Attachments

 

 

Quality Handbook

 

 

Foundation Degree Health and Social Care

Programme Specification

 

 

SECTION A:CORE INFORMATION

 

  1.  

Name of programme:

Health and Social Care

 

  1.  

Award title:

Foundation Degree

 

  1.  

Programme linkage:

 

Is this part of group of linked programmes between which students can transfer at agreed points?

No

 

  1.  

Is the programme a top-up only?

 

No

  1.  

Does the programme have a Foundation Year (Level 3) associated with it so that students enter for a four-year programme and progress directly from the Foundation Year to Stage 1 without having to re-apply?

 

No

  1.  

Level of award:

 

Level 5

  1.  

Awarding Body:

University of Sunderland

 

  1.  

Department:

Faculty of Education and Society
School of Social Sciences

 

  1.  

Programme Studies Board:

Health and Social Care

 

  1.  

Programme Leader:

 

Anneliesa Butler

 


  1. How and where can I study the programme?

 

At Sunderland:

 

Full-time on campus

 

Part-time on campus

 

As work-based learning full-time

 

As work-based learning part-time

 

As a full-time sandwich course

 

As a part-time sandwich course

 

By distance learning

 

 

At the University of Sunderland London campus: 

 

Full-time on campus

 

Part-time on campus

 

As work-based learning full-time

 

As work-based learning part-time

 

As a full-time sandwich course

 

As a part-time sandwich course

 

By distance learning

 

 

At a partner college:

 

Full-time in the UK 

Part-time in the UK

Full-time overseas

 

Part-time overseas

 

By distance learning

 

As a full-time sandwich course in the UK

 

As a part-time sandwich course in the UK

 

As a full-time sandwich course overseas

 

As a part-time sandwich course overseas

 

As work-based learning full-time in the UK 

As work-based learning part-time overseas

 

Other (please specify)

 

 

The Foundation Degree Health and Social Care is taught at partner colleges for two years (achieving level 5), the students can then top up at stage 3 by joining the BSc (Hons) Health and Social Care, which is the designated route.

 

  1. How long does the programme take?

 

 

Min number of years / months

Max number of years / months

Full-time

2

4

Part-time

2

4

Distance learning

 

 

Work-based learning

2

4

 

For start-dates please see the current edition of the Prospectus or contact the relevant department at the University.

 

SECTION B:FURTHER CORE INFORMATION 

 

See Outline Programme Proposal Form for ADC for questions 13 to 25

 

  1. Learning and teaching strategy

 

The diversity of teaching, learning and assessment methods used enables students to develop as autonomous learners able to pursue areas of health and social care specialism (including social organisations, social care or health practice, health promotion/education), and to increase skills of group work and co-operation. The teaching and learning strategy and the content of the modules (which are all core) are structured to ensure that the student takes progressively more responsibility for their own learning.

 

The underpinning principle of the Foundation Degree is to widen participation – to offer a learning environment for those who might not otherwise attend university. On SSC modules, FdSc students complete the same assessments as students on the BSc Health and Social Care. The main difference however is that students studying at the colleges are able to work in smaller groups with more one to one support.

 

Workshops and VLEs are used to introduce students to key theories or to impart essential factual knowledge at all levels. These are then followed by opportunities for students to explore their learning through one to one support, the content and nature of which are determined by the nature of individual modules.

 

 

  1. Retention strategy

 

A benefit of the FdSc is that by working in smaller groups means that students are more visible to the APLs and teaching staff which means that a greater focus can be given to student retention and recognising potential issues as they arise.

 

 

  1. Any other information

 

The FdSc is closely linked to the BSc (Hons) Health and Social Care therefore much of the ethos and working of the FdSc reflects that of the BSc which is in fact the FdSc’s key stakeholder.

 

 

 


SECTION C:TEACHING AND LEARNING

 

  1. What is the programme about?

 

The Foundation Degree Health and Social Care was developed in recognition of the multi-disciplinary nature of current and future occupational destinations within the health and social care fields.  The Programme sets out a comprehensive curriculum that includes a range of academic knowledge and generic skills across the subject areas of social work, social policy, health studies and also practical appreciation of the health and social care sector. Within this framework students are able to understand organisational dynamics and are also encouraged to specialise in particular pathways, areas and topics of interest.  Students are offered flexibility in their mode of study. This includes either full-time or part-time study, which is delivered through a combination of day and evening sessions. 

 

  1. What will I know or be able to do at each Stage of the programme?

 

Learning Outcomes Stage 1 – Skills  

By the end of this Stage of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

 

S1A range of transferable communication, inter-personal, and analytical skills relating to health and social care.

S2Introductory information technology skills relevant to both the academic and practical environments of health and social care.

S3Development of an independent and responsible approach to both academic and practice-based learning.

S4Skills enabling effective research and the validation of findings.

S5Skills in applying knowledge base to practice, including evidence-based practice.

 

Learning Outcomes Stage 1 – Knowledge

By the end of this Stage of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

 

K1Personal core learning skills required to achieve effective learning.

K2The specialised knowledge base required to work within a health and social care context.

K3The methodological frameworks, approaches and tools required to undertake research within health and social care settings as well as their strengths and limitations.

K4The core inter-personal skills required to work with and for people.

K5The impact of values and ethics, and underpinning knowledge relating to health and social care practice and research.

