Attachments

 

 

Quality Handbook

 

 

Programme Specification Template - Undergraduate

 

SECTION A:CORE INFORMATION

 

  1.  

Name of programme:

Exercise, Health and Fitness

  1.  

Award title:

Foundation Degree (FdSc)

  1.  

Programme linkage:

 

No

If yes:

This programme is one of a group of related programmes which also includes BSc (Hons) Nutrition Exercise and Health (as a top-up final year for successful students of the FdSc)

 

It is possible to transfer between this programmes which runs off campus, and Stage 2 of the relevant BSc (Hons) programme on-campus. This will be subject to agreements between relevant programme leaders and collaborating organisations. Additionally, students who wish to transfer would be required to evidence successful attainment of 120 Level 4 credits.

  1.  

Is the programme a top-up only?

 

No

  1.  

Does the programme have a Foundation Year (Level 3) associated with it so that students enter for a four-year programme and progress directly from the Foundation Year to Stage 1 without having to re-apply?

 

No

 

  1.  

Level of award:

 

Level 4 / Level 5

  1.  

Awarding Body:

University of Sunderland

  1.  

Department:

Sport and Exercise Sciences

  1.  

Programme Studies Board:

Sport Studies Board

  1.  

Programme Leader:

 

Dr Sandra Leyland

 


  1. How and where can I study the programme?

 

At Sunderland:

 

Full-time on campus

 

Part-time on campus

 

As work-based learning full-time

 

As work-based learning part-time

 

As a full-time sandwich course

 

As a part-time sandwich course

 

By distance learning

 

 

At the University of Sunderland London campus: 

 

Full-time on campus

 

Part-time on campus

 

As work-based learning full-time

 

As work-based learning part-time

 

As a full-time sandwich course

 

As a part-time sandwich course

 

By distance learning

 

 

At a partner college:

 

Full-time in the UK 

X

Part-time in the UK

X

Full-time overseas

 

Part-time overseas

 

By distance learning

 

As a full-time sandwich course in the UK

 

As a part-time sandwich course in the UK

 

As a full-time sandwich course overseas

 

As a part-time sandwich course overseas

 

As work-based learning full-time in the UK 

 

As work-based learning part-time overseas

 

Other (please specify)

 

 

  1. How long does the programme take?

 

 

Min number of years / months

Max number of years / months

Full-time

2 years

9 years

Part-time

3 years

9 years

Distance learning

 

 

Work-based learning

 

 

 

For start-dates please see the current edition of the Prospectus or contact the relevant department at the University. For start-dates for programmes delivered in a partner college, please contact the relevant college.

 

SECTION B:FURTHER CORE INFORMATION 

 

  1. Learning and teaching strategy. 

 

In concordance with the QAA Benchmark Statement for Hospitality, Leisure, Sport and Tourism (2016), the Foundation Degree in Exercise, Health and Fitness programme aims to provide students with the broad range of knowledge and skills designed to facilitate employment or further study in Exercise, Health and Fitness and related vocational areas through a rational, structured and coherent programme of study.

 

This programme will provide students with the wide range of theoretical knowledge and extensive practical skills relevant to the needs of employers. It is intended that students will not only be able to apply their knowledge, understanding and practical expertise in a wide range of relevant situations, but also will build up a variety of transferable skills over the duration of the programme The award is a stand-alone award of the University but enhances and complements exercise, health and fitness awards that are accredited through relevant sector skills councils.   

 

 

The Programme aims to develop in each student a broad and balanced knowledge and understanding of the essential facts, concepts, principles and theories related to the study of exercise, health and fitness. It should enable students to develop the ability to recognise and respond to moral, ethical, sustainability and safety issues which directly pertain to the context of study including relevant legislation and ‘professional codes of conduct.

 

Students’ competencies in a range of practical skills will be developed so that they can understand and assess risks, as well as, plan, design, manage and execute practical activities using appropriate techniques and procedures to work safely in the field and in the laboratory with continuous regard for safety and risk assessment.

 

Finally, an important aspect of this Programme is that it should provide students with a knowledge and skills base from which they can proceed to employment OR to further studies in Exercise, Health and Fitness or multi-disciplinary areas involving life sciences. 

 

The Programme has been designed to develop in each student the essential transferable skills for continued and lifelong learning to enhance competence and innovation in their developing careers after studying. This happens through offering students the opportunity to become active participants in learning. This may challenge some of the traditional approaches to learning with which they are familiar in that the programme content will ensure that value is placed firmly on the need for them to develop a capacity for lifelong learning.  Furthermore, a key issue in the development of this programme, as with all Fd programmes, has been to ensure that work based knowledge, skills and practice is central to the focus of the programme.

