Attachments

 

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BA Social Work

 

Faculty of Education and Society

 

Department of Social Sciences

 

 

PROGRAMME SPECIFICATION

 

 

Date of Cluster Review

06/05/2016

Date Approved by QMSC:

 

 

 

 

 

 


Version History

 

Please complete each time a new version is drafted e.g.

 

Version

Occasion of Change

Change Author

Last Modified

1.0

Version presented to FQMSC

Jane Tunmore

01/03/13

2.0

Updated onto new programme specification template for Periodic review

 

29/01/16

3.0

Module list and Teaching and Learning Matrix updated to reflect changes to assessment in SWK110 and SWK323

Alex Summer

12/06/17

4.0

 

Module List and Teaching and Learning Matrix updated to reflect changes in assessment in SWK 320

Updated names of module leaders

Jane Tunmore

20/09/17

5.0

Module list and Teaching and Learning Matrix updated to reflect changes to assessment in SWK319

Alex Summer

25/06/18

6.0

Module list and Teaching and Learning Matrix updated to reflect changes to assessment in SWK114

Julie Smiles

14/09/2018

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

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Quality Handbook

 

 

AQH-B2-3a Undergraduate Programme Specification Template

August 2015

 

AQH-B2-3a Undergraduate Programme Specification Template

 

 

SECTION A: CORE INFORMATION

 

  1. Name of programme

Social Work

 

  1. Award title

BA Honours

 

  1. Programme linkage

Is this part of group of linked programmes between which students can transfer at agreed points?

 

 

 

 

  1. Is the programme a top-up only?

 

 

 

 

  1. Does the programme have a Foundation Year (level 3) associated with it so that students enter for a four-year programme and progress directly from the Foundation Year to Stage 1 without having to re-apply?

 

 

 

  1. Level of award 

 

 

 

  1. Awarding body: University of Sunderland

 

  1. Which department is it in? Social Sciences

 

  1. Programme Studies Board? Social Work

 

  1. Programme Leader: Jane Scutt

 

  1. How and where can I study the programme?

 

At Sunderland:

 

Full-time on campus

Part-time on campus

As work-based learning full-time

 

As work-based learning part-time

 

As a full-time sandwich course

 

As a part-time sandwich course

 

By distance learning

 

 

  1. How long does the programme take?

 

 

Min number of years / months

Max number of years / months

Full-time

3

6

Part-time

4

6

Distance learning

 

 

Work-based learning

 

 

 

For start-dates please see the current edition of the Prospectus or contact the relevant department at the University. For start-dates for programmes delivered in a partner college, please contact the college.

 

SECTION B – FURTHER CORE INFORMATION 

 

Use Outline Programme Proposal Form for ADC (AQH-B2-2), for questions 13 to 25

 

  1. Learning and teaching strategy.

On this programme our aim is to ensure that key social work principles underpin and are demonstrated in all aspects of your teaching and learning – from set classroom and assessment tasks to formal and informal interactions with all contributors to the programme.

 

Students who are successful in gaining a place on BA Social Work arrive with a range of academic, personal and practice experiences which are valued as a crucial contribution to learning on the programme. The programme team has a strong commitment to adult learning principles; in particular, students are encouraged to be actively involved in managing their own learning, using and building on their own relevant experiences and that of others in the teaching/learning group. There is an emphasis on activities that support students to develop the ability to reflect on their own learning, values and skills, as a basis for professional practice. The process of reflection is built into teaching, learning and assessment activities, including individual tutorials and supervision by your Practice Educator on placement. The staff team will use the same processes of reflection to review their contribution to your learning and their interaction with you.

You will be encouraged to examine and question ‘taken for granted’ views (including your own!) and knowledge and to develop your understanding of wider social and organisational contexts which shape the lives of service users and carers and the nature of social work. You will be encouraged to examine power structures, discrimination and social inequalities and consider their implications for practice. As part of your development as an independent learner you will develop research skills which enable you to access ‘evidence’ to support or challenge current understandings and practice in social work. Small group discussions, debates and presentations within the workshop approach we take to teaching create opportunities for you to develop your own views and learn from others.

 

There is a strong emphasis on experiential and problem based learning within the classroom to support practice based learning on placement. We use case studies, practice scenarios, role play and current practice documentation within these activities which help you to move between theory, knowledge and practice. Examples of such activities include court skills sessions, communication skills, and a community study.. Social media, interactive web-based study and other self-directed activities also add a real-world perspective to the learning you will undertake.

 

Your teaching and learning will be enhanced by the contribution of current practitioners, representatives of specialist services and service users and carers. They will deliver sessions on specific topics but will also be involved in experiential learning alongside you and contribute to assessments. Their views and feedback inform developments within the programme. You will be able to work alongside students from related programmes such as community and youth work, law and childhood studies with a range of practitioners to assess risk and plan intervention to develop your understanding of safeguarding processes and multidisciplinary working.

 

As you progress through the programme we will support you to develop confidence as an independent learner and practitioner, and the assessment tasks and expectations on placement reflect this shift as you move towards qualification.

 

  1. Retention strategy

The programme retention strategy has three key aspects;

  • it ensures that you are fully informed about what is expected of you throughout the programme, and resources and support available to you to meet these expectations.
  • it focuses on creating supportive and collaborative relationships between staff and students so that students can fully engage with the programme.
  • the programme is robust in its requirements but works within these requirements and regulations to respond as flexibly as possible to possible obstacles to progression.

 

This begins at induction in the first year when activities focus on introducing students to each other, to the staff team, the programme and the University resources and facilities. It is an opportunity to establish the ethos of the programme in terms of teaching, learning, expectations and support. Students identify their learning aims for the year and make plans about how these will be achieved. You will be given a comprehensive Programme Handbook at the beginning of the programme, which is available on the Virtual Learning environment (Canvas). Students are advised of assessment requirements in each module at the beginning of the academic year, and the information is repeated in module guides, on Sunspace and in an academic assignment year planner.

The programme recognises the complex contexts that students may need to manage and have developed a coordinated and responsive approach to meeting students’ personal and academic support needs to enable them so far as possible to maintain their studies. You will be allocated a personal tutor when you commence the programme and wherever possible this tutor will remain your key source of support throughout the programme. The role of the tutor is clearly outlined within Programme Handbooks and the Personal Tutor Handbook and is discussed in more detail in section 42. You will meet regularly with your tutor in planned sessions but can also contact them outside these times if you need additional information or support. We try to be as accessible as possible via e-mail and face to face contact.

In addition to the tutorial system, the programme leader maintains regular contact with the student cohort during each year of the programme, ensuring there are planned opportunities for feedback (Student Staff Forum at the end of each term) as well as responding to informal feedback during teaching and tutorial sessions throughout the year.

 

We understand that there will be times for some students when their progress on the programme is less than straightforward because of challenges in your academic or personal lives. Many students come to the programme with a range of responsibilities to be balanced. Your tutor, the lecturers leading the modules you take and the Programme Leader are able to advise you about the processes the University has in place to try to ensure that you are able to manage these and successfully complete the programme. These include processes which allow you to defer assessments/study or take time away from study, within the University regulations.

 

  1. Any other information

The programme combines an academic degree qualification with eligibility to apply for registration as a qualified social worker with the Health and Care Professions Council on successful completion of the full programme.