K6The application of core academic learning to the work-based environment underpinned by the knowledge of health and social care structures and processes.

 

Learning Outcomes Stage 2 – Skills

By the end of this Stage of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

 

S6A range of transferable communication, inter-personal, and critical self-appraisal skills in relation to academic and practical applications.

S7Higher level information technology skills relevant to both the academic and practice environments of health and social care including data analysis.

S8Experience in utilising the complex skills required to design a research project for a health or social care setting, and the ability to originate and develop ideas.

S9The ability to critically apply theory to practice.

 

Learning Outcomes Stage 2 – Knowledge

By the end of this Stage of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

 

K7The relevance of adult learning models including experiential learning theory in the development of his/her own effective learning within both academic and work-based contexts.

K8The critical examination and analysis of the core specialist knowledge base and emerging issues of contemporary health and social care.

K9The need to critically appraise research studies relevant to the current health and social care climate and the ongoing development of his/her own tool kit for a range of research methods.

K10The appraisal, assimilation and integration of core inter-personal skills, values and ethics as well as core academic learning to the work-based environment underpinned by A knowledge of health and social care structures and processes.

 

  1. What will the programme consist of?

 

Each undergraduate programme consists of a number of Stages from a minimum of 1 to a maximum of 4, each of which is equivalent to a year’s full-time study. The summary below describes briefly what is contained in each Stage. Most programmes have a mixture of core (i.e. compulsory) modules and optional ones, often with increasing choice as you move through the programme and gain in experience. In some programmes the choice of optional modules gives you particular ‘routes’ through the programme. The programme structure including a detailed list of modules can be found in the programme regulations.

 

The programme is made up of core modules which all students study, i.e., there are no optional modules. The rationale underpinning this approach is that the programme should reflect the key knowledge and generic skills attributing to awards included at interim levels.  Students are introduced to key knowledge and skills during level one and this foundational learning experience is developed and expanded through level two with the introduction of more complex concepts and ideas, along with a more focused approach. 

 

While the programme is structured curriculum content designed to be critical but generic in nature, it also provides opportunities for students to innovate, to question and to arrive at a critical understanding of their learning and their values in relation to professional practice. This is achieved through the work based learning in a range of health and social care settings which involves two principle work-based placement modules: Worked-based Learning in Health and Social Care Settings 1 (FHS115) and Worked-based Learning in Health and Social Care Settings 2 (FHS222). Students in level four and five (stage one and two) must complete a total of 150 placement hours (50 hours in FHS115 and 100 hours in FHS222) in a suitable placement setting.

 

In addition, assessment requires students to create resources or complete a task of their choice through which students can follow individual interests.

 

Stage 1

Stage one modules provide students with a broad introduction to the underlying concepts and principles of the discipline. The modules address the subject of understanding individuals in the context of social organisations and social processes in general, along with specialised knowledge and skills, required in the field of health and social care, for example, inter-personal skills.  While each module deals with very specific subjects, all modules are complimentary to each other and students are expected to apply core academic learning to the work-based environment.  The work-based learning module (FHS115) facilitates students’ engagement in the recognition and further understanding of the link between theory and practice.  SSC 105 Applied Qualitative Research Methods provides students with a basic knowledge of the methodological frameworks for research in health and social care settings.

 

The other core modules cover the following: an understanding of health and social care; study skills; and an introduction to, and understanding of psychosocial theory.

 

Stage 1 focuses on an introduction to a broad range of knowledge in the area of health and social care, how these working environments developed and what the implications are for the population and society. Students are introduced to both psychological and sociological theories in order to give them a foundation of knowledge in psycho-social approaches which is the key theoretical basis for health and social care environments.

 

Having a study skills module at Stage 1 is essential for students to develop skills for research and studying at Level 4 and above. This is often different to what they may have learned before, so is a key element for this stage.

 

Stage 2

Stage 2 modules build upon the foundations established at stage one and are largely concerned with significant contextual issues associated with professional practice in health and social care. The modules at Stage 2 represent the core specialist knowledge base and critical and reflective analyses of emerging issues of contemporary health and social care. The academic focus is also placed on the development of the student’s own effective learning.  Students are required to appraise, adopt and apply their academic knowledge, including theories and professional skills, such as inter-personal and communication skills via work-based learning in health and social care practice.

 

At Stage 2, subjects studied at Stage 1 are further developed in order to expand knowledge. Modules cover lifecourse approaches; health promotion; safeguarding vulnerable people; and contemporary challenges in health and social care.

 

These subject areas build on the student’s learning from Stage 1. Lifecourse approaches take a psycho-social theoretical basis to consider key issues in health and social care environments. Health promotion gives students the opportunity to put into practice skills learned at Stage 1 and consider the potential for getting messages across to people; considering both the how and why this could be achieved as well as considering ethical issues. As students are likely to work in health and social care environments they will therefore encounter issues concerning safeguarding. Studying in this area helps them to understand their duties and responsibilities as well as how to recognise risks and vulnerabilities.

 

A work placement enables students to gain practical experience in health and social care environments; giving them the opportunity to apply theory into practice and reflect on their learning. Their critical engagement is further encouraged in Level 5.

 

Students are also introduced to quantitative research methods in order to develop their own understanding of research and how to interpret research data.