 

To develop this aspect of active participants in their learning, the programme team have followed the University’s educational framework that centres around enquiry based learning.  This permits the development of levels of competence within and between all levels of the programme with a clear emphasis on a move from dependence on teaching and facilitation in the initial stages of the programme to competence in knowledge, skills and professionalism upon student completion of the programme. We have aimed to achieve this by using methodological approaches. For example at Level 4 the Personal Development and Studies Skills module (FSP133) introduces students to the concept of research, why it is undertaken, basic research skills and methods of presenting data.  In Stage 2 students are then engaged in a full module that covers research methods (FSP232 Research Methods and Study Skills).

 

 

The programme content will be delivered using a wide variety of methods (e.g. lecture, seminar, tutorial, workshop, problem-based learning, placement, case study and practical sessions involving tion, physical activity and sport). At all Stages/Levels students are expected to engage in directed self-study (e.g. reading relevant literature and technical material in preparation for assignments, workshop presentations and practical sessions). This is essential in order to expand student knowledge and skills in practical, analytical and theoretical contexts. Students will also take part in group work with peers in order to enhance their practical and communication skills as well as the ability to collaborate and work within a team. Seminars, workshops and practical sessions allow the provision of regular, formative (non-assessed) feedback in individual modules. In addition, regular meetings with a personal tutor will be scheduled to support the student. Personal tutors will provide an opportunity to reflect formally on academic development in relation to lifelong learning goals (e.g. future career/study plans) as well as assist with any personal issues that may be affecting the student. 

 

  1. Retention strategy

The University and its collaborative partners through which this course will be delivered have robust and historical infrastructures specifically designed and continuously developed to support student retention in academic and practical settings. Key University of Sunderland policies include Work-based Learning, the University Learning and Teaching Plan and the University Academic Strategy. By continually supporting students in their practical and work based activities as an integral part of the University Academic Strategy, we can ensure that students are individually valued as members of their cohort. We operationalise this by methodologically triangulating our identification of students who might be lost to attrition, lacking progression or exhibiting signs of personal anguish.

 

At collaborative partner level, there are monitoring meetings held to consider any issues that may impact on groups or individuals and to identify students who may require support.

 

This support is provided in the first instance by each partner’s Student Support Officer (or similar) who will provide the first point of contact support. This officer can then seek assistance or information from others in the University to help students. To supplement this work, the University has a Partnership Officer located part-time in the colleges to support their staff and to provide a direct interface with the University.  This is helpful for staff and students in the colleges.

 

All partners must have a number of processes and practices that are designed to impact on student retention:

          To ensure that students feel supported and welcomed, each college has developed its own induction process that intends to orientate students to the institution.  This is then supported by the University’s Programme Leader who visits the partners to meet with students and staff. At Level 4, new students take part in a number of key activities to ensure students get to know their tutors and colleagues. This helps to establish peer networks as well as give opportunities for students to meet with personal tutors and teaching staff. Within a short time, there is also an orientation to the University and support that is offered by the University to students, mainly related to the library.  This is also useful as it allows students to see where they might come to finish their top-up degree if they so wish. 

          Each college operates a operates a personal tutor system that embraces both Fd levels with each college designing a system that suits its requirements and those of the students.

          Students with disabilities or specific learning needs, e.g. mature students returning to study are offered support through college structures and systems.

          Responses to student feedback on all aspects of programme delivery, both their individual and group feedback, are a strong focus for each college, and in return the University. Each partner offers a form of Staff Student Liaison Committees and they run as colleges deem appropriate.  Those committees meet regularly, issues are dealt with and responses directed back to the student reps timeously. However, at both programme and module level student feedback is gathered and discussed openly and fully at relevant Studies Boards.  The latter takes place twice per annum in the University.

 

  1. Any other information.

 

SECTION C:TEACHING AND LEARNING

 

  1. What is the programme about?

The proposed FdSc in Exercise Health and Fitness will aim to provide graduates with a rounded theoretical and practical knowledge of the general and specific vocational areas of exercise health and fitness. Graduates will therefore have a range of employability options in the health and fitness sector.

 

  1. What will I know or be able to do at each Stage of the programme?

 

Learning Outcomes Stage 1 – Skills  

By the end of this Stage of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

S1.          Demonstrate a basic ability to communicate knowledge of Exercise, Health and Fitness to situations of limited complexity in order to provide a foundation for further study in the subject;

 

S2.          Select and describe theories and concepts relevant to an understanding of Exercise, Health and Fitness;

 

S3.          Identify and employ academic study skills to succeed in Higher Education study;

 

S4.          Illustrate the principles of data collection, analysis and data handling;

 

S5.          Identify personal learning and development goals;

 

Learning Outcomes Stage 1 – Knowledge

By the end of this Stage of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

K1.         Recognise key issues in Exercise, Health and Fitness;

 

K2.         Appreciate key concepts and theories in Exercise, Health and Fitness;

 

K3.         Appreciate academic study skills necessary to succeed in Higher Education;

 

K4.         Understand the research process;

 

K5.         Recognise one’s personal skill profile within the context of the programme;

 

 

Learning Outcomes Stage 2 – Skills

By the end of this Stage of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

S6.Apply knowledge of Exercise, Health and Fitness to the solution of familiar and unfamiliar problems;

 

S7.Analyse and apply selected theories and concepts to examine exercise in relation to Exercise, Health and Fitness.