 

SECTION C: TEACHING AND LEARNING

 

  1. What is the programme about?

We aim:

  • To ensure that on successful completion of the programme, you will meet the Standards of Proficiency for Social Work and are eligible for registration as Social Workers with the Health and Care Professions Council.
  • To ensure that you reach the standards of practice at qualifying level, as outlined in the Professional Capabilities Framework.
  • To create opportunities for you to develop as a critically reflective, analytical and research minded practitioner.
  • To deliver a curriculum influenced throughout by current research and practice and the experiences of service users and carers.
  • To ensure that social work values of valuing diversity and commitment to anti-oppressive practice and social justice are integral to the programme.

 

 

  1. What will I know or be able to do at each Stage of the programme?

 

Learning Outcomes Stage 1: By the end of this Stage of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

 

Skills  

S1The ability to find, organise and present information in a written form in a coherent and literate manner

S2The ability to discuss diverse or competing perspectives

S3The capacity to take responsibility for managing own learning and development using a range of approaches.

S4The use of problem-solving skills.

S5The ability to use supporting evidence to substantiate opinions and conclusions

S6The ability to explore own values, behaviours and personal attributes and how they impact upon the professional task

S7Core communication skills and the capacity to engage effectively with others.

S8Basic skills in reflection and capacity to learn from feedback.

 

Knowledge

K1Understanding of the profession’s ethical principles and their relevance to practice.

K2Understanding of the importance and contribution of service user and carer perspective

K3An appreciation of disadvantage, discrimination and ways of working with diversity

K4Understanding of the principles of rights justice, social inclusion and economic wellbeing

K5Understanding of key aspects of the roles, tasks, skills and values of social     work

K6An awareness of theoretical frameworks that underpin social work processes

K7Understanding of a range of psychological perspectives on human growth, development and behaviour

K8An initial understanding of key aspects of the legal and policy frameworks and guidance that inform and mandate social work practice

K9Understanding of key aspects of a range of sociological theories and concepts

K10A recognition of organisational contexts and frameworks for social work practice.

 

 

Learning OutcomesStage 2

By the end of this Stage of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

Skills

S9Understand the role of the professional social worker and demonstrate professionalism in a range of contexts. (PCF1)

S10Apply social work ethical principles and values to guide professional practice. (PCF2)

S11Recognise diversity and apply anti-discriminatory and anti-oppressive principles in practice. (PCF3)

S12Understand and, with support, apply in practice the principles of human rights, social justice, inclusion and equality (PCF4)

S13Apply knowledge of social sciences, law and social work theory to practice. (PCF5)

S14Use skills of reflection and analysis to inform and provide a rationale for professional decision-making. (PCF6)

S15Use judgement and authority to intervene with individuals, families and communities to promote independence, provide support and prevent harm, neglect and abuse. (PCF7)

S16Understand their role within social work organisational frameworks and within multi-agency and inter-professional settings, and operate appropriately within these. (PCF8)

S17Identify how professional leadership in social work can enhance practice and recognise the value of sharing and supporting the learning and development of others.    (PCF9)

S18Recognise and appraise diverse or competing perspectives, theories and values

S19Substantiate opinions and conclusions by use of reasoned argument and relevant evidence, both orally and in writing.

S20Analyse complex human situations using a range of knowledge and experience.

 

Knowledge

K11Understanding of how the profession’s ethical principles inform the decision making process

K12Understanding of processes for ensuring service user and carer participation and influence

K13Understanding of the effects of oppression, discrimination and social exclusion.

K14Critical appraisal of social work theories, processes models and methods of working.

K15Understanding of the impact of diverse range of life experiences and chances on the identity, and needs of children, families and adults.

K16Understanding of forms of harm and the concept of risk.

K17Critical understanding of the legislative, policy and practice responses in relation to safeguarding, meeting needs, promoting choice and protecting human rights.

K18Critical understanding of key aspects of organisational theory as they apply to social work practice

 

Learning Outcomes Stage 3

By the end of this Stage of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

Skills

S21Identify and behave as a professional social worker, committed to professional development and meeting the requirements of the professional regulator. (PCF1)

S22Critically apply social work ethical principles and values to guide professional practice. (PCF2)

S23Demonstrate a critical understanding of diversity and apply anti-discriminatory and anti-oppressive principles in practice. (PCF3)

S24Promote human rights, promote social justice and economic wellbeing. (PCF4)

S25Apply a critical understanding of social sciences, law and social work theory to practice. (PCF5)

S26Use skills of critical reflection and analysis to inform and provide a rationale for professional decision-making and develop imaginative, creative practice (PCF 6)

S27Use judgement and authority to intervene in complex situations with individuals, families and communities to promote independence, provide support and prevent harm, neglect and abuse. (PCF7)

S28Operate effectively within social work organisational frameworks and multi-agency and inter-professional settings and contribute to their development. (PCF8)

S29Recognise the importance of and begin to demonstrate professional leadership and contribute to supporting the learning and development of others.   (PCF9)

S30The ability to synthesise theory, knowledge and research to create a coherent and well-argued discussion, both orally and in writing.

S31The ability to critically analyse diverse or competing perspectives theories or values.

S32Creative and resourceful problem solving skills when addressing complex issues.

S33The ability to contribute positively to team work in a range of settings.

 

Knowledge

K19Critical understanding of ethical dilemmas and their impact on decision making

K20Critical understanding of the processes for partnership working with service users and carers.

K21Critical understanding of the principles and frameworks for human rights and social justice and their influence on practice

K22Understanding of the complexities of personal and structural discrimination and oppression in social work practice.

K23Critical understanding of the ideological and political context for social work

K24Critical understanding of the application to social work of research, theory and knowledge from social science disciplines

K25Critical understanding of research methodologies and methods

 

Learning Outcomes – Ordinary degree

If you are awarded an Ordinary degree you will have achieved the majority of the learning outcomes for the programme studied. However, you will have gained fewer credits at Stage 3 (at least 60) than students awarded an Honours degree, your knowledge will typically be less broad and you will typically be less proficient in higher-level skills such as independent learning.

 

  1. What will the programme consist of?

Each undergraduate programme consists of a number of Stages from a minimum of 1 to a maximum of 4, each of which is equivalent to a year’s full-time study. The summary below describes briefly what is contained in each Stage. Most programmes have a mixture of core (ie compulsory) modules and optional ones, often with increasing choice as you move through the programme and gain in experience.

In some programmes the choice of optional modules gives you particular ‘routes’ through the programme. The programme structure including a detailed list of modules can be found in the programme regulations.

The programme has been designed to ensure that all aspects of the Professional Capabilities Framework, and the Knowledge and Skills Statements for Adult Social Work and Child and Family Social Work are covered at the appropriate level, and that on graduation you meet the HCPC Standards of Proficiency for Social Work.

 

Stage 1

The programme will provide you with a broad foundation in law and relevant social sciences at Stage One with a focus on the application of these to social work practice.  This means that you will be introduced to key ideas from sociology to support you to understand structures, processes and divisions within society. You will explore key schools of thought in psychology and examine how understandings of human growth and development inform social work practice. You will be then introduced to the political and ideological context for social policy and social work and you will begin to look in more detail at specific areas of relevant policy. The law module runs throughout the year covering key aspects of the law in relation to human rights, equality, adult care, mental health and child care. Alongside this, you will learn about the historical background of social work, explore its key values in relation to your own and examine what is meant by important concepts such as discrimination, oppression, social, justice and equality.  You will be introduced to the basic social work processes and frameworks within which social workers practice and theories that underpin practice.

 

The Skills for Practice module begins with essential study skills teaching and development and you will be introduced to essential professional practice skills and approaches such as active listening and communication skills, as well as reflective practice in preparation for placement. You will be encouraged to develop your understanding of your professional identity as a social work student. Through opportunities to shadow practitioners in the work place, your understanding of professionalism and the social work role will be enhanced. A community study will enable you to draw together and reflect on your learning from this stage. This will be assessed within a professional discussion with a panel of practitioners, service user and carers and academic staff. Throughout this level we place a strong emphasis on students working with and learning from the experiences of service users and carers and practitioners.