 

  1. How will I be taught?

 

Scheduled teaching activities

Independent study

Placement

 

The general approach to teaching, learning, and assessment in this programme acknowledges the University’s teaching and learning strategies. It also reflects the involvement of colleagues from the partner Colleges of Further Education and articulates the additional requirements of the Foundation Degree prospectus.

 

An active approach to learning is central to the programme, as is an ethos that encourages students to reflect upon their own values in relation to learning and to professional values. Didactic lectures will be kept to a minimum and as far as possible, and depending upon class sizes, lectures resemble seminars and workshops and incorporate student-centred activities. Active learning approaches are utilised to ensure maximum student participation in the learning process.

 

Tutorial support is offered on both a group and an individual basis throughout the programme and at pre-arranged times. The involvement of the work experience personnel is also an important part of this aspect; where appropriate college and University staff will collaborate in the delivery of the curriculum.

 

The programme utilises various teaching and learning strategies in order to provide our diverse student body attracted through widening participation with innovative and flexible learning experience. Teaching and learning methods are outlined in the module descriptors but throughout the programme students will experience a range of methods including:

 

  • Formal Lectures
  • Seminars
  • Workshops
  • Group work
  • Case Studies
  • Tutorials
  • Use of audio-visual resources
  • Class presentation
  • Self directed learning
  • Use of VLE

 

A list of the modules in each Stage of the programme can be found in the

Programme Regulations.

 

A summary of the types of teaching, learning and assessment in each module of the programme can be found in the Matrix of Modes of Teaching.



 

 

  1. How will I be assessed and given feedback? 

 

Written examinations

Coursework

Practical assessments

 

A summary of the types of teaching, learning and assessment in each module of the programme can be found in the Matrix of Modes of Teaching.

 

The generic assessment criteria which we use can be found here. Some programmes use subject-specific assessment criteria which are based on the generic ones.

 

This programme uses the Generic University Assessment Criteria

YES

This programme uses the Subject Specific Assessment Criteria

NO

 

The University regulations can be found here.

 

The assessment strategy of the programme supports the view that assessment is a critical part of the students learning experience. Assessment methods are designed not only to grade performance and to allow judgements relating to progression, but to motivate learners and influence their learning strategies.

 

Students receive a range of assessments. Diagnostic assessment is introduced into both level one and two modules by means of formative assessment prior to summative assessment. Particular attention is given to the variety of summative assessment methods to ensure that relevance of each means of assessment to particular module learning outcomes is carefully matched. 

 

The programme team aims to devise an overall assessment schedule which is balanced throughout the year.  In the beginning of each academic year assessment schedule is given to the students (See the section on ‘Assessment’ in Student Programme Handbook). The programme is increasingly moving towards online submission of written assignments via turnitin.

 

A diverse range of assessment techniques and methods that are appropriate to the stage of academic learning are used, including:

 

  • Small group presentations
  • Individual presentations
  • Essays
  • Projects
  • Time constrained tests
  • Case study analyses
  • Reports
  • Observed Simulation Exercises
  • Reflective journals/portfolios
  • Research critiques

 

Feedback
Extensive written feedback is also given through specific comments on the student’s assignment script so that the student can understand exactly what aspects of their coursework is strong and where there are development needs. Students are also offered the opportunity to obtain oral formative feedback on all assessments.

University Moderation Events

All second marked work is then moderated at the University to ensure marking consistency within the partnership colleges. All members of the programme team from different colleges including module tutors meet at the end of each semester for moderation across the partner colleges.

 

External Examiner

A pertinent selection of level two assessments is sent to the external examiner and comments by the external examiners are reflected upon and responded to.

 

The University aims to return marked assessments and feedback within 4 working weeks of the assignment submission date after internal moderation processes have been completed. If this is not possible, students will be notified by the Module Leaders when the feedback is available and how it can be obtained.

 

The Academic Misconduct Regulations and associated guidance can be found here. It is the responsibility of students to ensure they are familiar with their responsibilities in regards to assessments and the implications of an allegation of academic misconduct.

 

Students should refer to the University Regulations for information on degree classifications and compensation between modules.

 


 

  1. Teaching, learning and assessment matrix

 

NB. Not all option modules may be offered in any one academic year and will depend on the availability of staff and the priorities of the school. In addition, modules will usually need to be selected by a minimum number of students. Option modules may be available on more than one programme and the Programme Leaders will liaise with the Faculty Management Team to ensure there is a reasonable amount of choice in any given year.

 

Matrix of modes of teaching, learning and assessment

 

Stage 1

 

T: Taught, D: Delivered, A: Assessed

 

Module

Code

Core / optional

Modes of T&L

Modes of Assessment

LO K1

LO K2

LO K3

LO K4

LO K5

LO K6

LO S1

LO S2

LO S3

LO S4

LO S5

Understanding Health & Social Care

SSC 106

Core

Lectures, private study, seminars

Small group work

Personal profile

Group presentation - 

Time constrained test – one and half hours   

D

D

A

 

T

D

A

T

D

A

T

D

A

D

 

 

 

 

T

D

A

Dimensions in Health and Social Care

SSC 120

Core

Lectures, private study, group work,  seminars

Essay

Multiple Choice questionnaire

D

T

D

A

 

T

D

A

T

D

A

T

D

A

 

 

 

 

T

D

A

Qualitative Research Methods in Social Sciences

SSC 105

Core

Lectures, private study, seminars

Small group work.