 

S8.Plan and design practical activities using appropriate techniques and procedures;

 

S9.Appraise evidence in the context of research methods and data sources; 

 

Learning Outcomes Stage 2 – Knowledge

By the end of this Stage of the programme successful students should know, understand or be able to do the following:

K6.Recognise different methods of enquiry, interpretation and analysis of relevant data and appropriate enquiry;

 

K7.Demonstrate knowledge of one or more of the following: current professional practice/regulations/government policy/different interventions;

 

K8.Demonstrate appreciation of the role of Exercise, Health and Fitness and its relationship to wider social policy initiatives.

 

K9.Recognise and respond to moral, ethical, sustainability and safety issues which directly pertain to the context of study including relevant legislation and codes of conduct; 

 

 

Each FdSc programme consists of a number of Stages (1 and 2) each of which is equivalent to a year’s full-time study. The summary below describes briefly what is contained in each Stage. Most programmes have a mixture of core (i.e. compulsory) modules and optional ones, often with increasing choice as you move through the programme and gain in experience. In some programmes the choice of optional modules gives you particular ‘routes’ through the programme. The programme structure including a detailed list of modules can be found in the programme regulations.

 

Stage 1

The aim of Stage 1 is to provide an introduction to the key subject areas within Exercise Health and Fitness with a specific focus on building subject knowledge, skills and experiences of working with people of all ages and abilities. 

 

At Level 4 students are required to study 120 credits. There are six core modules at Level 4, these are:

FSP130 Physiology of Sport and Exercise

FSP132 Introduction to Sport and Exercise Psychology

FSP134 Anatomy for Exercise and Sport

FSP116 Exercise Management 1

FSP114 Sociology of Sport, Exercise and Health

FSP133 Personal Development and Study Skills

 

The aim is to expose students to a range of basic knowledge and skills in order to develop a solid foundation on which to build as they advance through Level 5. In addition, the Personal Development and Study Skills module aims to develop students’ academic, employability and research skills to prepare them for successful vocational employment or Higher Education.

 

Stage 2

The aim of Stage 2 is to embed subject specific knowledge when working with people of all ages and abilities. As part of this process students will gain experience of more advanced techniques to improve their ability to apply theoretical principles to real-world scenarios. At Level 5 all students again undertake 120 credits made up from six core modules. Modules at Level 5 continue to follow and build on the six themes undertaken at Level 4. The Level 5 modules are:

 

  • FSP212 Fitness Testing and Assessment
  • FSP234 Psychology of Exercise
  • FSP235 Personal Training
  • FSP218 Public Health, Health Promotion & Exercise
  • FSP233 Sport Injury Management
  • FSP232 Research Methods and Study Skills

 

The aim is to expose students to a range of approaches to enhance knowledge and skills for working at higher levels with people of all ages and abilities. In addition, the Research Methods and Study Skills module. aims to develop students’ ability to analyse and academically communicate data sets and qualitative methodological approaches that will allow students to put theory into practice.

 

 

  1. How will I be taught?

The Faculty has a published Learning and Teaching (L & T) plan that follows the University’s L & T strategy. This plan places students at the heart of the L & T process and promotes the reinforcement of previous knowledge on which students can build, as well as the development of new knowledge and skills. The plan encourages a range of teaching modes that both interest and stretch the students and places strong emphasis on facilitating student learning through active participation.

 

The programme will employ a variety of learning and teaching methods. While there are many different forms of learning and teaching methods, they can be grouped under three distinct categories of scheduled teaching activities, independent study and placements, written examinations, coursework and practical assessments.

 

Teaching and learning methods at both levels include lectures, seminars, tutorials and practical sessions. Students will be encouraged to develop vocational as well as graduate skills through learning tasks which require them to work independently, in small groups, communicate in writing and orally, manage and present numerical and other forms of data, and recognise and solve problems. The majority of modules will run in a single semester but this is dependent upon local logistics and exigencies. 

 

Tutors will also encourage students to begin to plan for life beyond university by mapping skills, knowledge and attributes to possible career/study plans. Students are expected to take much greater responsibility for their learning and be increasingly comfortable planning and managing their studies as they progress through the three levels.

 

A list of the modules in each Stage of the programme can be found in the Programme Regulations.

 

A summary of the types of teaching, learning and assessment in each module of the programme can be found in the Matrix of Modes of Teaching.

 

  1. How will I be assessed and given feedback? 

 

The University of Sunderland seeks to ensure that assessment supports academic standards through a range of processes.  Regulations, qualification and level descriptors and generic assessment criteria provide a framework for ensuring comparability of standards between subject areas, and in line with institutional standards and national norms.  The University has adopted the qualification descriptors in the QAA Framework for Higher Education Qualifications (FHEQ), which define the ‘achievements, and attributes represented by the main qualification titles’ and ‘provide important points for reference for setting and assessing standards’ (Part 1: The Purpose of the Framework, FHEQ, 2001). Within this framework the University has adopted the NICATS level descriptors to provide a more detailed description of the skills and knowledge, which are appropriate for study at Undergraduate level. Finally, teaching, learning and assessment is aligned to Subject Benchmark Statements and National Occupational Standards.