 

Stage 2

At Stage Two, you will look more closely at the policy and practice guidance frameworks in adult and child care services. Teaching and learning throughout is strongly underpinned by a whole family approach and this is consolidated in a joint activity involving a number of programmes towards the end of the first term, based on case material and supported by practitioners and service users and carers. You will explore theoretical frameworks for understanding the wide and diverse experiences of people who use services, as well as the organisational structures and social contexts for providing services. You will explore in particular models and methods of social work practice, with an emphasis on the importance of holistic assessment and seeing the individual within their family and community.

 

The module content will encourage you to consider the impact of issues such as discrimination, oppression and poverty, and you are given the opportunity to consider principles of human rights and social justice in social work practice. Alongside this, we will help you to understand the tensions around areas such as harm, capacity, risk assessment, professional judgement and working together with other professionals. Practitioners and service users contribute to teaching and you will be encouraged to use research about service users’ experiences to help you understand and evaluate policy and practice. In the second semester, you will undertake a 70-day placement in a practice setting where you will apply your learning. In this setting you will begin to engage with professional supervision and further develop your reflective practice skills. Your practice will be assessed using the Professional Capabilities Framework at this level.

 

Stage 3

At Stage Three, you will be able to explore your own interests in more depth and use your skills as an independent learner. We will examine the philosophical underpinnings of social work values in more depth and apply these to ethical practice dilemmas with individuals and families, across all age groups and within a range of contexts. There is a strong focus on developing your skills in critical analysis and decision making, and assessing and managing risk. There is an opportunity to explore emerging contemporary issues using a human rights perspective. You will be introduced to social research methods and apply these to an area of individual interest for your dissertation. In the final practice placement, you will consolidate your learning and further develop your practice skills in more complex situations. As you move towards the position of being a qualified practitioner you will be helped to build on and further strengthen your understanding of professionalism and leadership, focusing in particular on the use of professional supervision

 

 

  1. How will I be taught?

Scheduled teaching activities

Independent study

Placement

The programme team has a strong commitment to adult learning principles. We encourage students to be actively involved in managing their own learning, using and building on their own relevant experiences and that of others in the teaching/learning group. There is an emphasis on activities that support students to develop the ability to reflect on their own learning, values and skills, as a basis for professional practice. Within University we have developed a workshop format as our favoured approach, although the more traditional lecture and seminar mode is also used where there are large class groups. Workshop activities may include formal lecture input, small group discussion, experiential exercises, student research and presentation, use of audiovisual material and input from expert practitioners, service users and carers who are involved in teaching throughout the programme.

 

We will ensure that you have the opportunity to learn from practitioners about how current policy developments are being translated into practice, and about ‘cutting edge’ practice models. We have developed excellent partnerships with service users and carers who are involved in teaching and assessment at all levels of the programme which enables you to consider the diverse experiences of individuals and groups with whom you might work as a social worker.

 

Small group learning activities will encourage you to build on skills in peer support and team working, which are particularly relevant to social work. Your own relevant personal, voluntary or employment experiences are valued and utilised in the learning process, however case studies and a variety of interactive practice material will also be used to support your learning

 

At Stage One the involvement of service users and carers and practitioners in communication skills teaching will create opportunities for you to practise your basic interviewing and assessment techniques in a realistic but safe setting, and then reflect on your own recorded performance. You will be supported to reflect on your own values and develop your understanding of the value base of social work within workshop sessions. Individual and group tutorials will provide further opportunity for you to explore these areas using directed reading, individual and group exercises.

The module and programme pages on the VLE will direct you to useful sources of information, guidance about assignments as well as about research seminars or conferences. The assessment programme includes individual written assignments, presentation work and the use of reflective journals and will provide you with the opportunity to develop skills such as researching and using information as well as communication and presentational skills.

 

Whilst on placement, you will receive independent mentoring from a qualified Practice Educator. Opportunities for developing your knowledge and understanding will be provided through individual practice learning sessions, agency training, studying agency policies, visits to a range of resources and direct work with service users and workers from a range of professional backgrounds. Meetings with your Practice Educator will provide you with the opportunity to reflect on and analyse your practice and learning through written reports and verbal contributions

 

A list of the modules in each Stage of the programme can be found in the Programme Regulations. ( Appendix 1)

 

A summary of the types of teaching, learning and assessment in each module of the programme can be found in the Matrix of Modes of Teaching Learning and Assessment (Appendix 2)

 

 

 

  1. How will I be assessed and given feedback? 

Written examinations

Coursework

Practical assessments

 

A summary of the types of teaching, learning and assessment in each module of the programme can be found in the Matrix of Modes of Teaching Learning and Assessment (Appendix 2)

 

The generic assessment criteria which we use can be found here. Some programmes use subject-specific assessment criteria which are based on the generic ones.

 

This programme uses the Generic University Assessment Criteria

YES

 

This programme uses the Subject Specific Assessment Criteria

 

NO

 

The University regulations can be found here

 

Stage 1, you will firstly undertake a diagnostic written assignment designed to help you, with assistance from a tutor, to identify your learning needs in terms of producing an academic piece of work. Study skills teaching, based around a workbook, will enable you to prepare for this assignment. Feedback from the exercises and the diagnostic assignment will help you to tackle your Stage One assignments. These will help you to begin to build your skills in information gathering and analysis. Alongside this you will begin to explore the experience of working as a member of a team and develop skills in presenting information clearly to an audience in group presentations. In SWK110 Law for Social Workers, we will test your factual knowledge through an examination and application of law to practice will be tested in a case study based exercise. Communication skills will be assessed using a role play simulation of a social work interview and your reflection on your own practice within this process. 

 

Stage 2 assignment tasks are linked to current policy and practice where possible, with emphasis on theory, and skills in evaluation and analysis. Reflection on practice and the ability to integrate knowledge, theory and values to practice skills are key features of the assessment of your placement. These are assessed through completion of a portfolio of evidence e.g. notes of supervision sessions and reflective accounts.

The practice module is graded using a professional discussion exercise between you, and two registered social workers, one of whom may be a tutor, which explores a particular piece of practice and the student’s learning and professional development within the placement. 

 

Stage 3 the assessment tasks will expect you to undertake much more detailed research around your own areas of interest and to demonstrate more advanced skills in evaluation and critical analysis in both your academic study and practice. At this stage assessment tasks will require you to demonstrate a more complex understanding of the knowledge, skills and values that underpin practice. Although there is a greater emphasis at this level on producing more complex written assignments (including a dissertation of 8,000 words) you will also be encouraged to be more curious and creative in presentations, debates, and an interactive case study. You will be expected to take a broader view of social work and to explore some of the complex dilemmas in policy and practice. In completing your practice portfolio, you will need to provide a range of placement based evidence including records of direct observations of practice, critical commentary on supervision and practice examples. The practice module will be graded using a reflective account of a significant piece of practice.

These assessments will form a substantial part of the evidence required for having met the PCF capabilities at qualifying level as a whole.  It will supplement evidence from assessments in other modules at this stage to demonstrate that you have met the HCPC Standards of Proficiency for Social Work and are developing the knowledge and skills identified in the Knowledge and Skills Statements for Social Workers in Adult Services, and for Child and Family Social Work .

The assessment strategy is in line with University assessment regulations but does not include compensation within modules or condonement of modules overall. This ensures that all learning outcomes are successfully achieved and you reach the qualifying level in all areas of the Professional Capabilities Framework.