Written methodology section for final research report

Written qualitative research report 

 

 

 

T

D

A

 

 

T

D

A

 

T

D

A

T

D

A

T

D

A

T

D

A

Independent Learning and Professionalism in the Social Sciences

SSC114

Core

Lectures, private study, group work, seminars, Workshops .

Information search task (40%).

Reflective account (60%)

T

D

A

 

T

D

A

T

D

A

T

D

A

 

 

T

D

A

T

D

A

T

D

A

T

D

A

T

D

A

T

D

A

Exploring Psycho-Social Theory

SSC 110

Core

Lectures, Private study, Practice exercise, Small group work.

A 15-minute presentation

Summative assessment assignment

T

D

A

T

D

A

 

T

D

A

T

D

A

 

T

D

A

T

D

A

D

T

D

A

 

T

D

A

Work-based Learning in Health and Social Care Settings 1

FHS115

Core

Work based learning, individual tutorials, class based discussion Private study.

Individual presentation of 15 minutes 4

Reflective portfolio

T

D

A

T

D

A

 

 

T

D

A

 

T

D

A

T

D

A

T

D

A

T

D

A

T

D

A

 

T

D

A

 


Stage 2

 

T: Taught, D: Delivered, A: Assessed

 

Module

Code

Core / optional

Modes of T&L

Modes of Assessment

LO K7

LO K8

LO K9

LO K10

LO S6

LO S7

LO S8

LO S9

Quantitative Methods in Social Sciences

FHS 215

Core

Lectures, private study, seminars;

small group work.

Group presentation drawing on a (SPSS) dataset analysis of their own questionnaires

Quantitative research report

T

D

A

D

A

 

 

T

D

A

 

 

 

T

D

A

Contemporary Challenges in Health and Social Care

FHS223

Core

Lectures; private study; group work;  seminars.

Case study and Funding Pitch

 

T

D

A

T

D

A

 

 

 

 

T

D

A

Work-based Learning in Health and Social Care Settings 2

FHS222

Core

Lectures; private study; Tutorials;

Role play workshops.

Reflective portfolio Individual oral presentation of 15 minutes

 

 

T

D

A

T

D

A

T

D

A

T

D

A

T

D

A

T

D

A

 

T

D

A

Health Improvement and Healthy Lifestyles

SSC 202

Core

Work Experience; Private study; Classroom discussions; Individual tutorial.

Written assignment.  Project

T

D

A

 

T

D

A

T

D

A

T

D

A

 

 

D

 

T

D

A

Early Life Course Approaches in Health and Social Care

SSC 230

Core

Workshops; Private study; Seminars.

Time Constraint Test

Written assignment.

T

D

A

T

D

A

T

D

A

T

D

A

 

 

 

T

D

A

Working together to Safeguard Vulnerable Children, Young People and Adults

SSC227

Core

Lectures; Seminars; Workshops Self-directed study; Directed reading; Assessment preparation research:

Presentation

TCT

T

D

A

T

D

A

T

D

A

T

D

A

T

D

A

 

T

D

A

T

D

A

 

 

 

*Indicates a compulsory module which must be successfully passed for progression to further modules or to the next academic year of study.


  1. How does research influence the programme? 

 

The programme teams at each of the colleges underpin their teaching with current research and knowledge. All of the modules are designed with current thinking in mind – some of these are the same modules as the BSc and some are independent to the
FdSc H&SC.

 

An example of research into teaching can be seen in the introduction of the new BSc and FdSc module SSC227 Working Together to Safeguard Vulnerable Children, Young People and Adults. This module was devised by the previous FdSc programme leader following research for her PhD thesis. There are continuing problems with partnership and multi-agency working that underpin safeguarding problems so this module focuses on how employees in health and social care organisations share responsibility for safeguarding. This was implemented on the BSc and started on the FdSc. This is evidence of how staff member’s research knowledge can influence the design and delivery of the programme. It also ensures there is continuity between the FdSc and BSc.

 

A further development on the FdSc this year has been extending the open invitation to attend CASS research seminars specifically to the FdSc students. The intention for this was to demonstrate the current research in relevant areas of health and social care whilst also encouraging the FdSc students to feel part of the research community at the university. This was welcomed by the students; it must be noted that many of the module leaders have presented their research at these events; all of which underpins their modules.

 

 

SECTION D:EMPLOYABILITY

 

  1. How will the programme prepare me for employment?

 

The programme gives you the opportunity to develop skills which you can use in the future. Some skills are more specific than others to the subject area, or to a particular type of activity, but all skills can be applied in a range of employment situations, sometimes in quite unexpected ways. The skills which this programme is designed to develop are listed below.

 

The Foundation Degree is relatively unique in that it provides additional points of entry for under-represented groups and thus achieves a widening of participation in Higher Education. On achieving the Foundation Degree, students are automatically given a place in Stage 3 of the BSc (Hons) Health and Social Care. Research indicates that having an undergraduate qualification increases future earning potential. This is particularly significant for the students entering the Foundation Degree.

 

Due to the completion of work-based placements in level four and five, students automatically make contact with potential employers in health and social care environments. This gives them immediate opportunities to foster relationships with potential employers and to enhance their CVs.

