to which Stages?

Stage 1

 

Stage 2

Stage 3

Stage 4

 

 

If yes, with what qualifications? N/A

 

  1. What kind of support and help will there be?

 

  1. In the department: All students on the programme will be mature students with significant experience in the workplace. Typically, your needs are often more related to study skills and issues related to the administration of the programme. These needs will be met with a combination of a personal tutor who will be assigned to each student and the support of a professional lead – an experienced investigator cognisant of the current issues facing the investigators. Communication will be via email, telephone and where required by the student. The programme leader will also be available should you require one-to-one advice concerning matters about the administration of the programme. Your personal tutor will be a member of the course team and will be available to provide one to one studies advice.
  2. In the university as a whole: The University provides a range of professional support services including wellbeing, counselling, disability support, and a Chaplaincy. Click on the links for further information.

 

  1. What resources will I have access to?

 

On campus

In a partner college

 

By distance learning

 

 

On campus

General Teaching and Learning Space

IT

Library

VLE

Laboratory

Studio

Performance space

Other specialist

Technical resources 

 

The overall strategy of the University and the Faculty is to develop an environment where your learning experience will be both effective and enjoyable. Emphasis is placed upon a student centred learning environment, which maximises access to learning opportunities and resources, largely through ICT. The programme team expects that existing provision and developments support the curriculum, are appropriate to QAA benchmarks, the subject learning outcomes are consistent with teaching and learning assessment strategies and are appropriate as subject learning outcomes. Due to the nature of the programme, you are likely to be studying remotely, although it is anticipated that appropriate facilities will be available to you in either your own employing organisation or geographical location.

 

The University Library Service provides a comprehensive and well-used information network. Access to the electronic services of the University will be provided to you via provision of a Shibboleth account, which provides access to a wide range of electronic resources. You will receive training in skills to use these resources via the University’s online training module ‘Infobites’ to which you will be introduced at induction. All other Library catalogue and electronic resources are available from the Library web site and again, accessing this will be covered during your induction.

 

As you are likely to be geographically remote from Sunderland, the programme will make extensive use of Canvas as a networking tool with academics and peers, to support your ongoing learning and development and the achievement of module and programme learning outcomes. You will be given training in the use of Canvas as part of the induction programme.

 

Information about the University’s facilities can be found here.

 

Please see the relevant college prospectus or website for details of college learning resources if you are planning to study in one of our partner colleges.

 

 

  1. Are there any additional costs on top of the fees?

 

No, but all students buy some study materials such as books and provide their own basic study materials.

Yes (optional) All students buy some study materials such as books and provide their own basic study materials. In addition there are some are additional costs for optional activities associated with the programme (see below)

 

Yes (essential) All students buy some study materials such as books and provide their own basic study materials. In addition there are some are essential additional costs associated with the programme (see below)

 

 

  1. How are student views represented?

 

All taught programmes in the University have student representatives for each Stage (year-group) of each programme who meet in a Student-Staff Liaison Committee (SSLC) where they can raise students’ views and concerns. The Students’ Union and the faculties together provide training for student representatives. SSLCs and focus groups are also used to obtain student feedback on plans for developing existing programmes and designing new ones. Feedback on your programme is obtained every year through module questionnaires and informs the annual review of your programme. Student representatives are also invited to attend Programme and Module Studies Boards which manage the delivery and development of programmes and modules.  Faculty Academic Committee, also has student representation. This allows students to be involved in higher-level plans for teaching and learning. At university level Students are represented on University level Committees by sabbatical officers who are the elected leaders of the Students’ Union.

 

The University’s student representation and feedback policy can be found here.

 

Final-year students are also invited to complete a National Student Survey (NSS) which asks a standard set of questions across the whole country. The results of this are discussed at Programme Studies Boards and at Faculty Academic Committee to identify good practice which can be shared and problems which need to be addressed. We rely heavily on student input to interpret the results of the NSS and ensure that we make the most appropriate changes.

 

SECTION G:QUALITY MANAGEMENT 

 

  1. National subject benchmarks

 

The Quality Assurance Agency (QAA) for Higher Education publishes benchmark statements which give guidance as to the skills and knowledge which graduates in various subjects and in certain types of degree are expected to have. These can be found here.

 

Are there any benchmark statements for this programme?