 

  1. Matrix of Modes of Teaching Learning and Assessment (see Appendix 2)

 

  1. How does research influence the programme?

Social work is a profession which is constantly adapting to new challenges whilst strengthening its understanding of core issues. This is reflected in the programme’s commitment to ensuring that all teaching is based on the most recent research, academic literature and policy developments. The teaching and assignments support you to develop skills in research to enable you to maintain currency and develop your knowledge and skills in practice.

 

The Social Work team has a strong commitment to research and evidence based teaching and we are engaged in a wide variety of research activities including practice related outreach activities which add currency to teaching on the programme.

The programme also draws on a wide range of researchers and practitioners from the field to provide specialist input into a number of modules at all levels.

The social work team are active members of the Centre for Applied Social Science, (CASS click here) which combines original academic research with practice-based collaborations and reach-out activities. There are regular Faculty and Departmental research seminar sessions for staff and students and the social work team both present and participate in these sessions.

SECTION D: EMPLOYABILITY

 

  1. How will the programme prepare me for employment?

The programme gives you the opportunity to develop skills which you can use in the future. Some skills are more specific than others to the subject area, or to a particular type of activity, but all skills can be applied in a range of employment situations, sometimes in quite unexpected ways.

Clearly in applying to come on this programme you have expressed a commitment to a career in social work. The curriculum is of course carefully designed to ensure you develop the knowledge, skills and values to enter the profession. The involvement of practitioners, employers and service users and carers adds another dimension to this as you are able to network and develop your understanding of the wider context for social work. This is strengthened further in the practice placements. There are additional opportunities to learn new skills to promote your personal development and resilience, e.g. to learn mindfulness skills with carers, to work with service users on assertiveness skills.

 

If you decide to move into a different field of employment, you will take with you valuable and transferable skills in working as a member of team, problem solving in complex situations, managing risk and stress and excellent communications skills in verbal and written form.

You will have developed your skills in critical analysis and decision making, and will have demonstrated you are resourceful and creative in problem solving.

Throughout the programme there will be opportunities to enhance your opportunities for employment through the Sunderland Futures programme (see link below) and support in the process of gaining employment from the Careers and Employment Service who provide bespoke sessions for the programme and individual coaching opportunities for students.

 

For information about other opportunities available to our students who study on campus, click here.

 

 

  1. Particular features of the qualification (optional)

The BA Social Work programme is approved by the Health and Care Professions Council and successful completion of the full programme only leads to eligibility for the successful graduate to apply to the HCPC for registration as a qualified social worker

 

  1. Professional statutory or regulatory body (PSRB) accreditation. 

 

PSRB accreditation is not relevant to this programme 

 

PSRB accreditation is currently being sought for this programme

 

This programme currently has PSRB accreditation

 

The approval (accreditation) of the programme is open-ended subject to satisfactory annual monitoring.

The relevant PSRB is the Health and Care Professions Council

 

Accreditation gives graduates eligibility for the successful graduate to apply to the HCPC for registration as a qualified social worker. This depends upon successful completion of the whole programme.

 

There are programme-specific regulations relating to the following. Details are given in the programme regulations:

 

The modules to be studied

x

Pass-marks for some or all modules and/or parts

(elements) of modules 

x

Requirements for progression between one Stage and another

x

Placement requirements

x

Attendance requirements

x

Professional practice requirements

x

Degree classification  

 

 

Interim or exit awards are not accredited and do not confer eligibility to apply for registration with HCPC as a qualified social worker.
SECTION E: PROGRAMME STRUCTURE AND REGULATIONS

 

See Programme Regulations Form (Appendix 1)

 

SECTION F: ADMISSIONS, LEARNING ENVIRONMENT AND SUPPORT

 

  1. What are the admissions requirements?

The University’s standard admissions requirements can be found in the university regulations. Programme-specific requirements which are in addition to those regulations are given below. 

 

 

Can students enter with advanced standing?

 

No

 

The University has a process by which applicants whose experience to date already covers one or more modules of the programme they are applying for may seek Accreditation of Prior Learning (APL). Full details can be found here but if you think that this may be relevant to you, please contact the department which offers the programme you are interested in.

 

  1. What kind of support and help will there be?

 

We are strongly committed to offering well-planned and consistent support for students from the point of application and admission onwards

.

Induction

The Admissions Tutor for the programme will keep in touch with you once you have been offered a place and you will be invited to an event in July to meet all the staff, existing and past students, service users and carers to learn more about the programme and prepare you for starting in September. When you arrive there will be a week of induction activities which introduce you to fellow students, the building, university resources and the details of the programme. There are lots of opportunities to discuss any queries with staff and you will be introduced to the VLE and the library.

You will be given a comprehensive Programme Handbook which summarises this information and has details about the programme structure and timetable. There will be a module guide for each module – a paper copy for the first year as well as a copy on the VLE. These give you detailed information about the content and expectations of the module and guide you towards the full range of support materials for your learning available on the VLE. You will quickly find that the module and programme spaces on the VLE are used for communicating information and discussions to support teaching in the classroom and assignment preparation.

 

Tutor Support

You will be allocated a personal tutor for each of the three stages of the Programme. The role of the tutor is clearly outlined within Programme Handbooks, so that students are understand the difference between academic and personal tutoring. These roles are also explained at induction. Whilst it is not possible to guarantee the same personal tutor throughout the three years, if a student has a specific need to stay with the same tutor then it is generally possible to accommodate this. It is sometimes necessary to involve external tutors to cover the tutoring workload, which includes significant contact with and visits to students whilst on placement.. External tutors are drawn from a group of people who have detailed knowledge and experience of the degree programme and social work practice.

The programme has a structured tutorial programme so you will know from the beginning of the year how many times you can expect to see your tutor during planned Professional and Academic Development sessions. This programme of tutorials is structured to ‘front load’ contact in the earlier part of the year. The developmental journey towards practice and professional identity begins in induction and continues throughout the programme. Progress is demonstrated in an individual Readiness for Practice Portfolio within which students reflect on their learning and their engagement with both the programme and the social work profession. This is supported by work undertaken in modules across the programme, and shared with your tutor during Professional and Academic Development sessions. Students are introduced to the concept of emotional resilience at the beginning of Stage One within the tutorial process and the Readiness for Practice Portfolio evidences students’ on-going review of their own emotional wellbeing, and strategies for supporting resilience as they progress through the programme. The range of activities within the portfolio is shaped by, and provides evidence for, the appropriate stages of the PCF throughout the programme. You will be reassured at induction that you are able to contact your personal tutor to arrange additional individual tutorials to seek support with any issues impacting on your studies.

 

In addition to the tutorial system, there are tutors responsible for each stage. They ensure that information affecting the whole cohort is communicated effectively but are also another point of contact. The Stage/level Tutors teach on modules which ensure they have contact with the students at that level throughout the academic year and are responsible for reviewing attendance across modules.

 

Part-time Students

Part time students access the full time programme on a part time basis. Before they commence the programme they are invited to meet with a member of the Programme team who advises them about module choices and helps them to plan their pathway through the programme. Each student is allocated a personal tutor who ensures that Professional and Academic Development sessions for them are arranged to suit their specific needs.

 

Academic tutorial support

Academic support is also available to students from module tutors. As with personal tutoring, tutorials include both individual and group support. For example, most tutors will incorporate time within teaching sessions to offer guidance on assignments, whilst making it clear that individual support is also available. Structured small group tutorials are also arranged to support assignment preparation and module leaders offer feedback on assignment plans via e-mail.