 

We recommend that students take the opportunity to top-up on to the BSc Health and Social Care in order to improve their future employment opportunities. From this students have gone into roles such as teachers in schools for children with behavioural difficulties, drug and alcohol support workers, domestic violence project workers. Students also then have the opportunity to apply for further professional postgraduate courses in areas such as nursing, social work, occupational therapy and teaching for example.

 

The significant benefit of a health and social care qualification is the opportunities it opens up for students to develop in areas that they are interested in. The Foundation Degree is very much the start of that journey. There are also opportunities for on-campus students outside your programme of study.

 

There are also opportunities for on-campus students outside your programme of study.

 

For information about other opportunities available to our students who study on campus, click here.

 

Additional opportunities to develop your experiences more widely will vary if you study at one of our partner colleges. For information about the extra-curricular activities available in any of our colleges please contact the college direct. 

 

  1. Particular features of the qualification

 

Within the FdSc, students take part in placements at both level four and level five. As such, all students must have an Enhanced DBS prior to starting the programme.

 

  1. Professional statutory or regulatory body (PSRB) accreditation. 

 

PSRB accreditation is not relevant to this programme 

PSRB accreditation is currently being sought for this programme

 

This programme currently has PSRB accreditation

 

 

 

 


SECTION E:PROGRAMME STRUCTURE AND REGULATIONS

 

  1. & 40.

 

PART B   - PROGRAMME REGULATION/s

 

Name of programme: Health and Social Care

Title of final award: Foundation Degree

Interim awards[1]: Higher Education Certificate Health and Social Care

Accreditation: N/A

 

University Regulation N/A

 

Regulations apply to students commencing their studies from N/A

 

Regulations apply to students

Date the regulations apply

Intakes affected

Stage 1

 

 

Stage 2

 

 

Stage 3

 

 

Stage 4

 

 

 

 

Stage 1

 

Core modules:

 

Code

Title

Credits

FHS 115

Work-based Learning in Health and Social Care Settings 1

20

SSC 105

Applied Qualitative Research Methods

20

SSC 106

Understanding Health and Social Care

20

SSC 110

Exploring Psycho-Social Theory

20

SSC 114

Developing Independent Learning and Professionalism in the Social Sciences

20

SSC 120

Dimensions of Health and Social Care

20

 

Optional Modules

 

There is no provision for an option module at Stage 1.

 

Elective Modules

There is no provision for an elective module at Stage 1.

 

Progression Regulations

 

There are no programme-specific progression regulations[2]

 

Stage 2

 

Core modules

 

Code

Title

Credits

FHS 223

Contemporary Challenges in Health and Social Care

20

FHS 215

Quantitative Methods in the Social Sciences

20

FHS 222

Work-based Learning in Health and Social Care Settings 2

20

SSC 202

Health Improvement and Healthy Lifestyles

20

SSC 227

Working together to Safeguard Vulnerable Children, Young People and Adults

20

SSC 230

Early Life Course Approaches to the Health and Social Care of Children, Young People and Families

20

 

 

Optional modules

 

There is no provision for an option module at Stage 2.

 

 

 

Elective modules

 

There is no provision for an elective module at Stage 2.

 


 

SECTION F:ADMISSIONS, LEARNING ENVIRONMENT AND SUPPORT

 

  1. What are the admissions requirements?

 

The University’s standard admissions requirements can be found in the university regulations. Programme-specific requirements which are in addition to those regulations are given below.

Usually, we require one of the following qualifications in a relevant subject area:

  • 56 UCAS points from a minimum of one A Level/AVCE or equivalent
  • Modern Apprenticeship (NVQ Level 3 plus Key Skills)
  • NVQ Level 3
  • BTEC National Diploma at Level 3

We also require 2 passes at GCSE grade C or above, which must include Mathematics and English Language, or a minimum of Level 2 Key Skills in Communication and Application of Number. If you have studied for a GCSE which has a numerical grade then you will need to achieve a grade 4 or above.

 

The current entry requirements for this programme is as specified in the Fees and Entry Requirements section on the programme page on the University’s website.

 

Entry from a University of Sunderland Foundation Year

 

Can students enter with advanced standing?

Yes

 

If yes, to which Stages?

 

Stage 1

 

Stage 2

Stage 3

 

Stage 4

 

 

If yes, with what qualifications?

 

The University has a process by which applicants whose experience to date already covers one or more modules of the programme they are applying for may seek Accreditation of Prior Learning (APL). Full details can be found here but if you think that this may be relevant to you, please contact the department which offers the programme you are interested in.

 

Completion of Stage 1 of another Foundation Degree or HND in Health and Social Care so long as it meets the requirements for APL.

 

The University has a process by which applicants whose experience to date already covers one or more modules of the programme they are applying for may seek Accreditation of Prior Learning (APL). Full details can be found here but if you think that this may be relevant to you, please contact the department which offers the programme you are interested in.

 

  1. What kind of support and help will there be?

 

Student support and guidance is provided primarily at the college where you are studying. Please see the relevant college prospectus or website for details of student support if you are planning to study in one of our partner colleges.

 

Students are supported in a threefold way: firstly, by the assistant programme leader in the college who usually has a dual role of also being the link mentor for the student; secondly, by the mechanisms the university puts in place for collaborative partnership agreements and; thirdly by leaning agreement with the placement supervisor/mentor. APLs are the programme leads within the colleges who are the point of the liaison between the PL and the college and students.