 

The assessment strategy adopted for the Foundation Degree in Exercise, Health and Fitness utilises recommendations concerning assessment outlined in the University of Sunderland Academic Strategy and specific Assessment Policy. The assessment strategy also aims to build on good practice developed in the Department, the University as a whole, and the partner’s institution.

 

Specific assessment criteria enable the work of students to be aligned with minimal threshold standards and, where appropriate, to be graded to indicate a level of achievement above and below threshold standards.  Specific assessment criteria are written for each component of assessment in a module and are aligned to generic assessment criteria defined by the University (2008)[1].

 

The assessment strategy for the Foundation Degree in Exercise, Health and Fitness serves three main functions: summative (i.e., to measure the performance of a student on a module); diagnostic (i.e., to generate information about a student’s strengths and weaknesses); and formative (i.e., to aid the learning process). 

 

Assessment drives learning, guiding the way in which students learn and manage their time, therefore students benefit from effective and timely feedback on coursework. Assessment load will enable appropriate measurement of achievement, as well as being realistic for both staff and students in terms of volume and timing. The processes of assessment are transparent with explicit assessment and marking criteria to facilitate effective learning and allow for the provision of timely, meaningful and effective feedback. 

 

Assessment procedures adopted for the Foundation Degree in Exercise, Health and Fitness ensure the mode and format of assessment are commensurate with both the programme aims and learning outcomes and with individual module aims and learning outcomes.  The spectrum of assessment strategies used at each stage change to reflect and monitor academic development.  The teaching team conduct a monitoring and review process to ensure that students are not over assessed and that all appropriate knowledge and skills are assessed at some point in the programme but not necessarily that all skills are assessed in all modules and all stages of the programme.

 

The assessment strategy within the Foundation Degree in Exercise, Health and Fitness adopts a range of methods in each year of the programme to enable the assessment of scientific evidence-based knowledge, from which the students will develop graduate and professional skills.. Methods are selected to ensure the breadth of knowledge, understanding, skills and attributes are assessed appropriately. Methods will include laboratory reports, essays, practicals, portfolios, written and oral reports, case studies, time constrained assessment and group tasks.

 

Clear links are made between the selected methods of teaching and learning with selected methods of assessment and with the specific tasks of assessment to ensure successful attainment of learning outcomes.

 

Formative assessment will be part of the assessment strategy at each level, taking a variety of forms to encourage effective feedback and learning support. Formative and summative assessments are designed to confirm the development of transferable skills, for example through practical laboratory sessions and in report writing. Communication skills are assessed though oral presentations and written work.

 

 

All summative assessments have submission dates set in advance and published in the module guide. It is a student's responsibility to meet these deadlines.. The University and its partners recognise that from time to time circumstances may occur which are exceptional, beyond the student’s control, and which may affect their assessments. Requests for extensions or consideration of extenuating circumstances may be made in accordance with the University of Sunderland Regulations Governing Extensions of Assessment Deadlines and Consideration of Extenuating Circumstances[2]  and each partner will co-operate in this objective. 

Students undertake a range of assessments in Level 4 which include shorter assessments due early in the module so that students can gauge their progress. At level 5 assessment methods are included to support learning, student achievement and graduate skill development. Assessment items include oral presentations, practicals, seminars, coursework (reports, essays, case study) and exams. Assessments typically require students to engage with real-world examples and/or case studies with personal self-reflection to apply knowledge and understanding to support Exercise, Health and Fitness Assessment methods continue to reflect the over-arching assessment strategy which is designed to offer a range of assessments to support learning, student achievement and graduate skill development thereby supporting their plans for work and/or further study on successful completion of their FdSc.

 

The programme will employ a variety of assessment methods. While there are many different forms of assessment, they can be grouped under three distinct categories of written examinations, coursework and practical assessments.

 

 

  • Ensuring students are aware of how assessment drives their educational experience
  • Ensuring a range of assessment mechanisms that incorporate the opportunity for extensive Formative Feedback
  • Anonymising written examination scripts
  • Supporting and making reasonable adjustment for students who have special needs in relation to learning and teaching
  • Using University quality assurance frameworks, policies and guidelines to actively support students in their assessment submissions /examinations
  • Selecting a ratio of coursework to examinations that is representative of student’s needs, to provide evidence of higher order thinking skills rather than merely recall
  • Giving clear indications of marking criteria across every module of the programme
  • Taking collaborative approaches in designing assessment
  • Providing clarity in terms of what is expected of students
  • Incorporating opportunities for self-assessment and peer assessment across the programme wherever possible in relation to formative assessment mechanisms
  • Using a strategic variation in case based scenarios as a basis for enquiry based learning every academic year 

 

Assessment feedback, of both a formative and a summative nature, will be provided within four weeks of the date of submission in accordance with the University of Sunderland Feedback to Students on Assessed Work Policy (2010)[3] and University of Sunderland Assessment Policy (2011)[4]. Clearly vacation periods, public holidays and Examination Board timing may cause this to be extended. It should be noted that marks achieved are not considered final until confirmed by the Examination Board.