 

NO

 

The subject benchmark(s) for this programme is/are:

 

There are no benchmarks for this programme.

 

The QAA also publishes a Framework for Higher Education Qualifications (FHEQ) which defines the generic skills and abilities expected of students who have achieved awards at a given level and with which our programmes align. The FHEQ can be found here.

 

  1. How are the quality and standards of the programme assured?

 

The programme is managed and quality assured through the University’s standard processes. Programmes are overseen by Module and Programme Studies Boards which include student representatives. Each year each module leader provides a brief report on the delivery of the module, identifying strengths and areas for development, and the programme team reviews the programme as a whole.  The purpose of this is to ensure that the programme is coherent and up-to-date, with suitable progression from one Stage to another, and a good fit (alignment) between what is taught and how students learn and are assessed - the learning outcomes, content and types of teaching, learning and assessment. Student achievement, including progress between Stages of the programme and degree classification, is kept under review. The programme review report is sent to the Programme Studies Board and the Faculty in turn reports issues to the University’s Quality Management Sub-Committee (QMSC).

 

External examiners are appointed to oversee and advise on the assessment of the programme. They ensure that the standards of the programme are comparable with those of similar programmes elsewhere in the UK and are also involved in the assessment process to make sure that it is fair. They are invited to comment on proposed developments to the programme. Their reports are sent to the Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Academic) as well as to the Faculty so that issues of concern can be addressed.

 

All programmes are reviewed by the University on a six-yearly cycle to identify good practice and areas for enhancement. Programmes are revalidated through this review process. These reviews include at least one academic specialist in the subject area concerned from another UK university. Quality Assurance Agency (QAA) review reports for Sunderland can be found here.

 

Further information about our quality processes can be found here.

 

 


Quality Handbook

 

SITS SUMMARY PROGRAMME/SHORT COURSE DETAILS

(Form to be completed electronically by the Faculty and forwarded to the Quality Support Officer supporting the Approval event, or sent to Planning & MI for faculty devolved processes before sending to Quality Support (with the exception of Short Courses and GRS))

This form is to be completed when a new programme has been validated and approved so that the programme codes and progression and awards rules can be set up in SITS.  This also needs to be completed at periodic course review when there have been significant modifications to the course.

 

Please note that all details entered onto this form will go onto every student’s record that is attached to this programme and it is therefore imperative that the information is correct. 

 

1 Programme Details

New/ Modification/Review:

Please ensure the minor modification document is included

Modification

Full Programme Title:

Applied Investigation

If replacement for existing course, specify title and course code:

 

Qualification Aim:

e.g. Foundation degree of Science, Bachelor of Arts (Honours)

BA (Hons)

Qualification Level (NQF level):

6

JACS 3.0 code

JACS code = e.g. (V100) History, (I100) Computing Science, etc. See HESA Website https://www.hesa.ac.uk/jacs3

N215

Is the programme Open or Closed:

A course is defined as closed when specifically designed for a certain group of people and not also available to other suitably qualified candidates. It may be designed for a particular company however if the same course is also run for other suitably qualified candidates, not employed by the company, then the course is not closed.

Open

Faculty and School:

Business, Law and Tourism

Sunderland Business School

Location of study:

e.g. SAGE, Sunderland in London, Sunderland

Sunderland, Sunderland in London

Last Date Registration (PBI) Number of days:

The number of days after the start date of the course that it is possible for students to register onto it. It is also referred to as the migration date.

 

Programme Leader:

Ian Carr/Emma Spooner

Academic Team for the programme:

Undergraduate Business

Date of Approval/Modification/Review:

2018 (Modification)

Date of next review (QS to complete):

2022/23

Accrediting Body or PSRB
If yes please attach a completed PSRB form

No

 

Programme Specific Regulations

If yes, please attach a completed Programme Specific Regulations form

No

 

Does this programme come under the Key Information Set return?

If yes, please attach a completed KIS form

 

Is this an undergraduate programme whose primary (but not necessarily only) purpose is to improve the effectiveness of practitioners registered with a professional body? If yes, please specify which body:

http://www.hefce.ac.uk/media/HEFCE,2014/Content/Pubs/2016/201622/HEFCE2016_22.pdf  (Page 88, paragraph f)

e.g. a short course aimed at registered nurses

No


Professional Body:

 

 

Interim  Awards

If a student does not achieve their qualification aim, what lower awards might they be entitled to, assuming they have the credits?  The subject title for any lower level award should be given where this is different from the subject of the qualification aim.