 

Since the programme recruits from a wide spectrum of society, including those groups currently under-represented in Higher Education, student voices are important in identifying and shaping mechanisms of support and guidance. All students are advised to interact with and meet their assistant programme leader on a regular basis. A student representative is nominated by students in the first few weeks of the programme.  They are encouraged to collect feedback from others in the group and present the view of students in each Board of Studies to which they are invited.

 

Students are offered a range of academic and personal support that includes:

 

  • Induction
  • Personal level tutors
  • Programme handbooks
  • Module guides
  • Library skills induction
  • Extensive library facilities, journal and book stocks
  • Computing facilities induction
  • Learning resource centre
  • Email
  • Access to the university VLE (SunSpace) and other electronic databases

 

The University provides a range of professional support services including health and well-being, counselling, disability support, and a Chaplaincy. Click on the links for further information.

 

Please see the relevant college prospectus or website for details of student support if you are planning to study in one of our partner colleges.


  1. What resources will I have access to?

 

On campus

In a partner college

By distance learning

 

 

On campus

 

General Teaching and Learning Space

 

IT

Library

VLE

Laboratory

 

Studio

 

Performance space

 

Other specialist

 

Technical resources 

 

 

Information about the University’s facilities can be found here.

 

Please see the relevant college prospectus or website for details of college learning resources if you are planning to study in one of our partner colleges.

 

  1. Are there any additional costs on top of the fees?

 

No, but all students buy some study materials such as books and provide their own basic study materials.

Yes (optional) All students buy some study materials such as books and provide their own basic study materials. In addition there are some are additional costs for optional activities associated with the programme (see below)

 

Yes (essential) All students buy some study materials such as books and provide their own basic study materials. In addition there are some are essential additional costs associated with the programme (see below)

 

 

  1. How are student views represented?

All taught programmes in the University have student representatives for each Stage (year-group) of each programme who meet in a Student-Staff Liaison Committee (SSLC) where they can raise students’ views and concerns. The Students’ Union and the faculties together provide training for student representatives. SSLCs and focus groups are also used to obtain student feedback on plans for developing existing programmes and designing new ones. Feedback on your programme is obtained every year through module questionnaires and informs the annual review of your programme. Student representatives are also invited to attend Programme and Module Studies Boards which manage the delivery and development of programmes and modules.  Faculty Academic Committee, also has student representation. This allows students to be involved in higher-level plans for teaching and learning. At university level Students are represented on University level Committees by sabbatical officers who are the elected leaders of the Students’ Union.

 

The University’s student representation and feedback policy can be found here.  Please see the relevant college information for details of Student-Staff Liaison Committees if you are planning to study in one of our partner colleges.

 

Programme Leader: Programme Leader oversees and manages the programme as a whole and gives full support and guidance to all issues concerning student support, welfare and progression. The University programme leader and the assistant programme leaders in the partner Colleges work together as a close knit team to support students.

Assistant Programme Leaders: In addition to the programme leader assistant programme Leaders are appointed at each of the partner colleges with similar responsibilities for the programme in their specific institutions.

 

The Programme Leader and Assistant Programme Leaders have a close relationship and use regular formal and informal communication to maintain good practice between the University and partnership colleges.  Continued collaboration is encouraged via staff development e.g. moderation/assessment workshops, curriculum and related research development, and programme team meetings. As Assistant Programme Leaders are based within the colleges they are the initial point of contact for student support. Due to this characteristic of the FdSc programme the Assistant Programme Leaders are often the first line of contact between students and the university Programme Leader.

 

Level Tutors and Personal development profiling: Each year of study has a level tutor, or Assistant Programme Leader as personal tutor. Students and tutors meet regularly, allowing them to build up a relationship. This process encourages the student to develop skills and reflect upon the relevance and impact of their learning and needs. A key role of these tutors is to help students to build up a personal development profile (PDP). PDPs are designed to create a portfolio of skills developed throughout the students’ time at their partnership colleges in order to assist students in future academic and career options. The PDP process encourages the student to develop skills in assessing and valuing experiential learning, evaluating and reflecting upon their relevance skills, and upon the impact that learning has on his/her career.  Part of the PDP process gives students additional tutorials for their placement choice, which also provides a forum for career planning.

 

Final-year students are also invited to complete a National Student Survey (NSS) which asks a standard set of questions across the whole country. The results of this are discussed at Programme Studies Boards and at Faculty Academic Committee to identify good practice which can be shared and problems which need to be addressed. We rely heavily on student input to interpret the results of the NSS and ensure that we make the most appropriate changes.

 

If you are studying in one of our partner colleges the college will have its own mechanisms for obtaining student feedback. Some of these may be the same as those on-campus at the University but others may be different. You should ask your college for further information.


SECTION G:QUALITY MANAGEMENT 

 

  1. National subject benchmarks

 

The Quality Assurance Agency (QAA) for Higher Education publishes benchmark statements which give guidance as to the skills and knowledge which graduates in various subjects and in certain types of degree are expected to have. These can be found here.

 

Are there any benchmark statements for this programme?

NO

 

There are no benchmarks for this programme.

 

The QAA also publishes a Framework for Higher Education Qualifications (FHEQ) which defines the generic skills and abilities expected of students who have achieved awards at a given level and with which our programmes align. The FHEQ can be found here.