 

 

Feedback to students on performance

Within tutorials with your personal tutor you will be given feedback not only on your academic performance (e.g. via the use of the diagnostic assignment at Stage One) but on your developing professional identity. On-going formative feedback is offered within teaching sessions to the group or individuals and more formal written feedback on individual assignments is supplemented by feedback to all students on common mistakes or difficulties in responding to an assignment task, either within a teaching session, or using the VLE. All students who have been referred or deferred in assignments are offered an individual academic tutorial, followed if necessary by further e-mail contact or further tutorial support.

 

Support on placement

On placement you will be part of a Training Team including your university Placement Tutor and your Practice Educator, a social worker with additional training. The Practice Educator will offer you weekly supervision to reflect on your progress and support you in your practice. S/he will assess your practice which will be reviewed at midway point and at the end of your placement. You will usually be part of a team who will be available for advice and support.

 

Study skills support

In the first few weeks of the module there is a study skills programme. This covers essential aspects of academic study, for example, essay planning, referencing conventions, and researching information.

 The first assignment is marked in detail and you meet with your tutor to discuss this and identify any additional support you may need.

 

At the beginning of Stage Two and Stage Three refresher sessions are delivered by programme staff to cover essay planning, accessing on line and research material and referencing. 

 

We have excellent relationships with the Disability and Health and Well-being Teams within the university and can support you to access appropriate advice if you need it.

The University provides a range of professional support services including health and well-being, counselling, disability support, and a Chaplaincy. Click on the links for further information.

 

  1. What resources will I have access to?

 

On campus

In a partner college

 

By distance learning

 

 

On campus

General Teaching and Learning Space

X

IT

X

Library

X

VLE

X

Communication Skills Rooms

X

Studio

 

Performance space

 

Other specialist technical resources 

 

Practice placements

X

 

Most of your teaching and learning will take place at the St Peter’s Campus, in Reg Vardy and David Goldman Buildings. The social work staff team also have their offices in the Reg Vardy Building There are a number of informal meeting spaces and small rooms for individual tutorials. All teaching rooms are equipped with AV equipment and Smartboards and there are a number of learning spaces on campus for students’ use when teaching is not taking place. The Prospect Library is adjacent to the buildings where teaching takes place and provides an excellent range of resources and study support services which are detailed via the link below.

 

  1. Are there any additional costs on top of the fees?

 

No, but all students buy some study materials such as books and provide their own basic study materials.

 

Yes (optional) All students buy some study materials such as books and provide their own basic study materials. In addition, there are some are additional costs for optional activities associated with the programme (see below)

x

Yes (essential) All students buy some study materials such as books and provide their own basic study materials. In addition, there are some are essential additional costs associated with the programme (see below)

 

 

There will be travel costs associated with placement. Currently students receive a bursary travel allowance payment to contribute towards these, but this is under review by the Department of Health.

 

  1. How are student views represented?

All taught programmes in the University have student representatives for each Stage (year-group) of each programme who meet in a Student-Staff Liaison Committee (SSLC) where they can raise students’ views and concerns. The Students’ Union and the faculties together provide training for student representatives. SSLCs and focus groups are also used to obtain student feedback on plans for developing existing programmes and designing new ones. Feedback on your programme is obtained every year through module questionnaires and informs the annual review of your programme. Student representatives are also invited to attend Programme and Module Studies Boards which manage the delivery and development of programmes and modules.  Various Faculty committees, particularly Faculty Academic Experience Committee, Academic Development Committee and Quality Management Sub-Committee also have student representation. This allows students to be involved in higher-level plans for teaching and learning. There is a parallel structure at university level on which students are represented by sabbatical officers who are the elected leaders of the Students’ Union.

 

The University’s student representation and feedback policy can be found here.

 

Final-year students are also invited to complete a National Student Survey (NSS) which asks a standard set of questions across the whole country. The results of this are discussed at Programme Studies Boards and at Faculty Academic Experience Committee to identify good practice which can be shared and problems which need to be addressed. We rely heavily on student input to interpret the results of the NSS and ensure that we make the most appropriate changes.

 

Because we teach in a way which encourages your participation we find that we receive ongoing feedback from students about how the module/year is progressing.

Module evaluation includes group activities and discussions in the final session, and at the end of each semester we hold a student/staff forum in which students’ feedback on the overall programme. These processes mean we can be making adjustments where necessary throughout the year.

 

SECTION G: QUALITY MANAGEMENT 

 

  1. National subject benchmarks

 

The Quality Assurance Agency for Higher Education publishes benchmark statements which give guidance as to the skills and knowledge which graduates in various subjects and in certain types of degree are expected to have. These can be found here.

 

Are there any benchmark statements for this programme?

YES

 

 

  1. The subject benchmark for this programme is:

The subject bench mark statement for this programme is The Subject Benchmark Statement for Social Work (2016). This can be found here

 

  1. Professional Body Requirements

In addition, there are particular professional body requirements for this programme:

 

The Health and Care Professions Council Standards of Proficiency for Social Work

http://www.hpc-uk.org/assets/documents/10003B08Standardsofproficiency-SocialworkersinEngland.pdf

The Health and Care Professions Council Standards of Education and Training.

http://www.hpc-uk.org/assets/documents/10002C0EHPCStandardsofeducation(A5)(final).pdf

The Professional Capabilities Framework, currently held by the British Association of Social Workers but will be transferred to Social Work England in 2018.

https://www.basw.co.uk/pcf/

 

The QAA also publishes a Framework for Higher Education Qualifications (FHEQ) which defines the generic skills and abilities expected of students who have achieved awards at a given level and with which our programmes align. The FHEQ can be found here.

 

  1. How are the quality and standards of the programme assured?

The programme is managed and quality assured through the University’s standard processes. Programmes are overseen by Module and Programme Studies Boards which include student representatives. Each year each module leader provides a brief report on the delivery of the module, identifying strengths and areas for development, and the programme team reviews the programme as a whole.  The purpose of this is to ensure that the programme is coherent and up-to-date, with suitable progression from one Stage to another, and a good fit (alignment) between what is taught and how students learn and are assessed - the learning outcomes, content and types of teaching, learning and assessment. Student achievement, including progress between Stages of the programme and degree classification, is kept under review. The programme review report is sent to the Faculty Quality Management Sub-Committee which in turn reports issues to the University’s Quality Management Sub-Committee (QMSC) and Academic Development Committee (ADC).

 

The Programme Studies Board is supported in its work by two sub-groups: the Practice Learning Group, and the Recruitment and Admissions Group.  They consider issues particular to their area of expertise and if necessary bring recommendations for change to the Programme Studies Board.

 

When students are out on their assessed practice placements they are under the supervision of a Practice Educator who is evidenced to be meeting or have met the required standards for practice education in social work through being in the process of or have successfully completed the requirements for Stage 1 (for first placements) or Stage 2 (for final placements) of the Practice Educator Professional Standards, or equivalent. 

Whilst on placement students also continue to receive support from a tutor who acts as a point of contact between the placement and the University and will intervene in the case of any difficulties or disputes as well as monitoring the student’s progress. 

 

The University is also part of a wider strategic partnership which includes regional employers and another social work programme provider which is designed to promote excellence in social work training in order to meet employer requirements.

 

At the end of each academic year, the programme team meets with employer and service user and carer representatives to review the programme, consider any adjustments or developments and plan for the following year, to ensure the influence of current policy and practice on curriculum content and design.