 

Interim Award Title

Credits Required

Interim Structure

Please show mandatory requirements if applicable e.g. core module codes

1

Diploma of Higher Education in Applied Investigation

120

 

2

 

 

 

3

 

 

 

 

Combined Subjects Programmes only

Will the subject run as Major/Minor/Dual:

 

Any subject(s) not permitted to be combined with this subject:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2 Mode Of Attendance

01                          Full-time

Full-time students are those expected to study for more than 24 weeks per year, for a minimum of 21 hours per week and are paying the full-time fee.

 

02                          Other Full-time

Students who attend full-time for a period less than 24 weeks per year

31Part-time

Students who are expected to study for less than 21 hours per week.

 

31Part-time at Full-time Rate

Students who are studying full-time credits over part-time attendance

 

 

 

3 Admissions

An admissions or MCR code will be created to allow student applications.

Tick appropriate

UUCAS

Universities and Colleges Admission Services

Required for full-time undergraduate programmes only.

 

DDirect Entry

Required for FT, PT, PG and PGR, only where students will be admitted though the admissions teams or where the programme needs to be advertised on the web

GGTTR

Graduate Teacher Training Registry

Education only, where applicable

 

 

 

4Collaborative Provision

UK

 

Overseas

 

Institution

Collaborative Model

Funding Arrangements

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

5aCourse Block

Full-time - Overall length of the programme in months:

 

Part-time - Overall length of the programme in months:

24 months

Does this course offer a sandwich placement?

If yes, please indicate which programme year this placement is to take place.

No

Programme Year:

Is this compulsory or optional?

Compulsory/Optional

Does this course offer a study abroad year out? If yes, please indicate which programme year this placement is to take place.

No

Programme Year:

Is this compulsory or optional?

Compulsory/Optional

 

 

 

6   Major Source of Funding

Please note this relates to funding for the programme and not individual students

HEFCE

Higher Education Funding Council for England

 

Skills Funding Agency/EFA/Degree Apprenticeship

 

NCTL

National College for Teaching and Leadership

 

Wholly NHS Funded

Partially NHS Funded

Departments of Health/NHS/Social Care. For all Health funded programmes please indicate whether the programme is eligible for an NHS Bursary

-  Eligible for NHS BursaryY/N

 

 

 

N

Standard Fee

If no then the Learning Resources Form should be attached

Yes/No

Other Funding:

– Please Specify:

 

 

 

 

7   Education Programmes Only

This section must be completed for any programmes marked above as ‘NCTL’ funded

Teacher Training Identifier:

 

Teacher Training Scope:

 

Qualification Aim:

QTS and academic award, QTS only, QTS by assessment only

 

 

 

   DETAILS SUPPLIED BY:Ian Carr        DATE:February 2018

 


Module List

Award, Route (if applicable) and Level

New/Existing/ Modified  Module (N/E/MM)

Module Title

Module Code

Module Credit Value

Whether core or option

Must choose (i.e. designated option):

Assessment weighting – give % weight for each assessment item

Pre-/co-requisites

Module leader

Other comment (if required)

Date of Entry on SITS.

N/MM only

( After event)

JACS Code

Academic Team

L5

N

Conducting Investigations

WBL201

40

C

 

50:50

 

Emma Spooner

 

 

M211

Corporate & Work Based Learning

N

Contemporary Issues in Interviewing Victims and Witnesses

WBL202

40

C

 

50:50

 

Emma Spooner

 

 

M211

Corporate & Work Based Learning

N

Contemporary Issues in Interviewing Suspects

WBL203

40

C

 

100

 

Emma Spooner

 

 

M211

Corporate & Work Based Learning

L6

M

Extending Professional Competence

WBL301

30

C

 

25:75

 

Ian Carr

 

 

N612

Corporate & Work Based Learning

M

Research Dissertation

WBL308

90

C

 

100

 

Emma Spooner

 

 

M211

Corporate & Work Based Learning

 


[[1]] Same as main award unless agreed otherwise at validation – e.g. to meet PSRB requirements