 

A summary of the types of teaching, learning and assessment in each module of the programme can be found in the Matrix of Modes of Teaching.

 

The generic assessment criteria which we use can be found here. Some programmes use subject-specific assessment criteria which are based on the generic ones.

 

This programme uses the Generic University Assessment Criteria

YES

NO

This programme uses the Subject Specific Assessment Criteria

YES

NO

 

The University regulations can be found here.

 

The University aims to return marked assessments and feedback within 4 working weeks of the assignment submission date after internal moderation processes have been completed. If this is not possible, students will be notified by the Module Leaders when the feedback is available and how it can be obtained.

 

The Academic Misconduct Regulations and associated guidance can be found here. It is the responsibility of students to ensure they are familiar with their responsibilities in regards to assessments and the implications of an allegation of academic misconduct.

 

Students should refer to the University Regulations for information on awards and compensation between modules.

 

  1. Teaching, learning and assessment matrix

 

NB. Not all option modules may be offered in any one academic year and will depend on the availability of staff and the priorities of the school. In addition, modules will usually need to be selected by a minimum number of students. Option modules may be available on more than one programme and the Programme Leaders will liaise with the Faculty Management Team to ensure there is a reasonable amount of choice in any given year.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Award, Route (if applicable) and Level

New /Existing/ Modified  Module (N/E/MM)

Module Title

Module Code

Module Credit Value

Whether core or option

Must choose (ie designated option):

Assessment weighting – give % weight for each assessment item

Pre-/co-requisites

Module leader

Other comment (if required)

Date of Entry on SITS.

 

JACS Code

Certificate of Higher Education (CertHE)

Level 4

E

Physiology of Sport and Exercise

FSP130

20

Core

 

CW 40%

Ex 30%

Practical 30%

None

Dr Paul Innerd

 

 

C600

E

Sociology of Sport, Exercise and Health

FSP114

20

Core

 

CW 1 50%

CW2 50%

None

Dr Paul Davis

 

 

C600

N

Introduction to Sport and Exercise Psychology

 

FSP132

20

Core

 

CW  50%

EX1 25%

EX2 25%

None

Dr Steven Anderson

 

 

C600

E

Anatomy for Exercise and Sport

 

FSP134

20

Core

 

Practical 50%

EX 50%

None

Dr Saeed Fayaz

 

 

C600

E

Exercise Management 1

FSP 116

20

Core

 

CW 50%

Practical 50%

None

Morc Coulson

 

 

C600

N

Personal Development and Study Skills

FSP133

20

Core

 

CW 100%

None

John O’Leary

 

 

C600


Foundation Degree in Exercise Health and Fitness (FdSc)  Level 5

 

E

Fitness Testing and Assessment

FSP 212

20

Core

 

CW 1 40%

CW 2 60%

None

Dr Will Evans

 

 

C600

N

Psychology of Exercise

FSP

234

20

Core

 

CW1 40%

EX 30%

CW2 40%

None

Dr Sandra Leyland

 

 

C600

N

Sport Injury Management

FSP

233

20

Core

 

CW 40%

EX 60%

None

Dr Saeed Fayaz

 

 

C600

E

Personal Training

FSP

228 

20

Core

 

CW1 50%

CW2 50%

None

Morc Coulson

 

 

C600

E

Public Health, Health Promotion and Exercise

FSP

218

20

Core

 

CW1 60%

CW2

40%

None

Morc Coulson

 

 

C600

N

Research Methods and Study Skills

FSP

232 

20

Core

 

CW1 50%

CW2 50%

None

Dr Bob Hogg

 

 

C600

 

 

 

 

Award, Route (if applicable) and Level

New /Existing/ Modified  Module (N/E/MM)

Module Title

Module Code

Module Credit Value

Whether core or option

Must choose (ie designated option):

Assessment weighting – give % weight for each assessment item

Pre-/co-requisites

Module leader

Other comment (if required)

Date of Entry on SITS.

N/MM only

 

JACS Code


 

  1. How does research influence the programme? 

The University promotes the concept of the Research Informed Curriculum and the Department has staff engaged in research and reach out activity in areas that relate specifically to exercise health and fitness.  While the University strongly encourages staff in collaborative partnerships to be involved in research, any research being undertaken is on a voluntary basis. However, the University does invite all partners to attend relevfant research briefings and in the immediate past there has been one PhD completion and two current PhD candidates from among the FE staff. .