 

External examiners are appointed to oversee and advise on the assessment of the programme. There is a requirement from the HCPC for at least one of the external examiners to be from the relevant part of the Register.   They ensure that the standards of the programme are comparable with those of similar programmes elsewhere in the UK and are also involved in the assessment process to make sure that it is fair. They are invited to comment on proposed developments to the programme. Their reports are sent to the Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Academic) as well as to the Faculty so that issues of concern can be addressed.

 

All programmes are reviewed by the University on a six-yearly cycle to identify good practice and areas for enhancement. Programmes are revalidated through this review process. These reviews include at least one academic specialist in the subject area concerned from another UK university. The University is subject to external review by the Quality Assurance Agency for Higher Education on a six-year cycle. Their review reports for Sunderland can be found here.

 

Further information about our quality processes can be found here.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Appendix 1

 

PART B   - PROGRAMME REGULATIONS

 

Name of programme: Social Work

Title of final award: BA with Honours

Interim awards[1]: Certificate in Applied Social Care Studies

Diploma in Applied Social Care Studies

Ordinary Degree in Applied Social Care Studies

 

Accreditation: BA with Honours is approved by the Health and Care Professions Council from 02/07/2014. This an open-ended approval subject to satisfactory annual monitoring.

University Regulation:1.1, 2.3.2, 4.2.1, 4.3.1, 6.1.3

 

  1. Admissions

Applicants whose first language is not English must achieve a minimum IELTS score of 7 in all four areas.

For admission to the programme there must be:

  •       A satisfactory health check
  •       A satisfactory Disclosure and Barring Service check at enhanced level
  •       A satisfactory outcome of any declaration of involvement with Local Authority Adults or Children’s Services
  •       A satisfactory outcome of any declaration of disciplinary issues.

 

  1. Time Limits

The maximum time allowed for a student to complete will be six years from the date of first registration. In exceptional extenuating circumstances, as adjudicated by the Social Work Programme Assessment Board, a maximum of one year additional registration may be granted.

 

  1. Interim Award Titles

A variation from the university regulations has been given to allow the interim award titles to be different from the main title award.

 

Stage 1

 

Core modules:

 

Code

Title

Credits

SWK110

Law for Social Workers

20

SWK116

Introduction to Social Policy

20

SWK113

Psychology and Human Growth and Development

20

SWK114

Skills for Practice

20

SWK115

Social Work Theory and Practice 1

20

SSC101

Introduction to Social Theory

20

 

  1. Progression Regulations

To meet the recommendations of the College of Social Work (the professional endorsing body at the point of approval), the following restrictions have been approved by Academic Board as a variation from the University regulations.

 

You must achieve a pass of 40% in each of the elements of assessment in all modules.

 

The pre-requisites for modules at Stage 2 are such that the only modules which may be trailed as a failed module to Stage 2 (in accordance with the current Undergraduate Regulations) are SSC101 or SWK116

 

Stage 2

 

Core modules

 

Code

Title

Credits

SWK207

Working with Children, Young People and Families

20

SWK213

Working with Adults

20

SWK222

Mental Health Social Work

20

SWK220

Social Work Theory and Practice 2

30

SWK221

First Placement

30

 

Progression Regulations

To meet the recommendations of the College of Social Work, the following restrictions have been approved by Academic Board on the provisions of the University regulations.

 

You must achieve a pass of 40% in each of the elements of assessment in all modules in order to pass the module. In addition, no modules can be compensated so you must achieve an overall pass of 40% in each module.

 

Stage 3

 

Core modules

 

Code

Title

Credits

SWK 320

Contemporary Issues in Social Welfare

20

SWK 319

Critical Social Work Theory and Practice

20

 

SWK 322

Social Work Dissertation

30

SWK 321

Social Work Research Methods

10

SWK323

Final Placement

40

 

 

Progression Regulations

To meet the recommendations of the College of Social Work the following restrictions have been approved by Academic Board on the provisions of the University regulations:

 

You must achieve a pass of 40% in each of the elements of assessment in all modules in order to pass the module.

 

5. Attendance

The BA (Hons) Social Work programme leads to a professional qualification; therefore 100% attendance in class is expected. Any student whose attendance falls below 80% in any module without extenuating circumstances during one semester will not normally be permitted to undertake assessment and will be referred in the relevant module/s and/or may be required to withdraw from the programme. Students with extenuating circumstances will be deferred in the relevant module(s). The Programme Academic team will make a recommendation on how the minimum attendance requirement can be met

6. Placement Referral and Resubmission

A student who fails a placement module at the first attempt may be allowed by the Assessment Board, as appropriate to:

 

 

  • re-submit relevant written work as a referral; and / or
  • repeat the placement (as a repeat with attendance) at the end of which one further referral of the written element will be permitted if needed, but the student may not repeat the placement for a third time.

 

7. Withdrawal from Placement

A student who has failed to submit for and / or has failed the assessments in all the modules of the given Stage to date, without extenuating circumstances, will be required by the MAB (Module Assessment Board) to withdraw from the placement until satisfactory performance has been achieved.  This may result in the student having to take an extra year in which to complete the placement.

 

8. Extensions to Placements

Under exceptional circumstances, the placement can be extended for up to two weeks.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Appendix 2

Matrix of modes of teaching, learning and assessment

 

Key: Taught: TDeveloped: D  Assessed: A

 

Stage 1

Module

Code

Core / optional

Modes of T&L

Modes of Assessment

K1

K2

K3

K4

K5

K6

K7

K8

K9

K10

S1

S2

S3

S4

S5

S6

S7

S8

Skills for Practice

SWK

114

Core

Workshops, skills practice sessions, shadowing, group work, inputs from service users, carers and practitioners, private study

Group Presentation

Portfolio

 

D

 

T

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

 

D

 

 

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

D

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

Social Work Theory and Practice 1

SWK

115

Core

Workshops, group work, inputs from service users, carers and practitioners, private study

Essay

Case based assessment and planning exercise

 

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

D

 

D

 

D

 

D

 

T

A

 

D

 

D

 

A

 

T

A

 

D

 

T

A

 

 

Law for Social Work

SWK

110

Core

Workshops, group work, input from practitioners, private study

Open book exam

Assignment

 

D

 

 

D

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

 

 

T

A

 

 

D

 

 

 

 

A

 

D

 

D

 

D

 

T

A

Introduction to Social Policy

SWK

116

Core

Workshops, group work, private study

Assignment

 

 

D

 

D

 

T

A

 

 

T

A

 

 

 

 

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

TA

 

D

 

D

 

 

A

 

TA

 

 

D

 

D

 

T

A

Introduction to Social Theory

SSC

101

Core

Lectures, seminars, private study

Poster

Essay

 

 

 

D

 

D

 

 

 

 

 

T

A

 

D

 

 

D

 

 

A

 

T

A

 

A

 

D

 

T

A

Psychology and Human Growth and Development

SWK

113

Core

Workshops, group work, private study.

Group Presentation

Case Study assignment

 

D

 

D

 

 

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

 

D

 

D

 

D

 

 

D

 

A

 

T

A

 

D

 

D

 

T

A

Stage 2

Module

Code

Core / optional

Modes of T&L

Modes of Assessment

K11

K12

K13

K14

K15

K16

K17

K18

S9

S

10

S11

S12

S13

S14

S

15

S16

S17

S18

S19

S20

Working with Children, Young People and Families

SWK

207

Core

Workshops, group work, group tutorials, input from practitioners and service users,

Case studies, video material, private study

Extended Case Study

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

D

 

D

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

D

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

 

 

D

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

Working with Adults

SWK 213

Core

Workshops, group work, input from practitioners and service users, video material, private study

Presentation

Assignment

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

D

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

D

 

D

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

D

 

 

 

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

Mental Health Social Work

SWK

222

Core

Workshops, group work, input from practitioners and service users, video material, private study

Essay

 

 

D

 

T

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

D

 

D

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

 

 

 

D

 

T

A

 

A

 

T

A

Social work Theory and Practice 2

SWK

220

Core

Workshops, group work, input from practitioners and service users, video material, case studies, private study

Essay

Reflective practice account.