 

  1. How are the quality and standards of the programme assured?

 

The programme is managed and quality assured through the University’s standard processes. Programmes are overseen by Module and Programme Studies Boards which include student representatives. Each year each module leader provides a brief report on the delivery of the module, identifying strengths and areas for development, and the programme team reviews the programme as a whole.  The purpose of this is to ensure that the programme is coherent and up-to-date, with suitable progression from one Stage to another, and a good fit (alignment) between what is taught and how students learn and are assessed - the learning outcomes, content and types of teaching, learning and assessment. Student achievement, including progress between Stages of the programme and degree classification, is kept under review. The programme review report is sent to the Programme Studies Board and the Faculty in turn reports issues to the University’s Quality Management Sub-Committee (QMSC).

 

External examiners are appointed to oversee and advise on the assessment of the programme. They ensure that the standards of the programme are comparable with those of similar programmes elsewhere in the UK and are also involved in the assessment process to make sure that it is fair. They are invited to comment on proposed developments to the programme. Their reports are sent to the Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Academic) as well as to the Faculty so that issues of concern can be addressed.

 

All programmes are reviewed by the University on a six-yearly cycle to identify good practice and areas for enhancement. Programmes are revalidated through this review process. These reviews include at least one academic specialist in the subject area concerned from another UK university. Quality Assurance Agency (QAA) review reports for Sunderland can be found here.

 

Further information about our quality processes can be found here.

 

Quality Handbook

 

 

 

SITS SUMMARY PROGRAMME/SHORT COURSE DETAILS

(Form to be completed electronically by the Faculty and forwarded to the Quality Support Officer supporting the Approval event, or sent to Planning & MI for faculty devolved processes before sending to Quality Support (with the exception of Short Courses and GRS))

This form is to be completed when a new programme has been validated and approved so that the programme codes and progression and awards rules can be set up in SITS.  This also needs to be completed at periodic course review when there have been significant modifications to the course.

 

Please note that all details entered onto this form will go onto every student’s record that is attached to this programme and it is therefore imperative that the information is correct. 

 

1 Programme Details

New/ Modification/Review:

Please ensure the minor modification document is included

 

Full Programme Title:

FdSc Health and Social Care

If replacement for existing course,
specify title and course code:

FDA Health and Social Care

Qualification Aim:

e.g. Foundation degree of Science, Bachelor of Arts (Honours)

Foundation Degree of Science

Qualification Level (NQF level):

Foundation Degree level 4 and 5

JACS 3.0 code

JACS code = e.g. (V100) History, (I100) Computing Science, etc. See HESA Website https://www.hesa.ac.uk/jacs3

L510N1

HECoS Code

See HESA Website https://www.hesa.ac.uk/innovation/hecos

100473

Is the programme Open or Closed:

A course is defined as closed when specifically designed for a certain group of people and not also available to other suitably qualified candidates. It may be designed for a particular company however if the same course is also run for other suitably qualified candidates, not employed by the company, then the course is not closed.

Open

Faculty and School:

Education and Society

Social Sciences

Location of study:

e.g. SAGE, Sunderland in London, Sunderland

Sunderland

Sunderland in London

Last Date Registration (PBI) Number of days:

The number of days after the start date of the course that it is possible for students to register onto it. It is also referred to as the migration date.

18 days

Programme Leader:

Anneliesa Butler

Academic Team for the programme:

Social Studies

Date of Approval/Modification/Review:

November 2016

Date of next review (QS to complete):

 

Accrediting Body or PSRB
If yes please attach a completed PSRB form

No

 

Programme Specific Regulations

If yes, please attach a completed Programme Specific Regulations form

No

 

Does this programme come under the Unistats return?

If yes, please attach a completed Unistats form

Yes

Is this an undergraduate programme whose primary (but not necessarily only) purpose is to improve the effectiveness of practitioners registered with a professional body? If yes, please specify which body:

https://www.hesa.ac.uk/collection/c16061/accreditation_list/

e.g. a short course aimed at registered nurses

No


Professional Body:

 

 

Interim  Awards

If a student does not achieve their qualification aim, what lower awards might they be entitled to, assuming they have the credits?  The subject title for any lower level award should be given where this is different from the subject of the qualification aim.

Interim Award Title

Credits Required

Interim Structure

Please show mandatory requirements if applicable e.g. core module codes

Certificate of Higher Education in Health and Social Care

120

FHS108, SSC106, SSC120, SSC110, SSC113, SSC114

 

 

 

Combined Subjects Programmes only

Will the subject run as Major/Minor/Dual:

 

Any subject(s) not permitted to be combined with this subject:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2 Mode Of Attendance

01                          Full-time

Full-time students are those expected to study for more than 24 weeks per year, for a minimum of 21 hours per week and are paying the full-time fee.

2 years min

4 years max

02                          Other Full-time

Students who attend full-time for a period less than 24 weeks per year

 

31Part-time

Students who are expected to study for less than 21 hours per week.

2 years min

4 years max

31Part-time at Full-time Rate

Students who are studying full-time credits over part-time attendance

 

 

 

3 Admissions

An admissions or MCR code will be created to allow student applications.