 

There are many ways in which the curriculum will be both informed by research and include research. At the forefront of the delivery is the core staff who have considerable research expertise in many domains. Staff in the faculty have won a number of bids for health related projects, including work with primary school children with a mission to identify both the amounts of physical activity undertaken by school pupils and the underlying causes for the relative activity levels.  Performance enhancing drugs is another recent topical area of interest. The work has been written up and is being sent off for publication. Other staff are active in both pedagogical research that will inform their practices. Thus, the work that they and others have undertaken is both shaping how this curriculum has been developed, as well as some of the content of the curriculum itself.

 

Students embrace the research process from Semester 1 of their 1st year, with basic concepts. This is furthered in 2nd year with the module Research Methods and Study Skills module which is a core component of the second year of study. Throughout the two years, research skills will be developed with individual and group projects in both theoretical and practical modules.  This has the added value of developing students’ communication skills in a variety of contexts.

 

SECTION D:EMPLOYABILITY

 

  1. How will the programme prepare me for employment?

 

The programme gives you the opportunity to develop skills which you can use in the future. Some skills are more specific than others to the subject area, or to a particular type of activity, but all skills can be applied in a range of employment situations, sometimes in quite unexpected ways. The skills which this programme is designed to develop are listed above in Section C.

 

The Fd programmes are strongly vocational and follow guidelines from the Sectors Skills Council for this area.  As such, the content has been shaped by the industry itself. Vocational demands are met by ensuring that students cover core theory that underpins exercise health and fitness BUT then have great opportunities to put this theory into practice, on and off site with other colleagues and then in work-based situations.

 

 

There is great opportunity for students to develop vocationally relevant generic skills such as problem-solving, communication and reflection, while at the same time specific coaching and teaching skills are developed. This provides skills that are transferable across the graduate employment market. Additionally, students are introduced to CV writing and job applications in the Level 4 module Personal Development and Study Skills. All of the partners offer their students opportunities to look for further employment and assist with CV writing, job applications and effective interview techniques.

 

The specific nature of the programme allows for students to apply for roles in the fitness and health industry and also for teacher training posts if they add sport related areas to their programmes.

 

The FdSc Exercise Health and Fitness includes work-based learning opportunities either within the colleges’ own structures or outwit with local employers. 

 

For information about other opportunities available to you to develop your experiences more widely will vary if you study at one of our partner colleges. For information about the extra-curricular activities available in any of our colleges please contact the college direct. 

 

 

 

  1. Particular features of the qualification

 

Graduates of this programme will have undertaken significant work of self-reflection to help turn experience into learning.  They are encouraged to question, challenge and develop their knowledge, skills and practice in all areas of the exercise fitness and health professions. . Reflection and reflexive practice enhance both learning and professional development. The integration of knowledge, understanding and skills, acquired from different sources at different times improves self-awareness and facilitates engagement in the first stages of lifelong learning.

 

Completion of this programme will leave students well-prepared to seek employment or advance to HE. .

 

  1. Professional statutory or regulatory body (PSRB) accreditation.

 

PSRB accreditation is not relevant to this programme 

X

PSRB accreditation is currently being sought for this programme

 

This programme currently has PSRB accreditation

 

 

 

SECTION E:PROGRAMME STRUCTURE AND REGULATIONS

 

Complete and insert Part B of the Programme Regulations Form, for questions 39 and 40

 

SECTION F:ADMISSIONS, LEARNING ENVIRONMENT AND SUPPORT

 

  1. What are the admissions requirements?

 

The Programme typical offer will be 260 points from a minimum of 2 A levels/AVCEs or equivalent (e.g. 1 x AVCE double award).

 

 

 

Entry point

Standard entry requirements

Entry with advanced standing

Other

Level 4 (u/g)

 

Our typical offer is 56 UCAS points gained from A Levels/BTEC qualifications or equivalent. We will also accept PPP at BTEC Extended Diploma level.

 

 

Level 5 (u/g)

 

120 credits

Requisite credits in appropriate discipline with comparable syllabus.

 

 

Additional requirements

Additionally the following criteria must be met;

We also require 2 passes at GCSE grade C or above, which must include Mathematics and English Language, or a minimum of Level 2 Key Skills in Communication and Application of Number. If you have studied for a GCSE which has a numerical grade then you will need to achieve a grade 4 or above.

 

Our offer of a place will take into account any relevant employment experience.

 

Applicants without formal qualifications may qualify for entry through relevant work-based experience. Applicants may be asked to attend an interview and present a portfolio of evidence.

 

The University’s standard admissions requirements can be found in the university regulations.

 

The current entry requirements for this programme is as specified in the Fees and Entry Requirements section on the programme page on the University’s website.

 

Entry from a University of Sunderland Foundation Year

 

Can students enter with advanced standing?

Yes

No

 

If yes, to which Stages?

Stage 1

 

Stage 2

Yes

 

If yes, with what qualifications?

Students can enter with advanced standing at Levels 5 (Stage 2) if they have the requisite number of credits (120) in appropriate disciplines with comparable syllabus. The University has a process by which applicants whose experience to date already covers one or more modules of the programme they are applying for may seek Accreditation of Prior Learning (APL). Full details can be found here but if you think that this may be relevant to you, please contact the department which offers the programme you are interested in.