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

D

 

D

 

T

A

 

D

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

D

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

 

 

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

First Placement

SWK

221

Core

Direct work with service users and carers, team work and co-working, shadowing, supervision and reflection.

Professional Discussion

Portfolio

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

D

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

A

 

A

 

A

 

Stage 3

Module

Code

Core / optional

Modes of T&L

Modes of Assessment

K19

K20

K21

K22

K23

K24

K25

S21

S22

S23

S24

S25

S26

S27

S28

S29

S30

S31

S32

S33

Social Work Research Methods

SWK

321

Core

Lectures, seminars, group work, private study

Comparative Research Study

 

T

A

 

 

 

 

D

 

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

 

T

A

 

D

 

 

 

T

 

 

 

 

 

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

 

 

Social Work Dissertation

SWK

322

Core

Workshops, individual supervision, private study

8,000-word dissertation

 

 

D

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

 

 

 

 

A

 

 

T

A

 

 

 

 

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

D

 

Contemporary Issues in Social Welfare

SWK

320

Core

Workshops, group work, video material, input from practitioners, learning sets, private study

Written Assignment

 

 

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

 

 

 

D

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

D

 

D

 

 

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

D

 

D

Critical Social Work Theory and Practice

SWK

319

Core

Workshops, group work, video material, case studies, input from service users, carers and practitioners, private study.

Written Assignment

Written Report

 

T

A

 

D

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

D

 

T

A

 

 

 

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

 

 

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

 

D

 

D

Final Placement

SWK

323

Core

Direct work with service users and carers, team work and co-working, shadowing, supervision and reflection.

Professional Discussion

Practice

Portfolio

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

D

 

D

 

D

 

T

A

 

 

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

A

 

T

A

 

T

A

 

 


Appendix 1

 

 

 

SITS SUMMARY PROGRAMME DETAILS

 

PROGRAMME DETAILS

 

Exit Award: Title of programme/award

BA (Hons) Social Work

Faculty

FES

Department

Social Sciences

Academic (SITS) code[2] (Course Code)

BMSOCWRK

Programme Studies Board[3]

Social Work

UCAS code[4] (if applicable).  If other, please state method.

L500

JACS code[5]

L500

Qualification Level / Qualification Aim

Undergraduate Degree

 

Interim awards (please state)

NB Achievement of these awards does not confer eligibility to apply for registration with HCPC

 

 

Certificate in HE/Applied Social Care Studies

Diploma in HE/Applied Social Care Studies

BA (ordinary) Applied Social Care Studies.

 

Modes of delivery & duration:

 

Full time       yes/no ………3.. years

Sandwich     yes/no  

Part time      yes/no………   normally maximum 6. years

Work Based Learning  yes/no

On-campus  yes/no

Off-campus  yes/no  (please state type)

Programme Leader:

Jane  Scutt

Date of Approval Event/Modification/Cluster Review

03.05.2013

Date of next review (QAE to complete)

 

Start date of Programme (QAE to complete)

23.09.2013

Number of intakes per annum.

(if more than one per year please state how many and likely month(s) intake starts)

One in September.

 

FUNDING DETAILS

 

Confirm funding arrangements for programme e.g. HEFCE/TTA/NHS/Other[6]

HEFCE

If it is TTA, is it primary/secondary/F.E./Other (please state)

N/A

Is the programme Open or Closed[7]:

Open

 

ACCREDITING BODY

Health and Care Professions Council

Detail of Accreditation:

 

 

Programme approved by the Health and Care Professions Council 02/07/14. This is an open-ended approval, subject to satisfactory annual monitoring reports.

 

 

COLLABORATIVE:

please complete details

UK                     yes/no

Overseas           yes/no

Institution                                      Collaborative model[8]         Funding arrangements[9]

…………………………………………..            ………………………………         ….……………………..

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

INTERIM AWARD SCHEDULE

 

Interim award title

Certificate in Higher Education /Certificate in Applied Social Care Studies

 

NB Achievement of this award does not confer eligibility to apply for registration with HCPC

 

 

Credits required

120

Interim structure

Students must successfully complete the following core modules:

SWK 114 Skills for Practice

SWK 115 Social Work Theory and Practice 1

SWK 113 Psychology and Human Growth and Development

SWK 110 Law for Social Work

SWK 116 Introduction to Social Policy

SSC 101 Introduction to Social Theory

 

Diploma in Higher Education/Diploma in Applied Social Care Studies

 

NB Achievement of this award does not confer eligibility to apply for registration with HCPC

240

All students must successfully complete the modules described above and in addition the following core modules:

SWK 207 Working with Children, Young People and Families

SWK 213 Working with Adults

SWK 222 Mental Health Social Work

SWK 220 Social Work Theory and Practice 2

SWK 221 First Placement

 

BA Applied Social Care Studies

 

NB Achievement of this award does not confer eligibility to apply for registration with HCPC

 

300

All students must successfully complete the modules described above and in addition 60 credits at Stage 3

BA (Hons) Social Work

 

NB The BA Social Work programme is approved by the HCPC and successful completion of the full programme only leads to eligibility for the successful graduate to apply to the HCPC for registration as a qualified social worker

360

All students must successfully complete the modules listed above and in addition the following core modules:

SWK 319 Critical Social Work Theory and Practice

SWK 320 Contemporary Issues in Social Welfare

SWK 321 Social Work Research Methods

SWK 322 Social Work Dissertation

SWK 323 Final Placement

 

 

DETAILS SUPPLIED BY: Jane Scutt       DATE: 22.02.2013


Appendix 4 – Module list

 

 

Award, Route (if applicable) and Level

Module Title

Module Code

Module Credit Value

Whether core or option

Assessment weighting – give % weight for each assessment item

Pre-/co-requisites

Module leader

Date of entry on SITS.

N/MM only (after event)

JACS CODE

Stage1

Social Work Theory and Practice 1

SWK  115

20

Core

CW1 Values assignment 40%

CW2 Case based assessment and planning exercise.

 

None

Eileen Dunn

 

 

L500

 

Psychology and Human Growth and Development

SWK 113

20

Core

CW1 Group presentation30%

CW2

Written assignment 70%

None

Jane Scutt

 

L500

 

Skills for Practice

SWK

114

20

Core

CW1 Group presentation 50%

CW2 Portfolio 50%

CW3 Readiness for Practice Workbook

None

Julie Smiles

 

 

L500

 

Law for Social Workers

SWK 110

20

Core

CW1  Mental Health Open book exam 30%

CW2 Written assignment 40%

CW 3 Child Care Law Open Book Exam 30%

None

Jane Scutt

 

L500

 

Introduction to Social Theory

 

SSC 101

20

Core

CW1 TCT 50%

CW2 Essay 50%

None

Andrew Dalton

 

L300

 

Introduction to Social Policy

SWK 116

20

Core

CW1 Written assignment 40%

CW2 Policy Report

60%

None

Karin Scott

 

L500

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stage 2

Working with Children, Young People and Families

SWK 207

20

Core

CW1 Extended Case Study 100%

Pre-requisites:

SWK 115,113,114,

110

Jane Scutt

 

 

L500

 