Tick appropriate

UUCAS

Universities and Colleges Admission Services

Required for full-time undergraduate programmes only.

code BL95

DDirect Entry

Required for FT, PT, PG and PGR, only where students will be admitted though the admissions teams or where the programme needs to be advertised on the web

 

GGTTR

Graduate Teacher Training Registry

Education only, where applicable

 

 

 

4Collaborative Provision

UK

Yes

Overseas

No

Institution

Collaborative Model

Funding Arrangements

Sunderland College, FE

C

 

Bishop Auckland College, FE

C

 

Gateshead College, FE

C

 

TyneMet College, FE

C

 

5Course Block

Full-time - Overall length of the programme in months:

24 – 48 months

Part-time - Overall length of the programme in months:

24 – 48 months

Does this course offer a sandwich placement?

If yes, please indicate which programme year this placement is to take place.

Yes

Programme Year: 1 & 2

Is this compulsory or optional?

Compulsory

Does this course offer a study abroad year out?
If yes, please indicate which programme year this placement is to take place.

No

Programme Year:

Is this compulsory or optional?

N/A

 

6   Major Source of Funding

Please note this relates to funding for the programme and not individual students

HEFCE

Higher Education Funding Council for England

HEFCE

Skills Funding Agency/EFA/Degree Apprenticeship

 

NCTL

National College for Teaching and Leadership

 

Wholly NHS Funded

Partially NHS Funded

Departments of Health/NHS/Social Care. For all Health funded programmes please indicate whether the programme is eligible for an NHS Bursary

-  Eligible for NHS BursaryY/N

 

 

 

Standard Fee

If no then the Learning Resources Form should be attached

Yes/No

Other Funding:

 

– Please Specify:

 

7   Education Programmes Only

This section must be completed for any programmes marked above as ‘NCTL’ funded

Teacher Training Identifier:

 

Teacher Training Scope:

 

Qualification Aim:

QTS and academic award, QTS only, QTS by assessment only

 

 

 

   DETAILS SUPPLIED BY:  Andrew Dalton DATE:  18/12/18


Module List

 

Award, Route (if applicable) and Level

New/Existing/ Modified  Module (N/E/MM)

Module Title

Module Code

Module Credit Value

Whether core or option

Must choose (ie designated option):

Assessment weighting – give % weight for each assessment item

Pre-/co-requisites

Module leader

Other comment (if required)

Date of Entry on SITS.

N/MM only

(After event)

JACS Code

Level 4

E

Understanding Health & Social Care

SSC 106

20

Core

 

Presentation 1200 words equivalent 40%

 

Written assignment 1500 words 60%

None

Anneliesa Butler

 

 

 

4

E

Dimensions in Health and Social Care

SSC 120

20

Core

 

1500 word essay 50%

Multiple Choice questionnaire 50%

None

Jacqui Merchant

 

 

 

4

E

Applied Qualitative Research Methods in Social Sciences

SSC 113

20

Core

 

Written methodology section for final research report word count of 1000. 35%

Written qualitative research report  2000 words 65%

None

Anneliesa Butler

 

 

 

4

N

Developing Independent Learning and Professionalism in the Social Sciences

SSC114

20

Core

 

Information search task (40%).

Reflective account (60%)

None

Neil Evans

 

 

 

4

E

Exploring Psycho-Social Theory

SSC 110

20

Core

 

A 15-minute presentation 40%

Summative assessment assignment 2,000 words 60%

None

Vicky Trueman

 

 

 

4

E

Work-based Learning in Health and Social Care Settings 1

FHS115

20

Core

 

Individual presentation of 15 minutes 40% of mark.

reflective portfolio 60%.

None

Anneliesa Butler

50 Work placement hours required

 

 

Level 5

E

Quantitative Methods in Social Sciences

FHS215

20

Core

 

Group presentation drawing on a (SPSS) dataset analysis of their own questionnaires 30%

Quantitative research report of 2500 words 70%

None

Anneliesa Butler

 

 

 

5

N

Contemporary Challenges in Health and Social Care

 

 

 

FHS223

20

Core

 

Case study of 1500 words 50% and funding pitch (written and verbal) of 1500 words. 50%

None

Anneliesa Butler

 

 

 

Award, Route (if applicable) and Level

New/Existing/ Modified  Module (N/E/MM)

Module Title

Module Code

Module Credit Value

Whether core or option

Must choose (ie designated option):

Assessment weighting – give % weight for each assessment item

Pre-/co-requisites

Module leader

Other comment (if required)

Date of Entry on SITS.

N/MM only

(After event)

JACS Code

5

E

Work-based Learning in Health and Social Care Settings 2

FHS222

20

Core

 

Reflective portfolio 60%

Individual oral presentation of 15 minutes 40%

None

Anneliesa Butler

100 Work placement hours required

 

 

 

 

 

 

5

E

Health Improvement and Healthy Lifestyles

SSC 202

20

Core

 

Written assignment of 2000 words 50%

A project 2000 words 50%

None

Vicky Trueman

 

 

 

5

E

Early Life Course Approaches in Health and Social Care

SSC 230

20

Core

 

Time Constraint Test 1500 words 50%

Written assignment 2000 words 50%

None

Jacqui Merchant

 

 

 

5

E

Working Together to Safeguard Vulnerable Children, Young People and Adults

SSC227

20

Core

 

Presentation (40%), TCT (60%)

None

Lesley Deacon

 

 

 

 


[1] Same as main award unless agreed otherwise at validation – eg to meet PSRB requirements

[2] This will be the norm – university regulations apply