 

Other acceptable qualifications

 

a)         An appropriate BTEC National Certificate or Diploma

b)         Scottish Highers

c)         Irish Leaving Certificate

d)         Access Course: We would require successful completion of a Quality Assurance Agency for Higher Education Access Programme and that you would have a minimum of GCSE grade C Mathematics and English Language (or have obtained the equivalent as part of your course).

e)         Such other qualifications or appropriate experience as the Programme Studies Board deems to be equivalent, e.g. other degrees or Access courses validated or approved by the University of Sunderland or kite-marked by other institutions.

f)          International applications are considered on individual merit, with qualifications being mapped onto the learning outcomes of indicative Advanced Level syllabi.

g)         Accreditation of prior learning is done on an individual level for students who wish to gain entry to level 4 or 5 of the Programme. This is monitored by the Programme Studies Board.

 

Where an applicant’s first language is not English, and where an applicant possesses qualifications other than those indicated in (a) to (d) above, evidence is required of at least Level 6 attainment in the International English Language Testing Scheme (IELTS).  However, students must be aware that to qualify and be accepted for teacher training an IELTS score of 6.5 is necessary.  This may mean that some overseas students will need to undertake additional language development classes and take another IELTS assessment during the progress of the course.

 

  1. What kind of support and help will there be?
    1. In the department and the colleges:

Advice related to academic issues will be given by the programme leader, module leaders, and personal tutors as appropriate.  Module leaders and personal tutors liaise with the programme leader, providing an information chain, and communicating the feedback for action at programme, or even university level if appropriate.

 

Programme Leader

 

The programme leader is the nominated member of staff from the University who manages the programme. The key task is to link with the Assistant Programme Leader in the collaborative partner. The Programme Leader is the conduit through which new information flows to the partner and is responsible for ensuring quality standards are maintained.

 

Assistant Programme Leader

 

The Assistant Programme Leader takes responsibility for informing students of the different programme routes available to ensure the appropriateness of the chosen route based on student career aspirations and interests. The assistant programme leader will ensure students study the correct modules for their chosen programme route and provide advice on academic progression. The assistant programme leader offers advice and support to students and takes responsibility for identifying and training year group student representatives, for organising the students at their level into teaching groups, and for collecting feedback at staff-student forums.

 

Personal Tutor

 

On entry to the programme, each student is allocated a personal tutor, who will continue in that role throughout the Programme to provide continuity and allow trust to develop. This tutor will be an academic staff member within the partner colleges. The personal tutor is the first point of contact for students to access to discuss any difficulties with the Programme or personal issues that may be affecting their performance. The student is expected to meet with their personal tutor at least three times a year.

 

Personal tutors have responsibility for advising and counselling students about problems arising from their understanding of the nature of the learning and assessment process; monitoring any personal problems that the students encounter and advising on how other staff within the University can support them in sorting out the problems. Furthermore the personal tutor will also encourage students to see the benefits of developing self-help networks with fellow students and, advising the Assistant Programme Leader of any learning difficulties that the students are having so that appropriate support can be provided by specialist staff within the university.

 

The personal tutor will provide the required support if they are equipped to do so. If a personal tutor does not feel equipped to provide the requisite level of support they should refer the student on to the Assistant Programme Leader and/or other College or University or Students’ Union support services, for example, counselling.

 

Advice on study skills is given early in the Programme. Students will be encouraged to liaise with the Programme team closely throughout their period of study. Remedial support for students who fail module assessments will be provided by the module leader.

 

Module Leader

 

Module leaders play a significant role in supporting students. The module leader is responsible for the provision of information regarding teaching, learning, assessment and feedback for individual modules. Module leaders are required to provide students with a detailed module guide, which outlines the aims of the module, the learning outcomes, assessment requirements, learning resources and the proposed teaching and learning strategies. Module leaders are also required to explicitly outline the specific modes of assessment and assessment criteria. Advice on answering questions and undertaking individual assignments will be provided in the module guides. However, students will have access to module staff for further advice as, and when necessary. Remedial support for students who fail module assessments will be provided by the module leader.

 

In the first instance, where there is a specific module related academic issue or query, students are advised to discuss issues with the module tutor (for team delivered modules) and/or the module leader. Issues which cannot be resolved at modular level will be referred to the Programme Leader. Much of the module related support required will be provided during formal contact time but the opportunity for students to schedule individual meetings with module leaders/tutors is made available.

 

Advice on study skills are given early in the programme. Students will be encouraged to liaise with the programme team closely throughout their period of study.

 

Careers and guidance

 

The colleges offer Careers and Employability Service (CES) support to enhance students’ employment opportunities.  Additionally, academic staff will provide guidance about career opportunities for students and external speakers will be invited from different sectors of the employment market to come to college and the University to talk to students about their work.  Each college has very strong links with local employers including within national governing bodies of sport, coaching, sport development, sport management, primary, secondary and further education, health, physical activity, strength and conditioning and fitness. Thus there is a significant amount of expertise for students to access in terms of knowledge and what it means to work within each sector.