Working with Adults

SWK

213

20

Core

CW1 Presentation 40%

CW2 Written assignment 60%

Pre-requisites:

SWK 115,113,114,

110

Stephen Mordue

 

 

L500

 

Social Work Theory and Practice 2

SWK

220

30

Core

CW1 Essay

CW2 Reflective Practice Account

 

Pre-requisites:

SWK 115,113,114,

110

Eileen Dunn

 

L500

 

Mental Health Social Work

SWK

222

20

Core

CW1 Essay 40%

CW2 Presentation 60%

Pre-requisites:

SWK 115,113,114,

110

Stephen Mordue

 

L500

 

First Placement

SWK

221

30

Core

CW1 Professional Discussion 100%

CW2 Portfolio Pass/Fail

Pre-requisites: BA Social Work Stage 1

Co-requisites:

SWK 207 SWK213, SWK220, SWK222

Stephen Mordue

 

L500

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stage 3

Social Work Research Methods

SWK

321

10

Core

CW1 Comparative Research Study 100%

 

 

 

Pre-requisites:

Stage I and Stage 2 BA Social Work

Rick Bowler

 

L500

 

Social Work Dissertation

SWK

322

30

Core

CW1 Dissertation

100%

Pre-requisites: Stage 1 and Stage 2 BA Social Work

 

Jane Scutt

 

L500

 

Contemporary Issues in Social Welfare

SWK

320

20

Core

CW1 Critical Review 30%

 

CW2 Essay 70%

 

Pre-requisites: Stage I and Stage 2 BA Social Work or equivalent

 

Jane Tunmore

 

 

L500

 

Critical Social Work Theory and Practice

SWK 319

20

Core

CW1 Assignment 40%

CW2 Written Report 60%

Pre-requisites: Stage 1 and Stage2 BA Social Work:

Alex Summer

 

L500

 

Final Placement

SWK 323

40

Core

CW1 Professional Discussion 100%

CW2 Portfolio Pass/Fail

Pre-requisites:

Stage1 and Stage 2 BA Social Work

Co-requisites:

SWK 321, 322, 320 and 319

 

Stephen Mordue

 

L500

 

 


Appendix 5

Generic Assessment Criteria – Undergraduate Bachelor’s degree

These should be interpreted according to the level at which you are working

 

Categories

 

Grade

Relevance

Knowledge

Analysis

Argument and Structure

Critical Evaluation

Presentation

Reference to Literature

Pass

86 – 100%

The work examined is exemplary and provides clear evidence of a complete grasp of the knowledge, understanding and skills appropriate to the Level of the qualification.  There is also unequivocal evidence showing that all the learning outcomes and responsibilities appropriate to that Level are fully satisfied. At this level it is expected that the work will be exemplary in all the categories cited above. It will demonstrate a particularly compelling evaluation, originality, and elegance of argument, interpretation or discourse.

76-85%

The work examined is excellent and demonstrates comprehensive knowledge, understanding and skills appropriate to the Level of the qualification.  There is also excellent evidence showing that all the learning outcomes and responsibilities appropriate to that level are fully satisfied. At this level it is expected that the work will be excellent in the majority of the categories cited above or by demonstrating particularly compelling evaluation and elegance of argument, interpretation or discourse and there may be some evidence of originality

 

70 – 75%

The work examined is of a high standard and there is evidence of comprehensive knowledge, understanding and skills appropriate to the Level of the qualification.  There is also clearly articulated evidence demonstrating that all the learning outcomes and responsibilities appropriate to that level are satisfied  At this level it is expected that the standard of the work will be high in the majority of the categories cited above or by demonstrating particularly compelling evaluation and elegance of argument, interpretation or discourse.

 

60 – 69%

Directly relevant to the requirements of the assessment

A substantial knowledge of relevant material, showing a clear grasp of themes, questions and issues therein

Good analysis, clear and orderly

Generally coherent and logically structured, using an appropriate mode of argument and/or theoretical mode(s)

May contain some distinctive or independent thinking; may begin to formulate an independent position in relation to theory and/or practice. 

Well written, with standard spelling and grammar, in a readable style with acceptable format

Critical appraisal of up-to-date and/or appropriate literature.  Recognition of different perspectives.  Very good use of source material.  Uses a range of sources

 

50 – 59%

Some attempt to address the requirements of the assessment: may drift away from this in less focused passages

Adequate knowledge of a fair range of relevant material, with intermittent evidence of an appreciation of its significance

Some analytical treatment, but may be prone to description, or to narrative, which lacks clear analytical purpose

Some attempt to construct a coherent argument, but may suffer loss of focus and consistency, with issues at stake stated only vaguely, or theoretical mode(s) couched in simplistic terms

Sound work which expresses a coherent position only in broad terms and in uncritical conformity to one or more standard views of the topic

Competently written, with only minor lapses from standard grammar, with acceptable format

Uses a variety of literature which includes some recent texts and/or appropriate literature, though not necessarily including a substantive amount beyond library texts.  Competent use of source material.

40 – 49%

Some correlation with the requirements of the assessment but there are instances of irrelevance

Basic understanding of the subject but addressing a limited range of material

Largely descriptive or narrative, with little evidence of analysis

A basic argument is evident, but mainly supported by assertion and there may be a  lack of clarity and coherence

Some evidence of a view starting to be formed but mainly derivative.

A simple basic style but with significant deficiencies in expression or format that may pose obstacles for the reader

Some up-to-date and/or appropriate literature used.  Goes beyond the material tutor has provided.  Limited use of sources to support a point.

Fail

35 – 39%

Relevance to the requirements of the assessment may be very intermittent, and may be reduced to its vaguest and least challenging terms

A limited understanding of a narrow range of material

Heavy dependence on description, and/or on paraphrase, is common

Little evidence of coherent argument: lacks development and may be repetitive or thin

Almost wholly derivative: the writer’s contribution rarely goes beyond simplifying paraphrase

Numerous deficiencies in expression and presentation; the writer may achieve clarity (if at all) only by using a simplistic or repetitious style

Barely adequate use of literature.  Over reliance on

material provided by the tutor. 

The evidence provided shows that the majority of the learning outcomes and responsibilities appropriate to that Level are satisfied – for compensation consideration.

30 – 34%

 

The work examined provides insufficient evidence of the knowledge, understanding and skills appropriate to the Level of the qualification.  The evidence provided shows that some of the learning outcomes and responsibilities appropriate to that Level are satisfied.  The work will be weak in some of the indicators.

15-29%

The work examined is unacceptable and provides little evidence of the knowledge, understanding and skills appropriate to the Level of the qualification.  The evidence shows that few of the learning outcomes and responsibilities appropriate to that Level are satisfied. The work will be weak in several of the indicators.

0-14%

The work examined is unacceptable and provides almost no evidence of the knowledge, understanding and skills appropriate to the Level of the qualification.  The evidence fails to show that any of the learning outcomes and responsibilities appropriate to that Level are satisfied. The work will be weak in the majority or all of the indicators.

 

 


[1] Same as main award unless agreed otherwise at validation – eg to meet PSRB requirements

[2] To be allocated by AIS

[3] Programme Studies/Assessment Board that will have management responsibilities for the programme.

[4] Please contact Admissions Manager for code

[5] JACS code = e.g. (V1) History, (G5) Computing Science, etc.

[6] Please confer with David Balme for funding status for programme

[7] An Open programme constitutes an open admissions policy.  A Closed programme is normally specific to one client only (and usually for a short course through U.S.E.).  If in doubt please consult Academic Services.

 

[8] As per QAE guidelines

[9] Please contact David Balme for confirmation of funding details