 

The colleges also provides career advice and helps students and recent graduates to make effective career decisions and gain relevant paid / voluntary work experience and placements. They communicate part-time / vacation / graduate job opportunities, provide help and advice with CVs, job applications and interview preparation and inform students of employer fairs and presentations.

 

In a partner college:

Please see the relevant college prospectus or website for details of student support if you are planning to study in one of our partner colleges.

 

  1. What resources will I have access to?

 

On campus

 

In a partner college

x

By distance learning

 

 

On campus

General Teaching and Learning Space

X

IT

X

Library

X

VLE

X

Laboratory

X

Studio

 

Performance space

X

Other specialist (Sports facilities)

X

Technical resources 

X

 

Text for details listed above:

 

Each collaborative partner will have a range of facilities and resources to meet the needs of the Programme and the students.  This set of resource is audited by the University prior to course commencement and at periods throughout the course’s lifespan to ensure that appropriate resource is available.

 

Please see the relevant college prospectus or website for details of college learning resources if you are planning to study in one of our partner colleges.

 

  1. Are there any additional costs on top of the fees?

 

No, but all students buy some study materials such as books and provide their own basic study materials.

X

Yes (optional) All students buy some study materials such as books and provide their own basic study materials. In addition there are some additional costs for optional activities associated with the programme (see below)

 

Yes (essential) All students buy some study materials such as books and provide their own basic study materials. In addition there are some essential additional costs associated with the programme (see below)

 

 

 

  1. How are student views represented?

All taught programmes in the University and in collaborative partners have student representatives for each Stage (year-group) of each programme who meet in a Student-Staff Liaison Committee (SSLC) or similar.  In this forum issues can be raised and students’ views and concerns voiced. SSLCs and focus groups are also used to obtain student feedback on plans for developing existing programmes and designing new ones. Feedback on your programme is obtained every year through module questionnaires and informs the annual review of your programme. Student representatives are also invited to attend Programme and Module Studies Boards that are held on University premises and through which the delivery and development of programmes and modules is reviewed. 

The University’s student representation and feedback policy can be found here.

 

Undergraduate programmes only: Second-year students are also invited to complete a National Student Survey (NSS) which asks a standard set of questions across the whole country. The results of this are discussed at Programme Studies Boards and with Assistant Programme Leaders to identify good practice which can be shared and problems which need to be addressed. We rely heavily on student input to interpret the results of the NSS and ensure that we make the most appropriate changes.

 

Programmes offered in partner colleges: If you are studying in one of our partner colleges the college will have its own mechanisms for obtaining student feedback. Some of these may be the same as those on-campus at the University but others may be different. You should ask your college for further information.

 

 

SECTION G:QUALITY MANAGEMENT 

 

  1. National subject benchmarks

 

The Quality Assurance Agency (QAA) for Higher Education publishes benchmark statements which give guidance as to the skills and knowledge which graduates in various subjects and in certain types of degree are expected to have. These can be found here.

 

Are there any benchmark statements for this programme?

YES

 

 

The subject benchmark(s) for this programme is/are outlined in DoE Teachers’ Standards which can be found here

 

There are no benchmarks for this programme.

 

The QAA also publishes a Framework for Higher Education Qualifications (FHEQ) which defines the generic skills and abilities expected of students who have achieved awards at a given level and with which our programmes align. The FHEQ can be found here.

 

  1. How are the quality and standards of the programme assured?

 

The programme is managed and quality assured through the University’s standard processes. Programmes are overseen by Module and Programme Studies Boards which include student representatives. Each year each module leader provides a brief report on the delivery of the module, identifying strengths and areas for development, and the programme team reviews the programme as a whole.  The purpose of this is to ensure that the programme is coherent and up-to-date, with suitable progression from one Stage to another, and a good fit (alignment) between what is taught and how students learn and are assessed - the learning outcomes, content and types of teaching, learning and assessment. Student achievement, including progress between Stages of the programme and degree classification, is kept under review. The programme review report is sent to the Programme Studies Board and the Faculty in turn reports issues to the University’s Quality Management Sub-Committee (QMSC).

 

External examiners are appointed to oversee and advise on the assessment of the programme. They ensure that the standards of the programme are comparable with those of similar programmes elsewhere in the UK and are also involved in the assessment process to make sure that it is fair. They are invited to comment on proposed developments to the programme. Their reports are sent to the Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Academic) as well as to the Faculty so that issues of concern can be addressed.

 

All programmes are reviewed by the University on a six-yearly cycle to identify good practice and areas for enhancement. Programmes are revalidated through this review process. These reviews include at least one academic specialist in the subject area concerned from another UK university. Quality Assurance Agency (QAA) review reports for Sunderland can be found here.

 

Further information about our quality processes can be found here.

 

Please also complete and insert the SITS form.